Archives de catégorie : Appels à contribution

CFP : Criminalising and emancipatory trends in family law in Indonesia and other muslim majority countries

CFP : Criminalising and emancipatory trends in family law in Indonesia and other muslim majority countries, 15-16 November 2018, KITLV, Leiden

Organised by the Van Vollenhoven Institute for Law, Governance and Society (VVI) / Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV) / Leiden University Centre for Islamic Studies (LUCIS)

Subject matter
Looking at legal developments related to family law[1] in Indonesia and other Muslim majority countries, we see two simultaneous trends developing. On the one hand there is an increasing tendency on the part of many states to criminalise sexual behaviour considered in contravention of Islamic law, such as pre- and extramarital sex and LBGT-relations. This development seems a response to the ‘moral panic’ concerning the supposedly increasing debauchery of modern times and sexual behaviour of youth in particular. Technological developments such as the spread of Facebook, Instagram, Whatsapp and smartphones have reinforced the sense of a lack of control people experience over the behaviour of their children, other family members – and perhaps themselves. The call for state action to do something about this has led to new legislation regulating morals. While such legislation may be symbolic in appearance and patchy in its enforcement, its consequences may still be far-reaching.

At the same time state-sponsored forms of Islamic family law that promote emancipation of women and children have steadily continued to gain ground in many of these countries, not only at the level of legislation and judicial rulings but also in social practices. The most prominent examples are the equality of women in matters of divorce and inheritance, but in a country such as Indonesia we also see increasing recognition of the position of children born outside marriage.

An issue at the crossroads between criminalisation and emancipation concerns early marriage. With any marriage under the age of 18 defined as child marriage by international human rights law, states have to manoeuver between criminalisation of those involved in such relations and the protection against unwanted consequences – which is more difficult if they go underground. An extra complication is that in this process the agency of those involved gets out of sight easily, as particularly in Muslim societies teenagers will only be allowed to have sexual relations in the context of marriage. In that sense, raising the age of marriage may actually decrease their agency.

The role of international human rights law extends beyond the issue of early marriage. When it concerns criminalising behaviour, human rights law often opposes such legislation. This applies in particular to LGBT-issues. UN human rights commission reports address this issue, forcing states to justify their behaviour. By contrast, the efforts at promoting equality of women and men in Muslim family law are in line with CEDAW and draw upon such ideas. However, states are careful not to draw exclusively upon this framework, as this may further antagonise conservative religious forces opposing such trends.

We are inviting paper proposals that examine these trends and address the following questions:

  • To what extent are these two trends to be seen in Indonesia and other Muslim majority countries? What forms do they take? What differences do we see?
  • How can we explain these developments? To what extent are they local or domestic in nature and what is the role of transnational discourses?
  • What is the role of international human rights law in these processes? How do discourses drawing upon this source of legitimation relate to discourses referring to Islam?

Format
A two-day seminar with paper presentations. We intend to publish a selection of papers in a special issue of a journal or an edited volume.

Paper proposals should be submitted with titles and abstracts (with a 400 word maximum) to Mies Grijns (ln.vinunediel.wal@snjirg.m)  and Adriaan Bedner (ln.vinunediel.wal@rendeb.w.a) before 28 September 2018. We will send notifications of acceptance by 5 October 2018.

[1] We interpret ‘family law’ broadly, as the normative frameworks regulating kinship and intimate relations between human beings.

Voir : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/call-papers-criminalising-emancipatory-trends-family-law-indonesia-muslim-majority-countries/

CFP : Myanmar Update 2019

CFP : Myanmar Update 2019 : Living with Myanmar, 15-16 March 2019, Australian National University

Proposals due by 7 September 2018

The next Myanmar Update conference will be held on Friday, 15 March and Saturday, 16 March 2019 at The Australian National University, Canberra. Hosted by the ANU Myanmar Research Centre, in the College of Asia and the Pacific, the conference has as its theme ‘Living with Myanmar’.

The conference theme is a response to the challenges that people in Myanmar continue to face in living with the legacies of sixty years of military rule. Since 2011 Myanmar has experienced profound changes and reforms. The formation of a new government in Myanmar, led by the National League for Democracy, was also a crucially important milestone in the country’s transition to a more inclusive form of governance. And yet, for many people everyday struggles remain unchanged, and have often worsened in recent years. Key economic, social and political reforms are stalled, conflict persists and longstanding issues of citizenship and belonging remain. Since the last conference in 2017, Myanmar’s restive borderlands have been the site of escalating military campaigns, driving more than 800,000 Rohingya, Kachin, Shan and Karen people to flee internally or across borders. These dynamics have complicated Myanmar’s diplomatic relations with neighbouring countries and exposed the fractures at the heart of Myanmar’s transition to partial civilian rule.

Building on the 2017 Update which probed the theme of ‘Transformations’, the 2019 conference seeks to explore the contradictions, ambiguities and complexities of ‘Living with Myanmar’. What is it like to live with and navigate the institutions, socialities and political ideals that shape life for many people in and outside of the territory of Myanmar? How are people engaging in creative and productive ways with Myanmar’s historical, geographic and institutional complexities? We invite scholars and practitioners to probe these questions, focusing on how everyday people, activists, state officials and external actors craft lives and worldviews as they live with Myanmar.

Paper proposals

The Myanmar Update conference convenors invite paper proposals from interested academics, analysts, researchers, and professionals, that address the overall theme of ‘Living with Myanmar’ in any of the following topic areas: Politics and Governance; Economic Change and Stagnation; Law and Justice; Conflict and Peace; Citizenship and Identity; and Society and Culture. We also welcome proposals for our Burmese-language panel, which can be submitted in Burmese on any one of the preceding themes, following the same format as for English-language papers. The organisers are particularly interested to receive proposals that explore the nuances and dynamics of living with Myanmar from urban and rural areas. And papers that challenge the theme are also very welcome!

Papers will be grouped into sessions addressing these different themes. In addition to these sessions, the conference will include a keynote address, and Political and Economic Update papers, presented by invited speakers.

As in previous Updates, the conveners are interested in receiving proposals from new voices, both within academia and outside it. We are particularly interested, of course, in new voices from Myanmar. We are happy to provide advice and guidance to participants who may have limited experience in international conference presentations. Paper proposals in Burmese will be accepted and, if required, translation services will be available for their presentation at the conference in a non-Burmese language session.

To submit a proposal, please fill in your details at the following link:

https://goo.gl/forms/5Y5iGzlM0CpqIdOl2

This should be submitted no later than Friday, 7 September 2018.

Plus d’informations sur : http://myanmar.anu.edu.au/events/myanmarburma-update/myanmar-update-2019

 

 

CFP : Marriage Migration, Family and Citizenship in Asia

CFP : Marriage Migration, Family and Citizenship in Asia, 31 January – 01 February 2019, National University of Singapore

Deadline : 31 August 2018

In recent decades, there has been a marked increase in cross-border marriages in East Asian industrialised economies such as Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea and Singapore. Marriage migration and the rise of cross-cultural/cross-national families have the potential to challenge the substance, meanings and boundaries of citizenship. Scholars have argued that ‘social citizenship’ cannot simply be read through a singular focus on the legal framework governing citizenship status. Instead, citizenship should be better understood as ‘a terrain of struggle’ (Stasiulis and Bakan, 1997), shaped by state-led as well as socially embedded ideologies of gender, race and class, and negotiated on an everyday basis within public and private spheres. These forms of negotiation are clearly foregrounded in the case of female marriage migrants, as their citizenship is constrained not only by gendered hierarchies central to the patriarchal family, but also the gendered mode of ‘familial citizenship’ upheld by many Asian nation-states, positioning them as wives and dependents of their citizen-husbands. Incorporated into the private sphere of the family as domestic caregivers and socio-biological reproducers, marriage migrants straddle the ambivalent position of being ‘outsiders’ both within the state and the family. Despite their vulnerable status, some marriage migrants expressed agency in claiming and negotiating citizenship entitlements on grounds of their caregiving roles and socio-biological membership of the family. As a result, the family becomes an important site where citizenship as ‘a terrain of struggle’ typically occurs.

Thus far, extant studies have tended to approach citizenship as an individual-centred concept vis-à-vis the nation-state (Lopez, 2015), thus fading the family into the background. This workshop sets out to go beyond the state-individual nexus by bringing the family back into the discussion of marriage migration and citizenship as contested arenas. As the overarching thematic focus, we propose that the family is a strategic site where citizenship is mediated, negotiated and contested. Using the family as the lens to study marriage migration and citizenship, this workshop aims at drawing out the intersections between the individual, the family and the state. Given that the effects of citizenship laws targeting the non-citizen member are likely to spill over to other citizen members (Fix & Zimmerman, 2001), we also call for a re-conceptualization of citizenship to include family-level experience.

In sum, the workshop focuses on families formed out of cross-border marriages as a case in point to examine how the intricate nexus between marriage migration, family and citizenship emerges and develops in the context of inter-regional marriage migration within Asia or in Asian diasporas. We are particularly interested in marriage migration between Asian countries, given the predominant collectivist and familistic norms in the region. This is also an area that has been given less attention in the literature compared to east-west cross-cultural marriages. Questions to be addressed include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • How do nation-states mobilize notions of ‘the family’ for its citizenship project and what are the repercussions for different types of families?
  • How does citizenship structure the formation, trajectory and outcomes of families resulted from cross-border marriages?
  • How is one’s citizenship negotiated, adapted, or lived at the family level in the case of cross-border marriages?
  • How is citizenship operated within the family through its non-citizen member, i.e. the marriage migrant and/or their children?
  • What are the tensions between the individual, the family and the state when negotiating citizenship boundaries and how are these tensions produced along gender, generation, racial/ethnic lines?

Submission of proposals

Paper proposals should include a title, an abstract (250 words maximum) and a brief personal biography of 150 words for submission by 31 August 2018. Please note that only previously unpublished papers or those not already committed elsewhere can be accepted. The organizers plan to publish a special issue with selected papers presented in this workshop. By participating in the workshop, you agree to participate in the future publication plans of the organizers. Hotel accommodation for three nights and a contribution towards airfare will be provided for accepted paper participants (one author per paper).

Please submit your proposal using the provided template to Ms Tay Minghua at minghua.tay@nus.edu.sg. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by 30 September 2018. Participants will be required to send in a completed draft paper (6,000-8,000 words) by 4 January 2019.

Plus d’informations sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Event/Detail/86d486f0-62f2-4151-9333-91ba68327594

 

 

 

CFP : Southeast Asian Media Studies

CFP : Southeast Asian Media Studies

The Southeast Asian Media Studies is the international, semi-annual, blind peer-reviewed, and open-access scholarly journal of the Southeast Asian Media Studies Association (SEAMSA), an academic community that aims to be at the forefront of Southeast Asian media studies and research.

CFP : Volume 1, n° 1 & 2
October 2018 : Vol. 1, n° 1
December 2018 : Vol. 1, n° 2

Special focus
Explorations in Southeast Asian Media Studies: Theories, Trajectories, and Futures

Recommended topics
The first two issues of the journal aim to provide a collection of theoretical and discursive articles on Southeast Asian media studies and literacy. The recommended topics are the following:

  • Definitions, status, and directions of Southeast Asian media studies
  • Authorship of Southeast Asian media studies: Who should do/write it?
  • Emerging media theories in and about Southeast Asian mass and new media
  • Practices and methods in Southeast Asian media studies
  • Critical reviews of media studies in and about Southeast Asian mass and new media
  • Media literacies in Southeast Asia
  • Audiences in Southeast Asia
  • Media technologies and processes and the Southeast Asian populace
  • Media convergence in Southeast Asian contexts
  • Southeast Asian politics and the media
  • Media laws, policies, and regulations in the ASEAN region
  • Business, ownership, management, and control of Southeast Asian mass media
  • Southeast Asian cultures and the media
  • Southeast Asian mainstream, local, translocal, diasporic, and indigenous media practices
  • Southeast Asian languages and the media
  • Genders and identities in Southeast Asian media
  • Southeast Asian media and the environment

Submission procedure
All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another journal or any academic publication. Authors should follow the journal’s manuscript guidelines.

All manuscripts should be sent to editor.seams@gmail.com. Please use the subject “SUBMISSION: Vol.1 No.1&2_Surname_Short Title” (e.g. SUBMISSION: Vol.1 No.1&2_Doe_A Review of Southeast Asian Media Theories). The deadline for manuscripts for both issues is on 15 August 2018.

Voir : https://seamediastudies.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

CFP : Inside Indonesia special issue (January 2020) : sexualities in Indonesia

CFP : Inside Indonesia Special Issue (January 2020) : Sexualities in Indonesia

Indonesia has experienced enormous change in its relationship to sexuality in the last decade. In 2008, the Pornography Law was passed. In 2016, the ‘LGBT Crisis’ began with hundreds of people arrested for supposedly immoral acts. In 2017, Indonesia’s Constitutional Court narrowly rejected a petition to criminalise all sex outside marriage with a 5/4 vote.

This Special Issue explores Indonesia’s vexed relationship with sexuality and seeks contributions on topics such as:
the pornography law; the LGBT crisis; efforts to change the criminal code; impacts on individuals, groups and social movements; love; marriage; HIV, sexual health; reproduction; education and awareness.

For more information please contact: Sharyn.davies@aut.ac.nz

 

CFP : Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

CFP : Antennae : The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture « Uncontainable natures : Southeast Asian ecologies and visual culture » 

Guest-editors: Kevin Chua, Lucy Davis, and Nora A. Taylor

For this issue of Antennae: Journal of Nature in Visual Culture, the editorial team seeks submissions from writers, artists, curators, and cultural theorists working with nature, ecology, and post-humanistic philosophy in Southeast Asia.

The past few decades have seen a resurgence of forms of containment in Southeast Asia, whether political (new governmental exclusions and repressions) or epistemological (new scientific understandings of nature). More acutely, certain governments and non-governmental organizations have utilized and underwritten a politics of nature, instrumentalizing nature for their own ends. This issue will gather papers and artistic contributions that contest this new reality. How have recent “scientific” understandings of nature in the region reaffirmed capitalism? How is nature uncontained and uncontainable in Southeast Asia?

It is a truism to say that the extended region of Southeast Asia – which encompasses the Western shores of the South China Sea, the Eastern shores of the Indian Ocean and the archipelagoes of Indonesia and the Philippines – has its own diverse yet particular ecologies. Nor is it any surprise to find various permutations of climate disasters and climate crimes in the region, from deforestation, haze, land reclamation, mudslides, to seas of plastic and flooding. This issue will propose new ways of thinking about nature as politically and epistemologically uncontainable, ungovernable, and irreducible. How have artists thought and practiced in interconnected lifeworlds – making ecology (a) practice – via an engagement with regional geographies, cultures and histories? How have artists drawn on indigenous animisms or the colonial production of “nature” to create an eco-politics of the present?

Ultimately, Uncontainable Natures seeks to push against the ever-recurring specter of anthropocentrism. From China to Singapore, technological “fixes” to climate change tend to reinstall human centrality. How have artists and exhibitions critically engaged anthropocentric tropes of colonial natural history or modern representations of the natural world? How have non-human actors intervened in or subverted modern orders of representation? How do pre-modern nonhuman agents or spirit ecosystems animate contemporary art practices in urban Asia? How have artists working with biology and new technologies in Southeast Asia troubled anthropocentric hubris, expanding our understanding of what it means to be human? How have they challenged deep-seated notions of “life,” and questioned capitalistic vitalisms of various kinds? How has our current ecological crisis brought about new porous understandings of the entanglement of nature and culture in the Southeast Asian region?

Topics considered include, but are not limited to:

Climate change, past and present
Political economics of nature
Species loss
Rights to land, air and water
Materialities
Ethno-biologies/botanies/ecologies
Ghosts, spirits, specters
Spirit lives of objects
Feminist, LGBTQ/ intersectional recuperations of ‘traditional’ eco-lore
Non-human ecological agents: animals, plants, mountains, forests, oceans
Ecological ramifications of recent archaeological research (for example the Sulawesi cave paintings) and associated art historical shifts
Non-visual sensual ecologies and knowledges: sonic, haptic, energetic fields
Urban nature cultures
New migrant species, viruses or bacteria
Critical technological interconnectivities
Critical internet ecologies and cosmologies
Science fictional and speculative ecologies
Southeast Asian eco-hack-and-tinkerings
Politics and cultures of waste

Submission guidelines:

Academic essays = length 6000-10000 words
Artists’ portfolio = 5/6 images along with 1000 words max statement/commentary
Interviews = maximum length 8000 words
Fiction = maximum length 8000 words
Roundtable discussions = 5000 words

Deadlines:
Abstracts: August 31st 2018 (Please submit a 350 words abstract along with a CV and one or two images)
Selection process is finalized and feedback sent by: October 31st
Submissions of final pieces: March 31st
Please email any questions to: Giovanni Aloi: Editor in Chief of Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture antennaeproject@gmail.com (www.antennae.org.uk)

Voir: https://www.facebook.com/168701325727/posts/10155283825675728/

CFP : The Rohingya Crisis : A Multidimensional Tragedy

CFP : The Rohingya Crisis : A Multidimensional Tragedy, 24/08/2018, Asia Centre Bangkok

The Rohingya Crisis sparked by the 25 August 2017 attacks on Government forces by Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) in Rakhine State, Myanmar, triggered one of the worst humanitarian crises in contemporary history – “a textbook case of ethnic cleansing”. In a matter of a few months over 750,000 Rohingya people, mostly women and children, fled to Bangladesh. Five months later, as of 23 January 2018, the Rohingya were subjected to a repatriation agreement between Bangladesh and Myanmar that was postponed. The current human rights discourse centers on pointing out the discrimination practices against the Rohingyas, the failure of moral leadership previously embodied in Aung San Suu Kyi, the impotence of ASEAN, the need for accountability for atrocities committed by the Myanmar military and the determination of voluntariness when the Rohingya refugees are repatriated. This call invites contributions that go beyond and delve deeper into this multidimensional tragedy. It is an opportunity for researchers who have been investigating different aspects of the crisis to highlight their work. Researchers of selected papers will be invited to participate in a 1 day conference in Bangkok, to mark the anniversary of one of the largest humanitarian catastrophes in Southeast Asia. Selected papers will be compiled and published as an edited volume.

Key Themes: Papers will address critical issues spanning the following themes
ARSA : Unpack ARSA’s role in the crisis
Development: Evaluate economic growth’s role for values change
Elites: Dissect the elites’ conflicting interests
Fake News: Examine the role of misinformation in generating violence
Geopolitics: Capture the external global and regional power dimensions
Hosts: Examine the role of Bangladesh and other destination countries
Human Trafficking: Identify illicit networks and their exploitative practices
Identity: Sketch the competing ethnic and religious political positions
Prejudice: Explain the inflexible attitudes against the Rohingyas
Rakhine Perspective: Articulate the majority-minority dimensions
SGBV: Analyse the different sexual and gender based violence

Submission Guidelines
Submit your abstract (and eventual final papers) to: contact@asiacentre.co.th

An initial 300 word abstract should be sent to Dr. James Gomez and Dr. Robin Ramcharan by 28 February 2018. Full papers will be due by 1 June 2018 and will be peer reviewed. Research articles should be between 5,000 to 6,000 words (incl. footnotes and references).

Project Coordination
As part of this project, a coordination meeting with selected authors is scheduled at Asia Centre, Bangkok, for 24 August 2018, marking the one year anniversary of the attacks by ARSA in Rakhine State. The meeting shall take stock of the latest developments and finalize the selected papers. Authors will thereafter revise their papers, which shall be submitted to the publisher on 1 October 2018.

Project Financing
This is a self-funded project. Hence, each participant is requested to contribute US$ 300 net, which will cover the costs of the meeting, catering, communication as well as editorial costs. Authors shall secure their own funds for travel, daily subsistence and accommodation while in Bangkok.

Registration
All keynote speakers, presenters and participants are required to complete the Conference Registration Form and submit at the time of abstract submission and/or application to participate. The Registration Form is available at the event website at https://asiacentre.co.th/event/the-rohingya-crisis-a-multidimensional-tragedy/

Important Dates
Abstract Submission: 30 June 2018
Abstract Acceptance: notification within three days of submission
Payment of conference fees: upon acceptance of abstract
Full paper submission: latest 31 July 2018
Please contact the Events Coordinator at research@asiacentre.co.th if you need an extension or are not able to produce a full paper in time for the conference

Visit the Call for Papers for more information: https://asiacentre.co.th/event/the-rohingya-crisis-a-multidimensional-tragedy/

Enquiries: contact@asiacentre.co.th

CFP : Council on Thai Studies Conference

CFP : Council on Thai Studies Conference, 12-14 October 2018 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Abstracts due by 1 August.

We are honored that this year’s keynote speaker will be Dr Puangthong Pawakapan, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Political Science at Chulalongkorn University and 2018-2019 Harvard-Yenching Fellow. She will speak on “Development and Impact of the Thai Military’s Political Offensive.”

COTS, established in 1972, is a consortium of universities with a particular interest in Thai Studies.

The annual COTS meeting is designed to provide scholars, students, and practitioners with opportunities to present both preliminary and more developed research analysis and reflections, primarily in the social sciences and humanities, related to Thai Studies.
Key information:
· Dates: 12-14 October 2018; conference will begin at noon on the afternoon of Friday, 12 October.
· Location: Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), University of Wisconsin-Madison, 206 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706

· Deadline for proposals for presentations: 1 August 2018
· The organizers welcome proposals for individual paper presentations, panels of papers, roundtable discussions, film screenings and other formats as suggested by participants. For individual paper presentations and films, please send an abstract (250 words). For roundtable discussions, please send an abstract (250 words) and list of participants. For panels of papers, please send an abstract of the panel (250 words) as well as abstracts of the individual papers.

Questions and proposal submissions should be sent to Tyrell Haberkorn, tyrell.haberkorn@wisc.edu (Chair, COTS 2018).

Plus d’informations sur : https://seasia.wisc.edu/home-page/event/cots/

10th Engaging with Vietnam : an interdisciplinary dialogue conference

10th Engaging with Vietnam : an interdisciplinary dialogue conference

Dichotomies in Knowledge Production: Vietnam through the Multiple Lenses of ‘Self-and-Other’

15-21 December 2018, Ho Chi Minh City & Khanh Hoa Province, Vietnam
Part 1: 15-16 December, Ho Chi Minh City
Part 2: 17 December, HCMC – Nha Trang City, Khanh Hoa (by express train)

Part 3: 17-21 December, Khanh Hoa Province

Co-organizers: University of Hawaii at Manoa – USA, University of Social Sciences and Humanities – Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City

2018 marks a milestone for Engaging With Vietnam – its 10th anniversary. We would like to invite you to the 10th Engaging With Vietnam Conference to experience another stimulating and enriching gathering that will take place all the way from Ho Chi Minh City to Khanh Hoa, a coastal province in Central Vietnam. A ride on an express train between the two cities promises a pleasant trip with amazing scenery that will stimulate both reflections and conversations. We are very delighted to have this opportunity to continue to tour Vietnam with the 10th conference participants. The conference venue in Khanh Hoa is right by the beach. How wonderful to engage in meaningful and rigorous academic sessions while being refreshed with ocean breezes and blue water!

To continue its interdisciplinary engagement, this 10th conference focuses in particular on dichotomies, the dichotomization of knowledge, and the discursive constructions of dichotomies in Vietnam-related knowledge production and scholarship. Dichotomies and dichotomization often come in the form of ‘Self and Other’ and/or in pairs of contrasts, such as ‘global – local’, ‘traditional – modern’, ‘Western values – Asian values’, ‘Vietnamese women – foreign women’, ‘nationalism – cosmopolitanism’, ‘developed – underdeveloped/developing’, ‘urban – rural’, ‘privileged – disadvantaged’, ‘active – passive’, ‘critical thinking – passive and rote learning’, ‘Global North – Global South’, and ‘Vietnam – ASEAN’, etc.

Continuer la lecture de 10th Engaging with Vietnam : an interdisciplinary dialogue conference

AAS CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR THE 2019 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

CFP :  AAS Annual Conference, 21-24 March 2019, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel in Denver, Colorado

On behalf of the Program Committee for the Association for Asian Studies, I am pleased to issue the Call for Proposals for the AAS Annual Conference to be held March 21-24, 2019 at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel in Denver, Colorado.

We are pleased to invite colleagues in Asian studies to submit proposals for Organized Panels, Roundtables, and Workshop sessions, in addition to Individual Papers proposals for the committees consideration. The program committee seeks sessions that will engage panelists and audiences in the consideration of ideas, information, and interpretations that will advance knowledge about Asian regions and, by extension, will enrich teaching about Asia at all levels. AAS Membership is not a requirement for the submission of a proposal or participation.

We have updated our Call for Proposals related webpages to try and make this process as simple and clear as possible. Please see the three-step guide below to start your submission process. The deadline for submission of all proposals and Late Developing Countries (LDC) travel grant requests is Wednesday, August 1 at 5pm Eastern Time. All proposals must be submitted electronically via the AAS electronic submission application. We will not accept proposals submitted via email. This proposal submission application will be available for submissions beginning Tuesday, May 29 through Wednesday, August 1, 2018. After the submission deadline, your proposal will be forwarded to the appropriate program committee members for review. You will find detailed instructions via the sections listed in the right hand column on this screen.

If you have any questions regarding panel participation or proposal submissions that are not answered in this Call for Proposals or the FAQ’s, please contact the AAS secretariat at AASconference@asian-studies.org.

We look forward to an exciting and intellectually stimulating conference in the mile high city of Denver that reflects the dynamism of Asian studies and the AAS.

Voir : http://www.asian-studies.org/Conferences/AAS-Annual-Conference/Conference-Menu/CALL-FOR-PROPOSALS/CFP-2019-Home

CFP : Vietnam Update 2018

CFP : Vietnam Update 2018, 12-13 November, Australian National University

The Vietnam Update in 2018 will be held from 12-13 November at the Australian National University. Conference Themes: Environment Society and Culture International Relations International Trade and Investment

Proposals for this Update should be no longer than 300 words, with final papers to be no longer than 8,000 words (including references). Priority will be given to papers based on original, unpublished research focusing on Vietnam and its relationships with regional neighbours and institutions across the four themes outlined above. The Update is expected to result in a publication of the papers. Proposals for papers are accepted on the understanding the Update organisers will have first right of refusal for papers accepted for presentation at the conference. Proposals must be submitted to Elizabeth St George (elizabethstgeorge@outlook.com), Conference convenor, by 20 June 2018. Final papers must be submitted by 30 October 2018.

 

CFP : Global Labor Migration: Past and Present

CFP : Global Labor Migration: Past and Present, 20-22 June 2019, The International Institute for Social History,  Amsterdam

About

Labor migration is a vast, global, and highly fluid phenomenon in the 21st century, capturing public attention and driving political controversy.  There are more labor migrants working in areas beyond their birth country or region than ever before.  Although scattered across the social ladder, migrant workers have always clustered, at least initially, in the bottom rungs of the working class.  Even as cross-border or inter-regional movement may beckon as a source of hope and new opportunity, the experience for the migrants and their families is often fraught with peril.  Labor migrants are vulnerable: they are exploited more easily by recruiters and employers, and are less likely to benefit from union representation.  They often face arrest or deportation when attempting to fight for their rights, and are bound to special documents that limit their ability to change jobs.  Moreover, as recent history reminds us, host-country fears directed towards labor migrants can also spark larger political movements characterized by nativist, racist, or even outright fascist tendencies.  Clearly, there is a need to combat fear with understanding and to reach for improved global regulations and standards to protect the rights and welfare of migrants alongside those of host country working people.

Because today global labor migration is shaping the lives of millions, and because it is receiving unprecedented attention by scholars, the newly-formed Global Labor Migration Network (GLMN) is currently planning for a Global Labor Migration Summit to take place in Amsterdam in summer 2019.  Involving scholars and activists from diverse parts of the globe and drawing on a wide variety of disciplines–including history, sociology, anthropology, ethnic studies, women and gender studies, public health, law and public policy–this project will bring international attention to one of the world’s most pressing issues, generate scholarly dialogue and new research agendas, and propose policies that can improve conditions for migrants.  The conference will also include a range of presentation formats: brief papers, roundtables, and open conversations.

Our keynote speakers for the conference have been announced! They are Donna Gabaccia of the University of Toronto and Bridget Anderson of the University of Bristol.

Continuer la lecture de CFP : Global Labor Migration: Past and Present

CFP : Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

CFP : Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

Rising Voices in Southeast Asian Studies – A SEAC / AAS Initiative with support from the journal, TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia

Submission Deadline: 15 June 2018

The Southeast Asia Council (SEAC) of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) is seeking paper proposals from up-and-coming scholars to join a “Rising Voices” panel on the broad topic of “Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia.” We seek to recruit early career scholars from Southeast Asian countries in order to form a panel for eventual inclusion in the 2019 Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies, to be held in Denver, CO from March 21-24, 2019.

The panel will be chaired by Dr. Nam C. Kim, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Once paper presenters have been selected, the chair, along with Dr. Oona Paredes, Assistant Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, will assist the panelists in preparing a panel abstract, facilitate revision of individual paper proposals, and offer mentoring and networking support to the panel participants, as needed.

With financial support from the AAS and the journal TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia, SEAC will be able to offer modest travel support to certain members of the panel with demonstrated need in traveling to the conference from Southeast Asia. It is hoped that participation in the panel will also enable scholars to obtain funding from other sources, including the individual country groups at AAS, as well as their home institutions, to stay for the whole conference. Once the panel is formed, the organizers will also make every effort to help panelists seek additional funding on the basis of demonstrated need. Upon completion of the conference, authors will be encouraged to submit their papers to TRaNS for potential publication, subject to peer-review.

Continuer la lecture de CFP : Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

CFP : Forest and Society

CFP : Special Section @ The economies, ecologies and politics of social forestry in Indonesia: Current issues and emerging trends

After decades of advocacy for a greater role of local communities in the management of natural resources, social forestry has become a central policy commitment of the Indonesian government. At the national level, President Joko Widodo’s administration has committed to expanding social forestry areas to 12.7 million hectares to local community management by 2019. Such policy commitments emerged in response to the growing pressure from land conflicts, and a long struggle by advocacy groups to support recognition of rights and agrarian reform. These regulatory changes also represent major policy breakthroughs for more progressive governance strategies in support of social justice, equitable development practices, and better natural resource management. However, studies on the implementation of social forestry policy in the past remain inconclusive. Furthermore, the policy application is proceeding rapidly faster than the evaluative opportunity that research can provide.

The numerous social forestry permits being signed across Indonesia provide a timely area of inquiry. Evidence-based studies are still lacking on the processes and effects of the current policy imperative. Can social forestry achieve its promise of alleviating poverty, empowering communities and improving forest governance? And if so, in what ways? Additionally, few studies are available on the role of social forestry in responding to the broader and more contemporary issues such as climate change mitigation and adaptation, forest landscape and peatland restoration, global demands for sustainable value chains, timber legality, green economy, and upcoming initiatives on ASEAN economic integration.

Forest and Society is therefore initiating the first of its series on emerging trends of social forestry across Southeast Asia by examining dynamics taking place in Indonesia. The primary aim is to take stock of evidence on the rapid implementation of social forestry permits across Indonesia and to promote knowledge on the realities, achievements, challenges and pathways to sustainable strategies for the future. We invite authors from academics, researchers, students, concerned citizens, policy makers and forestry practitioners to contribute original research, on a range of methods (quantitative, qualitative, and mixed), to improve our collective understanding of social forestry in Indonesia. We invite paper submissions on politics, ecology, economy and culture. We also welcome research approaches at various scales, including review articles that take on a macro perspective or rich contextual studies of site-specific experiences, as well as comparative approaches across sites.

Submission Guidelines

Tentative publication schedule:

  • Submission     : May 2018 – August 2018
  • Peer Review    : Since submitted until October 2018
  • Publishing       : November 2018

For further information, read the full instruction for authors as well as the template: here, or submit your paper via the journal’s online submission site: here 

Please contact for any queries at

Voir : http://journal.unhas.ac.id/index.php/fs/index

 

 

CFP : Pratu

CFP : Pratu : Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia

Pratu: Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia is the initiative of a group of research students in the Department of History of Art and Archaeology at SOAS University of London in collaboration with departmental mentors. The journal is funded by the Alphawood Foundation, under the auspices of the Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme (SAAAP). The student editorial group works closely with an advisory group formed of members of SAAAP’s Research & Publications Committee.

Pratu is conceived as a site for emerging scholars to publish new research on the ancient to premodern Buddhist and Hindu visual and material culture of Southeast Asia. The journal’s remit adheres to that of SAAAP itself, covering ‘study of the built environment, sculpture, painting, illustrated texts, textiles and other tangible or visual representations, along with the written word related to these, and archaeological, museum and cultural heritage’.

Pratu means ‘gateway’ or ‘entrance’ in several Southeast Asian languages. The salience of the term for our project lies in its etymological development, where the application of Khmer morphology to Tai terminology to name architectural structures of Indic fame betrays the complexity of the historical evolution of Southeast Asian Buddhist and Hindu traditions. The journal is a gateway: a space of access and transition that reflects our aim to facilitate new scholars’ first experiences with academic publishing as they move from student to early career researcher status. This includes Southeast Asian scholars who would like to reach a wider readership by publishing in English translation and benefitting from the peer-review process. In this way Pratu offers greater exposure to scholars and new research, and furthers the development of inter-institutional and international collaboration.

Call for Papers:

Pratu: Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia, inaugural issue, January 2019.

Deadline: 30 June 2018

Download the CFP

Site de la revue : https://pratujournal.org/