Archives de catégorie : ACTUALITES

Pirates lands: Governance and maritime piracy

Seminar : « Pirates lands : Governance and maritime piracy » by Ursula Daxecker, 21 June 2018, KITLV

Abstract
Piracy—like civil war, terrorism, and other organized crime—is a problem of weak and fragile states. But while helpful in identifying the countries most affected by maritime piracy, focusing on the weakness of entire countries does little to further our understanding of why piracy clusters close to some coastal communities but not to others. Our book argues that local governance and infrastructural development help explain pirate location. Pirate operations require substantial upfront investments, aided by proximity to markets and infrastructure. For sophisticated attacks, a group leader or boss provides pirates with a boat, fuel, equipment, and money to bribe officials. We therefore expect that in weak or failed states, pirates will operate in coastal areas where local governance is weak enough to incentivize collusion among pirates and authorities, yet strong enough to ensure that infrastructure and markets are sufficiently developed to permit the organization of sustained piracy. We examine our arguments empirically in quantitative analyses of local governance patterns and piracy in Indonesia. Field research conducted in Indonesia’s Riau Islands helps us to further assess the plausibility of theoretical mechanisms. Interviews with former pirates, community members, and journalists highlight the importance of access to markets and infrastructure for pirate operations, and also provided us with numerous examples of tacit and active collusion by local governance providers and the community.

Speaker
Ursula Daxecker is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam and a member of the Amsterdam Institute of Social Science Research. Her work explores the determinants of election violence and organized crime. She is currently completing a book manuscript on maritime piracy (co-authored with Brandon Prins). She also recently completed a four-year research project collecting disaggregated data on electoral contention and violence funded by the Dutch Science Foundation and the EC’s Marie Curie actions. She is associate editor at European Journal of International Relations and International Interactions. Her work is published in British Journal of Political Science, Journal of Peace Research, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Public Choice, Electoral Studies, among others.

Voir : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/seminar-piracy-riau-ursula-daxecker/

 

Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archives : An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares

Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archives : An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares, 30-31 July 2018, Novotel Manila Araneta Center, Quezon City

We are pleased to inform you that the international journal Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints School of Social Sciences, Ateneo de Manila University and the Southeast Asian Studies Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University are organizing an international conference titled “Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archive: An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares.” It will be held on 30–31 July 2018 at the Novotel Manila Araneta Center Cubao, Quezon City.

In a prolific career spanning five decades, Resil B. Mojares has produced a remarkable body of work that combines meticulous research, incisive analysis, and elegant, lyrical writing.

An exemplary home-grown and -educated activist, intellectual, institution-builder, and man of letters, Mojares has made important, often pioneering, contributions to diverse fields and subjects, ranging from Philippine literature (Origins and Rise of the Filipino Novel: A Generic Study of the Novel until 1940; [co-ed.] the two-volume Sugilanong Sugboanon), architecture (Casa Gorordo in Cebu: Urban Residence in a Philippine Province, 1860–1920), theater and social history (Theater in Society, Society in Theater: Social History of a Cebuano Village, 1840–1940), to intellectual history (Brains of the Nation: Pedro Paterno, T. H. Pardo de Tavera, Isabelo de los Reyes, and the Production of Modern Knowledge), biography (Vicente Sotto: Maverick Senator; The Man Who Would be President: Serging Osmeña and Philippine Politics; Aboitiz: Family and Firm in the Philippines), history and politics (The War Against the Americans: Resistance and Collaboration in Cebu, 1899–1906; [co-ed.] From Marcos to Aquino: Local Perspectives on the Political Transition in the Philippines).

Apart from book-length works, Mojares has also produced occasional essays (collected in House of Memory; Waiting for Mariang Makiling: Essays in Philippine Cultural History; Isabelo’s Archive; The Resil Mojares Reader; and Interrogations in Philippine Cultural History) that have done much to illuminate “what is obscure, hidden, and marginal” in a plurilingual, pluricultural Philippines. His works blur “the boundaries between academic and literary writing,” while simultaneously building on, and questioning, the “idea and performance of the archive—capacious, diverse, makeshift, open-ended, and polymorphic, and one ‘national’ in its motive and ambition” (Mojares, “Writing the Archive,” Manila Review Issue 5, Sept. 2014).

The perspectives Mojares brings to his study of Philippine history, politics, society, culture, and the arts are methodologically eclectic and capable of moving effortlessly between and across local, national, regional (subnational and supranational), and transnational scales.

This international conference celebrates the life, career, and writings of Resil B. Mojares. It aims not only to assess Professor Mojares’s influence, but also to engage with the ideas, issues, and contexts brought up by his writings on and across various fields of inquiry.

This call for participation is addressed to those who wish to attend the conference but not present papers. Interested parties are requested to complete and submit the registration form, and remit their registration fees, on or before 27 July 2017.

For Philippine participants: P5,500
For overseas participants: US$120
On-site registration (30–31 July 2018): P6,000, with no assured conference packet.

For inquiries, please email philstudies.soss@ateneo.edu

CFP : The Rohingya Crisis : A Multidimensional Tragedy

CFP : The Rohingya Crisis : A Multidimensional Tragedy, 24/08/2018, Asia Centre Bangkok

The Rohingya Crisis sparked by the 25 August 2017 attacks on Government forces by Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) in Rakhine State, Myanmar, triggered one of the worst humanitarian crises in contemporary history – “a textbook case of ethnic cleansing”. In a matter of a few months over 750,000 Rohingya people, mostly women and children, fled to Bangladesh. Five months later, as of 23 January 2018, the Rohingya were subjected to a repatriation agreement between Bangladesh and Myanmar that was postponed. The current human rights discourse centers on pointing out the discrimination practices against the Rohingyas, the failure of moral leadership previously embodied in Aung San Suu Kyi, the impotence of ASEAN, the need for accountability for atrocities committed by the Myanmar military and the determination of voluntariness when the Rohingya refugees are repatriated. This call invites contributions that go beyond and delve deeper into this multidimensional tragedy. It is an opportunity for researchers who have been investigating different aspects of the crisis to highlight their work. Researchers of selected papers will be invited to participate in a 1 day conference in Bangkok, to mark the anniversary of one of the largest humanitarian catastrophes in Southeast Asia. Selected papers will be compiled and published as an edited volume.

Key Themes: Papers will address critical issues spanning the following themes
ARSA : Unpack ARSA’s role in the crisis
Development: Evaluate economic growth’s role for values change
Elites: Dissect the elites’ conflicting interests
Fake News: Examine the role of misinformation in generating violence
Geopolitics: Capture the external global and regional power dimensions
Hosts: Examine the role of Bangladesh and other destination countries
Human Trafficking: Identify illicit networks and their exploitative practices
Identity: Sketch the competing ethnic and religious political positions
Prejudice: Explain the inflexible attitudes against the Rohingyas
Rakhine Perspective: Articulate the majority-minority dimensions
SGBV: Analyse the different sexual and gender based violence

Submission Guidelines
Submit your abstract (and eventual final papers) to: contact@asiacentre.co.th

An initial 300 word abstract should be sent to Dr. James Gomez and Dr. Robin Ramcharan by 28 February 2018. Full papers will be due by 1 June 2018 and will be peer reviewed. Research articles should be between 5,000 to 6,000 words (incl. footnotes and references).

Project Coordination
As part of this project, a coordination meeting with selected authors is scheduled at Asia Centre, Bangkok, for 24 August 2018, marking the one year anniversary of the attacks by ARSA in Rakhine State. The meeting shall take stock of the latest developments and finalize the selected papers. Authors will thereafter revise their papers, which shall be submitted to the publisher on 1 October 2018.

Project Financing
This is a self-funded project. Hence, each participant is requested to contribute US$ 300 net, which will cover the costs of the meeting, catering, communication as well as editorial costs. Authors shall secure their own funds for travel, daily subsistence and accommodation while in Bangkok.

Registration
All keynote speakers, presenters and participants are required to complete the Conference Registration Form and submit at the time of abstract submission and/or application to participate. The Registration Form is available at the event website at https://asiacentre.co.th/event/the-rohingya-crisis-a-multidimensional-tragedy/

Important Dates
Abstract Submission: 30 June 2018
Abstract Acceptance: notification within three days of submission
Payment of conference fees: upon acceptance of abstract
Full paper submission: latest 31 July 2018
Please contact the Events Coordinator at research@asiacentre.co.th if you need an extension or are not able to produce a full paper in time for the conference

Visit the Call for Papers for more information: https://asiacentre.co.th/event/the-rohingya-crisis-a-multidimensional-tragedy/

Enquiries: contact@asiacentre.co.th

Twenty years of Indonesian democracy—how many more?

« Twenty years of Indonesian democracy—how many more? » by Edward Aspinall, 24 May 2018, New Mandala

When Indonesia’s New Order regime met its end in May 1998, I was a PhD student researching Indonesian opposition movements while teaching Indonesian language and politics at a university in Sydney. Along with other lecturers and students, I watched the live broadcast of Suharto’s resignation speech, listening to the words of one of our colleagues as she translated the president’s fateful words for Australian TV. Clustered around a television screen in a poky AV lab, everyone present felt awed by the immensity of what we were witnessing, relieved that a dangerous political impasse had been broken, and nervously hopeful about the future after so many long years of political stagnation.

The extraordinary achievements of political reform in the years that followed formed one of the great success stories of the so-called “third wave” of democratisation—the worldwide surge of regime change that began in Southern Europe in the mid-1970s and then spread through Latin America, Africa and Asia. The post-Suharto democracy has now lasted longer than did Indonesia’s earlier period of parliamentary democracy (1950–1957), and the subsequent Guided Democracy regime (1957–65). While it still has another dozen years to pass the record set by Suharto’s New Order, Indonesian democracy has proved that it has staying power.

What few would question, though, is that the quality of Indonesia’s democracy was a problem from the beginning—and that under President Joko Widodo (Jokowi) democratic quality has begun to slide dramatically.

Earlier this year, the Economist Intelligence Unit gave Indonesia its largest downgrading in its Democracy Index since scoring began in 2006. With a score of 6.39 out of a possible maximum of 10, the country is now bumping down toward the bottom of the index’s category of “flawed democracies”, on the verge—if it sinks just a little lower—of crossing into the category of “hybrid regime”. This downgrading of Indonesia’s position follows similar drops for the country in other democracy indices like the Freedom in the World survey compiled by Freedom House.

Indonesia’s trajectory is not bucking the global trend. Around the world, democracy is in retreat. Freedom House says democracy is facing “its most serious crisis in decades”, with 71 countries experiencing declines in political rights and civil liberties in 2017 and only 35 registering gains, making 2017 the twelfth year in a row showing global democratic recession.

Unlike during an earlier era of military coups, today the primary source of democratic backsliding is elected politicians. Leaders such as Russia’s Vladimir Putin, Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Hungary’s Viktor Orbán undermine the rule of law, manipulate institutions for their own political advantage, and restrict the space for democratic opposition. Elected despotism is, increasingly, the order of the day. Indeed, as I argue here, the primary threat to Indonesia’s democratic system today comes not from actors outside the arena of formal politics, like the military or Islamic extremists, but the politicians that Indonesians themselves have chosen.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/20-years-reformasi/

Research internship: ‘Digital humanities and traditional Indonesian literature’

Research internship: ‘Digital humanities and traditional Indonesian literature’

As of September 1, 2018, KITLV is offering a three-months’ internship for an MA-student in literature, history, computer science or area studies.

Intership
The intern will assist dr. Kathryn Wellen with a pilot study which uses digital humanities techniques to study family relations in state formation in early modern Indonesian history.  The intern’s tasks will be to:

  • assemble data from published (translations of) five or six Indonesian texts;
  • analyze assembled data using geographic and network analyses;
  • assist in planning a second, larger-scale study using similar methods.

The internship will take place at the KITLV and will be for 3 months, 3 days per week. (This is equal to 10 ECT.  Academic credit may be arranged with the intern’s academic institution.)  The intern is encouraged to participate in the intellectual life of KITLV and the Leiden University Centre for Digital Humanities.

Knowledge of digital humanities (particularly knowledge of network analysis and GIS software) is strongly preferred.  Knowledge of Indonesian or Dutch is also desirable.

KITLV offers:

  • the opportunity to gain working experience at an international research institute
  • the opportunity to give a presentation during a research meeting and to attend seminars within and outside KITLV to expand your academic network.
  • an internship fee of 180 euro bruto per month (based on 3 days per week) and if needed travel expenses will be covered.

Deadline application
Please send your application consisting of an expression of interest and cv including the names of at least two references to Dr. Kathryn Wellen: ln.vltik@nellew. The deadline for this application is June 28, 2018.

Voir : http://www.kitlv.nl/research-internship-digital-humanities-traditional-indonesian-literature/

Another Chinese paper stamp in a Malay manuscript

Red Chinese paper stamp of an animal, in Hikayat Muhammad Hanafiah, 1805. MSS Malay B.6, ff. 60v-61r.

Another Chinese paper stamp in a Malay manuscript by Annabel Teh Gallop, 05/06/2018, Asian and African Studies Blog, British Library

A few years ago, I became intrigued by the red ink stamps of Chinese paper makers occasionally glimpsed on the pages of Malay and Javanese manuscripts in the British Library, and in a post on Malay manuscripts on Chinese paper illustrated all the examples encountered so far. Recently, another example has surfaced, in a fine illuminated copy of the Hikayat Muhammad Hanafiah, copied by Muhammad Kasim in 1805. The manuscript was previously owned by John Leyden, and is therefore most likely to have been copied in Penang, where Leyden spent four months convalescing from late 1805 to early 1806. On the bottom left hand corner of f. 61 r is a red ink stamp of an animal, a rather rotund quadruped resembling a hippopotamus or rhinoceros.

Continuer la lecture de Another Chinese paper stamp in a Malay manuscript

CFP : Council on Thai Studies Conference

CFP : Council on Thai Studies Conference, 12-14 October 2018 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Abstracts due by 1 August.

We are honored that this year’s keynote speaker will be Dr Puangthong Pawakapan, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Political Science at Chulalongkorn University and 2018-2019 Harvard-Yenching Fellow. She will speak on “Development and Impact of the Thai Military’s Political Offensive.”

COTS, established in 1972, is a consortium of universities with a particular interest in Thai Studies.

The annual COTS meeting is designed to provide scholars, students, and practitioners with opportunities to present both preliminary and more developed research analysis and reflections, primarily in the social sciences and humanities, related to Thai Studies.
Key information:
· Dates: 12-14 October 2018; conference will begin at noon on the afternoon of Friday, 12 October.
· Location: Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), University of Wisconsin-Madison, 206 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706

· Deadline for proposals for presentations: 1 August 2018
· The organizers welcome proposals for individual paper presentations, panels of papers, roundtable discussions, film screenings and other formats as suggested by participants. For individual paper presentations and films, please send an abstract (250 words). For roundtable discussions, please send an abstract (250 words) and list of participants. For panels of papers, please send an abstract of the panel (250 words) as well as abstracts of the individual papers.

Questions and proposal submissions should be sent to Tyrell Haberkorn, tyrell.haberkorn@wisc.edu (Chair, COTS 2018).

Plus d’informations sur : https://seasia.wisc.edu/home-page/event/cots/

Broad strokes : Indonesian art and 20 years of Reformasi

Eko Nugroho (Photo courtesy of Eko Nugroho Studio)

Broad strokes : Indonesian art and 20 years of Reformasi by Erin Cook, 22/05/2018, The Interpreter, Lowy Institute

This month, Indonesia commemorates 20 years since the fall of strongman Suharto and two decades of the Reformasi era. Today, the strife of 1998 serves as inspiration for the country’s burgeoning contemporary arts.

Suharto’s New Order period was marked by mass-centralisation of powers in Jakarta, from which Indonesia’s cultural and artistic industries were not exempt. By the end of the Suharto era, any performance or exhibition needed the express permission of no less than four separate offices, including police and military, to go ahead. Cultural researcher Jennifer Lindsay has written that events at the time could be shut down “immediately if considered to have transgressed limits of tolerated political comment, or to have insulted ethnicity, religion, race, or inter-group relations”.

This environment, paired with the government control of all art schools in Indonesia, gave the Suharto administration immense control and influence over works of art produced during this period. Lindsay notes that this control also led to weariness among private citizens who would otherwise be strong patrons of the arts, leaving the country’s artists to navigate the minefield of acceptable subjects, or to look overseas for support.

Suharto’s demise not only freed the nation’s politics but also changed its art scene dramatically. Today, both Yogyakarta and Jakarta are developing reputations as contemporary art hubs in Asia, and Indonesia’s best artists are regularly showcased across the world. For the generation of artists who came of age in 1998 and are now reaching the top of their field, the days of the New Order continue provide ample inspiration, as well as cynicism.

Eko Nugroho is one of the leading artists of that generation. His bright, colourful sculptures, installations, wall art, and embroidery pieces deal with pertinent political issues, from corruption to the environment, and have been exhibited internationally. As a postgraduate student at Yogyakarta’s Indonesian Institute of the Arts in 1998, Nugroho’s work gradually became more political.

“The year was a starting point and a trigger to develop my works, so it was a kind of inspiration,” he told me.

I am part of the generation of artists post-Reformation, which means I am aware of the particular phenomena that took place in this country, and I can scrutinise their development. In those transition times, Indonesia chose democracy, but the Indonesian version of democracy … This idea of having our own version of democracy I find interesting and I often try to raise it in my works. We see and understand democracy through our society, our dynamics, and through the background of our political history, which have all shaped the current situation we are in.

The dark days of the 1965–66 anti-communist purges are a favourite subject for Indonesian artists. Pre-election promises from President Joko Widodo have failed to come to fruition, leaving the hard questions to be asked by practitioners such as Tintin Wulia, whose futuristic installation Not Alone reimagines the conflict 100 years in the future.

Questioning the legacy of the 1965 purges, talk of which was banned under Suharto, through art has become a lightning rod for conflict between the progressive community and conservative civil society groups and police. Yogyakarta, a city proud of its reputation as a place of tolerance, representative of the multiple identities found in Java, is a particular hotspot for protests, prompting an existential crisis.

Still, Nugroho never finds himself short of inspiration, echoing the oft-heard criticism of the Reformasi-era – how different is it really to before?

Even though Indonesia chose this new system, not many things have actually changed. The ways of thinking of those who run the country is still similar to [the New Order regime]. Twenty years is a short time. Those active in the New Order are still in power now.

That spectre influences the contemporary arts scene in Indonesia, Nugroho says. While Indonesian artists are less likely to be imprisoned for political works – a risk still faced by artists in neighbouring countries – there is a widespread and growing sense of self-censorship.

Nugroho believes this is because successive governments have been focused on the economic and political development of Indonesia, leaving fringe elements of civil society to rise unchecked. Younger artists in Indonesia were only children at the time of the upheaval in the late 1990s, and a division between them and artists of older generations has emerged.

Past fears are still brought up by senior artists, while the younger ones use political messages in more obvious ways. But the threats actually come from around us, from the society itself.

Nugroho points to extremist groups such as Jamaah Ansharut Daulah, a local affiliate of the Islamic State, as the “real censors”. Attacks such as those this month in Surabaya “create terror, fear, and anxiety”, and in turn give the government more scope to intervene in the name of security.

While that in itself is not unique to Indonesia, the relative newness of the country’s democracy creates pressure. Nugroho says:

[In Indonesia] everyone is still euphoric about being able to speak out, to criticise, or comment. Everyone talks, but it doesn’t mean they are ready for criticism. Everyone closes their ears. They want their own version of truth. We minimise research and data, and express our ego and personal opinions.

These teething pains have come to define much of Nugroho’s work and Indonesia’s global reputation in recent years.

This sort of democracy becomes interesting for me to observe, translated in my series of works with masks, although not in an obvious way. My works represent the stories I create which I wish the public can understand in their own ways and connect with what they’ve personally experienced, or with events they know.

Voir : https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/broad-strokes-indonesian-art-and-20-years-of-reformasi

 

10th Engaging with Vietnam : an interdisciplinary dialogue conference

10th Engaging with Vietnam : an interdisciplinary dialogue conference

Dichotomies in Knowledge Production: Vietnam through the Multiple Lenses of ‘Self-and-Other’

15-21 December 2018, Ho Chi Minh City & Khanh Hoa Province, Vietnam
Part 1: 15-16 December, Ho Chi Minh City
Part 2: 17 December, HCMC – Nha Trang City, Khanh Hoa (by express train)

Part 3: 17-21 December, Khanh Hoa Province

Co-organizers: University of Hawaii at Manoa – USA, University of Social Sciences and Humanities – Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City

2018 marks a milestone for Engaging With Vietnam – its 10th anniversary. We would like to invite you to the 10th Engaging With Vietnam Conference to experience another stimulating and enriching gathering that will take place all the way from Ho Chi Minh City to Khanh Hoa, a coastal province in Central Vietnam. A ride on an express train between the two cities promises a pleasant trip with amazing scenery that will stimulate both reflections and conversations. We are very delighted to have this opportunity to continue to tour Vietnam with the 10th conference participants. The conference venue in Khanh Hoa is right by the beach. How wonderful to engage in meaningful and rigorous academic sessions while being refreshed with ocean breezes and blue water!

To continue its interdisciplinary engagement, this 10th conference focuses in particular on dichotomies, the dichotomization of knowledge, and the discursive constructions of dichotomies in Vietnam-related knowledge production and scholarship. Dichotomies and dichotomization often come in the form of ‘Self and Other’ and/or in pairs of contrasts, such as ‘global – local’, ‘traditional – modern’, ‘Western values – Asian values’, ‘Vietnamese women – foreign women’, ‘nationalism – cosmopolitanism’, ‘developed – underdeveloped/developing’, ‘urban – rural’, ‘privileged – disadvantaged’, ‘active – passive’, ‘critical thinking – passive and rote learning’, ‘Global North – Global South’, and ‘Vietnam – ASEAN’, etc.

Continuer la lecture de 10th Engaging with Vietnam : an interdisciplinary dialogue conference

AAS CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR THE 2019 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

CFP :  AAS Annual Conference, 21-24 March 2019, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel in Denver, Colorado

On behalf of the Program Committee for the Association for Asian Studies, I am pleased to issue the Call for Proposals for the AAS Annual Conference to be held March 21-24, 2019 at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel in Denver, Colorado.

We are pleased to invite colleagues in Asian studies to submit proposals for Organized Panels, Roundtables, and Workshop sessions, in addition to Individual Papers proposals for the committees consideration. The program committee seeks sessions that will engage panelists and audiences in the consideration of ideas, information, and interpretations that will advance knowledge about Asian regions and, by extension, will enrich teaching about Asia at all levels. AAS Membership is not a requirement for the submission of a proposal or participation.

We have updated our Call for Proposals related webpages to try and make this process as simple and clear as possible. Please see the three-step guide below to start your submission process. The deadline for submission of all proposals and Late Developing Countries (LDC) travel grant requests is Wednesday, August 1 at 5pm Eastern Time. All proposals must be submitted electronically via the AAS electronic submission application. We will not accept proposals submitted via email. This proposal submission application will be available for submissions beginning Tuesday, May 29 through Wednesday, August 1, 2018. After the submission deadline, your proposal will be forwarded to the appropriate program committee members for review. You will find detailed instructions via the sections listed in the right hand column on this screen.

If you have any questions regarding panel participation or proposal submissions that are not answered in this Call for Proposals or the FAQ’s, please contact the AAS secretariat at AASconference@asian-studies.org.

We look forward to an exciting and intellectually stimulating conference in the mile high city of Denver that reflects the dynamism of Asian studies and the AAS.

Voir : http://www.asian-studies.org/Conferences/AAS-Annual-Conference/Conference-Menu/CALL-FOR-PROPOSALS/CFP-2019-Home

CFP : Vietnam Update 2018

CFP : Vietnam Update 2018, 12-13 November, Australian National University

The Vietnam Update in 2018 will be held from 12-13 November at the Australian National University. Conference Themes: Environment Society and Culture International Relations International Trade and Investment

Proposals for this Update should be no longer than 300 words, with final papers to be no longer than 8,000 words (including references). Priority will be given to papers based on original, unpublished research focusing on Vietnam and its relationships with regional neighbours and institutions across the four themes outlined above. The Update is expected to result in a publication of the papers. Proposals for papers are accepted on the understanding the Update organisers will have first right of refusal for papers accepted for presentation at the conference. Proposals must be submitted to Elizabeth St George (elizabethstgeorge@outlook.com), Conference convenor, by 20 June 2018. Final papers must be submitted by 30 October 2018.

 

CFP : Global Labor Migration: Past and Present

CFP : Global Labor Migration: Past and Present, 20-22 June 2019, The International Institute for Social History,  Amsterdam

About

Labor migration is a vast, global, and highly fluid phenomenon in the 21st century, capturing public attention and driving political controversy.  There are more labor migrants working in areas beyond their birth country or region than ever before.  Although scattered across the social ladder, migrant workers have always clustered, at least initially, in the bottom rungs of the working class.  Even as cross-border or inter-regional movement may beckon as a source of hope and new opportunity, the experience for the migrants and their families is often fraught with peril.  Labor migrants are vulnerable: they are exploited more easily by recruiters and employers, and are less likely to benefit from union representation.  They often face arrest or deportation when attempting to fight for their rights, and are bound to special documents that limit their ability to change jobs.  Moreover, as recent history reminds us, host-country fears directed towards labor migrants can also spark larger political movements characterized by nativist, racist, or even outright fascist tendencies.  Clearly, there is a need to combat fear with understanding and to reach for improved global regulations and standards to protect the rights and welfare of migrants alongside those of host country working people.

Because today global labor migration is shaping the lives of millions, and because it is receiving unprecedented attention by scholars, the newly-formed Global Labor Migration Network (GLMN) is currently planning for a Global Labor Migration Summit to take place in Amsterdam in summer 2019.  Involving scholars and activists from diverse parts of the globe and drawing on a wide variety of disciplines–including history, sociology, anthropology, ethnic studies, women and gender studies, public health, law and public policy–this project will bring international attention to one of the world’s most pressing issues, generate scholarly dialogue and new research agendas, and propose policies that can improve conditions for migrants.  The conference will also include a range of presentation formats: brief papers, roundtables, and open conversations.

Our keynote speakers for the conference have been announced! They are Donna Gabaccia of the University of Toronto and Bridget Anderson of the University of Bristol.

Continuer la lecture de CFP : Global Labor Migration: Past and Present

CFP : Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

CFP : Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

Rising Voices in Southeast Asian Studies – A SEAC / AAS Initiative with support from the journal, TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia

Submission Deadline: 15 June 2018

The Southeast Asia Council (SEAC) of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) is seeking paper proposals from up-and-coming scholars to join a “Rising Voices” panel on the broad topic of “Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia.” We seek to recruit early career scholars from Southeast Asian countries in order to form a panel for eventual inclusion in the 2019 Annual Conference of the Association for Asian Studies, to be held in Denver, CO from March 21-24, 2019.

The panel will be chaired by Dr. Nam C. Kim, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Once paper presenters have been selected, the chair, along with Dr. Oona Paredes, Assistant Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, will assist the panelists in preparing a panel abstract, facilitate revision of individual paper proposals, and offer mentoring and networking support to the panel participants, as needed.

With financial support from the AAS and the journal TRaNS: Trans-Regional and -National Studies of Southeast Asia, SEAC will be able to offer modest travel support to certain members of the panel with demonstrated need in traveling to the conference from Southeast Asia. It is hoped that participation in the panel will also enable scholars to obtain funding from other sources, including the individual country groups at AAS, as well as their home institutions, to stay for the whole conference. Once the panel is formed, the organizers will also make every effort to help panelists seek additional funding on the basis of demonstrated need. Upon completion of the conference, authors will be encouraged to submit their papers to TRaNS for potential publication, subject to peer-review.

Continuer la lecture de CFP : Archaeology, Heritage, and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

CFP : Forest and Society

CFP : Special Section @ The economies, ecologies and politics of social forestry in Indonesia: Current issues and emerging trends

After decades of advocacy for a greater role of local communities in the management of natural resources, social forestry has become a central policy commitment of the Indonesian government. At the national level, President Joko Widodo’s administration has committed to expanding social forestry areas to 12.7 million hectares to local community management by 2019. Such policy commitments emerged in response to the growing pressure from land conflicts, and a long struggle by advocacy groups to support recognition of rights and agrarian reform. These regulatory changes also represent major policy breakthroughs for more progressive governance strategies in support of social justice, equitable development practices, and better natural resource management. However, studies on the implementation of social forestry policy in the past remain inconclusive. Furthermore, the policy application is proceeding rapidly faster than the evaluative opportunity that research can provide.

The numerous social forestry permits being signed across Indonesia provide a timely area of inquiry. Evidence-based studies are still lacking on the processes and effects of the current policy imperative. Can social forestry achieve its promise of alleviating poverty, empowering communities and improving forest governance? And if so, in what ways? Additionally, few studies are available on the role of social forestry in responding to the broader and more contemporary issues such as climate change mitigation and adaptation, forest landscape and peatland restoration, global demands for sustainable value chains, timber legality, green economy, and upcoming initiatives on ASEAN economic integration.

Forest and Society is therefore initiating the first of its series on emerging trends of social forestry across Southeast Asia by examining dynamics taking place in Indonesia. The primary aim is to take stock of evidence on the rapid implementation of social forestry permits across Indonesia and to promote knowledge on the realities, achievements, challenges and pathways to sustainable strategies for the future. We invite authors from academics, researchers, students, concerned citizens, policy makers and forestry practitioners to contribute original research, on a range of methods (quantitative, qualitative, and mixed), to improve our collective understanding of social forestry in Indonesia. We invite paper submissions on politics, ecology, economy and culture. We also welcome research approaches at various scales, including review articles that take on a macro perspective or rich contextual studies of site-specific experiences, as well as comparative approaches across sites.

Submission Guidelines

Tentative publication schedule:

  • Submission     : May 2018 – August 2018
  • Peer Review    : Since submitted until October 2018
  • Publishing       : November 2018

For further information, read the full instruction for authors as well as the template: here, or submit your paper via the journal’s online submission site: here 

Please contact for any queries at

Voir : http://journal.unhas.ac.id/index.php/fs/index

 

 

CFP : Pratu

CFP : Pratu : Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia

Pratu: Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia is the initiative of a group of research students in the Department of History of Art and Archaeology at SOAS University of London in collaboration with departmental mentors. The journal is funded by the Alphawood Foundation, under the auspices of the Southeast Asian Art Academic Programme (SAAAP). The student editorial group works closely with an advisory group formed of members of SAAAP’s Research & Publications Committee.

Pratu is conceived as a site for emerging scholars to publish new research on the ancient to premodern Buddhist and Hindu visual and material culture of Southeast Asia. The journal’s remit adheres to that of SAAAP itself, covering ‘study of the built environment, sculpture, painting, illustrated texts, textiles and other tangible or visual representations, along with the written word related to these, and archaeological, museum and cultural heritage’.

Pratu means ‘gateway’ or ‘entrance’ in several Southeast Asian languages. The salience of the term for our project lies in its etymological development, where the application of Khmer morphology to Tai terminology to name architectural structures of Indic fame betrays the complexity of the historical evolution of Southeast Asian Buddhist and Hindu traditions. The journal is a gateway: a space of access and transition that reflects our aim to facilitate new scholars’ first experiences with academic publishing as they move from student to early career researcher status. This includes Southeast Asian scholars who would like to reach a wider readership by publishing in English translation and benefitting from the peer-review process. In this way Pratu offers greater exposure to scholars and new research, and furthers the development of inter-institutional and international collaboration.

Call for Papers:

Pratu: Journal of Buddhist and Hindu Art, Architecture and Archaeology of Ancient to Premodern Southeast Asia, inaugural issue, January 2019.

Deadline: 30 June 2018

Download the CFP

Site de la revue : https://pratujournal.org/