Archives par mot-clé : Media

CFP : Southeast Asian Media Studies, vol. 1, n° 3, december 2019

Objective

The third issue of the Southeast Asian Media Studies journal aims to provide a collection of research articles about the mass media of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam, bringing together discursive inquiries on media studies and literacy in and about the aforementioned countries.

Deadline : July 20, 2019

Recommended topics

• Emerging media theories in and about the mass media in/of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam;
• Critical reviews of media studies in and about the mass media in/of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam;
• Mass media literacies in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam;
• Audiences in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam;
• Media technologies and processes in/of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam;
• Media convergence in the contexts of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam;
• Politics and the media; Media policies and regulations
• Business, ownership, management, and control of mass media
• Cultures and media in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam;
• Mainstream, local, and indigenous media practices in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam; Local languages and the media;
• Genders and identities in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam media;
• Ecomedia in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam

Submission procedure

All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another journal or other forms of publication. Authors should follow the guidelines here: https://seamediastudies.wordpress.com/author-guidelines/

All manuscripts should be sent to editor.seams@gmail.com.

Plus d’informations sur : https://seamediastudies.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

If Indonesia wants to combat hoaxes it must fix its public broadcasters

If Indonesia wants to combat hoaxes it must fix its public broadcasters by Ross Tapsell, 25/09/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

On election night in 2014, Indonesians tuned in to two 24-hour news stations to see who won. On TVOne, Prabowo Subianto was touted as the winner. Over on MetroTV, Joko “Jokowi” Widodo was declared the winner. Given the partisan coverage of both stations throughout the election, it was not surprising that many viewers had no idea who actually won. Few bothered to check TVRI, Indonesia’s state-run television station.

Since then, citizens have become increasingly wary of partisan mainstream news sites, and are turning to a swathe of alternative online sources of information, some of which are deliberately produced to encourage sectarianism.

One solution to this problem is an independent, fearless, public media that could provide a serious alternative to privately owned conglomerates and the increasing spread of hoax news and disinformation online. Indonesia is in dire need of a robust publicly owned media in the digital era. Unfortunately, public broadcasting in Indonesia is ‘dying’ and needing ‘revitalisation’.

 In countries such as the United Kingdom (BBC), Australia (ABC), and Japan (NHK), nation-wide public broadcasters produce news and information across a variety of platforms, including the internet. In Australia, for example, the ABC has three digital television stations, a 24-hour news station that can be live-streamed online, and hundreds of local radio stations (which are also available online), as well as a growing online news and information presence through abc.net.au.

Indonesia’s public media looks more like the United States model, where television station PBS is underfunded and ignored by viewers, overpowered by privately owned cable news stations like Fox and CNN.

Lire la suite : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/if-indonesia-wants-to-combat-hoaxes-it-must-fix-its-public-broadcasters/