Archives par mot-clé : Répression

The Cell, Exile, and the New Burma: A Political Education amid the Unfinished Journey toward Democracy

« The Cell, Exile, and the New Burma: A Political Education amid the Unfinished Journey toward Democracy » by Kyaw Zwa Moe, Yangon, New Myanmar Publishing House, 2018, 245 p., 27/08/2018, Tea Circle Oxford

David Scott Mathieson explores the new collection of essays by noted journalist Kyaw Zwa Moe, an emotional palimpsest of lives lived under military rule.

There is a painful poignancy to reading Kyaw Zwa Moe’s powerful collection of essays on the 30th Anniversary of the 1988 Uprising in Burma. The Cell, Exile, and the New Burma is an attempt to close a long circle of personal struggle, sacrifice, violence, complexity and inspiration. Yet it is a journey that refuses to reconnect, as if the hopes of 1988 ricocheted off the reality of entrenched military rule.

The Irrawaddy magazine’s editor, columnist and political talk-show host, Kyaw Zwa Moe is one of the most prominent chroniclers of the past three decades of Burma’s political drama. His new book is a timely reminder of recent history and the people who lived it, the lessons imparted should be guides for the present and future. How far along has Burma come, where are many of the people who were involved, and how do they feel about ‘Shwe Myanmar a-thit’ (the new golden Burma)?

His book is arranged in four parts: prison, exile, a series of eclectic personalized profiles of Burmese activists, leaders, and ordinary lives during dictatorship, and the final section on the ‘New Burma’ as the author returns from 12 years of exile in Thailand and reflects on the changes taking place.

Kyaw Zwa Moe was a teenage high-school student when the 1988 anti-government demonstrations surged in 1988 to topple the Socialist one-party rule backed by a ruthless military. He joined them and took to the underground life of activism. First arrested in December 1991 for his underground activities, he spent the next eight years in the notorious Insein and Tharrawaddy prisons.

Lire la suite sur : https://teacircleoxford.com/2018/08/27/the-cell-exile-and-the-new-burma-a-political-education-amid-the-unfinished-journey-toward-democracy-by-kyaw-zwa-moe-yangon-new-myanmar-publishing-house-2018-245-pages/

 

 

With Social Media, Vietnam’s Dissidents Grow Bolder Despite Crackdown

Nguyen Anh Tuan, a human rights activist, said that when police interrogated him in 2011, he had no one to turn to. But now with supporters on Facebook, “I cannot feel lonely anymore,” he said.

« With Social Media, Vietnam’s Dissidents Grow Bolder Despite Crackdown » by Julia Wallace, 02/07/2017, The New York Times

HANOI, Vietnam — A prominent blogger and environmental activist in Vietnam was sentenced last week to 10 years in prison on charges of national security offenses, including sharing anti-state propaganda on social media.

Nguyen Ngoc Nhu Quynh, better known by her online handle Mother Mushroom, had been held incommunicado since she was arrested in October, and attendance at her trial was strictly controlled.

But barely one hour after the verdict was handed down on Thursday, one of Ms. Quynh’s lawyers summarized his arguments and posted her final statement at the trial to his 61,000 Facebook followers.

“I hope that everyone will speak up and fight, overcome their own fears to build a better country,” she said, according to the lawyer. The statement was reposted thousands of times.

 In authoritarian Vietnam, the internet has become the de facto forum for the country’s growing number of dissenting voices. Facebook connections in particular have mobilized opposition to government policies; they played a key role in mass protests against the state’s handling of an environmental disaster last year. Now, the government is tightening its grip on the internet, arresting and threatening bloggers, and pressing Facebook and YouTube to censor what appears on their sites.

“Facebook is being used as an organizing tool, as a self-publishing platform, as a monitoring device for people when they are being detained and when they get released,” said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch.

Lire la suite sur : https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/07/02/world/asia/vietnam-mother-mushroom-social-media-dissidents.html?