Archives de catégorie : Vie de la recherche

Pirates lands: Governance and maritime piracy

Seminar : « Pirates lands : Governance and maritime piracy » by Ursula Daxecker, 21 June 2018, KITLV

Abstract
Piracy—like civil war, terrorism, and other organized crime—is a problem of weak and fragile states. But while helpful in identifying the countries most affected by maritime piracy, focusing on the weakness of entire countries does little to further our understanding of why piracy clusters close to some coastal communities but not to others. Our book argues that local governance and infrastructural development help explain pirate location. Pirate operations require substantial upfront investments, aided by proximity to markets and infrastructure. For sophisticated attacks, a group leader or boss provides pirates with a boat, fuel, equipment, and money to bribe officials. We therefore expect that in weak or failed states, pirates will operate in coastal areas where local governance is weak enough to incentivize collusion among pirates and authorities, yet strong enough to ensure that infrastructure and markets are sufficiently developed to permit the organization of sustained piracy. We examine our arguments empirically in quantitative analyses of local governance patterns and piracy in Indonesia. Field research conducted in Indonesia’s Riau Islands helps us to further assess the plausibility of theoretical mechanisms. Interviews with former pirates, community members, and journalists highlight the importance of access to markets and infrastructure for pirate operations, and also provided us with numerous examples of tacit and active collusion by local governance providers and the community.

Speaker
Ursula Daxecker is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam and a member of the Amsterdam Institute of Social Science Research. Her work explores the determinants of election violence and organized crime. She is currently completing a book manuscript on maritime piracy (co-authored with Brandon Prins). She also recently completed a four-year research project collecting disaggregated data on electoral contention and violence funded by the Dutch Science Foundation and the EC’s Marie Curie actions. She is associate editor at European Journal of International Relations and International Interactions. Her work is published in British Journal of Political Science, Journal of Peace Research, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Public Choice, Electoral Studies, among others.

Voir : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/seminar-piracy-riau-ursula-daxecker/

 

Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archives : An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares

Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archives : An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares, 30-31 July 2018, Novotel Manila Araneta Center, Quezon City

We are pleased to inform you that the international journal Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints School of Social Sciences, Ateneo de Manila University and the Southeast Asian Studies Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University are organizing an international conference titled “Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archive: An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares.” It will be held on 30–31 July 2018 at the Novotel Manila Araneta Center Cubao, Quezon City.

In a prolific career spanning five decades, Resil B. Mojares has produced a remarkable body of work that combines meticulous research, incisive analysis, and elegant, lyrical writing.

An exemplary home-grown and -educated activist, intellectual, institution-builder, and man of letters, Mojares has made important, often pioneering, contributions to diverse fields and subjects, ranging from Philippine literature (Origins and Rise of the Filipino Novel: A Generic Study of the Novel until 1940; [co-ed.] the two-volume Sugilanong Sugboanon), architecture (Casa Gorordo in Cebu: Urban Residence in a Philippine Province, 1860–1920), theater and social history (Theater in Society, Society in Theater: Social History of a Cebuano Village, 1840–1940), to intellectual history (Brains of the Nation: Pedro Paterno, T. H. Pardo de Tavera, Isabelo de los Reyes, and the Production of Modern Knowledge), biography (Vicente Sotto: Maverick Senator; The Man Who Would be President: Serging Osmeña and Philippine Politics; Aboitiz: Family and Firm in the Philippines), history and politics (The War Against the Americans: Resistance and Collaboration in Cebu, 1899–1906; [co-ed.] From Marcos to Aquino: Local Perspectives on the Political Transition in the Philippines).

Apart from book-length works, Mojares has also produced occasional essays (collected in House of Memory; Waiting for Mariang Makiling: Essays in Philippine Cultural History; Isabelo’s Archive; The Resil Mojares Reader; and Interrogations in Philippine Cultural History) that have done much to illuminate “what is obscure, hidden, and marginal” in a plurilingual, pluricultural Philippines. His works blur “the boundaries between academic and literary writing,” while simultaneously building on, and questioning, the “idea and performance of the archive—capacious, diverse, makeshift, open-ended, and polymorphic, and one ‘national’ in its motive and ambition” (Mojares, “Writing the Archive,” Manila Review Issue 5, Sept. 2014).

The perspectives Mojares brings to his study of Philippine history, politics, society, culture, and the arts are methodologically eclectic and capable of moving effortlessly between and across local, national, regional (subnational and supranational), and transnational scales.

This international conference celebrates the life, career, and writings of Resil B. Mojares. It aims not only to assess Professor Mojares’s influence, but also to engage with the ideas, issues, and contexts brought up by his writings on and across various fields of inquiry.

This call for participation is addressed to those who wish to attend the conference but not present papers. Interested parties are requested to complete and submit the registration form, and remit their registration fees, on or before 27 July 2017.

For Philippine participants: P5,500
For overseas participants: US$120
On-site registration (30–31 July 2018): P6,000, with no assured conference packet.

For inquiries, please email philstudies.soss@ateneo.edu

Unknown language discovered in Southeast Asia

« Unknown language discovered in Southeast Asia », 06/02/2018, Lund University

A previously unknown language has been found in the Malay Peninsula by linguists from Lund University in Sweden. The language has been given the name Jedek.
“Documentation of endangered minority languages such as Jedek is important, as it provides new insights into human cognition and culture”, says Joanne Yager, doctoral student at Lund University.

“Jedek is not a language spoken by an unknown tribe in the jungle, as you would perhaps imagine, but in a village previously studied by anthropologists. As linguists, we had a different set of questions and found something that the anthropologists missed”, says Niclas Burenhult, Associate Professor of General Linguistics at Lund University, who collected the first linguistic material from Jedek speakers.

The language is an Aslian variety within the Austroasiatic language family and is spoken by 280 people who are settled hunter-gatherers in northern Peninsular Malaysia.

The researchers discovered the language during a language documentation project, Tongues of the Semang, in which they visited several villages to collect language data from different groups who speak Aslian languages.

The discovery of Jedek was made while they were studying the Jahai language in the same area.

“We realised that a large part of the village spoke a different language. They used words, phonemes and grammatical structures that are not used in Jahai. Some of these words suggested a link with other Aslian languages spoken far away in other parts of the Malay Peninsula”, says Joanne Yager.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.lunduniversity.lu.se/article/listen-unknown-language-discovered-in-southeast-asia

Publication: Jedek: a newly discovered Aslian variety of Malaysia

 

Papia Kristang: Documenting and Describing one of Malaysia’s Disappearing Languages

« Papia Kristang: Documenting and Describing one of Malaysia’s Disappearing Languages » by Robert Laub, 07/02/2018, SOAS

Abstract

In the year 1511 Vasco da Gama and the Portuguese arrived in Malacca, one of Asia’s largest trade centres. As the Portuguese took root, intermixing between the Portuguese and locals led to the creation of a mixed community. Holding onto their Catholic faith and Eurasian traditions until today, they also continue to speak their Portuguese-lexified creole language, known as Papia Kristang. My study looks into the morphosyntactic structure of Kristang in relation to its contact languages, Portuguese and Malay, as well as in relation to Makista, the Portuguese-lexified creole of Macau. My research took me to Malacca where I had the opportunity to record native speakers of Kristang to help better understand the language.

Speaker Biography

Robert Laub is a PhD candidate at SOAS in Linguistics. He previously received his MA from SOAS in Language Documentation and Description and wrote his thesis on decreolization in Makista (Macau Creole). His current interests are Luso-Asian creoles, especially the morpho-syntax and how the sociopolitical and sociolinguistic environments help to shape the structure of these languages.

IPPA Conference Hue 2018

22nd Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association Conference, 22 – 28 september 2018, Hue, Vietnam

Liste des sessions :

  • Dispersal Barriers into Southeast Asia during the Late Pleistocene
  • Issues and Creative strategies in archaeological heritage conservation, education, and management
  • Call for Papers: Geoarchaeology in the Asia-Pacific region: current research and future directions – Please forward abstracts to: duke0035@flinders.edu.au
  • Transmission, Transportation and Transition: the Flow of Materials and Ideas Around the South China Sea Maritime Region
  • What Happens after You Excavate a Site? – Preliminary Examinations of Archaeological Records for Field Research
  • Maritime Trade with/without Complex Societies in the Indo-Pacific Region
  • Materialising ritual performance in the Australia, Pacific and Asia
  • The History of Archaeology in the Asia-Pacific Region: Learning from our Past
  • Continuously drumming– bronze drums as cultural heritage in contemporary Southeast Asia
  • Ancient Southeast Asian Hindu and Buddhist Art: Supporting Methodological Innovation
  • Migration, Mobility and Burial Practice in East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Western Pacific, 4000 through 2000 Years BP

Pour plus d’informations voir : http://khaocohoc.gov.vn/ippa-hue-2018

Colloquium on Genocide and Politicide in Asia

Colloquium on Genocide and Politicide in Asia, Spring 2018, Asian Studies Center and Peace and Justice Studies, Michigan State University

The Asian Studies Center and Peace and Justice Studies present the Genocide and Politicide in Asia Colloquium, which deepens our knowledge of Southeast Asia as a region from transnational perspectives by bringing outstanding scholars from around the world to the Michigan State University campus in spring 2018. Through lectures based on their cutting-edge research, these scholars will illustrate innovative ways to understand history, culture, society, as well as religion in Southeast Asia beyond national and regional boundaries.

A Time to Kill: Indonesia’s Anti-Leftist Purge in Comparative Perspective by Geoffrey Robinson (UCLA) : 09/02/2018

The Political Economy of Mass Murder: Indonesia’s 1965-1966 Killings and the Cold War by Brad Simpson (University of Connecticut) : 13/03/2018

Indonesia 1965-1966: Crimes, Calamities and the Quest for Accountability by Phelim Kine (Human Rights Watch) : 11/04/2018

Incitement to Mass Murder: the 1965-68 Indonesian Genocide by Saskia Wieringa (University of Amsterdam) : 24/04/2018

 

L’ancien droit siamois, réinterprétation bouddhiste du Code de Manou hindou ?

« L’ancien droit siamois, réinterprétation bouddhiste du Code de Manou hindou ? Réflexions à partir de l’étude des rapports entre royauté et droit » par Eugénie Mérieau, 02/02/2018, Séminaire de l’IAO

C’est par l’intermédiaire des peuples Môns que le droit hindou est parvenu aux peuples bouddhistes du Siam. Le code de Manou inspira, à partir des 14ème – 15ème siècles, le Phra Thammasat siamois, récit des origines du monde, des lois qui le régissent, et des devoirs du roi, ainsi que la Loi du Palais, ordonnant la vie dans l’enceinte du Palais. Jusqu’au début du 20ème siècle, le droit régissant la royauté demeure principalement composé de ces deux textes inspirés du droit hindou. Cette présentation s’attachera à analyser la transposition du droit hindou aux peuples bouddhistes et ses implications en ce qui concerne les rapports entre royauté et droit.

Eugénie Mérieau est post-doctorante auprès de la Chaire de constitutionnalisme comparé de l’Université de Göttingen.

Delta Cities: Rethinking Practices of the Urban

In Situ Graduate School : Delta Cities: Rethinking Practices of the Urban, 10/12/2018 – 15/12/2018, Ho Chi Minh City/Long Xuyen, An Giang

Participation is open to international doctoral students and advanced research master’s students with significant related professional experience from all social science, humanities and natural science disciplines, whose work deals with the theme of the In Situ Graduate School: Delta Cities: Rethinking Practices of the Urban.

Participation is open to PhD students and advanced research masters’ students with significant related professional experience worldwide whose work deals with the theme of the In Situ Graduate School: Media Activism and Postcolonial Futures.

We only accept applications for the In Situ Graduate School via our online application form.

Application forms sent in after the deadline (Thursday 1 March 2018) will not be considered for selection.

Application Procedure:

Prospective candidates are requested to submit the following documents:

  • Online application form
  • A writing sample that addresses the In Situ Graduate School theme (5-10 pages, may be single-spaced)

This sample will be used to select participants for the In Situ Graduate School as well as recipients of financial support, if requested.

All complete applications will be evaluated after the deadline and the selection results will be communicated (via email) before 1 May 2018.

Successful applicants receiving an acceptance letter must formally confirm their participation in the In Situ Graduate School within one month of notification and must pay the registration fee by 1 September 2018. Applicants who fail to send a confirmation email within one month of notification will forfeit their letter of acceptance.

Voir : https://iias.asia/masterclass/delta-cities-application

Southeast Asia meets global challenges

30th ASEAS conference : Southeast Asia meets global challenges, 05/09/2018 – 07/09/2018, Leeds

Conference themes are: Sustainable and Equitable Development; Social Change and Good Governance; Cultural Heritage and Cultural Production. The Call for Panels is now OPEN – deadline 31 January 2018. Please send proposals (max. 300 words) to Dr Janet Cochrane on J.E.Cochrane@leeds.ac.uk.

You don’t need to list all the participants in your panel at this stage, or even know who they will be – all we want is an outline of what your panel will be about. The panels will be publicised starting in February, and you (and others) can submit abstracts for papers from then on.  If you’re fairly new to academia you may be wondering how all this works, so please don’t hesitate to ask if you have any questions! Just drop us an email on J.E.Cochrane@leeds.ac.uk.

Leeds is a vibrant city in the north of England with its own airport and other excellent transport links (it’s 2.5 hours by train from London). More information can be found about the city here – https://www.visitleeds.co.uk/# and about the University of Leeds here – http://www.leeds.ac.uk/

 

Association for Mainland Southeast Asia Scholars (AMSEAS)

« Introducing the Association for Mainland Southeast Asia Scholars (AMSEAS) », 03/01/2018, New Mandala

Looking to connect with an interdisciplinary group of academics who work on Mainland Southeast Asia? The new Association for Mainland Southeast Asia Scholars (known by the acronym AMSEAS) is now accepting applications for membership.

AMSEAS is the first academic association in Australia and New Zealand to focus specifically on Mainland Southeast Asia. It meets a need in sub-regional academic associations and is affiliated with the Asian Studies Association of Australia.

AMSEAS seeks to foster and facilitate opportunities for the advancement of research and knowledge relevant to Mainland Southeast Asia. Recognising the benefits of adopting a multidisciplinary approach and encouraging dialogue between scholars of the individual countries, we promote and support the study of Mainland Southeast Asia. While the primary base of AMSEAS is Australian and New Zealand universities, we also welcome membership from academics, students and researchers from abroad.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/introducing-association-mainland-southeast-asia-scholars-amseas/

 Suivre AMSEAS sur sa page Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AMSEASAustralia/

 

Workshop : Rice in Southeast Asia – past and present

Early Rice Workshop : Rice in Southeast Asia – Past and Present, 4-6 January 2018, Sirindhorn Anthropology Centre

Archaeobotanists! A three-day workshop on human-plant relations has been organized by UCL’s Institute of Archaeology and Silpakorn University. The workshop aims to disseminate information on the Early Rice Project, but also research from scientists and archaeologists working in Southeast Asia. Topics include climate change, human-plant interactions, ethnobotany, and agricultural systems. A one-day practical session on archaeobotanical techniques will take place on the 6th of January for field archaeologists and students who wish to learn the basics of archaeobotanical sampling. Please email sirilucky.k@gmail.com (Sililuck Kantrasri) or criscastillo7@yahoo.com (Cristina Castillo) before the 15th of December if you are interested in attending either the seminar series or the practicals. Places are limited.

Speakers include Jane Carlos (UP Diliman), Cristina Castillo (UCL, Institute of Archaeology, London; Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, Kobe), Akkaneewut Chabangborn (Department of Geology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok), Nigel Chang (College of Arts, Society & Education, James Cook University, Queensland), Michelle S. Eusebio (Archaeological Studies Program, University of the Philippines, Manila; Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Florida), Dorian Fuller (UCL, Institute of Archaeology, London), Thanik Lertcharnrit (Department of Archaeology, Silpakorn University, Bangkok), Nguyen Mai Huong (Institute of Archaeology, Hanoi), Nguyen Thuy Duong (Historical Geology Department, Faculty of Geology, VNU University of Science, Hanoi), Nathsuda Pumijumnong (Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University), Paramita Punwong (Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom; York Institute of Tropical Ecosystems, Environment Department, University of York, York), Rasmi Shoocongdej (Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University, Bangkok), Sasivimon Swangpol (Department of Plant Science, Faculty of Science Mahidol University, Bangkok), Joyce White (Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology, Philadelphia).

Voir: https://www.facebook.com/ISEAArchaeology/photos/a.257018854458060.1073741830.233573613469251/848954788597794/?type=3&theater

CALL FOR PAPERS  for a joint meeting of The Asian Society of the History of Médicine (9th meeting) and HOMSEA (History of Medicine in Southeast Asia) to be held in Jakarta, Indonesia, June 27-30, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS 

for a joint meeting of The Asian Society of the History of Médicine (9th meeting) and HOMSEA (History of Medicine in Southeast Asia)

to be held in Jakarta, Indonesia, June 27-30, 2018

Theme: Colonial Medicine after Decolonisation: Continuity, Transition, and Change

Deadline for submission: 1 February 2018

Notification of acceptance will be given by 1 March 2018.

 Guidelines for Submission: Submissions on all topics related to the history of medicine in Asia are welcome; submissions related to the conference theme are especially encouraged. Participants can submit full panels (2, 3, or 4 papers) as well as individual papers. Paper proposals (title, author, and an abstract in English of no more than 200 words) and a1-page curriculum vitae or panel proposals (a panel proposing of no more than 200 words with abstracts and 1-page CVs of all participants) should be sent by electronic mail to James Dunk (james.dunk@sydney.edu.au). The program committee reserves the right to suggest changes and revisions to abstracts and panel proposals.

 

Program committee: Dr Harry Yi-Jui Wu (Hong Kong); Dr. Ning Jennifer Chang (Taipei); Prof Laurence Monnais (Montreal); A/Prof Hans Pols (Sydney); Dr. Yu-Chuan Wu (Taipei); Dr. Por Heong Hong (Kuala Lumpur); and members of the Local Arrangements Committee.

 

Unfortunately, the ASHM cannot offer funds to defray travel expenses due to budget constraints. There is a range of affordable accommodation available near the conference venue. Participants are encouraged to apply for support from their home departments or institutions.

The conference will be hosted by the Indonesian Academy of Sciences, which is located in the new buildings of the Indonesian National Library in the centre of Jakarta.

Laurence Monnais

Professeur titulaire – Département d’histoire

Directrice – Centre d’Etudes de l’Asie de l’Est (CETASE)

Directrice scientifique – Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal (PUM) http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/

Chercheur – Equipe MEOS http://www.meos.qc.ca/ – Institut de recherche en santé publique de l’Université de Montréal (IRSPUM) http://www.irspum.umontreal.ca/

Call for papers ASHM HOMSEAUniversité de Montréal

C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville

MONTREAL, QC, CANADA H3C 3J7

Tél : 514-343-6544

Panji tales awarded the status of world heritage by UNESCO

Panji tales awarded the status of world heritage by UNESCO

31 October 2017

The unique collection of more than 250 ancient tales revolving around the mythical Javanese Prince Panji, which is curated by Leiden University Libraries (UBL), has been acknowledged as world heritage by UNESCO. The UBL is grateful to UNESCO for this exceptionally prestigious award.

The Leiden collection of Panji tales is included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register, together with similar collections held by the national libraries of Indonesia, Malaysia and Cambodia. The Register contains documentary heritage of outstanding value to the world. UBL already holds two documents included in the UNESCO Register: La Galigo (2011) and Babad Diponegoro (2013). By digitising the Panji tales, they can be made available worldwide via free via open access for research and education. UBL has started a crowdfunding campaign to help digitise the Panji tales.

Mythical prince

Prince Panji is the title character in the popular Panji tales from Java. These stories arem always about a prince and a princess, about love and adventure. They can be rather complex, featuring name changes, masquerades, incarnations and transformations, and may take the form of text or theatre. There are dozens of known Panji tales, written in different languages, such as Javanese-Balinese, Javanese, Malaysian, Balinese, Sasak, Sundanese, Acehnese and Buginese. They originate from Eastern Java and have spread across a large area from Indonesia to Malaysia and from Cambodia to Thailand. They owe their popularity to the flexibility of the story which can be easily adjusted to fit local traditions.

From reading room to online at home

The unique manuscripts come in many different shapes and sizes and are handwritten in several different languages. At the moment, they can only be consulted in the library’s Special Collections reading room. By digitising the Panji tales, we will be able to provide worldwide open access for research and educational purposes. The study of these texts has led to many new insights about Southeast Asian history, literature and culture.

Crowdfunding

Digitising ancient manuscripts is expensive and time-consuming. With financial support from the public, these Panji tales can now be made accessible. A special Panji-website has been set up for the crowdfunding campaign. The website provides background information, including a film by Panji expert Dr Roger Tol, and offers the possibility to make donations to help digitise these manuscripts.

Panji Tales – Make Prince Panji digital!

8th LUCIS Annual Conference | Islamic Visualities and In/Visibilities: Reimagining Public Citizenship?

8th LUCIS Annual Conference | Islamic Visualities and In/Visibilities: Reimagining Public Citizenship?

Date
13 December 2017 – 15 December 2017
Address
Gravensteen Building
Pieterskerkhof 6
2311 SR Leiden

From Wednesday 13 until Friday 15 December 2017, the 8th annual conference of LUCIS will take place in Leiden. This year’s theme is Islamic Visualities and In/Visibilities: Reimagining Public Citizenship? Our keynote speaker is James Hoesterey from Emory University. The conference will take place in multiple locations of the Gravensteen Building. For more information, please consult the programme.

About the conference

This conference invites speakers from different disciplines to reflect on images as sites of religious inspiration, contestation, and imagination among Muslims in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The conference brings into conversation different aspects of the relationship between Islam and (ideas about) visuality.

What is the impact of images, visual communication, and the emergence of (new) visual cultures on the ways in which Islam is practiced, experienced, and interpreted? How do processes of religious change, such as the so-called Islamic revival, affect ways of seeing and ideas about what may and what may not be seen, and by whom?

These questions are increasingly urgent in an era of visual excess, in which the questioning and fragmentation of traditional religious authority goes hand in hand with the emergence of new Islamic visualities, and in which images of Islam are increasingly prolific in public spaces in both Muslim-majority and minority settings, drawing a variety of responses.

At the same time, we see this conference as an opportunity to discuss and evaluate much needed methodological and conceptual innovation in the study of Islam, which remains until this day dominated by an emphasis on oral and textual traditions and often passes over the everyday visual practices that are equally part of the religious lives of Muslims. How might the study of Islam benefit (more) from the turn to the visual in the humanities and the social sciences? What possibilities, practices, problems, questions, techniques, and agendas have arisen from this turn, and how can they help advance the study of Islam?

We approach these questions by focusing on practices of image-making. Islamic visualities, in our approach, comprise images and ways of seeing that are charged with religious meaning, as well as images and ways of seeing that bear on the image of the Islamic religion or culture as a whole. The concept of image-making – referring to the creativity and agency vested in the creation of images as well as the practices, relationships, and politics that inform the way in which “Islam” is seen – provides a fruitful starting point for the study of Islamic visualities and their impact on people and societies throughout the world.

Our goal is not to replace a “textual” approach by one that is “visual” in orientation. Instead, speakers are encouraged to take into account the mutuality of visual and verbal/textual traditions and its analysis. The setup of this conference thus serves to address a broad range of possibilities, creativities, contradictions, and tensions associated with Islamic visualities.

Keynote speaker

James Hoesterey (Emory University) on Digital Duplicity: Piety, Scandal, and the (Un)making of Islamism in Indonesia.

le site de la conférence

Symposium: Tradition and Contemporaneity in the Arts of Asia

Symposium: Tradition and Contemporaneity in the Arts of Asia, 09/11/2017, Department of Art & Art History, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

About the Talk

Modern and contemporary artists in Asia have had to cope with many challenges, from the influx of Western artistic priorities often intent on redefining or even erasing local artistic traditions, to the wholesale destruction of national infrastructure through unstable political systems and devastating wars. That artists have successfully risen to these challenges, as well as the resilience of local artistic systems and values, is eminently manifest in the vibrant contemporary arts of Asia today.

This symposium will explore the inspirational potential of traditional materials, methods, and styles of art making among modern and contemporary artists of India, China, Korea, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Thailand. It will feature illustrated presentations by three eminent scholars of modern and contemporary Asian art, followed by a moderated discussion, all focusing on the various ways regional “traditions” of art and culture function as inspiration, catalyst, or foil, some times honoring them, other times contrasting and even undermining them, often with humorous or ironic intent.

Speakers & Presentation Titles

headshot of Joan Kee

Joan Kee, “Tradition as ‘Contemporaneity’s Raw Materials’: Korea, China, and the Philippines”
Kee is an art historian specializing in art and law, with special research focus on modern and contemporary East and Southeast Asian art. She teaches at the University of Michigan, where she is Associate Professor in the History of Art. She is author of Contemporary Korean Art: Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method (2013), curated the exhibition From All Sides: Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method (2014), and serves as contributing editor to Artforum.

headshot of Sonal Khullar

Sonal Khullar, “The Pearl Divers and Shipwrecks of Marine Drive: History, Tradition, and Modernism in India.” Khullar is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Washington. Her research focus is on Indian art of the eighteenth century to the present, with additional teaching and research interests in transnational histories of art, feminist theory, and postcolonial studies. Publications include the award-winning Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930-1990 (2015).

Headshot of Iola Lenzi

Iola Lenzi, ““Not Nostalgia: How Tradition is Critically Co-opted in Thai and Vietnamese Contemporary Art” Lenzi is a Singapore-based curator, lecturer, and critic specializing in contemporary arts of Southeast Asia. She has curated exhibitions in in Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta and Bangkok, serves as lecturer for the Asian Art Histories MA program at Lasalle College, Singapore, and as regional correspondent for Asian Art, London. She is author of Museums of Southeast Asia (2005).

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.cseashawaii.org/event/symposium-tradition-and-contemporaneity-in-the-arts-of-asia/