Archives par mot-clé : Jokowi

Talking Indonesia: the road to 2019

Talking Indonesia: the road to 2019 by Marcus Mietzner, 30/08/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

In early August, Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and Prabowo Subianto registered as the only candidates for Indonesia’s 2019 Presidential Election, repeating their head-to-head showdown from 2014.

Much has changed in Indonesia’s political landscape over the past five years. For one, both men have new running mates. Jokowi is no longer a new entrant to national politics – he will enter 2019 with a five-year track record to defend, focused on infrastructure and social spending. The massive Islamist mobilisation in 2016 against then Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama also continues to reverberate through the political system. Further, 2019 will be the first time that the legislative and presidential elections will be held on the same day – 17 April – owing to a Constitutional Court decision ordering that these elections no longer be held several months apart.

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses the electoral landscape nine months out from next year’s polls with leading political observer Associate Professor Marcus Mietzner from the Australian National University’s Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs. Marcus is currently a visiting fellow at Kyoto University.

In 2018, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-the-road-to-2019/

Ma’ruf Amin: Jokowi’s Islamic defender or deadweight?

« Ma’ruf Amin: Jokowi’s Islamic defender or deadweight? » by Greg Fealy, 28/08/2018, New Mandala

The image was incongruous: President Joko Widodo (Jokowi), who wants his presidency defined by Indonesia’s rapid economic development and modernisation, stood awkwardly before the media on 10 August with his newly announced vice-presidential candidate, Ma’ruf Amin, a 75-year-old conservative Islamic scholar clad in traditional sarung and sandals. Answering criticism of his choice, Jokowi praised his running mate as “an untarnished figure, a wise ulama (Islamic scholar) who is respected across the Islamic community”. He proclaimed that with Ma’ruf on his ticket religion and nationalism would complement each other.

Indeed, Ma’ruf Amin is the most powerful ulama in the nation. Since 2015, he has occupied two pre-eminent positions: rais aam (president) of Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), the nation’s largest Muslim organisation; and chairman of the Indonesian Ulama Council (MUI), the paramount state-endorsed body for issuing rulings on Islamic issues. Prior to this, he was an influential member of Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s Presidential Advisory Council (Wantimpres).

The story of how Ma’ruf came to be Jokowi’s presidential partner tells us much about the dynamics of contemporary Indonesian politics. As many commentators have observed, the president’s search for greater Islamic credibility was the primary reason for Ma’ruf’s elevation. But to explain why Ma’ruf rather than one of the many other prominent Islamic leaders was chosen requires a closer look at his career and sources of legitimacy. Conservatism has been an important, but by no means the only, element in his rise.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/maruf-amin-jokowis-islamic-defender-deadweight/

 

Critical Asian Studies, vol. 49, no. 1, March 2017

untitled

Critical Asian Studies, vol. 49, no. 1, March 2017

Thematic Issue: Rethinking Marriage Migration in Asia: Development, Gender and Transnationalism, Part II

Table of contents : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcra20/49/1

A signaler :

  • Three Islamist generations, one Islamic state: the Darul Islam movement and Indonesian social transformation by Andi Rahman Alamsyah & Vedi R. Hadiz
  • President Jokowi and the 2014 Obor Rakyat controversy in Indonesia by Adam Tyson & Budi Purnomo