Visiting Fellowships in Indonesia Studies ISEAS

Visiting Fellowships in Indonesia Studies ISEAS

The ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute (formerly Institute of Southeast Asian Studies) invites applications for Visiting Fellowships in Indonesia Studies. Preference will be given to candidates who have done or can work on projects associated with one or more of the following themes:

  • The dynamics of Indonesian domestic politics and elections
  • The evolving role of the military in post-1998 Indonesia
  • Urbanization, decentralization and socio-political change in Indonesia
  • The application of quantitative analysis and/or Geographic Information System to the study of social trends in Southeast Asia

Other Requirements

  • Applicants must have received their Ph.D. degree no earlier than 1 August 2013, in any area of the humanities or social sciences (especially economics, political science/government, sociology, anthropology, geography and urban studies). The successful applicant is expected to start no later than 2 January 2019 and must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. degree at the point of employment.
  • Fluency in English and Bahasa Indonesia is preferred, along with good communications, networking and interpersonal skills.

Responsibilities

Depending on the expertise of the candidate, he or she will be conducting one or two projects related to the themes listed above. Visiting Fellows are also expected to contribute to ISEAS in the following ways:

  • Monitor economic, political and/or social cultural trends in Indonesia/Southeast Asia.
  • Write for a range of ISEAS publishing outlets such as ISEAS e-publications, Working Papers, academic journals and books.
  • Contribute to ISEAS collective research efforts.


Fellowship Benefits

  • An all-inclusive and fixed monthly stipend commensurate with qualifications and experience.
  • A monthly housing subsidy (applicable to non-Singaporeans only).
  • Term of each fellowship is one year, with possible extension for another year.

Application

Please submit one original and one copy of a complete application consisting of the following:

  • Cover letter (1 page)
  • Research Statement (elaborating on what you think are the key questions to be examined in Indonesia for the next 2-3 years; 300-500 words)
  • Research Plan (for one or two projects; each plan should address the research question, methodology and timeline; 3 pages each, double-spaced)
  • Dissertation abstract and table of contents
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Official transcript of grades and certified copy of Ph.D. degree (if degree is not in hand at time of application, a letter is needed from the thesis supervisor stating the expected date of completion)
  • Two letters of recommendation (sealed and signed; original copy only)

Enquiries: Please contact Senior Manager Human Resources (positions@iseas.edu.sg).
Please send application package by 30 March 2018 to: Senior Manager (Human Resource)

ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute
30 Heng Mui Keng Terrace
Singapore 119614

Tel: 67780955
(Only short-listed candidates will be notified)

Voir : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/about-us/opportunities/career-opportunities

Visiting Fellowships Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre

Visiting Fellowships Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre

The Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre (NSC) at the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute (ISEAS) in Singapore pursues research on premodern interactions between Asian societies and civilisations. NSC is now accepting Visiting Fellowship applications from scholars of all ranks who wish to undertake research in two areas:

1. Extra-regional linkages and networks: Focus on premodern maritime history, trade routes and economic links between Southeast Asia and China or India.
2. Intra-regional linkages and networks: Focus on premodern flows of economic activity, power, language, culture and religion within the Southeast Asian region.

The Visiting Fellowship will be for one year, with a possibility for extension.

Responsibilities
Successful applicants are expected to complete a paper based on their research for the peer-reviewed NSC Working Paper series or Archaeology Report Series; contribute short articles to NSC Highlights; give a public seminar in ISEAS; and contribute administratively to NSC and assist in developing NSC’s publications series where possible.

Fellowship Benefits
Successful applicants will receive a monthly (all-inclusive) stipend that is commensurate with his/her rank and experience. A round-trip economy airfare between the home country of the researcher and Singapore will also be provided (applicable to non-Singaporeans only).

Application
Applications should include a cover letter, a full CV, two reference letters, and a research proposal of not more than five pages (double spaced). The proposal should discuss the topic to be examined, plans for any fieldwork and duration, projected timeline of research, and output. The preferred period for the fellowship should also be indicated.

Review of applications will begin on 1 March 2018. The search will continue until appointments are made. Applications should be sent to the following address:

ATTN: Visiting Fellow Applications
Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre
ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute
30 Heng Mui Keng Terrace
Singapore 119614

Email: positions@iseas.edu.sg
Enquiries: Please contact Senior Manager (Human Resource) at positions@iseas.edu.sg
For more information on NSC please visit our page.
(Only short-listed candidates will be notified)

Voir : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/about-us/opportunities/career-opportunities

Islam and the Limits of the State

R. Michael Feener, David Kloos and Annemarie Samuels (eds), Islam and the Limits of the State : Reconfigurations of Practice, Community and Authority in Contemporary Aceh, Brill, 2015

This book examines the relationship between the state  implementation of Shariʿa and diverse lived realities of everyday Islam in contemporary Aceh, Indonesia. With chapters covering topics ranging from NGOs and diaspora politics to female ulama and punk rockers, the volume opens new perspectives on the complexity of Muslim discourse and practice in a society that has experienced tremendous changes since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. These detailed accounts of and critical reflections on how different groups in Acehnese society negotiate their experiences and understandings of Islam highlight the complexity of the ways in which the state is both a formative and a limited force with regard to religious and social transformation.

A télécharger sur : http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/9789004304864

 

Research Officer ISEAS

ISEAS Carrier Opportunities : Research Officer

Principal Responsibilities

  • Provide research support to the Institute’s Indonesia Studies Programme (ISP) and its researchers
  • Undertake analytical research on Indonesian domestic politics, culture and society.
  • Undertake translation work involving Bahasa Indonesia and English
  • Publish findings in a range of outlets provided by ISEAS, in the form of e-publications, and book chapters
  • Assist in the organization and management of conferences, workshops and seminars
  • Assist in the editorial management of ISP’s publications
  • Contribute to ISEAS collective research and public outreach efforts

Requirements:

  • Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in any area of the humanities or social sciences (especially Southeast Asia studies, political science/government, sociology, anthropology, geography and urban studies)
  • Native or near-native competency in Bahasa Indonesia and the ability to work on primary materials in Bahasa Indonesia
  • Experience with conducting social research in Indonesia
  • Good analytical skills with an aptitude for social research
  • Good communication, writing and editorial skills in English
  • Relevant working experience in research-oriented departments/organisations would be an advantage
  • Positive work attitude and ability to work under tight schedule

A remuneration package commensurate with experience and ability will be provided. Those interested are invited to send an updated CV and a covering letter to:

Senior Manager (Human Resource)
ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute
30 Heng Mui Keng Terrace
Singapore 119614
Tel: 67780955

Email: positions@iseas.edu.sg
Closing Date: 16 March 2018
(Only short-listed candidates will be notified)

Voir : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/about-us/opportunities/career-opportunities

CFP : 13th International Burma Studies Conference

CFP : 13th International Burma Studies Conference :

Distant Past(s), Latest News : Scholarly Insights on Burma/Myanmar, 3-5 August 2018, Bangkok

Under the auspices of the Center for Burma Studies (Northern Illinois University, US)

Since Myanmar began its bumpy path to democratization,  the global media discourse has been dominated by actors from the business, political, and civil society spheres. Yet it is a more crucial time than ever for academic and scholarly voices to share their insights and knowledge and play a role in the Myanmar’s development.  With this purpose, the Board of Trustees of the Burma Studies Foundation, the Burma Studies Group, and the Center for Burma Studies cordially invite you to participate in the 13th International Burma Studies Conference in Bangkok from August 3-5, 2018.

Taking an inclusive and multidisciplinary approach, the conference will examine all scholarly aspects of Burma/Myanmar studies in the aim of presenting a multi-faceted approach of the country at this turning point in its history. Recent political and economic events -including ongoing conflicts in Rakhine and Kachin State- will be given due, as well as development in the arts and the sciences. Therefore, research papers in fields such as anthropology, history, archaeology, art history, heritage studies, international relations, political sciences, economy, religious studies, environment and development studies, public health, linguistics and literature, music are all welcome.

Submission details

We are accepting proposals for either individual papers or whole panels by April 15, 2018. Prospective participants must submit — via attached Word document (.doc .docx) or pasted in an email — a title and 150-250 word abstract for his or her paper, as well as the presenter’s name, affiliation, and contact information.

Panel organizers: please also submit a panel abstract in addition to individual abstracts for every participant on one continuous document. Send this information to 13ibsc2018@gmail.com

Accepted participants and panel organizers will be notified in mid-May 2018.

Pour plus d’informations, voir : https://www.13ibsc2018.com/call-for-papers.html

 

 

Unknown language discovered in Southeast Asia

« Unknown language discovered in Southeast Asia », 06/02/2018, Lund University

A previously unknown language has been found in the Malay Peninsula by linguists from Lund University in Sweden. The language has been given the name Jedek.
“Documentation of endangered minority languages such as Jedek is important, as it provides new insights into human cognition and culture”, says Joanne Yager, doctoral student at Lund University.

“Jedek is not a language spoken by an unknown tribe in the jungle, as you would perhaps imagine, but in a village previously studied by anthropologists. As linguists, we had a different set of questions and found something that the anthropologists missed”, says Niclas Burenhult, Associate Professor of General Linguistics at Lund University, who collected the first linguistic material from Jedek speakers.

The language is an Aslian variety within the Austroasiatic language family and is spoken by 280 people who are settled hunter-gatherers in northern Peninsular Malaysia.

The researchers discovered the language during a language documentation project, Tongues of the Semang, in which they visited several villages to collect language data from different groups who speak Aslian languages.

The discovery of Jedek was made while they were studying the Jahai language in the same area.

“We realised that a large part of the village spoke a different language. They used words, phonemes and grammatical structures that are not used in Jahai. Some of these words suggested a link with other Aslian languages spoken far away in other parts of the Malay Peninsula”, says Joanne Yager.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.lunduniversity.lu.se/article/listen-unknown-language-discovered-in-southeast-asia

Publication: Jedek: a newly discovered Aslian variety of Malaysia

 

Rebranding Thailand: why is junta so obsessed with wordplay?

Petra Desatova

« Rebranding Thailand: why is junta so obsessed with wordplay? » by Kornkritch Somjittranukit, 04/02/2018, Prachatai (English)

During the past four years, the junta’s National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) has added many terms to the dictionary of Thai politics. At the beginning of their regime, the NCPO coined the term “Returning Happiness”, which later became the name of a weekly TV programme that junta leader Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha uses as a channel to communicate with the Thai people.

In 2016, the NCPO launched the “Pracharat” campaign, directly translated as “people-state,” as part of its attempt to form a political coalition among the military, the private sector, the bureaucracy and civil society. The most recent term is “Thai-ism democracy” which was invented after Prayut showed an intention to participate in the upcoming election.

Prachatai talked to Petra Desatova, a PhD student from Leeds University, who pointed out that these terms are not merely a play on words, but rather a systematic attempt to strengthen its authoritarian regime. An advisee of Prof Duncan McCargo, Desatova conducted research which examines the phenomenon of nation branding in the context of post-coup Thailand. It focuses on the period from the 22 May 2014 coup until 1 December 2016, when King Vajiralongkorn officially ascended the Thai throne.

Why is nation branding so important for the junta?

The solution that nation branding offers is in the ‘correction’ of people’s attitudes and behaviours towards the nation, and its socio-economic and political systems instead of changing the country’s economic, social and political conditions. It is about creating expectations, ‘selling’ attractive visions, making people feel proud of their nation, and encouraging particular behaviours while setting boundaries to others. This is exactly what the NCPO needed following the 2014 coup. They needed to re-engage the Thai people with the old elite’s vision of a creatively modernising yet socially traditional Thailand consisting of people that will reject the Shinawatras once and for all, abandon their provincial identities and democratic and social aspirations in exchange for a semi-authoritarian rule modeled on the military regimes from the early 1960’s (Field Marshal Sarit Thanarat) to the late 1980’s (General Prem Tinsulanonda).

Lire la suite sur : https://prachatai.com/english/node/7606

 

 

Papia Kristang: Documenting and Describing one of Malaysia’s Disappearing Languages

« Papia Kristang: Documenting and Describing one of Malaysia’s Disappearing Languages » by Robert Laub, 07/02/2018, SOAS

Abstract

In the year 1511 Vasco da Gama and the Portuguese arrived in Malacca, one of Asia’s largest trade centres. As the Portuguese took root, intermixing between the Portuguese and locals led to the creation of a mixed community. Holding onto their Catholic faith and Eurasian traditions until today, they also continue to speak their Portuguese-lexified creole language, known as Papia Kristang. My study looks into the morphosyntactic structure of Kristang in relation to its contact languages, Portuguese and Malay, as well as in relation to Makista, the Portuguese-lexified creole of Macau. My research took me to Malacca where I had the opportunity to record native speakers of Kristang to help better understand the language.

Speaker Biography

Robert Laub is a PhD candidate at SOAS in Linguistics. He previously received his MA from SOAS in Language Documentation and Description and wrote his thesis on decreolization in Makista (Macau Creole). His current interests are Luso-Asian creoles, especially the morpho-syntax and how the sociopolitical and sociolinguistic environments help to shape the structure of these languages.

Chinese Ways of Being Muslim

Yew Wai Heng, Chinese Ways of Being Muslim : Negotiating Ethnicity and Religiosity in Indonesia, NIAS Press, 2017

Many recent works on Muslim societies have pointed to the development of ‘de-culturalization’ and ‘purification’ of Islamic practices. Instead, by exploring architectural designs, preaching activities, cultural celebrations, social participations and everyday practices, this book describes and analyses the formation and contestation of Chinese Muslim cultural identities in today’s Indonesia. Chinese Muslim leaders strategically promote their unique identities by rearticulating their histories and cultivating ties with Muslims in China. Yet, their intentional mixing of Chineseness and Islam does not reflect all aspects of the multilayered and multifaceted identities of ordinary Chinese Muslims – there is not a single ‘Chinese way of being Muslim’ in Indonesia. Moreover, the assertion of Chinese identity and Islamic religiosity does not necessarily imply racial segregation and religious exclusion, but can act against them.
The study thus helps us to understand better the cultural politics of Muslim and Chinese identities in Indonesia, and gives insights into the possibilities and limitations of ethnic and religious cosmopolitanism in contemporary societies.

Voir : http://www.niaspress.dk/books/chinese-ways-being-muslim

 

The Balinese Digital Library

The Balinese Digital Library

Almost all of the writings in Balinese were digitized and preserved here in 2011 by the Internet Archive from their major library in Denpasar, Bali. A official in the cultural ministry said that this collection is « 90% of all writings in Balinese. » Most of the Balinese literature is written on palm leaves, or Lontar. Some were not digitized because of the culturally sensitive materials they contain. This makes the Balinese the first to have their complete literature online and available for free.

Bali has a rich tradition of literature that dates back several hundreds years. Balinese writings encompass the ancient literary texts composed in the old Javanese language of Kawi and Sanskrit; many based on the famous Indian epics of Ramayana and Mahabharata. The island’s literary works were mostly recorded on dried and treated palm leaves. The writings were incised in both sides of the leaf with a sharp knife and the script is then blackened with soot. The leaves are held and linked together by a string that passes through the central holes and knotted at the outer ends.

The lontar manuscripts range from ordinary texts to Bali’s most sacred writings. They include texts on religion, holy formulae, rituals, family genealogies, law codes, treaties on medicine (usadha), arts and architecture, calendars, prose, poems and even magic. Many lontar manuscripts contain information on important issues such as medicines and village regulations that are used as daily guidance.

Voir la collection de manuscrits sur lontars : https://archive.org/details/Bali&tab=collection

In Plain Sight : Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand

Tyrell Haberkorn, In Plain Sight : Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand, University of Wisconsin Press, 2018

Following a 1932 coup d’état in Thailand that ended absolute monarchy and established a constitution, the Thai state that emerged has suppressed political dissent through detention, torture, forced reeducation, disappearances, assassinations, and massacres. In Plain Sight shows how these abuses, both hidden and occurring in public view, have become institutionalized through a chronic failure to hold perpetrators accountable. Tyrell Haberkorn’s deeply researched revisionist history of modern Thailand highlights the legal, political, and social mechanisms that have produced such impunity and documents continual and courageous challenges to state domination.

Tyrell Haberkorn is an associate professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She is the author of Revolution Interrupted: Farmers, Students, Law, and Violence in Northern Thailand.

Voir : https://uwpress.wisc.edu/books/5453.htm

Of Beggars and Buddhas

Katherine A. Bowie, Of Beggars and Buddhas : The Politics of Humor in the Vessantara Jataka in Thailand, University of Wisconsin Press, 2017

An exploration of the subversive politics of humor in the most important story in Theravada Buddhism

The 547 Buddhist jatakas, or verse parables, recount the Buddha’s lives in previous incarnations. In his penultimate and most famous incarnation, he appears as the Prince Vessantara, perfecting the virtue of generosity by giving away all his possessions, his wife, and his children to the beggar Jujaka. Taking an anthropological approach to this two-thousand-year-old morality tale, Katherine A. Bowie highlights significant local variations in its interpretations and public performances across three regions of Thailand over 150 years.

The Vessantara Jataka has served both monastic and royal interests, encouraging parents to give their sons to religious orders and intimating that kings are future Buddhas. But, as Bowie shows, characterizations of the beggar Jujaka in various regions and eras have also brought ribald humor and sly antiroyalist themes to the story. Historically, these subversive performances appealed to popular audiences even as they worried the conservative Bangkok court. The monarchy sporadically sought to suppress the comedic recitations. As Thailand has changed from a feudal to a capitalist society, this famous story about giving away possessions is paradoxically being employed to promote tourism and wealth.

Katherine A. Bowie is a professor of anthropology and the director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She is the author of Rituals of National Loyalty: An Anthropology of the State and the Village Scout Movement in Thailand.

Voir : https://uwpress.wisc.edu/books/5446.htm

Ownership and control in 21st century Malaysia

« Ownership and control in 21st century Malaysia » by Charles Brophy, 17/01/2018, New Mandala

In a series of public lectures beginning in 2016, Professor Terence Gomez began to distil the findings of his latest research into corporate governance in Malaysia. The first finding was a marked reduction in the holding of private directorships by members of the ruling Barisan Nasional coalition. The second was a major growth in the influence and power of Government Linked Companies (GLCs; individual state-owned enterprises) and Government Linked Investment Companies (GLICs; state-owned investment vehicles) over the Malaysian economy.

What such findings did was to challenge typical understandings of “money politics”, and the relationship between politics and business, in Malaysia. The data pointed not towards the direct influence of the political class over private enterprise, but rather a growing centralisation of economic and political power in the Office of the Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance (an office which is today held concurrently), and the influence of the state over the economy through the GLCs and seven large GLICs. The resulting book, Minister of Finance Incorporated: Ownership and Control of Corporate Malaysia, written alongside Gomez’s team of research assistants, has brought into the spotlight not only problems of political centralisation and GLC/GLIC governance reform, but also the effect of the very structure of the Malaysian economy on the country’s continuing prospects for development. (Disclosure: the author works for Gerakbudaya, the Malaysia/Singapore publisher of Prof Gomez’s book, but writes here in a personal capacity.)

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/ownership-control-21st-century-malaysia/

 

Talking Indonesia: Pornography

Talking Indonesia: Pornography with Helen Pausacker, 18/01/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

The prohibition of pornography has been a controversial area of law in Indonesia, attracting the attention both of Islamic conservatives and activists promoting freedom of expression. Several public figures have been investigated and prosecuted under questionable circumstances, raising concerns that the law is being applied arbitrarily. Recently, the police investigation of Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) leader Rizieq Shihab and his female follower Firza Hussein over a leaked salacious Whatsapp chat has put prohibitions of pornography back in the headlines. The case has gained attention both because FPI has been one of the main groups pushing for pornography prosecutions, and because the investigation has been widely perceived as politically motivated, following Rizieq’s role in the protests against former Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama.

How does Indonesia regulate pornography, how have its anti-pornography laws been applied, and what determines who gets charged and convicted? How do debates over pornography reflect broader questions of morality and Islam in Indonesian society? In the first Talking Indonesia episode for 2018, Dr Dave McRae explores these issues with Dr Helen Pausacker, deputy director of the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society (CILIS) at Melbourne Law School.

In 2018, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey  from Monash University, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-pornography/

CFP : Religion in Southeast Asia

American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, 17 – 20 November 2018, Denver, Colorado, USA

The deadline for proposals is Thursday, March 1, 2018

Religion in Southeast Asia Unit

Statement of Purpose:

Situated at the nexus of several civilizational influences — including Indian, Chinese, and Middle Eastern — Southeast Asia, as a region, remains understudied in terms of its relevance to the theoretical and methodological study of religion. This neglect is in part due to the tendency to reduce Southeast Asian religious systems to the named “world religions” often identified with other regions. As a result, indigenous practices are not viewed in terms of their conceptual and other linkages — and in some cases the dynamic interactions between those practices and the religious practices brought over by different classes of immigrants are frequently overlooked. However, and especially in the last fifteen years, exciting materials addressing different religious cultures in Southeast Asia have emerged. Hitherto, there has been little scholarly conversation at the AAR on Southeast Asia. And, perhaps even less commonly, are Southeast Asian religious cultures (e.g., Buddhist, Islamic, Christian, Hindu, “animist,” Chinese, and Pacific) put into conversation with one another. In light of this need in the field, we strive to provide a context for this conversation as well as to foster critical thinking about Southeast Asia as a region.

Call for Papers: 

The Religion in Southeast Asia Program Unit at the American Academy of Religion invites proposals for individual papers, paper sessions, and roundtables. For those interested in proposing organized paper sessions, we would encourage you to consider a 90-minute session with pre-circulated papers. (This can be indicated in your panel proposal.) Continuing our effort to cultivate a greater inclusiveness in the range of topics and participants involved in the Unit’s activities, we will favor submissions from both underrepresented groups and those who have never before presented in this Program Unit. Topics of special interest for 2018 include:

• Religion, borders, and violence
• Religion as a critical category
• Southeast Asian scholarship on religion in Southeast Asia
• Contemporary ethnographies of religion

• Cinema in Southeast Asia
The Religion in Southeast Asia Unit is working with the Religion and Popular Culture Unit to organize a jointly sponsored session on cinema in Southeast Asia. The session will explore film as a site for debating issues — such as, e.g., historical memory and violence, LGBTQ rights, the place of religion in public life, changing ideals of romantic intimacy and personal accomplishment — that have proven difficult to discuss in other public arenas.

• Decolonization as Healing
With a wide range of other units, we plan to co-sponsor a session on the theme of decolonization as healing, recognizing that colonization in Africa and in other parts of our world has resulted in both historical and ongoing threats to health and wellbeing. We are looking for papers that address facets of this theme, including but not limited to: “Place, Land, and Environmental Degradation,” “Decolonization/Restoration of Identities,” “Vocabularies and Pragmatic Applications of Rituals and Ceremonies,” « Reclaiming the Past, Imagining the Future, » and “Tradition as Healer”. Co-sponsored with the Religions, Medicines and Healing; African Diaspora Religions, African Religions; Asian North American Religion, Culture, and Society; Body and Religion; Indigenous Religious Traditions; Latina/o Religion, Culture, and Society; Native Traditions in the Americas; Religions in the Latina/o Americas; Religion in South Asia, Religion in Southeast Asia; and Religion, Colonialism and Postcolonialism; and World Christianity Units. Successful proposals will clearly identify where the project fits within the Call for Papers, and will speak to its broader implications for African American religious history.
This session is a panel. Please submit a proposal for a paper or presentation. If your proposal is chosen, your paper will be circulated ahead of the conference and you’ll be asked to give a brief (5-7 minute) summary of the paper during the conference session.

Proposals may also be submitted on any other subject relating to religion in Southeast Asia.

Leadership:

Chair

Steering Committee