Archives par mot-clé : Minorités

Indonesia’s troubled minorities

Indonesia’s troubled minorities by Greg Fealy, 13/09/2018, The Sydney Morning Herald

Meiliana, a 44-year-old Buddhist mother of Chinese descent, sat crying in disbelief in a North Sumatra court in late August. The judges had just sentenced her to 18 months’ jail for blasphemy because she complained to a neighbor in 2016 about the ear-splitting volume of amplified calls to prayer from a nearby mosque. Her complaint had sparked violent backlash from local Muslim groups, who had stoned her home, forcing her and her family to flee to another city. They also attacked and seriously damaged twelve Buddhist temples in the area. The same court that sentenced her showed leniency to eight attackers arrested by police, giving them jail terms of just 1-2 months.

Meiliana’s story shone a spotlight on Indonesia’s draconian blasphemy laws and more broadly on how the nation treats its minorities. For a country that presents itself to the world as a moderate Muslim-majority democracy that respects diversity and enjoins religious and ethnic harmony, Indonesia has faced increasing criticism for rising intolerance and sectarianism. Human rights advocates argued that the violent reaction to Meiliana’s mosque complaint and her subsequent jailing are inseparable from the fact that she is from a double minority: Sino-Indonesians comprise less than 4 per cent of the nation and Buddhists less than 2 per cent. The Chinese have long been targets of social unrest, particularly from the majority Muslim community.

Assessing how moderate or intolerant Indonesia is towards its minorities is more difficult to assess than it might first appear. For example, a number of well-regarded non-government organisations annually compile figures on acts of religious intolerance. One such NGO, Setara Institute, recorded 201 breaches of religious freedom across Indonesia in 2017, most of which were directed at Christian, Buddhist, Hindu and Confucian minorities. Viewed in isolation, this is a significant number.

But on the other hand, in a religiously diverse nation of some 250 million people, several hundred cases might suggest that intolerance is relatively rare.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.smh.com.au/national/indonesia-s-troubled-minorities-20180913-p503i6.html

 

Peace and nation-building in Myanmar

Peace and nation-building in Myanmar by James T. Davies, 24/03/2017, New Mandala

James T. Davies reflects on the challenges to establishing a unified and conflict-free Myanmar.

Inclusion, understanding, autonomy, conflict and poverty – often far from the reach of the state — reflect just some of the challenges, as opportunities and progress, linked to the emergence of an inclusive national identity in Myanmar.

They were also the focus of an excellent panel discussion as part of the 2017 Myanmar Update hosted by the Australian National University on 17-18 February.

Cecile Medail, PhD Candidate at the University of New South Wales, began the panel with a look at the grassroots voices of Mon people in forming an inclusive national identity in Myanmar. The challenges of national identity during transition, and particularly for minority communities, were noted …

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/peace-nation-building-myanmar/

 

What’s (written) history for? On James C. Scott’s Zomia, especially Chapter 6½

Jean Michaud, « What’s (written) history for? On James C. Scott’s Zomia, especially Chapter 6½, » Anthropology Today, vol. 33, no. 1 (february 2017)

« Zomia. It sounds like a skin disease or some alarming bacteria. As it turns out, Zomia is a recently named space in Asia. As referred to in this article, Zomia encompasses the highlands of northeast India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and southwest China. Within these countries resides a combined population of over 100 million1 individuals officially registered as ‘national minorities’ by each respective government. For anthropologists who might have spent the last few years on a solitary digging trip to North Korea or foraging for tasty ontologies in Amazonia, let me start by teasing apart the term Zomia a little more, before I weigh in further on the Zomia debate. »

PDF à télécharger sur :  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-8322.12322/full