Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies, vol. 11, n° 1

Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies, vol. 11, n° 1
The Political Economy of New Authoritarianism

Guest Editors: Wolfram Schaffar, Rainer Einzenberger, Carl Middleton, Naruemon Thabchumpon

Table of contents

Current research on South-East Asia

  • Frontier Capitalism and Politics of Dispossession in Myanmar: The Case of the Mwetaung (Gullu Mual) Nickel Mine in Chin State by Rainer Einzenberger
  • The Iron Silk Road and the Iron Fist: Making Sense of the Military Coup D’État in Thailand by Wolfram Schaffar
  • The Institutions of Authoritarian Neoliberalism in Malaysia: A Critical Review of the Development Agendas Under the Regimes of Mahathir, Abdullah, and Najib by Bonn Juego
  • National Human Rights Institutions, Extraterritorial Obligations and Hydropower in Southeast Asia: Implications of the Region’s Authoritarian Turn by Carl Middleton
  • Thai Doctoral Students’ Layers of Identity Options Through Social Acculturation in Australia by Singhanat Nomnian
  • Typhoons, Climate Change, and Climate Injustice in the Philippines by William N. Holden

Research Workshop

  • The Social Base of New Authoritarianism in Southeast Asia: Class Struggle and the Imperial Mode of Living by Wolfram Schaffar

In Dialogue

  • “Trust Me, I am the One Who Will Drain the Swamp”: An Interview With Walden Bello on Fascism in the Global South by Wolfram Schaffar 

Book Reviews

  • Robinson, B. G. (2018), The Killing Season. A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66, by Timo Duile

Voir : https://aseas.univie.ac.at/index.php/aseas/issue/view/191/showToc

The Cell, Exile, and the New Burma: A Political Education amid the Unfinished Journey toward Democracy

« The Cell, Exile, and the New Burma: A Political Education amid the Unfinished Journey toward Democracy » by Kyaw Zwa Moe, Yangon, New Myanmar Publishing House, 2018, 245 p., 27/08/2018, Tea Circle Oxford

David Scott Mathieson explores the new collection of essays by noted journalist Kyaw Zwa Moe, an emotional palimpsest of lives lived under military rule.

There is a painful poignancy to reading Kyaw Zwa Moe’s powerful collection of essays on the 30th Anniversary of the 1988 Uprising in Burma. The Cell, Exile, and the New Burma is an attempt to close a long circle of personal struggle, sacrifice, violence, complexity and inspiration. Yet it is a journey that refuses to reconnect, as if the hopes of 1988 ricocheted off the reality of entrenched military rule.

The Irrawaddy magazine’s editor, columnist and political talk-show host, Kyaw Zwa Moe is one of the most prominent chroniclers of the past three decades of Burma’s political drama. His new book is a timely reminder of recent history and the people who lived it, the lessons imparted should be guides for the present and future. How far along has Burma come, where are many of the people who were involved, and how do they feel about ‘Shwe Myanmar a-thit’ (the new golden Burma)?

His book is arranged in four parts: prison, exile, a series of eclectic personalized profiles of Burmese activists, leaders, and ordinary lives during dictatorship, and the final section on the ‘New Burma’ as the author returns from 12 years of exile in Thailand and reflects on the changes taking place.

Kyaw Zwa Moe was a teenage high-school student when the 1988 anti-government demonstrations surged in 1988 to topple the Socialist one-party rule backed by a ruthless military. He joined them and took to the underground life of activism. First arrested in December 1991 for his underground activities, he spent the next eight years in the notorious Insein and Tharrawaddy prisons.

Lire la suite sur : https://teacircleoxford.com/2018/08/27/the-cell-exile-and-the-new-burma-a-political-education-amid-the-unfinished-journey-toward-democracy-by-kyaw-zwa-moe-yangon-new-myanmar-publishing-house-2018-245-pages/

 

 

CFP : Criminalising and emancipatory trends in family law in Indonesia and other muslim majority countries

CFP : Criminalising and emancipatory trends in family law in Indonesia and other muslim majority countries, 15-16 November 2018, KITLV, Leiden

Organised by the Van Vollenhoven Institute for Law, Governance and Society (VVI) / Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV) / Leiden University Centre for Islamic Studies (LUCIS)

Subject matter
Looking at legal developments related to family law[1] in Indonesia and other Muslim majority countries, we see two simultaneous trends developing. On the one hand there is an increasing tendency on the part of many states to criminalise sexual behaviour considered in contravention of Islamic law, such as pre- and extramarital sex and LBGT-relations. This development seems a response to the ‘moral panic’ concerning the supposedly increasing debauchery of modern times and sexual behaviour of youth in particular. Technological developments such as the spread of Facebook, Instagram, Whatsapp and smartphones have reinforced the sense of a lack of control people experience over the behaviour of their children, other family members – and perhaps themselves. The call for state action to do something about this has led to new legislation regulating morals. While such legislation may be symbolic in appearance and patchy in its enforcement, its consequences may still be far-reaching.

At the same time state-sponsored forms of Islamic family law that promote emancipation of women and children have steadily continued to gain ground in many of these countries, not only at the level of legislation and judicial rulings but also in social practices. The most prominent examples are the equality of women in matters of divorce and inheritance, but in a country such as Indonesia we also see increasing recognition of the position of children born outside marriage.

An issue at the crossroads between criminalisation and emancipation concerns early marriage. With any marriage under the age of 18 defined as child marriage by international human rights law, states have to manoeuver between criminalisation of those involved in such relations and the protection against unwanted consequences – which is more difficult if they go underground. An extra complication is that in this process the agency of those involved gets out of sight easily, as particularly in Muslim societies teenagers will only be allowed to have sexual relations in the context of marriage. In that sense, raising the age of marriage may actually decrease their agency.

The role of international human rights law extends beyond the issue of early marriage. When it concerns criminalising behaviour, human rights law often opposes such legislation. This applies in particular to LGBT-issues. UN human rights commission reports address this issue, forcing states to justify their behaviour. By contrast, the efforts at promoting equality of women and men in Muslim family law are in line with CEDAW and draw upon such ideas. However, states are careful not to draw exclusively upon this framework, as this may further antagonise conservative religious forces opposing such trends.

We are inviting paper proposals that examine these trends and address the following questions:

  • To what extent are these two trends to be seen in Indonesia and other Muslim majority countries? What forms do they take? What differences do we see?
  • How can we explain these developments? To what extent are they local or domestic in nature and what is the role of transnational discourses?
  • What is the role of international human rights law in these processes? How do discourses drawing upon this source of legitimation relate to discourses referring to Islam?

Format
A two-day seminar with paper presentations. We intend to publish a selection of papers in a special issue of a journal or an edited volume.

Paper proposals should be submitted with titles and abstracts (with a 400 word maximum) to Mies Grijns (ln.vinunediel.wal@snjirg.m)  and Adriaan Bedner (ln.vinunediel.wal@rendeb.w.a) before 28 September 2018. We will send notifications of acceptance by 5 October 2018.

[1] We interpret ‘family law’ broadly, as the normative frameworks regulating kinship and intimate relations between human beings.

Voir : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/call-papers-criminalising-emancipatory-trends-family-law-indonesia-muslim-majority-countries/

Birmanie : un an après la campagne contre les Rohingyas, le pouvoir renforcé ?

Des manifestations de masse ont commémoré le premier anniversaire de la répression opérée par l’armée birmane sur la population musulmane• Crédits : Paula Bronstein – Getty

Podcast : « Birmanie : un an après la campagne contre les Rohingyas, le pouvoir renforcé ? », 03/09/2018, Les Enjeux Internationaux, France Culture

Intervenante : Alexandra de Mersan
anthropologue, maître de conférences à l’Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales (Inalco).

Entre octobre 2016 et septembre 2017, 700 000 Rohingyas musulmans de l’Etat Rakhine (Arakan) avaient fui l’armée birmane vers le Bangladesh. Le rapport du Haut Commissariat aux Réfugiés est clair : meurtres de masses, viols collectifs, villages brûlés et passage des terres au bulldozer…

La liste des violences commises par l’armée est longue. Plus encore, les trois rapporteurs de l’ONU y voient assez de systématisme pour engager une « intention génocidaire » de la part de l’armée (Tatmadaw). Pour l’instant six militaires dont le Commandant en chef de l’armée le général Ming Aung Hlaing sont mis en cause. Le rapport est sévère aussi envers la première ministre Aung San Suu Kyi, dont le silence au moment des violences, et le soutien à l’armée contre les « terroristes » est jugé complice.

Les possibilités de poursuites réelles sont cependant minces. Comme en 2017, le Myanmar a rejeté ce rapport du HCR 2017 dont l’enquête n’avait pas été autorisée. Plus encore, toute mise en place d’une juridiction légitime (ou presque) devra passer par un vote du Conseil de Sécurité où la Birmanie y est soutenue par la Russie et la Chine pour qui le Myanmar est stratégique en Asie du Sud-Est : le projet de corridor économique Kunming-Kyaukpyu, du Yunnan jusqu’à l’Etat Rakhine, est la voie choisie par Pékin pour éviter à terme de passer par le détroit de Malacca.

Les autres diplomaties ont reçu prudemment le rapport. Dans un régime à deux têtes autonomes, l’armée et le pouvoir civil, des poursuites contre des militaires impliqueraient un changement politique majeur ; il mettrait en péril des intérêts étrangers et l’équilibre politique actuel : qui y est vraiment prêt ?

A écouter sur : https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/les-enjeux-internationaux/birmanie-la-crise-des-rohingas-inquiete-t-elle-le-regime

Ma’ruf Amin: Jokowi’s Islamic defender or deadweight?

« Ma’ruf Amin: Jokowi’s Islamic defender or deadweight? » by Greg Fealy, 28/08/2018, New Mandala

The image was incongruous: President Joko Widodo (Jokowi), who wants his presidency defined by Indonesia’s rapid economic development and modernisation, stood awkwardly before the media on 10 August with his newly announced vice-presidential candidate, Ma’ruf Amin, a 75-year-old conservative Islamic scholar clad in traditional sarung and sandals. Answering criticism of his choice, Jokowi praised his running mate as “an untarnished figure, a wise ulama (Islamic scholar) who is respected across the Islamic community”. He proclaimed that with Ma’ruf on his ticket religion and nationalism would complement each other.

Indeed, Ma’ruf Amin is the most powerful ulama in the nation. Since 2015, he has occupied two pre-eminent positions: rais aam (president) of Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), the nation’s largest Muslim organisation; and chairman of the Indonesian Ulama Council (MUI), the paramount state-endorsed body for issuing rulings on Islamic issues. Prior to this, he was an influential member of Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s Presidential Advisory Council (Wantimpres).

The story of how Ma’ruf came to be Jokowi’s presidential partner tells us much about the dynamics of contemporary Indonesian politics. As many commentators have observed, the president’s search for greater Islamic credibility was the primary reason for Ma’ruf’s elevation. But to explain why Ma’ruf rather than one of the many other prominent Islamic leaders was chosen requires a closer look at his career and sources of legitimacy. Conservatism has been an important, but by no means the only, element in his rise.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/maruf-amin-jokowis-islamic-defender-deadweight/

 

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 24 : Twenty Years after Suharto

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 24 : Twenty Years after Suharto

Table of contents

  • The New Normal: Indonesian Democracy Twenty Years after Suharto by Paige Johnson Tan
  • From Autocracy to Coalitional Presidentialism: The Post-Authoritarian Transformation of Indonesia’s Presidency by Marcus Mietzner
  • Quo Vadis Civil Islam? Explaining Rising Islamism in Post-Reformasi Indonesia by Alexander R. Arifianto
  • Twenty Years After Suharto: Dynastic Politics and Signs of Subnational Authoritarianism by Yoes C. Kenawas
  • The Trajectories of Transitional Justice and Its Discontents in Indonesia by Ehito Kimura

A lire sur : https://kyotoreview.org/

Kyoto review of Southeast Asia, n° 23 : Islamism in Southeast Asia

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 23 : Islamism in Southeast Asia

Table of contents

  • Islamism in Southeast Asia by Joseph Chinyong Liow
  • Modalities of Salafi Transnationalism in Southeast Asia by Zoltan Pall
  • Indonesia’s Islamist Mobilization by Sumanto Al Qurtuby
  • Constitutionalizing and Politicizing Religion in Contemporary Malaysia by Yvonne Tew
  • Moderate-radical Coalition in the Name of Islam: Conservative Islamism in Indonesia and Malaysia by Kikue Hamayotsu
  • Islamic Authority and the State in Brunei Darussalam by Dominik M. Müller

A lire sur : https://kyotoreview.org/issue-23/islamism-in-southeast-asia/

Symposium : Panji stories in manuscripts and performance

Symposium : Panji stories in manuscripts and performance, 21/09/2018, Leiden University Library

The Prince of Jenggala and the many faces of Panji

Panji stories are among the most popular works of Indonesian literature, art and theatre. To celebrate the recent Unesco-recognition of this important genre, the Leiden University Library and KITLV will hold a one-day symposium in Leiden on 21 September 2018 exploring Panji stories in manuscripts, paintings and dramatic performance. Through scholarly as well as artistic presentations, this broad-scope symposium will emphasize the many different ways in which these ancient stories were and still are passed on. It showcases the genre in all its diversity, including versions from different Indonesian and Mainland Southeast Asian regions, written or chanted texts, paintings and scrolls, and dramatic performances with masks or puppets. We close the day with a Javanese wayang-play presenting an exciting new interpretation of the Panji theme.

Wayang performance

The Javanese puppeteer Agus Bimo Prayitno and his musicians will finish the day with a unique and innovative shadow puppet theatre (wayang kulit) performance on Prince Panji. In this performance Panji features as a metaphor for Javanese farmers. They are encouraged to ensure the availability of water for their plots and households by taking care of their natural environment. The performance will take place in the Lipsius building, room 0.19, 15.30-16.30 hrs.

Programme

Leiden University Library, Vossius Room

9.30 -10.00 hrs
Arrival, coffee & tea

10.00 – 10.10 hrs
Word of welcome by Marije Plomp and Doris Jedamski (Asian Library)

10.10 – 10.30 hrs
Roger Tol and Wardiman Djojonegoro (under reserve), Background of the UNESCO recognition of Panji manuscripts.

10.30 – 11.00 hrs
Gijs Koster, Between Love and Domination: the Malay Hikayat Kuda Semirang Sira Panji Pandai Rupa.

11.00 – 11.30 hrs
Lydia Kieven, A comparative study of illustrations of Jayakusuma manuscripts in Jakarta, British Library, and Staatsbibliothek Berlin.

11.30 – 12.00 hrs
Peter Worsley, The rhetoric of paintings: the Balinese Malat and the prospect of a history of Balinese ideas, imaginings and emotions in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Leiden University Library, Heinsius room

12.00 – 14.00 hrs
Exhibition of Panji manuscripts, photographs and paintings from Leiden University Library/KITLV collections

12.00 – 12.15 and 12.30 – 12.45 hrs
Hedi Hinzler, Balinese wayang paintings on cloth and their stories.

13.00 – 14.00 hrs lunch break

14.00 – 14.30 hrs
Tea Skrinjaric, Unrolling the Story: Wayang Beber on Java

14.30 – 15.00 hrs
Clara Brakel and Silvy Puntowati, Panji stories as masked performances in Central Java. With a demonstration of Panji masks by dance group Kuwung-kuwung

15.00 – 15.30 hrs tea break

Lipsius building, room 0.19

15.30 – 16.30 hrs
Performance of Wayang Jantur (innovative Indonesian shadow puppet theatre based on Panji stories) Dhalang Agus Bimo Prayitno and musicians, with an introduction by Lydia Kieven.

Registration

We hope to welcome you at the symposium and/or wayang performance on 21 September. Please let us know if you’re joining us by sending us an email: aanmelding@library.leidenuniv.nl (subject: Symposium Panji stories and number of attendees) or by phone: 071-527 28 32. If you just want to attend the wayang performance in the Lipsius building, no registration is needed.

Voir : https://www.library.universiteitleiden.nl/news/2018/08/symposium-panji-stories-in-manuscripts-and-performance

Engaging the UWSA: Countering Myths, Building Ties

Wa flag flies outside school in Northern Wa Region (Image Credit: Andrew Ong)

« Engaging the UWSA: Countering Myths, Building Ties » by Andrew Ong, 20/08/2018, Tea Circle, An Oxford Forum for New Perspectives on Burma/Myanmar

Andrew Ong makes the case for the international community to reach out to the UWSA and build trust.

The carefully staged photos of tatmadaw Commander-in-Chief Min Aung Hlaing serving soup to United Wa State Army (UWSA) commander Bao Youyi, hospitalised after fatigue and hypertension at the Third Union Peace Conference (UPC) in July 2018, raised eyebrows across the country. The photo was posted to the former’s Facebook page and gestured towards bridge-building between the tatmadaw and the UWSA, the country’s strongest Ethnic Armed Organisation (EAO).

Building genuine trust however, will take far more than birds’ nest soup.

Not captured in the photograph were the UWSA’s demands for an official Wa State, amendments to the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA) and the 2008 Constitution, and recognition of the Wa-controlled territory on the Thai border.

The UWSA had in September 2016 walked out of Aung San Suu Kyi’s landmark attempt to build peace with EAOs, the 21st Century Panglong Conference (now UPC). The formation of the UWSA-led coalition, the Federal Political Negotiation and Consultative Committee (FPNCC) in April 2017, was a further blow to her NLD government’s hopes for significant progress in the peace process. The FPNCC submitted its demands at the Second UPC in May 2017, which were largely ignored. This Third UPC saw little concrete progress made, and now runs the risk of halting its momentum.

Perceptions and Myths of the UWSA

The UWSA was formed from the fracturing of the Communist Party of Burma (CPB) in 1989, its leaders quick to sign a ceasefire with the tatmadaw, one that has held to the present day. It controls fully two large swathes of territory along the Chinese and Thai borders, protected by an army of around 30,000.

Narratives about the UWSA have focused on secrecy and isolation, with sensationalised reporting about “an empire built on guns, drugs and blood”, or unverified allegations of the acquisition of helicopters and other weapons. The scant scholarly material centres on the political economy of opium and drugs, with book covers predominantly depicting soldiers in poppy fields.

In May 2015, the UWSA hosted the first EAOs summit at its headquarters in Pangkham, without the presence of Myanmar government representatives, and created the first opportunity for the press to visit Wa Region. Journalists were invited by the UWSA again in October 2016.

Paradoxically, while these visits gave a glimpse into life inside Wa Region, they also created distance – exaggerating the secrecy and remoteness of Wa Region, or its similarities to China. Across the media, representations of the UWSA invariably depict young soldiers marching, training, or guarding checkpoints, alongside charges of vice and lawlessness, and exotic visuals of the wildlife trade and casinos.

Little wonder then, that the UWSA remains “feared and poorly understood”, and few in Yangon can imagine ever engaging with the UWSA. Two serious misconceptions circulate in Yangon: first that the UWSA is a part or pawn of China, and second that they are mysterious, isolated and disengaged from Myanmar.

Lire la suite sur : https://teacircleoxford.com/2018/08/20/engaging-the-uwsa-countering-myths-building-ties/

The virtual museum of Balinese painting

The virtual museum of Balinese painting

The Virtual Museum of Balinese Painting brings the unique art of Bali to the world as well as providing Balinese communities with an invaluable cultural resource. The Virtual Museum is an online database of Balinese paintings which documents public and private collections held in different parts of the world.

The project began as a collaboration between researchers at the University of Sydney and the Australian Museum, together with input from the holder of a private collection of artworks painted in the village of Batuan in central Bali.

Some of the first entries showcased the ancient classical art of the village of Kamasan, Klungkung in east Bali. Kamasan paintings have been documented in a number of important collections such as the Australian Museum’s Forge Collection, and the collections of the American Museum of Natural History, the Leiden Ethnographic Museum, and the Tropen Museum in Amsterdam.

The Bali Cultural Service (Dinas Kebudayaan Bali) has provided valuable support for the project and granted permission to include the relatively unknown public collections in Bali, especially that of the Museum Bali, the island’s most important cultural repository. The incorporation of a database of works which belonged to the collection of Leo Haks further enhanced the scope of the project. The project was funded by a grant from the Australian Research Council and was led by the University of Sydney’s Adrian Vickers and Peter Worsley, together with Siobhan Campbell and staff from Australian Museum, in particular Stan Florek. The late Thomas Freitag played an indispensable role in the whole project. The website uses Heurist database software, and has been designed by Steven Hayes with programming by Steve White. Bruce Granquist, Wayan Jarrah Sastrawan, James Watson and Safrina Thristiawati carried out important research support. Site design is by Ireneusz Golka.

Experiencing Balinese culture

The government-run Bali Culture Service provides information on key events and places of cultural interest, such as the annual Balinese Cultural Festival (Pesta Kesenian Bali), held in June/July.

Major private art museums on Bali include the Museum Puri Lukisan, the Neka Art Museum, and the Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA) in Ubud, the Nyoman Gunarsa Museum in Klungkung, and the Museum Pasifika in Nusa Dua.

On peut explorer le site par artiste, par collection ou par récit (ex : Adiparwa, Calon Arang, Sutasoma …)

Voir : http://sydney.edu.au/heurist/balipaintings/

 

Digitising ‘sacred heirloom’ in private collections in Kerinci, Sumatra, Indonesia (EAP117)

Digitising ‘sacred heirloom’ in private collections in Kerinci, Sumatra, Indonesia (EAP117) – Endangered Archives Programme (British Library)

View archives from this project (1,419)

Aims and objectives

The highlands of Sumatra remain one of the most neglected regions of insular Southeast Asia in terms of philology, history and archaeology. Our knowledge of highland life and political-economic ties with the lowlands and other parts of Southeast Asia remains limited, relying mainly on the first European accounts from the beginning of the 19th century. Manuscripts and artefacts from the material culture are hence the most valuable sources of information about the region. The project is expected to reveal substantial data on the trading connections between the highlands and the lowlands, providing additional clues to the interpretation of the archaeological data.

Of the more than 80 private collections held in Kerinci with over 200 manuscripts and hundreds of artefacts, this project intends to cover about 40-60 collections, resulting in a digital archive of rare ancient manuscripts and artefacts from the 14th to the 20th century.

Some of the manuscripts and artefacts have already almost completely disintegrated while others are in better condition, but the majority are in a suitable state for copying. The materials are kept as sacred heirlooms and getting access to the materials is subject to negotiations with the caretakers and is time-consuming. During several small-scale pilot projects a small number of manuscripts were documented, enabling a good network to be established and support gained from senior figures of the Kerinci society, including the regent (bupati) of the Kerinci regency. Through this network of support it will be relatively easy for permission to be granted to document the collections.

There will be close cooperation with archaeologists to classify the artefacts and gather as much background information about provenance, distribution, and age of the artefacts as possible. The manuscripts will also be closely examined and all manuscripts in the Kerinci script will be character mapped for a possible reconstruction of the development of the Kerinci script and its relation to neighbouring Sumatran scripts. Malay language manuscripts will be examined in cooperation with Indonesian and international scholars.

It is planned to centrally store all information (digital images, descriptions, and transliteration) in a searchable database, which will be made available to the national libraries of the three Malay speaking countries Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, the Indonesian National Archive, the British Library, and a selected number of national and international libraries with a strong SEA focus. The database will also be accessible online.

Visit the project website and view some of the digital collections.

Outcomes

Blog: Heirloom manuscripts from Jambi – October 2014

The records copied by this project have been catalogued as:

  • EAP117/1 Sultan Mandaro Putih Collection
  • EAP117/2 Depati Singolago Tuo Collection
  • EAP117/3 Iskandar Zakaria Collection
  • EAP117/4 Pak Man Collection
  • EAP117/5 Yusuf Hasyim Collection …

Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, vol. 54, n° 1, 2018

Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, vol. 54, n° 1, 2018

Table of Contents

Survey of Recent Developments

  • Can Indonesia Secure a Development Dividend from Its Resource Export Boom? by Rashesh Shrestha & Ian Coxhead

Other Articles

  • Tax Non-Compliance and Perceptions of Corruption: Policy Implications for Developing Countries by Arifin Rosid, Chris Evans & Binh Tran-Nam
  • Property-Price Determinants in Indonesia by Matthew Gnagey & Ryan Tans
  • Regional Disparity in the Body Mass Index Distribution of Indonesians: New Evidence Beyond The Mean by Toshiaki Aizawa

Note

  • Predictability, Price Bubbles, and Efficiency in the Indonesian Stock-Market by Fahad Almudhaf

Book Reviews

  • Michaela Haug, Martin Rössler, Anna-Teresa Grumblies (eds), Rethinking Power Relations in Indonesia: Transforming the Margins by Thomas P. Power
  • Hans Hägerdal, Held’s History of Sumbawa: An Annotated Translation by William G. Clarence-Smith
  • Eko Saputro, Indonesia and ASEAN Plus Three Financial Cooperation: Domestic Politics, Power Relations, and Regulatory Regionalism by Joel Rathus

Voir : https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cbie20/54/1

 

 

 

 

 

Journal of Contemporary Asia, vol. 48, n° 4, 2018

Journal of Contemporary Asia, vol. 48, n° 4, 2018
Crisis, Populism and Right-wing Politics in Asia

Table of Contents

Original Articles

  • Asia’s Conservative Moment: Understanding the Rise of the Right by Priya Chacko & Kanishka Jayasuriya
  • The Right Turn in India: Authoritarianism, Populism and Neoliberalisation by Priya Chacko
  • Imagine All the People? Mobilising Islamic Populism for Right-Wing Politics in Indonesia by Vedi R. Hadiz
  • Authoritarian Statism and the New Right in Asia’s Conservative Democracies by Kanishka Jayasuriya
  • Limited Pluralism in a Liberal Democracy: Party Law and Political Incorporation in South Korea by Erik Mobrand
  • The Australian Right in the “Asian Century”: Inequality and Implications for Social Democracy by Carol Johnson
  • Creating Surplus Labour: Neo-Liberal Transformations and the Development of Relative Surplus Population in Indonesia by Muhtar Habibi

Commentary

  • Excessive Use of Deadly Force by Police in the Philippines Before Duterte by Peter Kreuzer

Book Reviews

  • Alpa Shah, Jens Lerche, Richard Axelby, Dalel Benbabaali, Brendan Donegan, Jayaseelan Raj and Vikramaditya Thakur, Ground Down by Growth: Tribe, Caste, Class and Inequality in Twenty-First Century India by Kenneth Bo Nielsen
  • Ashley South and Mary Lall (eds), Citizenship in Myanmar: Ways of Being In and From Burma by Gerry van Klinken

Voir : https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjoc20/48/4

 

 

 

The Lao dam collapse: a tragedy long in the making

« The Lao dam collapse: a tragedy long in the making » by Bruce Shoemaker, 03/08/2018, New Mandala

The partial collapse of a newly constructed dam in Laos has killed dozens of local villagers and devastated the lives and livelihoods of thousands—and in doing so exposed cracks in the hydropower agenda of the country’s one-party government. The South Korean and Thai companies spearheading the Xe Pian-Xe Namnoy project initially tried to write off the collapse as a natural disaster induced by heavy rains. However, this was very much an avoidable manmade tragedy caused by poor design, construction and operation.

While the Xe Pian-Xe Namnoy tragedy is particularly acute, the rush to transform Laos into “the battery of Southeast Asia” through rapid construction of large hydropower across the country is already a widespread, if largely unacknowledged, human rights and environmental disaster.

In a highly restrictive one-party state in which local people have no freedom of expression or access to independent media, and civil society is severely constrained, tens of thousands of people are being forcibly resettled to make way for large-scale hydropower projects and other infrastructure.

Many more communities downstream from these projects, dependent on migratory fish and other river resources for income and food security, have lost livelihoods and food sources without acknowledgement or redress. Some projects are being built in what are legally protected conservation areas, causing severe impacts on areas of high biodiversity significance. Xe Pian-Xe Namnoy was no exception.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/lao-dam-collapse-tragedy-long-making/

The Painting That Is Painted With Poetry Is Profoundly Beautiful

« The Painting That Is Painted With Poetry Is Profoundly Beautiful – Tang Chang » by Nora Taylor, Jul/Aug 2018, ArtAsiaPacific

Chills ran down my spine as I peered into the vitrine positioned toward the end of the late Tang Chang’s solo exhibition at the Smart Museum of Art, so beautifully and adeptly curated by Orianna Cacchione. On a faded sheet of paper was the word “gunman,” handwritten in English, and repeated in a pattern that resembles a monument. In the top right-hand corner, the word “democracy” appeared; at the bottom right was the date 1978. The Thai artist was referring to the suppression of the student protest against the return of Thanom Kittikachorn, an exiled military dictator, which had taken place two years earlier in Bangkok. That event, known as the October 1976 massacre, had led to the deaths of many at the hands of the Thai military. Yet, reading those words in the south of Chicago, I immediately thought of the recent and persistent shootings that have taken place in American schools. That a Thai artist—a self-described Buddhist, no less—would capture the mood of our violent times in such a poetic way was moving.

There were several other poems shaped like the Democracy Monument. Kill was one of them, and Democracy of Dictatorship (both 1978), written in Thai, was another. Many of the words were barely legible, appearing like scribbles, but their repetition created drawings, interwoven lines and shapes. I begin this review by mentioning these poems, even though Chang was also a painter and the exhibition included many of his paintings, because after walking through the rooms that held them, I could barely distinguish the poems from the paintings and vice versa. The title that the curator chose for the exhibition made complete sense. Poetry comes first, and is the medium for the paintings.

The exhibition at the Smart Museum is the first solo exhibition of Chang’s works outside of Thailand and the first to be held in the United States.

Lire la suite sur : http://artasiapacific.com/Magazine/109/ThePaintingThatIsPaintedWithPoetryIsProfoundlyBeautiful