Archives par mot-clé : Migrations

Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia

UC Berkeley-UCLA Southeast Asian Studies Conference

Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia

Deadline: January 19, 2018

April 27-28, 2018 at UC Berkeley

Migrations have characterized Southeast Asian lives and livelihoods in different ways in different eras; they have affected work, settlement patterns, resource use, small and large investments, religion, and culture. Migrations have formed and changed the composition of Southeast Asian societies and given rise to complex cultural, social, environmental, and political problems and opportunities. Past and present, migrations have been both forced and voluntary: forced to make way for certain kinds of development; triggered by violence and war; but also intentional and, at times, pioneering: to change lives, secure new livelihoods, or explore new ecologies.

Contributors to this conference will discuss continuities and changes in migration practices, patterns, and personnel, addressing a wide range of historical periods, disciplines, and themes. Abstracts (up to 500 words) should be sent to CSEAS at UC Berkeley (cseas@berkeley.edu) by Friday, January 19, 2018. Abstracts should include your name, affiliation and discipline and contact information (including e-mail address).

Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia

International Conference Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia, 10-11/11/2017, Binghamton University, The State University of New York

Plenary lectures by:

ERIC TAGLIACOZZO (Cornell University)
Ghosts in the Machine: Technology and Maritime Imperialism in Southeast Asia
ANAND YANG (University of Washington)
Empire of Labor: Indian Convict Workers in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Southeast Asia
ANGELA SCHOTTENHAMMER (University of Salzburg)
Surgeons and Physicians on the Move in the Indo-Pacific Waters (15th to 18th Centuries)
RANABIR SAMADDAR (Calcutta Research Group)
Rohingyas: The Emergence of a Stateless Population

The celebrated author AMITAV GHOSH will deliver the keynote address:
Embattled Earth: Commodities, Conflict and Climate Change in the Indian Ocean Region
5 pm, Friday, November 10, 2017
Chamber Hall, Anderson Center, main campus of Binghamton University

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.binghamton.edu/iaad/conference/index.html

 

 

 

2016 Wang Gungwu Prize

2016 Wang Gungwu Prize : Burma–Bengal Crossings: Intercolonial Connections in Pre-Independence India by Devleena Ghosh in Asian Studies Review, vol. 40, no. 2

Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA) president Professor Kent Anderson announced that Devleena Ghosh, an associate professor at the University of Technology Sydney, had been awarded the prestigious annual award for the best article in Asian Studies Review in 2016.

The article explores cultural and personal flows across the Bay of Bengal and the modern states of Burma, West Bengal and Bangladesh.

Abstract :

The large-scale movement of people between Burma and Bengal in the early twentieth century has been explored recently by authors such as Sugata Bose and Sunil Amrith who locate Burma within the wider migratory culture of the Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal and Southeast Asia. This article argues that the long and historical connections between Bengalis and Burmese were transformed by the British colonisation of the region. Through an analysis of selected literary texts in Bengali, some by well-known and others by obscure writers, this article shows that, for Indians, Burma constituted an elsewhere where the fantastic and superhuman were within reach, and caste and religious constraints could be circumvented and radical possibilities enabled by masquerade and disguise.

Cet article est disponible sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10357823.2016.1158237