Archives de catégorie : Publication

Publications

LES SULTANATS DU SUD PHILIPPIN UNE HISTOIRE SOCIALE ET CULTURELLE DE L’ISLAMISATION (XVE-XXE SIÈCLES)

Par Elsa CLAVÉ

Frontière orientale du monde islamisé, le Sud philippin a accueilli, entre le XVe et le XXe siècle, deux sultanats (Sulu et Magindanao Buayan) ainsi qu’une confédération musulmane Pat a pengampong ko Ranao). Cet ouvrage retrace l’émergence de ces entités politiques islamisées, en s’attachant à l’étude des changements sociaux et culturels induits par l’adoption de l’islam, religion universelle, aux confins de l’Asie du Sud Est. L’islam philippin y est abord partir des textes produits par ces sociétés islamisées. Ces textes mettent en évidence la circulation d’une culture cosmopolite malaise dans le Sud philippin ainsi que les spécificités locales d’un islam indigénisé.

Vers l’ouvrage 

PUBLICATIONS DU CASE : chapitre ouvrage

Anne-Valérie Schweyer co-écrit avec Tien-Nam Nguyen, Jean-Christophe Burie, Thi-Lan Le, 2021,  « On the Use of Attention in Deep Learning Based Denoising Method for Ancient Cham Inscription Images », DocumentAnalysis and Recognition – ICDAR 2021, 16th International Conference, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 5–10, Proceedings, Part I, p. 400-415, https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-03527339

Indonesia’s troubled minorities

Indonesia’s troubled minorities by Greg Fealy, 13/09/2018, The Sydney Morning Herald

Meiliana, a 44-year-old Buddhist mother of Chinese descent, sat crying in disbelief in a North Sumatra court in late August. The judges had just sentenced her to 18 months’ jail for blasphemy because she complained to a neighbor in 2016 about the ear-splitting volume of amplified calls to prayer from a nearby mosque. Her complaint had sparked violent backlash from local Muslim groups, who had stoned her home, forcing her and her family to flee to another city. They also attacked and seriously damaged twelve Buddhist temples in the area. The same court that sentenced her showed leniency to eight attackers arrested by police, giving them jail terms of just 1-2 months.

Meiliana’s story shone a spotlight on Indonesia’s draconian blasphemy laws and more broadly on how the nation treats its minorities. For a country that presents itself to the world as a moderate Muslim-majority democracy that respects diversity and enjoins religious and ethnic harmony, Indonesia has faced increasing criticism for rising intolerance and sectarianism. Human rights advocates argued that the violent reaction to Meiliana’s mosque complaint and her subsequent jailing are inseparable from the fact that she is from a double minority: Sino-Indonesians comprise less than 4 per cent of the nation and Buddhists less than 2 per cent. The Chinese have long been targets of social unrest, particularly from the majority Muslim community.

Assessing how moderate or intolerant Indonesia is towards its minorities is more difficult to assess than it might first appear. For example, a number of well-regarded non-government organisations annually compile figures on acts of religious intolerance. One such NGO, Setara Institute, recorded 201 breaches of religious freedom across Indonesia in 2017, most of which were directed at Christian, Buddhist, Hindu and Confucian minorities. Viewed in isolation, this is a significant number.

But on the other hand, in a religiously diverse nation of some 250 million people, several hundred cases might suggest that intolerance is relatively rare.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.smh.com.au/national/indonesia-s-troubled-minorities-20180913-p503i6.html

 

The Cell, Exile, and the New Burma: A Political Education amid the Unfinished Journey toward Democracy

« The Cell, Exile, and the New Burma: A Political Education amid the Unfinished Journey toward Democracy » by Kyaw Zwa Moe, Yangon, New Myanmar Publishing House, 2018, 245 p., 27/08/2018, Tea Circle Oxford

David Scott Mathieson explores the new collection of essays by noted journalist Kyaw Zwa Moe, an emotional palimpsest of lives lived under military rule.

There is a painful poignancy to reading Kyaw Zwa Moe’s powerful collection of essays on the 30th Anniversary of the 1988 Uprising in Burma. The Cell, Exile, and the New Burma is an attempt to close a long circle of personal struggle, sacrifice, violence, complexity and inspiration. Yet it is a journey that refuses to reconnect, as if the hopes of 1988 ricocheted off the reality of entrenched military rule.

The Irrawaddy magazine’s editor, columnist and political talk-show host, Kyaw Zwa Moe is one of the most prominent chroniclers of the past three decades of Burma’s political drama. His new book is a timely reminder of recent history and the people who lived it, the lessons imparted should be guides for the present and future. How far along has Burma come, where are many of the people who were involved, and how do they feel about ‘Shwe Myanmar a-thit’ (the new golden Burma)?

His book is arranged in four parts: prison, exile, a series of eclectic personalized profiles of Burmese activists, leaders, and ordinary lives during dictatorship, and the final section on the ‘New Burma’ as the author returns from 12 years of exile in Thailand and reflects on the changes taking place.

Kyaw Zwa Moe was a teenage high-school student when the 1988 anti-government demonstrations surged in 1988 to topple the Socialist one-party rule backed by a ruthless military. He joined them and took to the underground life of activism. First arrested in December 1991 for his underground activities, he spent the next eight years in the notorious Insein and Tharrawaddy prisons.

Lire la suite sur : https://teacircleoxford.com/2018/08/27/the-cell-exile-and-the-new-burma-a-political-education-amid-the-unfinished-journey-toward-democracy-by-kyaw-zwa-moe-yangon-new-myanmar-publishing-house-2018-245-pages/