CFP : Myanmar Update 2019

CFP : Myanmar Update 2019 : Living with Myanmar, 15-16 March 2019, Australian National University

Proposals due by 7 September 2018

The next Myanmar Update conference will be held on Friday, 15 March and Saturday, 16 March 2019 at The Australian National University, Canberra. Hosted by the ANU Myanmar Research Centre, in the College of Asia and the Pacific, the conference has as its theme ‘Living with Myanmar’.

The conference theme is a response to the challenges that people in Myanmar continue to face in living with the legacies of sixty years of military rule. Since 2011 Myanmar has experienced profound changes and reforms. The formation of a new government in Myanmar, led by the National League for Democracy, was also a crucially important milestone in the country’s transition to a more inclusive form of governance. And yet, for many people everyday struggles remain unchanged, and have often worsened in recent years. Key economic, social and political reforms are stalled, conflict persists and longstanding issues of citizenship and belonging remain. Since the last conference in 2017, Myanmar’s restive borderlands have been the site of escalating military campaigns, driving more than 800,000 Rohingya, Kachin, Shan and Karen people to flee internally or across borders. These dynamics have complicated Myanmar’s diplomatic relations with neighbouring countries and exposed the fractures at the heart of Myanmar’s transition to partial civilian rule.

Building on the 2017 Update which probed the theme of ‘Transformations’, the 2019 conference seeks to explore the contradictions, ambiguities and complexities of ‘Living with Myanmar’. What is it like to live with and navigate the institutions, socialities and political ideals that shape life for many people in and outside of the territory of Myanmar? How are people engaging in creative and productive ways with Myanmar’s historical, geographic and institutional complexities? We invite scholars and practitioners to probe these questions, focusing on how everyday people, activists, state officials and external actors craft lives and worldviews as they live with Myanmar.

Paper proposals

The Myanmar Update conference convenors invite paper proposals from interested academics, analysts, researchers, and professionals, that address the overall theme of ‘Living with Myanmar’ in any of the following topic areas: Politics and Governance; Economic Change and Stagnation; Law and Justice; Conflict and Peace; Citizenship and Identity; and Society and Culture. We also welcome proposals for our Burmese-language panel, which can be submitted in Burmese on any one of the preceding themes, following the same format as for English-language papers. The organisers are particularly interested to receive proposals that explore the nuances and dynamics of living with Myanmar from urban and rural areas. And papers that challenge the theme are also very welcome!

Papers will be grouped into sessions addressing these different themes. In addition to these sessions, the conference will include a keynote address, and Political and Economic Update papers, presented by invited speakers.

As in previous Updates, the conveners are interested in receiving proposals from new voices, both within academia and outside it. We are particularly interested, of course, in new voices from Myanmar. We are happy to provide advice and guidance to participants who may have limited experience in international conference presentations. Paper proposals in Burmese will be accepted and, if required, translation services will be available for their presentation at the conference in a non-Burmese language session.

To submit a proposal, please fill in your details at the following link:

https://goo.gl/forms/5Y5iGzlM0CpqIdOl2

This should be submitted no later than Friday, 7 September 2018.

Plus d’informations sur : http://myanmar.anu.edu.au/events/myanmarburma-update/myanmar-update-2019

 

 

ARI Job Opportunities 2019/20

ARI Job Opportunities 2019/20 – NUS

All positions are for outstanding, active researchers from around the world, to work on an important piece of Asia-related research in the social sciences or humanities.

Applicants should only apply for ONE of the four types of position (i.e. Senior Research Fellow, Research Fellow, Postdoctoral Fellow, or Visiting Senior Research Fellow). Apart from the quality of the research proposal, the applicant’s track record and supporting references, positions will be awarded on the basis of the relationship of the research topic to the identified priorities and themes of ARI’s research clusters as listed in Research Clusters and Their Focus (click here).

Applicants need to indicate the particular Research Cluster(s) to which they are applying. In cases where there may be overlapping research interests, you may nominate up to a maximum of 2 clusters.

During their term at ARI, recipients are expected to submit a working paper (not more than 10,000 words) to the ARI Working Paper Series. Candidates are also required to deliver research seminar(s), contribute to cluster activities, and to acknowledge ARI in any publications arising from work undertaken at the Institute.

Application process

Interested scholars are invited to email their applications, consisting of:

  1. A completed application form (please click here to download the application form). Please ensure to complete all sections of the form and submit it to us in MS Word or equivalent editable format. If a section is not applicable to your application, please state ‘NA’.
  2. Curriculum Vitae;
  3. Synopsis of the proposed research project (maximum of 8-10 single-spaced pages);
  4. At least one short sample of published work, preferably in English.
  5. It is primarily your responsibility to ensure that two letters of reference are sent to us in confidence via email reporting on your academic standing, potential and proposed research by 3 September 2018.
  6. Reference letters must clearly state your name, position and the cluster(s) that you have applied for.
  7. Closing date for applications is 3 September 2018. You may wish to check with your referees that they have submitted their references before the closing date..

Additional application information

  1. Please note that only fully completed applications will be considered (including submission of the two letters of reference).
  2. Please keep your email and attachments below 10MB by zipping any large files. Files larger than 10MB may be rejected by our email system.
  3. As we receive a high volume of applications, we strongly encourage you to apply well before the closing date.
  4. The appointment is conditional on approval by the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Ministry of Manpower granting you an Employment Pass or other applicable work passes.
  5. We regret that only successful candidates will be notified (via email). Candidates who do not hear from the University within 10 weeks after the closing date may assume the position has been filled.
  6. Submissions of applications, reference letters and/or queries are to be sent via email to ari_recruit@nus.edu.sg
  7. For further information, please visit our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Senior research fellowships/research fellowships

You will work under the supervision of the Cluster Leader and take the lead in duties such as organising workshops and conferences, applying for grant funding, participating in current cluster projects, and carrying out new projects. Administrative duties and committee work may be assigned to you from time to time.

 

Eligibility

  1. Applicants must have a PhD from a reputable university, and a developing publication record, preferably in the English Language.
  2. Only candidates with more than 5 years of research experience after their PhD may apply for a Senior Research Fellowship position.

Terms of appointment

  1. The appointment will be tenable for a period of two years in the first instance, with the possibility of another term of two years based upon satisfactory evaluation and available funding (i.e. up to a total of four years).
  2. Applications are invited for commencement in June/July 2019 or December 2019/January 2020
  3. The Senior Research Fellowship comes with a competitive remuneration package from S$6,000 per month, from which university subsidized housing will be deducted.
  4. The Research Fellowship remuneration is from S$5,500 per month. This all-in sum is inclusive of stipends for housing and living expenses. Please note that University Housing will not be provided and appointees are expected to make their own private accommodation arrangements.
  5. Travel assistance will be provided to eligible candidates.
  6. Singapore citizens and permanent residents are eligible for provident fund benefits.
  7. All salary and benefits-in-kind are subjected to taxation in accordance with local tax laws.
  8. There is support for research fieldwork and conference attendance (on application and subject to approval).
  9. Research staff at ARI are expected to participate actively in the life of the Institute, including attendance at seminars, conferences and ARI social events.
  10. Other benefits that the University provides and information about working at NUS and living in Singapore are available at http://www.nus.edu.sg/careers/potentialhires/index.html. Terms and conditions, according to university guidelines, are subject to change without prior notice..

 

Postdoctoral fellowships

You will work under the supervision of the Cluster Leader and shall carry out duties including: organising workshops and conferences, applying for grant funding, participating in current cluster projects, and carrying out new projects. Administrative duties and committee work may be assigned to you from time to time.

Eligibility

  1. Candidates must have fulfilled all requirements of securing a PhD from a reputable university at the time they take up their appointment at ARI.
  2. If you are still a PhD candidate at the point of application, you may also apply provided that you are confirmed for graduation by your commencement date at ARI. An official letter from the Registrar’s Office of your university will be required to confirm the award of your PhD degree.

Terms of appointment

  1. The appointment will be tenable for a period of two years only.
  2. Applications are invited for commencement in June/July 2019 or December 2019/January 2020
  3. PDFs receive an all-inclusive, fixed monthly salary of S$5,500. This all-in sum is inclusive of stipends for housing and living expenses.
  4. A one-off travel assistance grant of S$2,000 will be provided to eligible candidates.
  5. Singapore citizens and permanent residents are eligible for provident fund benefits.
  6. All salary and benefits-in-kind are subjected to taxation in accordance with local tax laws.
  7. Please note that University Housing will not be provided and appointees will have to make their own accommodation arrangements..
  8. There is support for research fieldwork and conference attendance (on application and subject to approval). .
  9. Candidates must have been awarded their PhD within the last 2 years.
  10. Research staff at ARI are expected to participate actively in the life of the Institute, including attendance at seminars, conferences and ARI social events.
  11. Other benefits that the University provides and other information about working
    –    at NUS and living in Singapore are available at http://www.nus.edu.sg/careers/potentialhires/index.html. Terms and conditions, according to university guidelines, are subject to change without prior notice.

Plus d’informations sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Page/ARI-JobOpportunities2018-19#PDF

CFP : Marriage Migration, Family and Citizenship in Asia

CFP : Marriage Migration, Family and Citizenship in Asia, 31 January – 01 February 2019, National University of Singapore

Deadline : 31 August 2018

In recent decades, there has been a marked increase in cross-border marriages in East Asian industrialised economies such as Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea and Singapore. Marriage migration and the rise of cross-cultural/cross-national families have the potential to challenge the substance, meanings and boundaries of citizenship. Scholars have argued that ‘social citizenship’ cannot simply be read through a singular focus on the legal framework governing citizenship status. Instead, citizenship should be better understood as ‘a terrain of struggle’ (Stasiulis and Bakan, 1997), shaped by state-led as well as socially embedded ideologies of gender, race and class, and negotiated on an everyday basis within public and private spheres. These forms of negotiation are clearly foregrounded in the case of female marriage migrants, as their citizenship is constrained not only by gendered hierarchies central to the patriarchal family, but also the gendered mode of ‘familial citizenship’ upheld by many Asian nation-states, positioning them as wives and dependents of their citizen-husbands. Incorporated into the private sphere of the family as domestic caregivers and socio-biological reproducers, marriage migrants straddle the ambivalent position of being ‘outsiders’ both within the state and the family. Despite their vulnerable status, some marriage migrants expressed agency in claiming and negotiating citizenship entitlements on grounds of their caregiving roles and socio-biological membership of the family. As a result, the family becomes an important site where citizenship as ‘a terrain of struggle’ typically occurs.

Thus far, extant studies have tended to approach citizenship as an individual-centred concept vis-à-vis the nation-state (Lopez, 2015), thus fading the family into the background. This workshop sets out to go beyond the state-individual nexus by bringing the family back into the discussion of marriage migration and citizenship as contested arenas. As the overarching thematic focus, we propose that the family is a strategic site where citizenship is mediated, negotiated and contested. Using the family as the lens to study marriage migration and citizenship, this workshop aims at drawing out the intersections between the individual, the family and the state. Given that the effects of citizenship laws targeting the non-citizen member are likely to spill over to other citizen members (Fix & Zimmerman, 2001), we also call for a re-conceptualization of citizenship to include family-level experience.

In sum, the workshop focuses on families formed out of cross-border marriages as a case in point to examine how the intricate nexus between marriage migration, family and citizenship emerges and develops in the context of inter-regional marriage migration within Asia or in Asian diasporas. We are particularly interested in marriage migration between Asian countries, given the predominant collectivist and familistic norms in the region. This is also an area that has been given less attention in the literature compared to east-west cross-cultural marriages. Questions to be addressed include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • How do nation-states mobilize notions of ‘the family’ for its citizenship project and what are the repercussions for different types of families?
  • How does citizenship structure the formation, trajectory and outcomes of families resulted from cross-border marriages?
  • How is one’s citizenship negotiated, adapted, or lived at the family level in the case of cross-border marriages?
  • How is citizenship operated within the family through its non-citizen member, i.e. the marriage migrant and/or their children?
  • What are the tensions between the individual, the family and the state when negotiating citizenship boundaries and how are these tensions produced along gender, generation, racial/ethnic lines?

Submission of proposals

Paper proposals should include a title, an abstract (250 words maximum) and a brief personal biography of 150 words for submission by 31 August 2018. Please note that only previously unpublished papers or those not already committed elsewhere can be accepted. The organizers plan to publish a special issue with selected papers presented in this workshop. By participating in the workshop, you agree to participate in the future publication plans of the organizers. Hotel accommodation for three nights and a contribution towards airfare will be provided for accepted paper participants (one author per paper).

Please submit your proposal using the provided template to Ms Tay Minghua at minghua.tay@nus.edu.sg. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 30 September 2018. Participants will be required to send in a completed draft paper (6,000-8,000 words) by 4 January 2019.

Plus d’informations sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Event/Detail/86d486f0-62f2-4151-9333-91ba68327594

 

 

 

CFP : Southeast Asian Media Studies

CFP : Southeast Asian Media Studies

The Southeast Asian Media Studies is the international, semi-annual, blind peer-reviewed, and open-access scholarly journal of the Southeast Asian Media Studies Association (SEAMSA), an academic community that aims to be at the forefront of Southeast Asian media studies and research.

CFP : Volume 1, n° 1 & 2
October 2018 : Vol. 1, n° 1
December 2018 : Vol. 1, n° 2

Special focus
Explorations in Southeast Asian Media Studies: Theories, Trajectories, and Futures

Recommended topics
The first two issues of the journal aim to provide a collection of theoretical and discursive articles on Southeast Asian media studies and literacy. The recommended topics are the following:

  • Definitions, status, and directions of Southeast Asian media studies
  • Authorship of Southeast Asian media studies: Who should do/write it?
  • Emerging media theories in and about Southeast Asian mass and new media
  • Practices and methods in Southeast Asian media studies
  • Critical reviews of media studies in and about Southeast Asian mass and new media
  • Media literacies in Southeast Asia
  • Audiences in Southeast Asia
  • Media technologies and processes and the Southeast Asian populace
  • Media convergence in Southeast Asian contexts
  • Southeast Asian politics and the media
  • Media laws, policies, and regulations in the ASEAN region
  • Business, ownership, management, and control of Southeast Asian mass media
  • Southeast Asian cultures and the media
  • Southeast Asian mainstream, local, translocal, diasporic, and indigenous media practices
  • Southeast Asian languages and the media
  • Genders and identities in Southeast Asian media
  • Southeast Asian media and the environment

Submission procedure
All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another journal or any academic publication. Authors should follow the journal’s manuscript guidelines.

All manuscripts should be sent to editor.seams@gmail.com. Please use the subject “SUBMISSION: Vol.1 No.1&2_Surname_Short Title” (e.g. SUBMISSION: Vol.1 No.1&2_Doe_A Review of Southeast Asian Media Theories). The deadline for manuscripts for both issues is on 15 August 2018.

Voir : https://seamediastudies.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Burma (Myanmar) since the 1988 uprising: A select bibliography (Third edition)

Burma (Myanmar) since the 1988 uprising: A select bibliography (Third edition), 30 July 2018, Griffith Asia Institute

When nation-wide pro-democracy demonstrations were crushed by the armed forces in 1988, thrusting Myanmar (Burma) into the world’s headlines, there was a surge of public interest in the country. Aung San Suu Kyi’s 15 years under house arrest and developments like the recent Rohingya crisis have helped it remain a focus of attention.

As Matrii Aung Thwin has written, over the past 30 years numerous studies have appeared, offering ‘a variety of perspectives that reveal particular and sometimes contested perceptions of the Burmese past, present and future’. The struggle against authoritarian rule by domestic political groups and the country’s ethnic and religious minorities has been the subject of hundreds of books, research papers and scholarly articles. Close attention has been paid to Myanmar’s economy, defence policies and foreign relations. New publications have been devoted to neglected aspects of the country’s society and culture. There have also been important contributions to Myanmar studies in broader works, covering subjects such as the involvement of armed forces in politics and the development problems of ‘failed’ states.

This increased level of academic and official interest has been matched by a greater awareness of Myanmar among the populations of Western and other countries, prompting the publication of a wide range of works designed mainly for the mass market. The biggest sellers have been travel guides, albums of photographs and recipe books. The China-Burma-India theatre during the Second World War has attracted renewed interest from military historians. There has also been a flood of political tracts, most produced by exiled dissidents and foreign activist groups. Since 1988, think tanks like the International Crisis Group and organizations such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have commissioned detailed analyses of key issues. Many publications have been posted on the Internet, but most have also been released in hard copy as books, reports and research papers.

As more and more works appeared, the need arose for a bibliography or checklist of major Myanmar-related publications, not only for scholars and officials but also for the flood of foreigners who, mainly after 2011, travelled to Myanmar as tourists, consultants, aid workers and business executives.

Responding to this need, in 2012 the Griffith Asia Institute’s Andrew Selth published a select bibliography entitled Burma (Myanmar) Since the 1988 Uprising. It listed 928 books and reports that had been produced in English, and in hard copy, since 1988. In response to popular demand a second edition was published in 2015, listing 1318 works. The aim of the bibliography remained the same, namely to provide academics, officials, students and members of the general public with an easily accessible list of works on Myanmar that had been produced over the past three decades. A third edition of this bibliography has just been released, both in hard copy and online. Reflecting the continued outpouring of publications about Myanmar in English, it lists 2133 works.

Lire la suite sur : https://blogs.griffith.edu.au/asiainsights/burma-myanmar-since-the-1988-uprising-a-select-bibliography-third-edition/

Télécharger la bibliographie sur : https://www.griffith.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0032/485942/Burma-Bibliography-2018-Selth-web.pdf

La saison du diable, une tragédie musicale. Entretien avec Lav Diaz

La saison du diable, une tragédie musicale. Entretien avec Lav Diaz par Clément Dumas et Elise Domenach, revue Esprit, juillet 2018

« J’ai toujours pensé que mon peuple était profondément mélodramatique. »

Votre film La saison du diable est-il né d’une impulsion différente des précédents ?

En effet. J’étais en train d’écrire un film noir, When the Waves Are Gone, avec une bourse de Harvard. J’ai commencé à écrire au milieu de 2016. Et en juin nous avons eu un nouveau président, Duterte. On lisait chaque jour dans les journaux le récit de nouvelles atrocités. J’ai commencé à écrire des chansons, comme une forme de confrontation à ce qu’il se passait, et d’engagement. Je commençais déjà à négliger le film noir… Puis j’ai pensé à utiliser ces chansons que j’avais accumulées et réaliser une comédie musicale. J’ai appelé Bianca (Balbuena), la productrice de When the Waves Are Gone. Je lui ai demandé si je pouvais utiliser l’argent mobilisé pour ce film pour réaliser un film musical. Elle était partante. Il fallait qu’on réponde à cette situation politique si inquiétante et décevante. Deux mois plus tard, nous tournions La saison du diable en Malaisie.

Chaque fois que vous sentez l’urgence de répondre à une situation politique présente dans votre pays, vous vous trouvez en situation de convoquer paradoxalement son passé. La loi martiale instaurée en 1972 par Marcos occupe nombre de vos films. Mais celui-ci diffère de Evolution of a Filipino Family (2004) ou From What is Before (2014). Ces deux films disent : « Attention, l’histoire peut se répéter ». Ici, vous dites plutôt : « L’histoire s’est répétée, il faut vous réveiller ! »

Oui. C’est un appel au réveil des masses. Il y est question de prise de conscience. Vous devez espérer que les masses deviennent conscientes.

Lire la suite sur : https://esprit.presse.fr/actualites/clement-dumas-et-elise-domenach/la-saison-du-diable-une-tragedie-musicale-entretien-avec-lav-diaz-41656#_ftn1

 

What has gone wrong in Cambodia ?

CAMBODIA : UN COLLECTS BALLOT BOXES (Photo by noboru hashimoto/Corbis via Getty Images)

« What has gone wrong in Cambodia ? » by Milton Osbourne, 19/07/2018, The Interpreter (Lowy Institute)

Concerns ahead of Cambodia’s elections on 29 July centre on the judgement that under Prime Minister Hun Sen the country has become increasingly authoritarian in political character while the government – through a range of parliamentary and judicial actions, and backed by absolute control of the forces of order – has eliminated any viable political opposition to ensure its electoral return.

How did we arrive at this state of affairs in which there is now very little external actors can, or will, do to prevent Hun Sen’s Cambodian People’s Party staying in office? Even if an unlikely election result occurs, with Hun Sen’s government voted out, it seems certain he would use all means, including force if necessary, to remain in power.

A brief review of Cambodia’s political history since the UN-supervised elections of 1993 is needed to understand the present situation.

The “original sin” that led to this set of circumstances occurred when the international community stepped back from involvement in Cambodia’s affairs and allowed the CPP to remain the dominant political force in the country, despite having lost the popular vote in the UN Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC)–supervised elections in 1993. With Hun Sen and the CPP refusing to accept defeat, the compromise arrangements that were cobbled together left all real power in their hands.

As David Chandler notes of the political opposition at the time in his A History of Cambodia, “The royalist party soon lost its voice in decision making as well as its freedom of manoeuvre.”

Tired of the problems in Cambodia that had been exercising Western governments for more than a decade, no external players intervened to change the course of events. Similarly, there was never any sign at that stage that Moscow and Beijing had any interest in becoming directly involved in opposing the CPP’s actions.

The complex political history of the period from 1993 to 1997 is well documented in David W. Roberts’ Political Transition in Cambodia: Power, Elitism and Democracy. A disclosure: I reviewed this book for Pacific Affairs in 2001 and commented that it could be read as a justification for Hun Sen’s political behaviour. But I found persuasive, then and now, his endorsement of a view offered by long-term observer of Cambodia Steve Heder that the key players of the period – Sihanouk, Sam Rainsy, and Ranariddh – were all characterised by “deeply illiberal, anti-democratic and anti-pluralist tendencies”.

This lack of action in 1993 was followed by the unwillingness of external players to take any measures that mattered after Hun Sen’s brutal coup de force in July 1997 that saw the CPP overwhelm Prince Ranariddh’s FUNCINPEC.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/what-has-gone-wrong-cambodia

The Pain Haka burial ground on Flores : Indonesian evidence for a shared Neolithic belief system in Southeast Asia

The Pain Haka burial ground on Flores : Indonesian evidence for a shared Neolithic belief system in Southeast Asia, Antiquity, vol. 90, n° 354, December 2016

Article en libre accès

Abstract

Recent excavations at the coastal cemetery of Pain Haka on Flores have revealed evidence of burial practices similar to those documented in other parts of Southeast Asia. Chief among these is the use of pottery jars alongside other forms of container for the interment of the dead. The dating of the site combined with the fact that this burial practice is present over such a wide geographic area suggests a widespread belief system during the Neolithic period across much of Southeast Asia.

A télécharger sur : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/pain-haka-burial-ground-on-flores-indonesian-evidence-for-a-shared-neolithic-belief-system-in-southeast-asia/314A2E3F53E1D81908983446B369855A

Podcast : A new Malaysia ?

Podcast : A New Malaysia? #1: Meredith Weiss and Ambiga Sreenevasan, 17/07/2018, New Mandala

Synopsis

In this podcast, New Mandala’s editor Liam Gammon talks to Prof Meredith Weiss about whether Malaysia is witnessing “democratisation through elections”, and Dr Ross Tapsell, Director of the ANU Malaysia Institute, speaks with Dato’ Ambiga Sreenevasan about how civil society can hold the new government to its promises of reform.

A écouter sur : http://www.newmandala.org/new-malaysia-1-meredith-weiss-ambiga-sreenevasan/

 

Workers say no to Vietnam’s ‘Special Exploitation Zones’

« Workers say no to Vietnam’s ‘Special Exploitation Zones’ » by Angie Ngoc Tran, 18/07/2018, New Mandala

On Sunday, 10 June 2018, thousands of people took to the streets in major Vietnamese cities—Nha Trang, Binh Thuan, Hanoi, and Ho Chi Minh City, among others. Academics, independent journalists, and overseas Vietnamese signed petitions to join in their protest against the Draft Law on the 99-year lease of the three Special Administrative and Economic coastal zones in Vietnam. Workers, too, went on strike in two industrial zones in Long An and Tien Giang provinces. These collective actions led to a concession from the government: it would delay the National Assembly’s ratification of the Draft Law to its next meeting.

Why now, given that the idea of these three special economic zones was “old news”, having been announced in May 2017? It turns out that lack of transparency about the details of the Draft Law—made available only before a vote in the June 2018 session of the National Assembly—had triggered these massive protests.

Only once the details became clear did protests begin in earnest. The protesters pointed to the risks of losing national sovereignty to China, alleged to be the key beneficiary of the Special Administrative and Economic zones scheme. While China is not mentioned in the 53-page Draft Law, the geopolitics of these three zones, spread from north to south, suggests otherwise: Vân Đồn (Quang Ninh province, bordering China), Bắc Vân Phong (Khanh Hoa province, ashore of the South China Sea), and Phú Quốc island (Kien Giang province, near the Sihanoukville Special Economic Zone in Cambodia, dominated by Chinese–Cambodian investment). Visas are to be waived for “citizens of the neighbouring country [China] sharing the border with Vietnam in Quang Ninh” (Article 55, Section 4), and for “citizens of the neighbouring country [Cambodia] sharing the border with Vietnam in Kien Giang province” (Article 57, Section 3). Who else would stand to benefit the most from both economic and administrative control over land, air, and sea lanes from these three zones?

Indeed, why introduce more economic zones when Vietnam already has 18 economic zones, offering tax breaks and low rents, and which still have open spaces for foreign investors? A careful review of the text of this Draft Law reveals many ambiguities and raises grave concerns for the wellbeing of the Vietnamese workers and the environment for them, their families, and society at large.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/workers-say-no-vietnams-special-exploitation-zones/

Critical Asian Studies, vol. 50, n° 3, 2018

Critical Asian Studies, vol. 50, n° 3, 2018

A signaler : 2 articles sur l’Asie du Sud-Est

  • Victim-warriors and iconic heroines: photographs of female combatants in Aceh, Indonesia by Elizabeth F. Drexler

Abstract

Analyzing photos and narratives of the “widows’ battalion” in Aceh, Indonesia that appeared in international and local print media between 2000 and 2002, this article traces how images of female combatants initially provided evidence of a uniformed, armed ethno-nationalist movement motivated by past state violence and linked to historical legends of women involved in armed resistance to colonialism. Subsequently, the heroines were recast as immoral young women pursuing inappropriate sexual relationships with the occupying military. The problems of intelligence gathering, double agents, and the indeterminate zone of overlap in which male soldiers collaborated in the past were rewritten as a problem of sexual or intimate relations that violated religious and cultural norms. In Aceh, the affective power and complexity of women’s positioning as both victim and combatant is fueled by the invocation of the iconic heroines of the anticolonial resistance and ideas about international human rights. Images and narration of the widows’ battalion appear to champion female combatants past and present, but in fact, contribute to the consolidation of the power of male commanders and combatants in the resistance movement. Analyses of human rights photography must consider the affective power of images beyond engaging the empathy of distant spectators to consider their role in conflict dynamics.

Voir : https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14672715.2018.1487311

  • The evolving narrative of denial: the Fraser government and the Timorese genocide, 1975–1980 by Peter Job

Abstract

As research by the Commission for Reception, Truth and Reconciliation in East Timor documents, the years 1975–1980 constituted the worst period of the Indonesian occupation of East Timor, during which grave human rights took place involving a high loss of life. In Australia, the government headed by Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser (1975–1983) sought to present itself as a supporter of human rights and the international rule of law. It also prioritized relations with the Suharto regime, which it saw as key to its policy position in Southeast Asia. These two positions came into conflict due to the Indonesian invasion of East Timor. The Fraser government therefore worked to propagate a narrative concerning East Timor which denied the seriousness of the situation, distorted the historical narrative, deflected blame from Indonesia, and depicted the Australian position as principled and realistic. This paper examines the development of this narrative as events progressed and information concerning the crisis in East Timor came to the attention of the outside world. It also examines how the Fraser government employed this narrative internationally in order to protect the Suharto regime from scrutiny.

Voir : https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14672715.2018.1489731?journalCode=rcra20

 

CFP : Inside Indonesia special issue (January 2020) : sexualities in Indonesia

CFP : Inside Indonesia Special Issue (January 2020) : Sexualities in Indonesia

Indonesia has experienced enormous change in its relationship to sexuality in the last decade. In 2008, the Pornography Law was passed. In 2016, the ‘LGBT Crisis’ began with hundreds of people arrested for supposedly immoral acts. In 2017, Indonesia’s Constitutional Court narrowly rejected a petition to criminalise all sex outside marriage with a 5/4 vote.

This Special Issue explores Indonesia’s vexed relationship with sexuality and seeks contributions on topics such as:
the pornography law; the LGBT crisis; efforts to change the criminal code; impacts on individuals, groups and social movements; love; marriage; HIV, sexual health; reproduction; education and awareness.

For more information please contact: Sharyn.davies@aut.ac.nz

 

CFP : Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

CFP : Antennae : The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture « Uncontainable natures : Southeast Asian ecologies and visual culture » 

Guest-editors: Kevin Chua, Lucy Davis, and Nora A. Taylor

For this issue of Antennae: Journal of Nature in Visual Culture, the editorial team seeks submissions from writers, artists, curators, and cultural theorists working with nature, ecology, and post-humanistic philosophy in Southeast Asia.

The past few decades have seen a resurgence of forms of containment in Southeast Asia, whether political (new governmental exclusions and repressions) or epistemological (new scientific understandings of nature). More acutely, certain governments and non-governmental organizations have utilized and underwritten a politics of nature, instrumentalizing nature for their own ends. This issue will gather papers and artistic contributions that contest this new reality. How have recent “scientific” understandings of nature in the region reaffirmed capitalism? How is nature uncontained and uncontainable in Southeast Asia?

It is a truism to say that the extended region of Southeast Asia – which encompasses the Western shores of the South China Sea, the Eastern shores of the Indian Ocean and the archipelagoes of Indonesia and the Philippines – has its own diverse yet particular ecologies. Nor is it any surprise to find various permutations of climate disasters and climate crimes in the region, from deforestation, haze, land reclamation, mudslides, to seas of plastic and flooding. This issue will propose new ways of thinking about nature as politically and epistemologically uncontainable, ungovernable, and irreducible. How have artists thought and practiced in interconnected lifeworlds – making ecology (a) practice – via an engagement with regional geographies, cultures and histories? How have artists drawn on indigenous animisms or the colonial production of “nature” to create an eco-politics of the present?

Ultimately, Uncontainable Natures seeks to push against the ever-recurring specter of anthropocentrism. From China to Singapore, technological “fixes” to climate change tend to reinstall human centrality. How have artists and exhibitions critically engaged anthropocentric tropes of colonial natural history or modern representations of the natural world? How have non-human actors intervened in or subverted modern orders of representation? How do pre-modern nonhuman agents or spirit ecosystems animate contemporary art practices in urban Asia? How have artists working with biology and new technologies in Southeast Asia troubled anthropocentric hubris, expanding our understanding of what it means to be human? How have they challenged deep-seated notions of “life,” and questioned capitalistic vitalisms of various kinds? How has our current ecological crisis brought about new porous understandings of the entanglement of nature and culture in the Southeast Asian region?

Topics considered include, but are not limited to:

Climate change, past and present
Political economics of nature
Species loss
Rights to land, air and water
Materialities
Ethno-biologies/botanies/ecologies
Ghosts, spirits, specters
Spirit lives of objects
Feminist, LGBTQ/ intersectional recuperations of ‘traditional’ eco-lore
Non-human ecological agents: animals, plants, mountains, forests, oceans
Ecological ramifications of recent archaeological research (for example the Sulawesi cave paintings) and associated art historical shifts
Non-visual sensual ecologies and knowledges: sonic, haptic, energetic fields
Urban nature cultures
New migrant species, viruses or bacteria
Critical technological interconnectivities
Critical internet ecologies and cosmologies
Science fictional and speculative ecologies
Southeast Asian eco-hack-and-tinkerings
Politics and cultures of waste

Submission guidelines:

Academic essays = length 6000-10000 words
Artists’ portfolio = 5/6 images along with 1000 words max statement/commentary
Interviews = maximum length 8000 words
Fiction = maximum length 8000 words
Roundtable discussions = 5000 words

Deadlines:
Abstracts: August 31st 2018 (Please submit a 350 words abstract along with a CV and one or two images)
Selection process is finalized and feedback sent by: October 31st
Submissions of final pieces: March 31st
Please email any questions to: Giovanni Aloi: Editor in Chief of Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture antennaeproject@gmail.com (www.antennae.org.uk)

Voir: https://www.facebook.com/168701325727/posts/10155283825675728/

Nahdlatul Ulama and the politics trap

« Nahdlatul Ulama and the politics trap » by Greg Fealy, 11 July 2018, New Mandala

At first glance, Indonesia’s largest Islamic organisation, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), has never been in a stronger position. It has a record number of members in cabinet. It enjoys close relations with the president, Joko Widodo (Jokowi), has privileged access to the corridors of power and is the beneficiary of increasingly generous largesse from the state, all of which are boosting the range of services and opportunities that it can provide to its vast membership. NU’s president, Ma’ruf Amin, is also the chairman of the influential Indonesian Ulama Council (MUI) and numerous other senior nahdliyyin (NU members) hold strategic positions in the bureaucracy, state-owned enterprises and the corporate sector. NU’s campaign to promote its “moderate”, culturally embedded Islam Nusantara (Archipelagic Islam) concept has won government endorsement and attracted international attention. In short, NU’s status as the pre-eminent Islamic organisation in Indonesia has never seemed more secure.

A closer look, however, suggests that the organisation’s position is more vulnerable and its future more uncertain than its current exuberant confidence might indicate. Indeed, NU is to an extent emblematic of some of the challenges facing Indonesia’s civil society more broadly. Among these are the increasing influence of conservative views at the grassroots, the hazards of engagement with party politics, and the increasingly blurred boundary between the state and civil society as the latter seeks to capture state resources, and governments seek to co-opt civic organisations such as NU to service their goals.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/nahdlatul-ulama-politics-trap/

2018 Malaysia Update – Regime change in Malaysia: how, why and the future

2018 Malaysia Update – Regime change in Malaysia: how, why and the future, 12 October 2018, Weston Theatre, JG Crawford Building (132), Lennox Crossing, ANU

The ANU Malaysia Institute will hold the 2018 Malaysia Update conference on Friday, 12 October. The conference provides an opportunity to examine the recent momentous changes in Malaysia, including the first regime change since independence in 1957, attempts to establish a new democratic nation, and its regional impact.

The conference will feature world-class expertise from leading academics of Malaysian Studies. Attendees will include academics within the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific, as well as government representatives and policymakers, diplomats, students, and the general public. The aim of the conference is to providing fresh thinking about the ways forward for the study of Malaysian society in scholarship as well as reflect on recent changes in Malaysia’s politics, economics and society which may reflect policy-making decisions.

Speakers include :

  • Meredith Weiss, State University of New York
  • Terence Gomez, University of Malaya
  • Amanda Whiting, The University of Melbourne
  • Vilashini Somiah, IMAN Research
  • Hew Wai Weng, Institute of Malaysian and International Studies, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
  • Serina Rahman, ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore
  • Sophie Lemiere, Harvard University
  • James Chin, University of Tasmania
  • Bridget Welsh, John Cabot University

The full conference program will be available in August. Registration is free but essential via Eventbrite.

Voir : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/cap-events/2018-10-12/2018-malaysia-update-regime-change-malaysia-how-why-and-future