Archives par mot-clé : Philippines

Philippines beyond cliches

Podcast #1 : Philippines beyond cliches : « Catholic country », 02/07/2018

Catholic. Run by dynasties. Crime-ridden. Enamoured of America. Obsessed with beauty. These are a few of the stereotypes that colour international perceptions of Southeast Asia’s fastest growing economy—and that New Mandala readers will hear dismantled in a series of podcasts on the theme of “The Philippines Beyond the Clichés” hosted by our Philippines editor Dr Nicole Curato.

In the first of five interviews with researchers, Nicole gets Associate Professor Jayeel S. Cornelio (Twitter: @jayeel_cornelio) to unpack the statement that “The Philippines is a Catholic country.” A sociologist by training, Jayeel is one of the leading scholars of contemporary religious life in the Philippines, and heads the Development Program at Ateneo de Manila University. His latest book is Being Catholic in the Philippines: Young People Interpreting Religion (Routledge 2016).

A écouter sur : http://www.newmandala.org/philippines-beyond-chliches-catholic-country/

IS in the Philippines and the Battle of Marawi: a new appraisal

« IS in the Philippines and the Battle of Marawi: a new appraisal » by Luke Lichin, 31/07/2018, New Mandala

Nine months since the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) retook the city of Marawi from a coalition of Islamic State (IS) affiliated groups, resulting in the deaths of at least 802 militants, 160 government forces, and 47 civilians, President Rodrigo Duterte signed the Bangsamoro Organic Law (BOL).

The legislation grants political and financial autonomy to a new Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in the Southern Philippines after decades of insurgency and years of tumultuous peace negotiations. Promisingly, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) voiced its satisfaction with the legislation, and is working towards the next steps of implementation, including the decommissioning of 30,000-40,000 fighters. Nevertheless, the BOL must still overcome a range of challenges, including efforts by IS-affiliates to spoil the prospect of peace in Mindanao and Sulu.

Speaking on behalf of the IS-aligned faction of the Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters (BIFF), Abu Misri Mama derided the BOL as an agreement that will benefit only the MILF, and warned of future attacks in response. Although the AFP dismissed the threat as empty propaganda, continuing clashes with the BIFF in Maguindanao and Cotabato lend credibility to Abu Misri Mama’s announcement. The BIFF, like the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) and the Maute Group, reject the notion of autonomy for Muslims in the Southern Philippines, and seek to create an IS Wilayat (province) in Southeast Asia; a casus belli that resonates with and attracts fighters from Mindanao, Sulu, and abroad.

Small and fragmented though they are, the BIFF, the ASG, and the Maute Group are resilient organisations that have defied the AFP’s attempts to stamp them out, and there is no better illustration of that resilience than the AFP’s victory in Marawi.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/philippines-battle-marawi-new-appraisal/

La saison du diable, une tragédie musicale. Entretien avec Lav Diaz

La saison du diable, une tragédie musicale. Entretien avec Lav Diaz par Clément Dumas et Elise Domenach, revue Esprit, juillet 2018

« J’ai toujours pensé que mon peuple était profondément mélodramatique. »

Votre film La saison du diable est-il né d’une impulsion différente des précédents ?

En effet. J’étais en train d’écrire un film noir, When the Waves Are Gone, avec une bourse de Harvard. J’ai commencé à écrire au milieu de 2016. Et en juin nous avons eu un nouveau président, Duterte. On lisait chaque jour dans les journaux le récit de nouvelles atrocités. J’ai commencé à écrire des chansons, comme une forme de confrontation à ce qu’il se passait, et d’engagement. Je commençais déjà à négliger le film noir… Puis j’ai pensé à utiliser ces chansons que j’avais accumulées et réaliser une comédie musicale. J’ai appelé Bianca (Balbuena), la productrice de When the Waves Are Gone. Je lui ai demandé si je pouvais utiliser l’argent mobilisé pour ce film pour réaliser un film musical. Elle était partante. Il fallait qu’on réponde à cette situation politique si inquiétante et décevante. Deux mois plus tard, nous tournions La saison du diable en Malaisie.

Chaque fois que vous sentez l’urgence de répondre à une situation politique présente dans votre pays, vous vous trouvez en situation de convoquer paradoxalement son passé. La loi martiale instaurée en 1972 par Marcos occupe nombre de vos films. Mais celui-ci diffère de Evolution of a Filipino Family (2004) ou From What is Before (2014). Ces deux films disent : « Attention, l’histoire peut se répéter ». Ici, vous dites plutôt : « L’histoire s’est répétée, il faut vous réveiller ! »

Oui. C’est un appel au réveil des masses. Il y est question de prise de conscience. Vous devez espérer que les masses deviennent conscientes.

Lire la suite sur : https://esprit.presse.fr/actualites/clement-dumas-et-elise-domenach/la-saison-du-diable-une-tragedie-musicale-entretien-avec-lav-diaz-41656#_ftn1

 

Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archives : An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares

Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archives : An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares, 30-31 July 2018, Novotel Manila Araneta Center, Quezon City

We are pleased to inform you that the international journal Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints School of Social Sciences, Ateneo de Manila University and the Southeast Asian Studies Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University are organizing an international conference titled “Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archive: An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares.” It will be held on 30–31 July 2018 at the Novotel Manila Araneta Center Cubao, Quezon City.

In a prolific career spanning five decades, Resil B. Mojares has produced a remarkable body of work that combines meticulous research, incisive analysis, and elegant, lyrical writing.

An exemplary home-grown and -educated activist, intellectual, institution-builder, and man of letters, Mojares has made important, often pioneering, contributions to diverse fields and subjects, ranging from Philippine literature (Origins and Rise of the Filipino Novel: A Generic Study of the Novel until 1940; [co-ed.] the two-volume Sugilanong Sugboanon), architecture (Casa Gorordo in Cebu: Urban Residence in a Philippine Province, 1860–1920), theater and social history (Theater in Society, Society in Theater: Social History of a Cebuano Village, 1840–1940), to intellectual history (Brains of the Nation: Pedro Paterno, T. H. Pardo de Tavera, Isabelo de los Reyes, and the Production of Modern Knowledge), biography (Vicente Sotto: Maverick Senator; The Man Who Would be President: Serging Osmeña and Philippine Politics; Aboitiz: Family and Firm in the Philippines), history and politics (The War Against the Americans: Resistance and Collaboration in Cebu, 1899–1906; [co-ed.] From Marcos to Aquino: Local Perspectives on the Political Transition in the Philippines).

Apart from book-length works, Mojares has also produced occasional essays (collected in House of Memory; Waiting for Mariang Makiling: Essays in Philippine Cultural History; Isabelo’s Archive; The Resil Mojares Reader; and Interrogations in Philippine Cultural History) that have done much to illuminate “what is obscure, hidden, and marginal” in a plurilingual, pluricultural Philippines. His works blur “the boundaries between academic and literary writing,” while simultaneously building on, and questioning, the “idea and performance of the archive—capacious, diverse, makeshift, open-ended, and polymorphic, and one ‘national’ in its motive and ambition” (Mojares, “Writing the Archive,” Manila Review Issue 5, Sept. 2014).

The perspectives Mojares brings to his study of Philippine history, politics, society, culture, and the arts are methodologically eclectic and capable of moving effortlessly between and across local, national, regional (subnational and supranational), and transnational scales.

This international conference celebrates the life, career, and writings of Resil B. Mojares. It aims not only to assess Professor Mojares’s influence, but also to engage with the ideas, issues, and contexts brought up by his writings on and across various fields of inquiry.

This call for participation is addressed to those who wish to attend the conference but not present papers. Interested parties are requested to complete and submit the registration form, and remit their registration fees, on or before 27 July 2017.

For Philippine participants: P5,500
For overseas participants: US$120
On-site registration (30–31 July 2018): P6,000, with no assured conference packet.

For inquiries, please email philstudies.soss@ateneo.edu

Religious extremism poses threat to ASEAN’s growth

« Religious extremism poses threat to ASEAN’s growth » by Gwen Robinson and Simon Roughneen, 14/12/2017, Nikkei Asian Review

Aided by social media, hardliners gain mainstream support

The Dec. 2 event marked a year since an estimated half-million people clamored in the rain for the arrest of Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, the then-governor of Jakarta. Since then, Purnama, a Protestant of Chinese descent nicknamed Ahok, lost the gubernatorial election and was sentenced to two years in jail on the same blasphemy charges that brought massive crowds onto Jakarta’s streets late last year.

The episode raised concerns around the world that Indonesia’s relatively tolerant variant of Islam — and its secular democracy — was under attack. And it was a startling display of the strength of Islamist groups in Indonesia, home to the world’s largest Muslim population. Among the organizers were the Islamic Defenders Front, known as FPI, and the Islamic Ummah Forum.

Those groups do not claim affiliation with the al-Qaida-linked militants who killed 202 people in Bali in 2002, nor the estimated 1,150 Indonesians who traveled to Syria and Iraq to fight for the so-called Islamic State. But the government has been sufficiently alarmed to ban the local wing of Hizbut Tahrir, another Islamist movement involved in the anti-Ahok protests — and which hopes to establish a caliphate.

Across Asia, the rise of hard-line religious movements is fueling a macho form of nationalism and creating dangerous new fault lines in communities. Beyond Indonesia with its numerous Islamist groups are Myanmar’s zealous Buddhist organizations, which have stoked anti-Muslim sentiment to deadly effect. Bangladesh has seen the rise of Islamic fundamentalists including Hefazat-e-Islam, while Sri Lanka has Bodu Bala Sena, a radical Sinhalese Buddhist group.

Such groups number in the dozens across Asia — fundamentalist Buddhists, Muslims and Hindus who are adding new fuel on what are sometimes ancient ethnic conflicts. Some boast memberships that run into the hundreds of thousands, powered by zealous social media campaigns, community support programs and effective fundraising operations. The donations, often tiny amounts collected from poor followers, become a source of support for hard-line leaders.

Analysts warn that such ethno-religious chauvinism represents the biggest threat to the economic growth the region has enjoyed in recent years — and to the dream of greater cohesion over trade and economic issues. « Rapid economic growth over the past three decades has raised standards of living across much of Asia, but left marginal areas, like Mindanao in the Philippines and Rakhine State in Myanmar, untouched and therefore comparatively worse off, » said Michael Vatikiotis, Asia director of the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue. « It is perhaps no coincidence that these areas are afflicted by violent conflict. »

Lire la suite sur : https://asia.nikkei.com/magazine/20171214/On-the-Cover/Religious-extremism-poses-threat-to-ASEAN-s-growth

 

IFUGAO SCULPTURE: EXPRESSIONS IN PHILIPPINE CORDILLERA ART

Exhibition : Ifugao Sculpture : Expressions in Philippine Cordillera Art, 01/12/2017 – 04/02/2018, University Museum and Art Gallery, University of Hong Kong

The University Museum and Art Gallery, The University of Hong Kong, is delighted to present Ifugao Sculpture: Expressions in Philippine Cordillera Art from December 1, 2017 to February 4, 2018, an exhibition of tribal art and culture. Rarely shown in such a large group display, both figurative sculptures and ritual boxes exemplify the talent of artists from the Ifugao, Bontoc and Kankanaey tribes in the northern Luzon region of the Philippines. The exhibition is organised in cooperation with Mr Martin Kurer and the Hong Kong-based Asian Art:Future (AA:F), a collection specialising in contemporary and antique Asian art.

The works displayed in the show range from sculptural objects, including ‘bulul’ statues, deities associated with the production of bountiful harvests; ‘hipag’ (or ‘hapag’) figures, war deities used as vehicles through which divine help can be summoned; sculptural boxes used in ceremonies, the ‘punamhan’; and various boxes for the storage of food—sometimes called ‘tangongo’ or ‘tanoh’—along with other functional items such as ‘kinahu’, food bowls, and toys. Fascinated with the modern abstract style of these carved 19th- and 20th-century sculptures, the exhibition takes an artistic rather than an anthropological approach, highlighting the aesthetics of the displayed artworks rather than signifying them as ethnic markers or religious tools. Both the bulul figures and boxes are deeply connected to cultural rituals, while they present abstract expressions of a group of talented rural artists.

Together, these selected pieces showcase the aesthetic and artistic side of a wide range of Cordillera sculptural art from the 18th through the 20th centuries. The pieces are arranged in line with various centres of artistic gravity—‘archaic’, ‘minimalist’, ‘transition’—although the lines are sometimes blurred, and most of the ‘archaic’ material also shows ‘minimalist’ elements.

One of the essays in the exhibition catalogue draws comparisons with other tribal arts and describes their influence over modern Western artists, such as the Russian Wassily Kandinsky (1866–1944), the Romanian Constantin Brancusi (1876–1957) and the French artist George Braque (1882–1963). This claim is based on visual comparisons and it is each object’s physical structure, design value and international character that is highlighted in the current exhibition.

Voir : http://www.umag.hku.hk/en/exhibition_detail.php?id=4040081

A Duterte reader

Nicole Curato (ed.), A Duterte Reader : Critical Essays on Rodrigo Duterte’s Early Presidency, SEAP Publications, 2017

A critical analysis of one of the most media-savvy authoritarian rulers of our time, this collection of essays offers an overview of Duterte’s rise to power and actions of his early presidency.  With contributions from leading experts on the society and history of the Phillipines, The Duterte Reader is necessary reading for anyone needing to contextualize and understand the history and social forces that have shaped contemporary Philippine politics.

Voir : http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140109186070

The First Reel : Philippine Film Festival in Berlin

The First Reel : Philippine Film Festival in Berlin, Breaking Boundaries, 3-5, 8-12 November 2017

We are proud to announce this year’s festival theme of « Breaking Boundaries », which is a nod to the myriad ways in which this year’s films portray going beyond, challenging, confronting, and struggling against individual, economic, political, and societal boundaries. From stories that feature people finding the courage to create a new life for themselves to a film that tackles indigenous Manobos’ struggles against environmental plunder and the militarization of their communities, the films in our lineup are about discovering one’s self, asserting one’s identity and rights, fighting for equality, struggling against oppression, and of reclaiming dignity.

Festival Schedule:

November 3, Friday – “Bwakaw” (2012), directed by Jun Lana
November 4, Saturday – “Batch ‘81” (1982), directed by Mike De Leon
November 5, Sunday – “Lorna” (2014), directed by Sigrid Andrea Bernardo
[break]
November 8, Wednesday – collection of Short Films by up-and-coming Filipino directors
November 9, Thursday – “Patintero: Ang Alamat ni Meng Patalo” (2015), directed by Mihk Vergara
November 10, Friday – “Birdshot” (2016), directed by Mikhail Red
November 11, Saturday – “Tu Pug Imatuy” (2017), directed by Arbi Barbarona
November 12, Sunday – “Sunday Beauty Queen” (2016), directed by Baby Ruth Villarama

Plus d’information sur la page FB du Festival : https://www.facebook.com/thefirstreel/

Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Management

Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Management, 23/10/2017, Ethnological Museum, Leiden

An international symposium in honour of the work of Prof. Dr. Gerard Persoon on the occasion of his retirement from Leiden University. 

The international symposium in honour of the work of retiring Professor Dr. Gerard Persoon, who held the IIAS Chair Environment and Development at the Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, will take place on October 23, 2017, at the Ethnological Museum in Leiden.

The symposium will consist of a series of presentations on the interdisciplinary theme of Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Management by scholars from the Philippines, Indonesia, Taiwan, Cameroon and the Netherlands, and will be closed by a lecture by Prof. Gerard Persoon himself (see the tentative program below).

Please register for the symposium by sending an email to the secretariat of the Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology (secrcaos@fsw.leidenuniv.nl) specifying your name and affiliation. As seats are limited, be advised to register early.

Tentative Program

Opening remarks by Prof. Dr. Cristina Grasseni (Scientific Director of the Insitute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, Leiden University)

Keynote address and Fifth Louwes Lecture by Mr. Dave de Vera (Executive Director Philippine Assoc. For Intercultural Development, Inc. (PAFID))

Title: Indigenous Community Conservation in the Philippines

Presentation by Dr. Dante Aquino (Professor/University Director, Research and Development)

Title: Promoting Indigenous Peoples Rights in the Philippines: Policy implementation and onsite field realities

Presentation by Dr. Tessa Minter (Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, Leiden University)

Title: Does ownership matter? Resource rights in the Philippines and Solomon Islands.  

Presentation by Dr. Louis Defo (World Wildlife Fund Cameroon)

Title: Hunters-gatherers and best practices in forestry industry. The case of the Baka of South East Cameroon

Presentation by Dr. Haman Unusa (Ministry of Environment; Protection of Nature and Sustainable Development; Visiting lecturer University of Dschang)

Title: Nomadic Pastoralism in Far North Cameroon: A response to environmental pressures rather than a cultural trait 

Presentation by Dr. Huei-Min Tsai (Associate Professor, Graduate Institute of Environmental Education, National Taiwan Normal University; Executive Secretary, International Geographic Union (IGU) Commission on Islands)

Title: A new hope for nature conservation: Indigenous movements in natural resource management and participatory approaches to biodiversity conservation on the Mentawai Islands of Indonesia 

Presentation by Prof. Dr. Gerard Persoon

Title: Indigenous Peoples: Local impact of international rights 

Voir : https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/en/events/2017/10/symposium-indigenous-peoples-and-natural-resource-management

Between worlds : Raden Saleh & Juan Luna

Exposition : Between worlds : Raden Saleh & Juan Luna, 16/11/2017 – 11/03/2018, Singtel Special Exhibition Gallery C, National Gallery Singapore

Explore the extraordinary life stories of two artists who are considered national heroes in their home countries––Indonesian painter Raden Saleh (c.1811–1880) and Filipino painter Juan Luna (1857–1899). Drawing from important collections around the world, this landmark exhibition brings together more than 80 of their works for the first time.

Between Worlds takes you through significant chapters of each artist’s journey, uncovering parallels and differences in their experiences, from their emergence as artists in Java and the Philippines; to their subsequent training and participation in artistic and social circles in Europe; and their later return to Southeast Asia.

Between Worlds is part of the showcase Century of Light, which features two exciting exhibitions on art from the 19th century, a post-Enlightenment era of innovation and change. Together with Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay, the show demonstrates the range of painting styles and art movements that emerged in Europe during this formative period, which has been and continues to be influential to the development of art in Southeast Asia and around the world.

Voir : https://www.nationalgallery.sg/see-do/programme-detail/619/between-worlds-raden-saleh-and-juan-luna

Will democracy in the Philippines go the way of Thailand?

Will democracy in the Philippines go the way of Thailand? by Michael Vatikiotis, 14/09/2017, The Economist

Rodrigo Duterte bears many similarities to Thaksin Shinawatra

WHEN Filipinos attempt to explain the political success of their tough-guy president, Rodrigo Duterte, they tend to point to local precursors. Joseph Estrada, a former matinée idol who had often played Robin Hood types, rose to the presidency by promising to be hard on bad guys and good to the poor. And then there is Ferdinand Marcos, who cultivated an image as a war hero to win election before assuming dictatorial powers, and whose reputation Mr Duterte is doing his best to restore.

Both these comparisons make Mr Duterte’s knack of casting himself as a friend of the people while giving short shrift to the niceties of democracy seem like a function of Philippine politics, in which populists occasionally attempt to stir up resentment against the hereditary caste of landowners who dominate government and the economy. After all, despite regular elections and much talk of reform, the 40 best-connected families still control about three-quarters of the Philippines’ wealth. Poverty is equally entrenched, as a visit to Manila’s slums or the southern, partly Muslim island of Mindanao makes clear.

But the Philippines is not the only country in South-East Asia with an entrenched establishment presiding over profound inequality. Most are blighted by single-party rule, or by a political churn which does not seem to have much impact on local power structures. Thailand, with a monarchy manipulated by the elites, is a case in point. The purpose of 12 military coups, two in the past 12 years, has been, as Michael Vatikiotis argues in “Blood and Silk”, a perceptive new book on the region, to maintain “an imposing if arcane edifice of power and [cultivate] a conservative mindset that has prevented the devolution of power and autonomy to ordinary people.”

Lire la suite sur : https://www.economist.com/news/asia/21728953-rodrigo-duterte-bears-many-similarities-thaksin-shinawatra-will-democracy-philippines-go?frsc=dg%7Ce

The Staying Power of Dynastic Politicians in the Philippines

The Staying Power of Dynastic Politicians in the Philippines by Nico Ravanilla, Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia (Issue 22), Young Academics Voice, September 2017

… And How We Might Think About Reforms that Could Undermine Their Entrenchment.

Elections in the Philippines are a family affair. Family dynasties control the political landscape, fielding candidates at all levels of government. The current makeup of the Philippine Senate is illustrative: a third of current Filipino Senators are either related to one of the last six Presidents or to former members of the Senate. But where political families are most prevalent is at the local level. What explains why the Philippines tend to elect candidates from the same set of political clans?

One explanation is that dynastic candidates tend to come from central families in social networks, and these families have an advantage in winning office. In a recent article published in American Economic Review, Cruz, Labonne and Querubin (forthcoming) find evidence that centrality in family networks matter a lot for the electoral success of mayoral candidates in the Philippines. Candidates from central families are not only more likely to stand for office; they also capture greater vote-shares all else equal. But what explains the electoral success of candidates from well-connected families? In a new paper, my co-authors and I argue that a key part of the answer is because family networks matter a lot to voters.

Lire la suite sur : https://kyotoreview.org/yav/the-staying-power-of-dynastic-politicians-in-the-philippines/

 

 

Feminist Fiction From the Philippines, Written 50 Years Ago

« Feminist Fiction From the Philippines, Written 50 Years Ago » by Melissa Chadburn, 01/09/2017, The New York Times

To enter the world of “The Woman Who Had Two Navels and Tales of the Tropical Gothic,” your faith must bend to the following: Time travel exists. Shapeshifting is possible. And a woman could be in power.

Nick Joaquin is considered one of the Philippines’ greatest writers. By introducing him here, the publisher Elda Rotor continues her careful curation of Filipino classics for Penguin’s roster. With authoritarian threats surging in both his home country and the United States, Joaquin’s re-emergence feels especially timely. Born in 1917, and a young man during World War II, he depicts war’s effects on a population still capable of rebellious celebration. Fluent in Spanish, Tagalog, and street slang, Joaquin wrote in English but summoned a space between languages. He was not a joiner but a man of singular pursuits. “I have no hobbies, no degrees; belong to no party, club or association,” he once said. “I like long walks … Dickens and Booth Tarkington, the old Garbo pictures, anything with Fred Astaire.” He was also defiant, even against dictatorship: When he was named National Artist of the Philippines in 1976, he said he would accept the honor only if Ferdinand Marcos freed the imprisoned poet Jose F. Lacaba. Marcos obliged.

Drafted in an age of strongmen, during the first two decades of the country’s postcolonial period between 1946 and 1965, the 11 works collected in this volume — 10 stories and a play — read as feminist. The story “Three Generations” presents a battle of two masculine wills, but a woman’s inner life drives it: The patriarch is mystified “by a certain nakedness in his wife’s mind; in the minds of all women, for that matter. You took them for what they appeared: shy, reticent, bred by nuns, but after marriage, though they continued to look demure, there was always in their attitude toward sex, an amused irony, even a deliberate coarseness.” Though they may lack the trappings of external power, women maintain the emotional and sexual self-possession to direct Joaquin’s narrative outcomes.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/books/review/nick-joaquin-the-woman-who-had-two-navels-and-tales-of-the-tropical-gothic.html

Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories

« Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories », 14/07/2017 – 11/03/2018, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

Landmark exhibition at Asian Art Museum showcases centuries of creativity and cultural exchange

On view July 14, 2017–March 11, 2018 and presented in the Tateuchi Thematic Gallery, Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories is the result of more than a decade of study and collecting by the museum’s curatorial team — a labor of love to expand the institution’s holdings in this oft-overlooked area.

This is the first exhibition ever mounted in the United States of Philippine art spanning from the precolonial period to today. It explores the Philippines’ diverse artistic practices through twenty-five rare and compelling works: traditional carving and weaving; Islamic metalwork; Christian art from the colonial period; and modern and contemporary painting and mixed-media. This rich variety comes together to tell the sometimes unfamiliar story of how the Philippines — an island nation positioned along ancient trade routes between China and India, and, later, Europe via the Americas — has for centuries been a center for artistic exchange and innovation.

“The artistic culture of the Philippines has been marked by a history of invasion, resistance, accommodation and adaptation,” explains Natasha Reichle, who as the museum’s associate curator of Southeast Asian art spent years acquiring the artworks organized into this exhibition. “What has been fascinating is seeing how contemporary artists draw upon aspects of this complex legacy to create new works, works that are celebrated in the Philippines and valued in a global art market that is beginning to appreciate their beauty, originality and sophistication.”

“Ironically, the Philippines’ colonial history and Christian artistic legacy placed much of its art outside familiar ‘Asian art’ storylines of Hinduism or Buddhism, which may have led to its exclusion from our museum’s original founding collection,” explains Reichle. “Luckily for our visitors, this is a story that wants to be told. We have pieces in this exhibition acquired by donation, given directly from artists and collectors, even from the families of former missionaries and on-the-ground field researchers. The backstory of how we acquired every artwork mirrors the fascinating history of the Philippines.”

Lire la suite sur : http://www.asianart.org/press_releases/81

Eduardo Masferré : People of the Philippine Cordillera

A densely populated southern Kalinga village with sugar cane growing among the houses.
Saklit, Tinglayan, Kalinga 1950

Collection de photographies du Museum fünf Kontinente  : Eduardo Masferré : People of the Philippine Cordillera

Eduardo Masferré (1909–1995) was a Filippino-Catalan photographer who made important documentary reports about the lifestyle of the people of the Philippine Cordillera in the middle of the 20th century. He is regarded as the Father of Philippine photography.

Eduardo was born in Sagada in the Mountain Province of Northern Luzon as the son of Jaime Masferré, a Spanish soldier whose family had emigrated from Spain in the late 19th century. Jaime married Mercedes Langkew, a local woman from Sagada and became a farmer and eventually an Episcopalian priest. From 1914 to 1922 the family went back to Catalonia so that their children could study there, but then they returned to the Philippines and Eduardo finished his studies there. In his early years he became interested in photography, he was a self-taught photographer and when World War II ended, he opened a photographic studio in Bontok. The first exhibitions of his photographs were held in Manila in 1982 and 1983 and subsequently in Europe, Japan and the United States.

“Eduardo Masferré is an artist who did the right thing at the right time for the right reasons. A photographer with remarkable foresight, Masferré understood that change is inevitable. So with his camera, his eye and his heart, he kept the Cordillera’s proud, ancient soul visible and timeless amidst the changes.
With passion and with dedication, Masferré made a creative record of the life around him, realizing its importance. He is a Filippino who loved Filippinos in their everyday, ordinary setting. This is evident in his photographs, which are intensely felt and imbued with the spiritual element of creativity. The world’s way of gauging civilization and the value placed on Filippino ethnic heritage have only recently caught with the vision Masferré had over fifty years ago”, said Felice Sta. Maria, the President and Trustee of the Metropolitan Museum of Manila, in a message to Masferré’s book People of the Philippine Cordillera: Photographs 1934 – 1956 which was published in 1988.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/pg/museumfuenfkontinente/photos/?tab=album&album_id=781120092013130

Voir les 90 photos d’Eduardo Masferré sur le site du musée : http://www.museum-fuenf-kontinente.de/museum/emuseumplus.html