Archives de catégorie : Appels à contribution

CFP : The Rohingya Crisis : A Multidimensional Tragedy

CFP : The Rohingya Crisis : A Multidimensional Tragedy, 24/08/2018, Asia Centre Bangkok

The Rohingya Crisis sparked by the 25 August 2017 attacks on Government forces by Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) in Rakhine State, Myanmar, triggered one of the worst humanitarian crises in contemporary history – “a textbook case of ethnic cleansing”. In a matter of a few months over 750,000 Rohingya people, mostly women and children, fled to Bangladesh. Five months later, as of 23 January 2018, the Rohingya were subjected to a repatriation agreement between Bangladesh and Myanmar that was postponed. The current human rights discourse centers on pointing out the discrimination practices against the Rohingyas, the failure of moral leadership previously embodied in Aung San Suu Kyi, the impotence of ASEAN, the need for accountability for atrocities committed by the Myanmar military and the determination of voluntariness when the Rohingya refugees are repatriated. This call invites contributions that go beyond and delve deeper into this multidimensional tragedy. It is an opportunity for researchers who have been investigating different aspects of the crisis to highlight their work. Researchers of selected papers will be invited to participate in a 1 day conference in Bangkok, to mark the anniversary of one of the largest humanitarian catastrophes in Southeast Asia. Selected papers will be compiled and published as an edited volume.

Key Themes: Papers will address critical issues spanning the following themes
ARSA : Unpack ARSA’s role in the crisis
Development: Evaluate economic growth’s role for values change
Elites: Dissect the elites’ conflicting interests
Fake News: Examine the role of misinformation in generating violence
Geopolitics: Capture the external global and regional power dimensions
Hosts: Examine the role of Bangladesh and other destination countries
Human Trafficking: Identify illicit networks and their exploitative practices
Identity: Sketch the competing ethnic and religious political positions
Prejudice: Explain the inflexible attitudes against the Rohingyas
Rakhine Perspective: Articulate the majority-minority dimensions
SGBV: Analyse the different sexual and gender based violence

Submission Guidelines
Submit your abstract (and eventual final papers) to: contact@asiacentre.co.th

An initial 300 word abstract should be sent to Dr. James Gomez and Dr. Robin Ramcharan by 28 February 2018. Full papers will be due by 1 June 2018 and will be peer reviewed. Research articles should be between 5,000 to 6,000 words (incl. footnotes and references).

Project Coordination
As part of this project, a coordination meeting with selected authors is scheduled at Asia Centre, Bangkok, for 24 August 2018, marking the one year anniversary of the attacks by ARSA in Rakhine State. The meeting shall take stock of the latest developments and finalize the selected papers. Authors will thereafter revise their papers, which shall be submitted to the publisher on 1 October 2018.

Project Financing
This is a self-funded project. Hence, each participant is requested to contribute US$ 300 net, which will cover the costs of the meeting, catering, communication as well as editorial costs. Authors shall secure their own funds for travel, daily subsistence and accommodation while in Bangkok.

Registration
All keynote speakers, presenters and participants are required to complete the Conference Registration Form and submit at the time of abstract submission and/or application to participate. The Registration Form is available at the event website at https://asiacentre.co.th/event/the-rohingya-crisis-a-multidimensional-tragedy/

Important Dates
Abstract Submission: 30 June 2018
Abstract Acceptance: notification within three days of submission
Payment of conference fees: upon acceptance of abstract
Full paper submission: latest 31 July 2018
Please contact the Events Coordinator at research@asiacentre.co.th if you need an extension or are not able to produce a full paper in time for the conference

Visit the Call for Papers for more information: https://asiacentre.co.th/event/the-rohingya-crisis-a-multidimensional-tragedy/

Enquiries: contact@asiacentre.co.th

CFP : Council on Thai Studies Conference

CFP : Council on Thai Studies Conference, 12-14 October 2018 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Abstracts due by 1 August.

We are honored that this year’s keynote speaker will be Dr Puangthong Pawakapan, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Political Science at Chulalongkorn University and 2018-2019 Harvard-Yenching Fellow. She will speak on “Development and Impact of the Thai Military’s Political Offensive.”

COTS, established in 1972, is a consortium of universities with a particular interest in Thai Studies.

The annual COTS meeting is designed to provide scholars, students, and practitioners with opportunities to present both preliminary and more developed research analysis and reflections, primarily in the social sciences and humanities, related to Thai Studies.
Key information:
· Dates: 12-14 October 2018; conference will begin at noon on the afternoon of Friday, 12 October.
· Location: Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), University of Wisconsin-Madison, 206 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706

· Deadline for proposals for presentations: 1 August 2018
· The organizers welcome proposals for individual paper presentations, panels of papers, roundtable discussions, film screenings and other formats as suggested by participants. For individual paper presentations and films, please send an abstract (250 words). For roundtable discussions, please send an abstract (250 words) and list of participants. For panels of papers, please send an abstract of the panel (250 words) as well as abstracts of the individual papers.

Questions and proposal submissions should be sent to Tyrell Haberkorn, tyrell.haberkorn@wisc.edu (Chair, COTS 2018).

Plus d’informations sur : https://seasia.wisc.edu/home-page/event/cots/

10th Engaging with Vietnam : an interdisciplinary dialogue conference

10th Engaging with Vietnam : an interdisciplinary dialogue conference

Dichotomies in Knowledge Production: Vietnam through the Multiple Lenses of ‘Self-and-Other’

15-21 December 2018, Ho Chi Minh City & Khanh Hoa Province, Vietnam
Part 1: 15-16 December, Ho Chi Minh City
Part 2: 17 December, HCMC – Nha Trang City, Khanh Hoa (by express train)

Part 3: 17-21 December, Khanh Hoa Province

Co-organizers: University of Hawaii at Manoa – USA, University of Social Sciences and Humanities – Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City

2018 marks a milestone for Engaging With Vietnam – its 10th anniversary. We would like to invite you to the 10th Engaging With Vietnam Conference to experience another stimulating and enriching gathering that will take place all the way from Ho Chi Minh City to Khanh Hoa, a coastal province in Central Vietnam. A ride on an express train between the two cities promises a pleasant trip with amazing scenery that will stimulate both reflections and conversations. We are very delighted to have this opportunity to continue to tour Vietnam with the 10th conference participants. The conference venue in Khanh Hoa is right by the beach. How wonderful to engage in meaningful and rigorous academic sessions while being refreshed with ocean breezes and blue water!

To continue its interdisciplinary engagement, this 10th conference focuses in particular on dichotomies, the dichotomization of knowledge, and the discursive constructions of dichotomies in Vietnam-related knowledge production and scholarship. Dichotomies and dichotomization often come in the form of ‘Self and Other’ and/or in pairs of contrasts, such as ‘global – local’, ‘traditional – modern’, ‘Western values – Asian values’, ‘Vietnamese women – foreign women’, ‘nationalism – cosmopolitanism’, ‘developed – underdeveloped/developing’, ‘urban – rural’, ‘privileged – disadvantaged’, ‘active – passive’, ‘critical thinking – passive and rote learning’, ‘Global North – Global South’, and ‘Vietnam – ASEAN’, etc.

Continuer la lecture de 10th Engaging with Vietnam : an interdisciplinary dialogue conference

AAS CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR THE 2019 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

CFP :  AAS Annual Conference, 21-24 March 2019, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel in Denver, Colorado

On behalf of the Program Committee for the Association for Asian Studies, I am pleased to issue the Call for Proposals for the AAS Annual Conference to be held March 21-24, 2019 at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel in Denver, Colorado.

We are pleased to invite colleagues in Asian studies to submit proposals for Organized Panels, Roundtables, and Workshop sessions, in addition to Individual Papers proposals for the committees consideration. The program committee seeks sessions that will engage panelists and audiences in the consideration of ideas, information, and interpretations that will advance knowledge about Asian regions and, by extension, will enrich teaching about Asia at all levels. AAS Membership is not a requirement for the submission of a proposal or participation.

We have updated our Call for Proposals related webpages to try and make this process as simple and clear as possible. Please see the three-step guide below to start your submission process. The deadline for submission of all proposals and Late Developing Countries (LDC) travel grant requests is Wednesday, August 1 at 5pm Eastern Time. All proposals must be submitted electronically via the AAS electronic submission application. We will not accept proposals submitted via email. This proposal submission application will be available for submissions beginning Tuesday, May 29 through Wednesday, August 1, 2018. After the submission deadline, your proposal will be forwarded to the appropriate program committee members for review. You will find detailed instructions via the sections listed in the right hand column on this screen.

If you have any questions regarding panel participation or proposal submissions that are not answered in this Call for Proposals or the FAQ’s, please contact the AAS secretariat at AASconference@asian-studies.org.

We look forward to an exciting and intellectually stimulating conference in the mile high city of Denver that reflects the dynamism of Asian studies and the AAS.

Voir : http://www.asian-studies.org/Conferences/AAS-Annual-Conference/Conference-Menu/CALL-FOR-PROPOSALS/CFP-2019-Home

CFP : Vietnam Update 2018

CFP : Vietnam Update 2018, 12-13 November, Australian National University

The Vietnam Update in 2018 will be held from 12-13 November at the Australian National University. Conference Themes: Environment Society and Culture International Relations International Trade and Investment

Proposals for this Update should be no longer than 300 words, with final papers to be no longer than 8,000 words (including references). Priority will be given to papers based on original, unpublished research focusing on Vietnam and its relationships with regional neighbours and institutions across the four themes outlined above. The Update is expected to result in a publication of the papers. Proposals for papers are accepted on the understanding the Update organisers will have first right of refusal for papers accepted for presentation at the conference. Proposals must be submitted to Elizabeth St George (elizabethstgeorge@outlook.com), Conference convenor, by 20 June 2018. Final papers must be submitted by 30 October 2018.

 

CFP : Global Labor Migration: Past and Present

CFP : Global Labor Migration: Past and Present, 20-22 June 2019, The International Institute for Social History,  Amsterdam

About

Labor migration is a vast, global, and highly fluid phenomenon in the 21st century, capturing public attention and driving political controversy.  There are more labor migrants working in areas beyond their birth country or region than ever before.  Although scattered across the social ladder, migrant workers have always clustered, at least initially, in the bottom rungs of the working class.  Even as cross-border or inter-regional movement may beckon as a source of hope and new opportunity, the experience for the migrants and their families is often fraught with peril.  Labor migrants are vulnerable: they are exploited more easily by recruiters and employers, and are less likely to benefit from union representation.  They often face arrest or deportation when attempting to fight for their rights, and are bound to special documents that limit their ability to change jobs.  Moreover, as recent history reminds us, host-country fears directed towards labor migrants can also spark larger political movements characterized by nativist, racist, or even outright fascist tendencies.  Clearly, there is a need to combat fear with understanding and to reach for improved global regulations and standards to protect the rights and welfare of migrants alongside those of host country working people.

Because today global labor migration is shaping the lives of millions, and because it is receiving unprecedented attention by scholars, the newly-formed Global Labor Migration Network (GLMN) is currently planning for a Global Labor Migration Summit to take place in Amsterdam in summer 2019.  Involving scholars and activists from diverse parts of the globe and drawing on a wide variety of disciplines–including history, sociology, anthropology, ethnic studies, women and gender studies, public health, law and public policy–this project will bring international attention to one of the world’s most pressing issues, generate scholarly dialogue and new research agendas, and propose policies that can improve conditions for migrants.  The conference will also include a range of presentation formats: brief papers, roundtables, and open conversations.

Our keynote speakers for the conference have been announced! They are Donna Gabaccia of the University of Toronto and Bridget Anderson of the University of Bristol.

Continuer la lecture de CFP : Global Labor Migration: Past and Present

CFP : Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

CFP : Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

Rising Voices in Southeast Asian Studies – A SEAC / AAS Initiative with support from the journal, TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia

Submission Deadline: 15 June 2018

The Southeast Asia Council (SEAC) of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) is seeking paper proposals from up-and-coming scholars to join a “Rising Voices” panel on the broad topic of “Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia.” We seek to recruit early career scholars from Southeast Asian countries in order to form a panel for eventual inclusion in the 2019 Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies, to be held in Denver, CO from March 21-24, 2019.

The panel will be chaired by Dr. Nam C. Kim, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Once paper presenters have been selected, the chair, along with Dr. Oona Paredes, Assistant Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, will assist the panelists in preparing a panel abstract, facilitate revision of individual paper proposals, and offer mentoring and networking support to the panel participants, as needed.

With financial support from the AAS and the journal TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia, SEAC will be able to offer modest travel support to certain members of the panel with demonstrated need in traveling to the conference from Southeast Asia. It is hoped that participation in the panel will also enable scholars to obtain funding from other sources, including the individual country groups at AAS, as well as their home institutions, to stay for the whole conference. Once the panel is formed, the organizers will also make every effort to help panelists seek additional funding on the basis of demonstrated need. Upon completion of the conference, authors will be encouraged to submit their papers to TRaNS for potential publication, subject to peer-review.

Continuer la lecture de CFP : Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

CFP : Forest and Society

CFP : Special Section @ The economies, ecologies and politics of social forestry in Indonesia: Current issues and emerging trends

After decades of advocacy for a greater role of local communities in the management of natural resources, social forestry has become a central policy commitment of the Indonesian government. At the national level, President Joko Widodo’s administration has committed to expanding social forestry areas to 12.7 million hectares to local community management by 2019. Such policy commitments emerged in response to the growing pressure from land conflicts, and a long struggle by advocacy groups to support recognition of rights and agrarian reform. These regulatory changes also represent major policy breakthroughs for more progressive governance strategies in support of social justice, equitable development practices, and better natural resource management. However, studies on the implementation of social forestry policy in the past remain inconclusive. Furthermore, the policy application is proceeding rapidly faster than the evaluative opportunity that research can provide.

The numerous social forestry permits being signed across Indonesia provide a timely area of inquiry. Evidence-based studies are still lacking on the processes and effects of the current policy imperative. Can social forestry achieve its promise of alleviating poverty, empowering communities and improving forest governance? And if so, in what ways? Additionally, few studies are available on the role of social forestry in responding to the broader and more contemporary issues such as climate change mitigation and adaptation, forest landscape and peatland restoration, global demands for sustainable value chains, timber legality, green economy, and upcoming initiatives on ASEAN economic integration.

Forest and Society is therefore initiating the first of its series on emerging trends of social forestry across Southeast Asia by examining dynamics taking place in Indonesia. The primary aim is to take stock of evidence on the rapid implementation of social forestry permits across Indonesia and to promote knowledge on the realities, achievements, challenges and pathways to sustainable strategies for the future. We invite authors from academics, researchers, students, concerned citizens, policy makers and forestry practitioners to contribute original research, on a range of methods (quantitative, qualitative, and mixed), to improve our collective understanding of social forestry in Indonesia. We invite paper submissions on politics, ecology, economy and culture. We also welcome research approaches at various scales, including review articles that take on a macro perspective or rich contextual studies of site-specific experiences, as well as comparative approaches across sites.

Submission Guidelines

Tentative publication schedule:

  • Submission     : May 2018 – August 2018
  • Peer Review    : Since submitted until October 2018
  • Publishing       : November 2018

For further information, read the full instruction for authors as well as the template: here, or submit your paper via the journal’s online submission site: here 

Please contact for any queries at

Voir : http://journal.unhas.ac.id/index.php/fs/index

 

 

CFP : Pratu

CFP : Pratu : Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia

Pratu: Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia is the initiative of a group of research students in the Department of History of Art and Archaeology at SOAS University of London in collaboration with departmental mentors. The journal is funded by the Alphawood Foundation, under the auspices of the Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme (SAAAP). The student editorial group works closely with an advisory group formed of members of SAAAP’s Research & Publications Committee.

Pratu is conceived as a site for emerging scholars to publish new research on the ancient to premodern Buddhist and Hindu visual and material culture of Southeast Asia. The journal’s remit adheres to that of SAAAP itself, covering ‘study of the built environment, sculpture, painting, illustrated texts, textiles and other tangible or visual representations, along with the written word related to these, and archaeological, museum and cultural heritage’.

Pratu means ‘gateway’ or ‘entrance’ in several Southeast Asian languages. The salience of the term for our project lies in its etymological development, where the application of Khmer morphology to Tai terminology to name architectural structures of Indic fame betrays the complexity of the historical evolution of Southeast Asian Buddhist and Hindu traditions. The journal is a gateway: a space of access and transition that reflects our aim to facilitate new scholars’ first experiences with academic publishing as they move from student to early career researcher status. This includes Southeast Asian scholars who would like to reach a wider readership by publishing in English translation and benefitting from the peer-review process. In this way Pratu offers greater exposure to scholars and new research, and furthers the development of inter-institutional and international collaboration.

Call for Papers:

Pratu: Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia, inaugural issue, January 2019.

Deadline: 30 June 2018

Download the CFP

Site de la revue : https://pratujournal.org/

CFP : Sustainable Transboundary Governance of the Environmental Commons in Southeast Asia

CFP : Sustainable Transboundary Governance of the Environmental Commons in Southeast Asia, 01-02/ 11/2018, Asia Research Institute, NUS, Singapore

Organisers : Michelle Miller, Jonathan Rigg , David Taylor

Submission deadline : 15 june 2018

Organised by the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore; supported by SSRC grant on Sustainable Governance of Transboundary Environmental Commons in Southeast Asia (MOE2016-SSRTG-068), and in collaboration with the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre.

Economic integration and resource interdependencies in a rapidly urbanising and increasingly middle class Southeast Asia are bringing to the political fore questions about how to sustainably govern common pool resources. As the development interests of Southeast Asian countries and their transnational partners, together with the political cultures that characterize ASEAN, come into growing tension with environmental agendas, the problem of transboundary environmental governance is being heightened by climatic instability and ever more frequent and costly disasters that cannot be neatly contained within nation-states, such as atmospheric pollution (regionally known as “haze”), wildfires, droughts and floods. These trends highlight both the shortcomings of existing transboundary environmental governance regimes and the “ASEAN way”, bringing attention to the need to forge more comprehensive and inclusive pathways to planning, managing and implementing policies for sustainable development within and beyond Southeast Asia.

Continuer la lecture de CFP : Sustainable Transboundary Governance of the Environmental Commons in Southeast Asia

Lee Kong Chian Research Fellowship – Singapor

Lee Kong Chian Research Fellowship

The Lee Kong Chian (LKC) Research Fellowship aims to facilitate new research and publishing about Singapore and Southeast Asian culture, economy and heritage. This will enrich the Southeast Asia-centric collections and resources of the Lee Kong Chian Reference Library at the National Library of Singapore (NLS) and the National Archives of Singapore (NAS).

We welcome talented scholars and researchers to use our resources and services, and to collaborate with us on joint research projects to create new knowledge.

Research Area

Preference is given to the following fields of research for 2018:

  • Early printing history in Singapore – relating to Malay press and colonial history
  • Peranakan literary works – literature in Malay by the Straits Chinese of Singapore and Malaysia
  • Critical inquiry on Singapore contemporary literature/ writers (or any art genres) post 1965
  • Comparative studies between colonial and post-independence Singapore and/or Southeast Asia
  • Social history of Singapore from the mid-19th century to the early 20th century through legal documents of the Koh Seow Chuan Collection
  • Study of Japanese occupation through the Lim Shao Bin collection
  • Business history through the use of NLS’s donor collections
  • Early textbooks in twentieth century Singapore
  • Asian diaspora in the Southeast Asia with special reference to Singapore, Malaysia & Indonesia
  • Study of colonial governors and administrators in Singapore
  • Maritime development in early Singapore
  • Social history of early communities in Singapore
  • Early land transaction in Singapore
  • Singapore music
  • In-depth study or comparative study of early Singapore newspapers
  • Study of the Royal Air Force Seletar Association archives from the NAS collections
  • Research on Chinese dialect group using the oral history collection
  • Social history of Singapore through NLS’s photographs collection (from donors and private collections from NLS and NAS)

Who Can Apply?

The LKC Research Fellowship is open to both local and foreign applicants who are able to undertake prescribed research topics that raise awareness of our collections. Successful applicants should have scholarly and research credentials or their equivalent. Applicants could be curators, historians, academics or independent researchers who should preferably have an established record of achievement in their chosen field of research and the potential to excel further.

Terms of the Award

The award of the Fellowship is for a period of six months.

A stipend of up to a maximum of S$2,000 per month will be provided to help LKC Research Fellows meet living expenses, local transportation and photocopying expenses.

In addition to the stipend, overseas Fellows will be provided with a one-time relocation package of $1,500, a one-time return airfare of up to $1500 (reimbursement basis), and monthly accommodation allowance of up to $2,500 (reimbursement basis).

For foreign applicants, please click here to download a guide for overseas candidates.

For further information/How to Apply, please click here for more details.

Applications should be emailed to LKCRF@nlb.gov.sg or mailed to the following address by 27 April 2018.

Attn: The Administrator

Lee Kong Chian Research Fellowship
National Library Headquarters
National Library Board
100 Victoria Street,
#14-01
Singapore 188064

Late or incomplete applications will not be accepted. Notification of acceptance or rejection will be made known within 3 months of the closing date.

For further information about the Fellowship, please contact:

The Administrator, Lee Kong Chian Research Fellowship
Tel: 6718 3247
Email: LKCRF@nlb.gov.sg

Call for papers : « Civil Society and Authoritarianism in Cold War Southeast Asia » [Leeds, septembre 2018]

« Civil Society and Authoritarianism in Cold War Southeast Asia, »

at the United Kingdom Association of Southeast Asian Studies annual conference at the University of Leeds, from September 5 to 7, 2018.

Paper proposals on Vietnam are especially welcome, but please pass on this announcement to any colleagues working on relevant topics from any part of Southeast Asia.

Proposal abstracts of approx. 250 words should be submitted to Sean Fear at s.fear@leeds.ac.uk by May 31, 2018.

The recent history of Southeast Asia has long been understood in the popular imagination through the lens of the Cold War; indeed, even the term “Southeast Asia” itself became prominent as a strategic geographical designation by Allied forces during the Second World War and its aftermath. But although somewhat subsumed in English-language scholarship by events such as the U.S.-Soviet rivalry or the Vietnam War, the region’s postwar history has been characterised by complex relations between authoritarian governments and a range of civil society groups. Far from superpower proxies, both governments and opposition repurposed and exploited Cold War rhetoric and foreign intervention to pursue domestic political ends.

Growing access to local archives, however, has contributed to new research which challenges previous superpower-driven narratives, and highlights local agency. This panel builds on these  promising lines of inquiry by exploring the complex and evolving relationship between state and civil society in Cold War Southeast Asia. We welcome papers which focus on the impact of international or transnational networks; the mobility of people and information; the rise of grassroots political and religious movements; the role of authoritarian government; political journalism; or the impact of the environment on political and social change, among other themes.

The full panel outline is available here and information about ASEAS-UK and the Leeds conference can be found here.

A small travel stipend can be available for travel within the UK. Please feel free to contact Sean Fear for more information, or if you have any questions.

ASEAS Conference : Discourses of development in Laos

Here is an abstract for a panel co-convened by Phill Wilcox (University of London) and Sonemany Nigole (Université Libre de Bruxelles) at the ASEAS conference, which will be held at the University of Leeds on September 5-7 this year:

http://www.polis.leeds.ac.uk/events/2018/conference-of-the-association-of-southeast-asian-studies-aseas-southeast-asia-meets-global-challenges

Discourses of development in Laos

Sonemany Nigole, Laboratoire d’Anthropologie des Mondes Contemporaines, Université Libre de Bruxelles  sonemany.nigole@gmail.com
Phill Wilcox, Anthropology Department, Goldsmiths, University of London

phillwilcox@hotmail.com

What does it mean to be one of the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) in the world? This status, created by the United Nations (UN) in 1971, counts within its members the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, which has intended to depart from LDC status since 1996 (the new exit target is by 2030). Meeting the objectives of the UN Millennium Development Goals is a preoccupation of the Lao authorities and an often-repeated statement across the country in official discourse. To whom is this rhetoric addressed? Moreover, how to fulfill these objectives and at the same time meet the goals of other public or private institutions (ASEAN, Foreign Direct Investment from China, Vietnam and Thailand) in which Laos is similarly engaged?

Laos has been “under an Aid Regime” for numerous years, yet the LDC status also carries with it certain advantages such as receiving help for international trade, for debt reduction, and public assistance for development. Therefore, what does “development” mean for the actors of change (Lao State, officials, NGO and international cooperation members, funders, beneficiaries, etc.)? What does it produce in terms of legitimacy, national identity and policies?

This panel takes these broad themes as its starting point, exploring what is meant by development and modernity in Laos, agendas of development from different points of view, who the various actors and agents of change are, the uniqueness (or not) of the context, and the implications and consequences of development programs and initiatives within and beyond Laos.

Format for Abstracts: 

Please submit your abstracts as a Word document with the following format: Title of abstract, Your name, institution & email address, Body of abstract (max. 250 words).

If you are interested please contact us before the 15th of Maysonemany.nigole@gmail.com or phillwilcox@hotmail.com

 

CFP : Genocide after 1948: 70 Years of Genocide Convention

CFP : Genocide after 1948: 70 Years of Genocide Convention, 7-8 December 2018, NIOD Amsterdam / Utrecht University

On 9 December 1948, the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Despite this commitment to prevent genocide and punish its perpetrators, several cases of genocide have occurred since, e.g. in Asia, Africa, and the European mainland itself. Millions of people have been categorically murdered on account of their real or perceived group identity – national, ethnic, racial, religious, political. What kind of impact(s) did the Convention have, and what type of changes were relevant in the postwar period? This multi-disciplinary conference will bring together historians, social scientists, and others, to explore the causes, courses, and consequences of genocide from a global perspective. The conference acknowledges the differences between genocide as a legal, historical, and social-scientific concept, and intends to include a variety of approaches.

We welcome papers on different cases across continents and decades, as well as critical issues that relate to mass violence, including, but not limited to, for example, the context of post-colonialism, the context of the Cold War and the contemporary context; the context of war, civil war and insurgency; intrastate power dynamics and political polarization; forms and institutions of violence; political economy, demography, ecology and geography; ideology, nationalism and identity politics; perpetration and individual perpetrators, victims and third parties; democratization; non-state actors.

The conference will consist of six main themes:

  • The concept of genocide and international law
  • (Civil) war and genocide
  • Perpetration
  • Genocide in Asia
  • Genocide in the Middle East
  • Genocide in Africa

We encourage both theoretical and empirical submissions. The conference will consist of a combination of formats, including pre-circulated paper sessions, public events, and book panels.

Abstracts for papers or panels (max 300 words) including a short biographical statement (max 100 words) can be submitted by 1 May 2018 to: genocideconference2018@niod.knaw.nl

Voir: https://networks.hnet.org/node/22055/discussions/1353629/cfp-genocide-after-1948-70-years-genocide-convention

CFP : Value, values and religion in the contemporary world

CFP : Value, values and religion in the contemporary world, 24-25 May 2018, The Center for Contemporary Buddhist Studies, University of Copenhagen

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 1 March 2018

This workshop seeks to engage with a seeming resurgence of interest in theories of value. In studies of religion, value has generally been used in the sociological sense of ideas about the good and desirable (religious/cultural values), a field of study recently revitalised by Joel Robbins. Value in the economic sense of ‘price mechanism’ (Graeber) has been employed analogically to uncover the economic workings of religion, for example in concepts such as symbolic value and the religious marketplace. However, economistic dimensions of religion are often assumed to be antithetical to religious values, particularly in analyses of religion and consumer society (Carette and King). We seek to question this assumption through discussion of the relationship between sociological and economic approaches to value in relation to religions and spiritualities in the contemporary world. Instead of understanding the commodification of religion as inevitably leading to a devaluation and lack of authenticity, we look at how commodification might also provide added value to local religious goods, ideas and lifestyles, as argued by Comaroff and Comaroff (2009) in relation to the commodification of ethnicity. For example, how has the marketing and branding of religion aided a process of growth and revitalization of religious institutions? What possible contentions and ambiguities arise within the nexus of religion and economics when religious or spiritual values become marketized and positioned within an economic value regime? How might discussion of value (economic) and values (sociological) open up ideas about the relationship between the individual (value as connected to strategy, agency, motivations, aspirations, interests, “homo economicus”) and the collective (values as moral, traditional, connected to socialization practices)?

We welcome papers from scholars working with value as a concept across a diversity of geographical and religious contexts, taking ‘religion’ in a broad sense to encompass a wide variety of beliefs, practices and spiritualities not limited to institutionalised religious traditions. We are particularly interested in ethnographically informed papers that analyse value and the relationship between value and values in practice. It should be noted that it is not the aim of the workshop to debate normative theories of religious ethics and their application in the contemporary world.

Pour plus d’informations, voir :