Postgraduate Conference – Movement: Southeast Asia

Postgraduate Conference : « Movement: Southeast Asia », 22/09/2017, SOAS

Summary

With evolving political, social, and cultural currents in Southeast Asia, movement is an important discursive lens to understand the dynamism of the region. Reflecting on movements, and change—from prehistory to the contemporary period—can improve our understanding of Southeast Asia, in terms of its constituent nation-states, peoples, and cultures, and as a region as well as an area of study. For this first postgraduate conference on Southeast Asia at SOAS, we invite papers that consider “movement.” For example, how can we critically investigate migration? Conflict and displacement? Diaspora and transnationalism? Trade? The movement of objects in and out of the region? Political movements? Social movements? Artistic movements? The movement of bodies in performance? Exchanges of ideas? Musical, visual, or filmic influences? Translation? Changes in the natural or architectural landscape? Climate change, resources, and resilience? Or indeed rethinking the delimitations of Southeast Asia as a region—and as an object of “area studies”?

Registration

The conference is open to all, free of charge but registration is essential. Please register here

This conference is organised by postgraduate students with the generous support from the SOAS Centre of South East Asian Studies and the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/22sep2017-postgraduate-conference-movement-southeast-asia-.html

Continuer la lecture de Postgraduate Conference – Movement: Southeast Asia

A télécharger : Architects of Buddhist Leisure

A télécharger : Justin Thomas McDaniel, Architects of Buddhist Leisure : Socially Disengaged Buddhism in Asia’s Museums, Monuments, and Amusement Parks, University of Hawaii Press, 2016

Buddhism, often described as an austere religion that condemns desire, promotes denial, and idealizes the contemplative life, actually has a thriving leisure culture in Asia. Creative religious improvisations designed by Buddhists have been produced both within and outside of monasteries across the region—in Nepal, Japan, Korea, Macau, Hong Kong, Singapore, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Justin McDaniel looks at the growth of Asia’s culture of Buddhist leisure—what he calls “socially disengaged Buddhism”—through a study of architects responsible for monuments, museums, amusement parks, and other sites. In conversation with noted theorists of material and visual culture and anthropologists of art, McDaniel argues that such sites highlight the importance of public, leisure, and spectacle culture from a Buddhist perspective and illustrate how “secular” and “religious,” “public” and “private,” are in many ways false binaries. Moreover, places like Lek Wiriyaphan’s Sanctuary of Truth in Thailand, Suối Tiên Amusement Park in Saigon, and Shi Fa Zhao’s multilevel museum/ritual space/tea house in Singapore reflect a growing Buddhist ecumenism built through repetitive affective encounters instead of didactic sermons and sectarian developments. They present different Buddhist traditions, images, and aesthetic expressions as united but not uniform, collected but not concise: together they form a gathering, not a movement.

Despite the ingenuity of lay and ordained visionaries like Wiriyaphan and Zhao and their colleagues Kenzo Tange, Chan-soo Park, Tadao Ando, and others discussed in this book, creators of Buddhist leisure sites often face problems along the way. Parks and museums are complex adaptive systems that are changed and influenced by budgets, available materials, local and global economic conditions, and visitors. Architects must often compromise and settle at local optima, and no matter what they intend, their buildings will develop lives of their own. Provocative and theoretically innovative, Architects of Buddhist Leisure asks readers to question the very category of “religious” architecture. It challenges current methodological approaches in religious studies and speaks to a broad audience interested in modern art, architecture, religion, anthropology, and material culture.

A télécharger sur : http://oapen.org/search?identifier=626388

Hearing Allah’s call : preaching and performance in Indonesian islam

Parution : Julian Millie, Hearing Allah’s call : preaching and performance in Indonesian Islam, Cornell University Press, 2017

Hearing Allah’s Call changes the way we think about Islamic communication. In the city of Bandung in Indonesia, sermons are not reserved for mosques and sites for Friday prayers. Muslim speakers are in demand for all kinds of events, from rites of passage to motivational speeches for companies and other organizations. Julian Millie spent fourteen months sitting among listeners at such events, and he provides detailed contextual description of the everyday realities of Muslim listening as well as preaching. In describing the venues, the audience, and preachers—many of whom are women—he reveals tensions between entertainment and traditional expressions of faith and moral rectitude.

The sermonizers use in-jokes, double entendres, and mimicry in their expositions, playing on their audiences’ emotions, triggering reactions from critics who accuse them of neglecting listeners’ intellects. Millie focused specifically on the listening routines that enliven everyday life for Muslims in all social spaces—imagine the hardworking preachers who make Sunday worship enjoyable for rural as well as urban Americans—and who captivate audiences with skills that attract criticism from more formal interpreters of Islam. The ethnography is rich and full of insightful observations and details. Hearing Allah’s Call will appeal to students of the practice of anthropology as well as all those intrigued by contemporary Islam.

Plus d’informations sur :  http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100973660

 

Postdoctoral fellowship in Southeast Asian Studies

Postdoctoral fellowship in Southeast Asian Studies, Chao Center for Asian Studies, Rice University, Houston, Texas

The Chao Center for Asian Studies (CCAS) at Rice University is currently accepting applications for the Henry Luce Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship in Southeast Asian Studies to begin January 1, 2018 (pending funding approval). The search is open to any aspects of academic research in Southeast Asia with a transnational orientation. By “transnational,” we mean an approach that devotes particular attention to the movement of people, products, ideas, beliefs, ethics, technologies, etc. across established borders and boundaries. Expectation is to teach one course a year and contribute to the Chao Center intellectual community.

Ph.D. degree by December 31, 2017 in one of the following fields: anthropology, art history, Asian studies, Asian American studies, cinema, comparative literature, Sanskrit studies, global health studies, history, political science, religion, sociology, or women’s/gender/sexuality studies.

The annual stipend is $50,000, with an additional $5,000 for research and travel expenses, and a one-time relocation allowance of $3,000 will also be provided. Renewal for the second year will be contingent upon the appointee’s performance in the first year.

Plus d’informations sur : https://jobs.rice.edu/postings/11649

 

Spatializing Enlightened Civilization in the Era of Translating Vernacular Modernity: Colonial Vietnamese Intellectuals’ Adventure Tales and Travelogues, 1910s–1920s

« Spatializing Enlightened Civilization in the Era of Translating Vernacular Modernity: Colonial Vietnamese Intellectuals’ Adventure Tales and Travelogues, 1910s–1920s » by Yufeng Chang in The Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 73, n° 3, August 2017

This article examines the strategy of literary spatialization employed by colonial subjects to imaginatively engage with colonial civilizing projects. It analyzes twelve adventure stories written between the 1910s and 1920s by colonial Vietnamese reformed scholars, whose lives were impacted by the pan-Asian reform movements that swept Japan, China, and Vietnam between the 1860s and 1900s. They reflected their experiences with Enlightened civilization as they were pushing for vernacularization and modernization through translating the Chinese transculturation of Japanese texts into Latin-based quốc ngữ script while constructing a national literature. Adventure tales and travelogues were considered suitable for aspiring writers to translatively imitate Western literature as presented in Chinese translation of Japanese texts. The authors negotiated with the French version of Enlightened Civilization by employing two East Asian literary tropes: the dangerous but exciting Rivers-and-Lakes World, where the protagonist ventures to search for văn minh, and the peaceful and other-worldly Peach Blossom Spring utopia, where the true qualities of văn minh are realized. These stories reveal colonial subjects’ admiration for and anxiety regarding the French mission civilisatrice, and their literary efforts to imagine a Vietnamese văn minh that would both impress and surpass the original models.

Voir : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-asian-studies/article/spatializing-enlightened-civilization-in-the-era-of-translating-vernacular-modernity-colonial-vietnamese-intellectuals-adventure-tales-and-travelogues-1910s1920s/878B6571DC96BFDD288864B169756EA5

Journal of Vietnamese Studies, vol. 12, n° 3 (Summer 2017)

Journal of Vietnamese Studies, vol. 12, n° 3 (Summer 2017)

The Transformation of Vietnamese Studies since 1980: Essays in Honor of Hue-Tam Ho Tai

Table of contents

  • Introduction by Mark Philip Bradley
  • Hue-Tam Ho Tai’s Millenarianism and Peasant Politics in Vietnam : A Retrospective by Charles Keith
  • The Postcolonial War : Hue-Tam Ho Tai and the “Vietnamese Turn” In Vietnam War Studies by Edward Miller
  • On Memory and Materiality in the Study of Vietnam by Christina Schwenkel
  • On Radicalism and Ethnographic Research on Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Vietnam by Ann Marie Leshkowich
  • Life Stories of Vietnamese Women Married to Chinese Men in Wanwei, Guangxi, China: A New Research Approach in Vietnam by Nguyễn Thị Phương Châm

Afterword

  • On Becoming a Student of Vietnamese History by Hue-Tam Ho Tai

Hue-Tam Ho Tai: List of Publications

  • Hue-Tam Ho Tai : List of Publications

Book Reviews

  • Nigel Thrift and Dean Forbes, « The Price of War: Urbanization in Vietnam, 1954–1985 » ; Danielle Labbé, « Land Politics and Livelihoods on the Margins of Hanoi, 1920–2010 » by Annette Kim
  •  Nam C. Kim, « The Origins of Ancient Vietnam » by John N. Miksic
  • Caroline Herbelin, Béatrice Wisniewski, and Françoise Dalex, « Arts du Vietnam: Nouvelles Approches » by Ellen Takata
  • Sarah Turner, Christine Bonnin, and Jean Michaud, « Frontier Livelihoods: Hmong in the Sino-Vietnamese Borderlands » by Oliver Tappe
  • Yves Le Jariel, « L’ Ami oublié de Malraux en Indochine: Paul Monin (1890–1929) Une vie inachevée » by Natasha Pairaudeau

Putting Myanmar’s “Buddhist Extremism” in an International Context

Putting Myanmar’s “Buddhist Extremism” in an International Context by Aye Thein, 01/09/2017, Tea Circle (Oxford)

Aye Thein argues that the international influences on “Buddhist extremism” have been overlooked.

This article further develops an idea I had briefly discussed in an earlier piece written for New Mandala in February 2017. A recent phenomenon in Myanmar, which has been called by different names by commentators depending on their preference, has put the country in the international spotlight. It has been characterised, among others terms, as “Buddhist nationalist”, “ultra-nationalist”, “militant Buddhist” and “Buddhist extremist”, the latter being used in the title of this article. MaBaTha or the Organisation for the Protection of Race and Religion, being the largest of the groups described by these various terms, has triggered a good deal of scholarly and journalistic attention.

What is problematic with the articles such as the ones using the terms quoted above is that most of them overemphasise the role of these groups as promoters of Islamophobia. In order to advance our understanding of this worrying trend, I will make the case here that more attention needs to be given to another role Buddhist nationalist groups play, which has hitherto been glossed over or commented on only in passing: that is, that they are in fact voracious consumers, albeit uncritical and selective, of global media coverage on Islam. This is where the international factor comes in.

Based on my reading of recent literature of the Buddhist nationalists in the Burmese language, I have observed at least three ways in which the international factor feeds into Islamophobia, as consumed and purveyed by these groups in Myanmar.

Lire la suite sur : https://teacircleoxford.com/2017/09/01/putting-myanmars-buddhist-extremism-in-an-international-context/

The Staying Power of Dynastic Politicians in the Philippines

The Staying Power of Dynastic Politicians in the Philippines by Nico Ravanilla, Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia (Issue 22), Young Academics Voice, September 2017

… And How We Might Think About Reforms that Could Undermine Their Entrenchment.

Elections in the Philippines are a family affair. Family dynasties control the political landscape, fielding candidates at all levels of government. The current makeup of the Philippine Senate is illustrative: a third of current Filipino Senators are either related to one of the last six Presidents or to former members of the Senate. But where political families are most prevalent is at the local level. What explains why the Philippines tend to elect candidates from the same set of political clans?

One explanation is that dynastic candidates tend to come from central families in social networks, and these families have an advantage in winning office. In a recent article published in American Economic Review, Cruz, Labonne and Querubin (forthcoming) find evidence that centrality in family networks matter a lot for the electoral success of mayoral candidates in the Philippines. Candidates from central families are not only more likely to stand for office; they also capture greater vote-shares all else equal. But what explains the electoral success of candidates from well-connected families? In a new paper, my co-authors and I argue that a key part of the answer is because family networks matter a lot to voters.

Lire la suite sur : https://kyotoreview.org/yav/the-staying-power-of-dynastic-politicians-in-the-philippines/

 

 

Viet Thanh Nguyen : Le sympathisant

Nouvelle parution : Viet Thanh Nguyen, Le sympathisant, Belfond, 2017

À la fois fresque épique, reconstitution historique et oeuvre politique, un premier roman à l’ampleur exceptionnelle, qui nous mène du Saigon de 1975 en plein chaos au Los Angeles des années 1980. Saisissant de réalisme et souvent profondément drôle, porté par une prose électrique, un véritable chef-d’oeuvre psychologique. La révélation littéraire de l’année.
Je suis un espion, une taupe, un agent secret, un homme au visage double.

Ainsi commence l’hallucinante confession de cet homme qui ne dit jamais son nom. Un homme sans racines, bâtard né en Indochine coloniale d’un père français et d’une mère vietnamienne, élevé à Saigon mais parti faire ses études aux États-Unis. Un capitaine au service d’un général de l’armée du Sud Vietnam, un aide de camp précieux et réputé d’une loyauté à toute épreuve.
Et, en secret, un agent double au service des communistes. Un homme déchiré, en lutte pour ne pas dévoiler sa véritable identité, au prix de décisions aux conséquences dramatiques. Un homme en exil dans un petit Vietnam reconstitué sous le soleil de L.A., qui transmet des informations brûlantes dans des lettres codées à ses camarades restés au pays. Un homme seul, que même l’amour d’une femme ne saurait détourner de son idéal politique…

SYMPATHISANT n. m. : personne qui approuve les idées et les actions d’un parti sans y adhérer.

Voir : http://www.belfond.fr/livre/litterature-contemporaine/le-sympathisant-viet-thanh-nguyen

Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (Part II)

Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (Part II) by Matthew J. Walton, 07/09/2017, Tea Circle (Oxford)

One of the holy grails of democratic studies is the idea of transformative citizenship. Many have theorized about how democracy could be transformative or how engaged citizenship could transform relationships between citizens and government, but it is difficult to really track this concept.

A national political dialogue process made up of biannual 21st Century Panglong Conferences, themselves consisting of 700 elite representatives mostly drawn from a few centrally important institutions, reflects multiple views on citizenship, none of them transformative in empowering or ennobling ways. It further privileges direct political participation and decision-making for a select few, while imposing a set of passive citizenship practices on the vast majority of the population. A meaningful voice in political decision-making (particularly about their own affairs) is the central complaint of almost every interest group in Myanmar, from ethnic armed groups to women’s organisations to opposition parties and student unions. Yet almost every step of the process leading to the current national political dialogue framework (from initial negotiations between a small government team and ethnic armed group leaders through to the drafting of the final framework by a nine member, all male group behind closed doors) has reinforced the notion that for most, citizenship is primarily a non-participatory notion, merely the act of being represented. And this type of citizenship cannot be transformative in the sense of turning people into more active, knowledgeable, inter-connected, and empathetic members of a political community.

What types of citizen engagement might be potentially transformative? A 2011 study looked at the presumed benefits of citizen participation in democratic governance and found that the positive effects of expanded participation are noticeable primarily to those actually taking part, which should not be surprising. The study specified these benefits as coming in the form of “knowledge, skills, and [democratic] virtues” (Michels 2011, 290). This insight helps to distinguish between the effects of different types of “democratic innovations,” for example referendums and deliberative forums. While referendums seem to result in more direct policy influence, deliberative forums would contribute more to individual citizen development, not to mention the embeddedness that seems to be so critical in the citizen-political community relationship.

Lire la suite : https://teacircleoxford.com/2017/09/07/political-communication-and-transformative-citizenship-in-myanmar-part-ii/

Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (Part I)

Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (Part I) by Matthew J. Walton, 06/09/2017, Tea Circle (Oxford)

Citizenship is undoubtedly one of the more contentious issues in Myanmar today. But with so much focus on the boundaries of national inclusion, discussions usually ignore a key aspect of citizenship: its practice. The following two posts are excerpted from a chapter that will appear in an upcoming volume, Citizenship in Myanmar: ways of being in and from Burma, edited by Ashley South and Marie Lall (ISEAS Press and Chiang Mai University Press, 2018).

The practice of citizenship includes various perspectives on what citizenship entails (the different rights and responsibilities), the roles of state and civil society groups in fostering citizenship, and expectations of citizen participation (as well as expectations of the state in facilitating that participation). A discussion of the practice of citizenship should also include attention to the many “skills” of citizenship that go beyond basic rights and responsibilities. Especially important—but often unaddressed—are the particular citizenship skills that need to be cultivated by government officials.

Developing a broader understanding of a diverse range of citizenship skills and practices is particularly necessary in the context of Myanmar’s rapid political change. Since at least the 2008 constitutional referendum, the country’s citizens have been expected to participate in politics in a variety of ways that were not only previously unavailable to them, they were actively denied by military-led governments. The result is a situation in which the meaning and content of citizenship is either limited among citizens or expressed in ways that do not necessarily accord with centralized notions of citizenship and participation in Myanmar or with international norms.

In these two posts, I consider the practice of citizenship primarily in relation to the national political dialogue process, now officially reconfigured as the 21st Century Panglong Conference, arguably the forum that (in some form or another) will shape Myanmar’s political future. This is a useful starting point for critical analysis, especially because many of the crucial aspects of citizenship practice that I discuss are completely ignored in the current political dialogue process.

Lire la suite sur : https://teacircleoxford.com/2017/09/06/political-communication-and-transformative-citizenship-in-myanmar-part-i/

Indonesia in the new world: globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty

Indonesia Update 2017 : Indonesia in the new world: globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty, 15-16 /09/ 2017, Australian National University

Today, globalisation is more complex than ever. The effects of the global financial crisis and increased inequality have in many countries spurred anti-global sentiment, and encouraged the adoption of populist and inward-looking policies. Discontent has manifested in some surprising results: Brexit, Trump, and possibly more to come. In Indonesia it has led to rising protectionism, a rejection of foreign interference in the name of nationalism, and economic policies dominated by calls for self-sufficiency. Meanwhile, human trafficking and the abuse of migrant workers have shown the other side of globalisation.

At the 2017 Indonesia Update conference, leading experts will explore key issues around globalisation, nationalism, and sovereignty in modern Indonesia. Topics will include the historical dynamics of Indonesia’s engagement with the global world, its stance in the South China Sea, and the emergence of new nationalism. Speakers will also examine nationalism in practice (for example, food sovereignty and resource nationalism) and the impact of and response to globalisation, as well as poverty, inequality, and gender issues.

LIVE STREAMING

The Political Update and Economic Update sessions will be live streamed at the ANU Indonesia Project Facebook page from 09:00AEST/06:00WIB on Friday 15 September. Other sessions will be video recorded and uploaded to the Indonesia Project YouTube channel in the weeks after the conference.

Voir le programme complet sur : http://www.newmandala.org/home/indonesia-new-world-globalisation-nationalism-sovereignty/

Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands

Nouvelle parution : Reimar Schefold, Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands, PRIMEDIA Editions, 2017

This book presents a detailed and inspiring picture of the traditional ways of life and the impressive art of the Mentawai archipelago located off the west coast of Sumatra in Indonesia. This shamanistic culture, most notably found on the northernmost island of Siberut, maintains an ancient relationship between man and the spiritual world. Within this worldview, everything is animated. Not only do humans have souls, but so do animals, plants and objects. To please these souls and to create harmony, alluring artifacts have been created for generations. In this way life, art, ritual and esthetics are intertwined: a notion reflected in the field photographs and in the beautiful and rare objects that are described and illustrated here. Toys for the Souls reveals for the first time the richness and creative power of an artistic imagination, deeply rooted in Southeast Asian prehistory.

Voir : http://www.tribalartmagazine.com/fischbacher/art-books/?a=view&id=382&lang=en

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 22 (September 2017)

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 22 (September 2017)

Thai cosmic politics : locating power in a diverse kingdom

Table of contents

  • Thai cosmic politics : locating power in a diverse kingdom by Edoardo Siani
  • In the name of the people : magic and the enigma of health governance in Thailand by Daena Funahashi
  • Land and lordship : royal devotion, spirit cults and the geo-body by Andrew Alan Johnson
  • « Raya kita » : Malay Muslims of Southern Thailand and the King by Annusorn Unno
  • A Christmas mourning : catholicism in post-Bhumibol Thailand by Giuseppe Bolotta
  • Good, clean mourning in Thailand cosmopolitan cosmos by Matthew Philipps

A lire sur : https://kyotoreview.org/

 

Inside Indonesia, n° 129 (Jul. – Sep. 2017) : Citizenship

Inside Indonesia n° 129 (Jul. – Sep. 2017) : Citizenship

« I am an Indonesian citizen! » by Ward Berenschot and Gerry van Klinken

What does exercising citizenship in Indonesia’s democracy look like?

 Digital citizenship by M. Zamzam Fauzanafi

Online corruption talk in Banten can be vitriolic

Labour takes a citizenship approach by Hari Nugroho

Despite the impressive activism of Pekalongan’s labour union, its political clout remains limited

Indonesia’s diaspora citizens by Yearry Panji Setianto

After decades of neglect, Indonesia’s diaspora demands more rights

From mother to citizen by Vita Febriany

The New Order actively promoted citizenship of a particular kind for women

 « We are natural-born children, you are adopted » by Safrudin Amin   

Locals contest national citizenship rights in North Maluku

When « home » is not home by Laila Kholid Alfirdaus

Locals react coolly to ex-transmigrants who return to Java after fleeing violence elsewhere

 Islam and citizenship by Chris Chaplin

Organisations like Wahdah Islamiyah envision an ‘Islamic’ citizenship for Indonesia

A lire sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/edition-129-jul-sep-2017-2