Archives par mot-clé : Indonésie

Indonesia’s troubled minorities

Indonesia’s troubled minorities by Greg Fealy, 13/09/2018, The Sydney Morning Herald

Meiliana, a 44-year-old Buddhist mother of Chinese descent, sat crying in disbelief in a North Sumatra court in late August. The judges had just sentenced her to 18 months’ jail for blasphemy because she complained to a neighbor in 2016 about the ear-splitting volume of amplified calls to prayer from a nearby mosque. Her complaint had sparked violent backlash from local Muslim groups, who had stoned her home, forcing her and her family to flee to another city. They also attacked and seriously damaged twelve Buddhist temples in the area. The same court that sentenced her showed leniency to eight attackers arrested by police, giving them jail terms of just 1-2 months.

Meiliana’s story shone a spotlight on Indonesia’s draconian blasphemy laws and more broadly on how the nation treats its minorities. For a country that presents itself to the world as a moderate Muslim-majority democracy that respects diversity and enjoins religious and ethnic harmony, Indonesia has faced increasing criticism for rising intolerance and sectarianism. Human rights advocates argued that the violent reaction to Meiliana’s mosque complaint and her subsequent jailing are inseparable from the fact that she is from a double minority: Sino-Indonesians comprise less than 4 per cent of the nation and Buddhists less than 2 per cent. The Chinese have long been targets of social unrest, particularly from the majority Muslim community.

Assessing how moderate or intolerant Indonesia is towards its minorities is more difficult to assess than it might first appear. For example, a number of well-regarded non-government organisations annually compile figures on acts of religious intolerance. One such NGO, Setara Institute, recorded 201 breaches of religious freedom across Indonesia in 2017, most of which were directed at Christian, Buddhist, Hindu and Confucian minorities. Viewed in isolation, this is a significant number.

But on the other hand, in a religiously diverse nation of some 250 million people, several hundred cases might suggest that intolerance is relatively rare.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.smh.com.au/national/indonesia-s-troubled-minorities-20180913-p503i6.html

 

Talking Indonesia: the road to 2019

Talking Indonesia: the road to 2019 by Marcus Mietzner, 30/08/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

In early August, Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and Prabowo Subianto registered as the only candidates for Indonesia’s 2019 Presidential Election, repeating their head-to-head showdown from 2014.

Much has changed in Indonesia’s political landscape over the past five years. For one, both men have new running mates. Jokowi is no longer a new entrant to national politics – he will enter 2019 with a five-year track record to defend, focused on infrastructure and social spending. The massive Islamist mobilisation in 2016 against then Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama also continues to reverberate through the political system. Further, 2019 will be the first time that the legislative and presidential elections will be held on the same day – 17 April – owing to a Constitutional Court decision ordering that these elections no longer be held several months apart.

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses the electoral landscape nine months out from next year’s polls with leading political observer Associate Professor Marcus Mietzner from the Australian National University’s Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs. Marcus is currently a visiting fellow at Kyoto University.

In 2018, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-the-road-to-2019/

Ma’ruf Amin: Jokowi’s Islamic defender or deadweight?

« Ma’ruf Amin: Jokowi’s Islamic defender or deadweight? » by Greg Fealy, 28/08/2018, New Mandala

The image was incongruous: President Joko Widodo (Jokowi), who wants his presidency defined by Indonesia’s rapid economic development and modernisation, stood awkwardly before the media on 10 August with his newly announced vice-presidential candidate, Ma’ruf Amin, a 75-year-old conservative Islamic scholar clad in traditional sarung and sandals. Answering criticism of his choice, Jokowi praised his running mate as “an untarnished figure, a wise ulama (Islamic scholar) who is respected across the Islamic community”. He proclaimed that with Ma’ruf on his ticket religion and nationalism would complement each other.

Indeed, Ma’ruf Amin is the most powerful ulama in the nation. Since 2015, he has occupied two pre-eminent positions: rais aam (president) of Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), the nation’s largest Muslim organisation; and chairman of the Indonesian Ulama Council (MUI), the paramount state-endorsed body for issuing rulings on Islamic issues. Prior to this, he was an influential member of Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s Presidential Advisory Council (Wantimpres).

The story of how Ma’ruf came to be Jokowi’s presidential partner tells us much about the dynamics of contemporary Indonesian politics. As many commentators have observed, the president’s search for greater Islamic credibility was the primary reason for Ma’ruf’s elevation. But to explain why Ma’ruf rather than one of the many other prominent Islamic leaders was chosen requires a closer look at his career and sources of legitimacy. Conservatism has been an important, but by no means the only, element in his rise.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/maruf-amin-jokowis-islamic-defender-deadweight/

 

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 24 : Twenty Years after Suharto

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 24 : Twenty Years after Suharto

Table of contents

  • The New Normal: Indonesian Democracy Twenty Years after Suharto by Paige Johnson Tan
  • From Autocracy to Coalitional Presidentialism: The Post-Authoritarian Transformation of Indonesia’s Presidency by Marcus Mietzner
  • Quo Vadis Civil Islam? Explaining Rising Islamism in Post-Reformasi Indonesia by Alexander R. Arifianto
  • Twenty Years After Suharto: Dynastic Politics and Signs of Subnational Authoritarianism by Yoes C. Kenawas
  • The Trajectories of Transitional Justice and Its Discontents in Indonesia by Ehito Kimura

A lire sur : https://kyotoreview.org/

Symposium : Panji stories in manuscripts and performance

Symposium : Panji stories in manuscripts and performance, 21/09/2018, Leiden University Library

The Prince of Jenggala and the many faces of Panji

Panji stories are among the most popular works of Indonesian literature, art and theatre. To celebrate the recent Unesco-recognition of this important genre, the Leiden University Library and KITLV will hold a one-day symposium in Leiden on 21 September 2018 exploring Panji stories in manuscripts, paintings and dramatic performance. Through scholarly as well as artistic presentations, this broad-scope symposium will emphasize the many different ways in which these ancient stories were and still are passed on. It showcases the genre in all its diversity, including versions from different Indonesian and Mainland Southeast Asian regions, written or chanted texts, paintings and scrolls, and dramatic performances with masks or puppets. We close the day with a Javanese wayang-play presenting an exciting new interpretation of the Panji theme.

Wayang performance

The Javanese puppeteer Agus Bimo Prayitno and his musicians will finish the day with a unique and innovative shadow puppet theatre (wayang kulit) performance on Prince Panji. In this performance Panji features as a metaphor for Javanese farmers. They are encouraged to ensure the availability of water for their plots and households by taking care of their natural environment. The performance will take place in the Lipsius building, room 0.19, 15.30-16.30 hrs.

Programme

Leiden University Library, Vossius Room

9.30 -10.00 hrs
Arrival, coffee & tea

10.00 – 10.10 hrs
Word of welcome by Marije Plomp and Doris Jedamski (Asian Library)

10.10 – 10.30 hrs
Roger Tol and Wardiman Djojonegoro (under reserve), Background of the UNESCO recognition of Panji manuscripts.

10.30 – 11.00 hrs
Gijs Koster, Between Love and Domination: the Malay Hikayat Kuda Semirang Sira Panji Pandai Rupa.

11.00 – 11.30 hrs
Lydia Kieven, A comparative study of illustrations of Jayakusuma manuscripts in Jakarta, British Library, and Staatsbibliothek Berlin.

11.30 – 12.00 hrs
Peter Worsley, The rhetoric of paintings: the Balinese Malat and the prospect of a history of Balinese ideas, imaginings and emotions in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Leiden University Library, Heinsius room

12.00 – 14.00 hrs
Exhibition of Panji manuscripts, photographs and paintings from Leiden University Library/KITLV collections

12.00 – 12.15 and 12.30 – 12.45 hrs
Hedi Hinzler, Balinese wayang paintings on cloth and their stories.

13.00 – 14.00 hrs lunch break

14.00 – 14.30 hrs
Tea Skrinjaric, Unrolling the Story: Wayang Beber on Java

14.30 – 15.00 hrs
Clara Brakel and Silvy Puntowati, Panji stories as masked performances in Central Java. With a demonstration of Panji masks by dance group Kuwung-kuwung

15.00 – 15.30 hrs tea break

Lipsius building, room 0.19

15.30 – 16.30 hrs
Performance of Wayang Jantur (innovative Indonesian shadow puppet theatre based on Panji stories) Dhalang Agus Bimo Prayitno and musicians, with an introduction by Lydia Kieven.

Registration

We hope to welcome you at the symposium and/or wayang performance on 21 September. Please let us know if you’re joining us by sending us an email: aanmelding@library.leidenuniv.nl (subject: Symposium Panji stories and number of attendees) or by phone: 071-527 28 32. If you just want to attend the wayang performance in the Lipsius building, no registration is needed.

Voir : https://www.library.universiteitleiden.nl/news/2018/08/symposium-panji-stories-in-manuscripts-and-performance

The virtual museum of Balinese painting

The virtual museum of Balinese painting

The Virtual Museum of Balinese Painting brings the unique art of Bali to the world as well as providing Balinese communities with an invaluable cultural resource. The Virtual Museum is an online database of Balinese paintings which documents public and private collections held in different parts of the world.

The project began as a collaboration between researchers at the University of Sydney and the Australian Museum, together with input from the holder of a private collection of artworks painted in the village of Batuan in central Bali.

Some of the first entries showcased the ancient classical art of the village of Kamasan, Klungkung in east Bali. Kamasan paintings have been documented in a number of important collections such as the Australian Museum’s Forge Collection, and the collections of the American Museum of Natural History, the Leiden Ethnographic Museum, and the Tropen Museum in Amsterdam.

The Bali Cultural Service (Dinas Kebudayaan Bali) has provided valuable support for the project and granted permission to include the relatively unknown public collections in Bali, especially that of the Museum Bali, the island’s most important cultural repository. The incorporation of a database of works which belonged to the collection of Leo Haks further enhanced the scope of the project. The project was funded by a grant from the Australian Research Council and was led by the University of Sydney’s Adrian Vickers and Peter Worsley, together with Siobhan Campbell and staff from Australian Museum, in particular Stan Florek. The late Thomas Freitag played an indispensable role in the whole project. The website uses Heurist database software, and has been designed by Steven Hayes with programming by Steve White. Bruce Granquist, Wayan Jarrah Sastrawan, James Watson and Safrina Thristiawati carried out important research support. Site design is by Ireneusz Golka.

Experiencing Balinese culture

The government-run Bali Culture Service provides information on key events and places of cultural interest, such as the annual Balinese Cultural Festival (Pesta Kesenian Bali), held in June/July.

Major private art museums on Bali include the Museum Puri Lukisan, the Neka Art Museum, and the Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA) in Ubud, the Nyoman Gunarsa Museum in Klungkung, and the Museum Pasifika in Nusa Dua.

On peut explorer le site par artiste, par collection ou par récit (ex : Adiparwa, Calon Arang, Sutasoma …)

Voir : http://sydney.edu.au/heurist/balipaintings/

 

Digitising ‘sacred heirloom’ in private collections in Kerinci, Sumatra, Indonesia (EAP117)

Digitising ‘sacred heirloom’ in private collections in Kerinci, Sumatra, Indonesia (EAP117) – Endangered Archives Programme (British Library)

View archives from this project (1,419)

Aims and objectives

The highlands of Sumatra remain one of the most neglected regions of insular Southeast Asia in terms of philology, history and archaeology. Our knowledge of highland life and political-economic ties with the lowlands and other parts of Southeast Asia remains limited, relying mainly on the first European accounts from the beginning of the 19th century. Manuscripts and artefacts from the material culture are hence the most valuable sources of information about the region. The project is expected to reveal substantial data on the trading connections between the highlands and the lowlands, providing additional clues to the interpretation of the archaeological data.

Of the more than 80 private collections held in Kerinci with over 200 manuscripts and hundreds of artefacts, this project intends to cover about 40-60 collections, resulting in a digital archive of rare ancient manuscripts and artefacts from the 14th to the 20th century.

Some of the manuscripts and artefacts have already almost completely disintegrated while others are in better condition, but the majority are in a suitable state for copying. The materials are kept as sacred heirlooms and getting access to the materials is subject to negotiations with the caretakers and is time-consuming. During several small-scale pilot projects a small number of manuscripts were documented, enabling a good network to be established and support gained from senior figures of the Kerinci society, including the regent (bupati) of the Kerinci regency. Through this network of support it will be relatively easy for permission to be granted to document the collections.

There will be close cooperation with archaeologists to classify the artefacts and gather as much background information about provenance, distribution, and age of the artefacts as possible. The manuscripts will also be closely examined and all manuscripts in the Kerinci script will be character mapped for a possible reconstruction of the development of the Kerinci script and its relation to neighbouring Sumatran scripts. Malay language manuscripts will be examined in cooperation with Indonesian and international scholars.

It is planned to centrally store all information (digital images, descriptions, and transliteration) in a searchable database, which will be made available to the national libraries of the three Malay speaking countries Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, the Indonesian National Archive, the British Library, and a selected number of national and international libraries with a strong SEA focus. The database will also be accessible online.

Visit the project website and view some of the digital collections.

Outcomes

Blog: Heirloom manuscripts from Jambi – October 2014

The records copied by this project have been catalogued as:

  • EAP117/1 Sultan Mandaro Putih Collection
  • EAP117/2 Depati Singolago Tuo Collection
  • EAP117/3 Iskandar Zakaria Collection
  • EAP117/4 Pak Man Collection
  • EAP117/5 Yusuf Hasyim Collection …

Talking Indonesia: local leadership

« Talking Indonesia: local leadership » by Bima Arya Sugiarto, 02/08/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

The 2018 regional elections brought victories for several candidates who have made a name for themselves as innovative and reform-oriented. Thanks to their successes in raising living standards, making local bureaucracies more efficient and creating urgently needed public spaces, young leaders such as Ridwan Kamil, Ganjar Pranowo, Nurdin Abdullah and Bima Arya Sugiarto won convincing election victories in some of Indonesia’s most populous regions.

But can this new breed of local leaders really change entrenched patterns of politics in Indonesia? How do they navigate established patronage channels? And how do they see their place within the broader political environment in Indonesia today?

In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these and other questions with one of these young politicians, Dr Bima Arya Sugiarto, the recently re-elected mayor of Bogor.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-local-leadership/

Talking Indonesia: the 2018 regional elections

Talking Indonesia: the 2018 regional elections, 05/07/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

On 27 June, Indonesia held elections for mayors and governors in 154 districts and 17 provinces. It was the third and final round of such regional elections – referred to as pilkada – in this five year electoral cycle.

The 2018 pilkada were particularly significant, for several reasons. They included gubernatorial elections in five provinces that between them account for more than half of Indonesia’s population: West Java, Central Java, East Java, North Sumatra and South Sulawesi.

It was also the first opportunity to observe how the divisive dynamics of the 2017 Jakarta gubernatorial elections might affect future elections. And with the national legislative and presidential elections now less than a year away, in April 2019, these local elections have been watched closely for any clues as to how next year’s political contests might play out.

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses this round of local elections, their results and their broader implications with a panel of leading political observers: Dr Charlotte Setijadi (ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute and Talking Indonesia co-host), Dr Philips Vermonte (executive director of the Centre for Strategic and International Studies, CSIS) and Dr Eve Warburton (ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute).

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-the-2018-regional-elections/

2018 regional elections: why is there a disconnect between local and national politics?

« 2018 regional elections: why is there a disconnect between local and national politics? » by Abdil Mughis Mudhoffir and Rafiqa Qurrata A’yun, 18/07/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

In late June, Indonesia held elections for district heads, mayors and governors in 171 regions. Many observers predicted the elections would exacerbate the polarisation of society — between Islamists on one hand and nationalists on the other — mirroring the dynamics of the 2017 Jakarta gubernatorial election.

Religious identity politics did play a role in some local election outcomes, as we discuss below. However, observers also predicted the local elections would reflect political alliances at the national level. In fact, most coalitions supporting candidates at the local level represented different political alliances and different divisions to those seen at the national level.

If anything, the regional elections demonstrated that there is no decisive ideological line differentiating most parties from the others. Political alliances are highly flexible and there appear to be no definitive political enemies.

For example, at the national level, Gerindra and the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) are opposition parties, but in local contests they readily align themselves with the same parties they oppose at the national level. Interestingly, decisions to build local political alliances are often made by the members of the party’s central board, not the local branches.

Lire la suite sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/2018-regional-elections-why-is-there-a-disconnect-between-local-and-national-politics/

Trading blows: NU versus PKS

« Trading blows: NU versus PKS » by Greg Fealy, 10/07/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

How did a visit to Israel by a senior Islamic figure lead to members of Indonesia’s largest Islamic organisation, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), accusing the nation’s second largest Islamic party, the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS), of behaving like communists who are out to destroy Indonesia? This is a tale about the fevered state of Islamic discourse in Indonesia, one nurtured in the hothouse of social media. It has been fuelled by long-standing and deepening doctrinal animosities as well as competing political interests. Its resonance will be felt in next year’s legislative and presidential elections.

The saga began in early June, when Yahya Cholil Staquf, the secretary of NU’s Religious Council (PB Syuriah) and a member of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s Advisory Council (Wantimpres) visited Israel. He travelled at the invitation of the advocacy group the American Jewish Committee (AJC) and gave a series of public lectures as well as met political and religious leaders and academics.

Yahya claimed he went to Israel out of concern for the Palestinians and a desire to foster peace in the Middle East. He also invoked the name of Abdurrahman Wahid (“Gus Dur”), Indonesia’s fourth president and former NU chair, who visited Israel on numerous occasions and served on the advisory board of the Peres Centre for Peace. Yahya ignored advice from many of his NU colleagues not to go and travelled without the approval of the NU Central Board.

News of the visit broke in the Islamic media on 9 June, sparking immediate controversy. When, a few days later, the Israeli press carried pictures of Yahya shaking hands with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Islamist groups reacted angrily, calling on NU and President Widodo to censure or dismiss him for undercutting Indonesia’s long-standing pro-Palestinian policy and for playing into the hands of an Israeli government that had only recently shot dead more than 50 Palestinians on the Gaza border. Criticism of Yahya sharpened when it was reported that he failed to meet any Palestinian leaders and had been “severely censured” by Hamas in a press statement on 11 June.

Lire la suite sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/trading-blows-nu-versus-pks/

The Pain Haka burial ground on Flores : Indonesian evidence for a shared Neolithic belief system in Southeast Asia

The Pain Haka burial ground on Flores : Indonesian evidence for a shared Neolithic belief system in Southeast Asia, Antiquity, vol. 90, n° 354, December 2016

Article en libre accès

Abstract

Recent excavations at the coastal cemetery of Pain Haka on Flores have revealed evidence of burial practices similar to those documented in other parts of Southeast Asia. Chief among these is the use of pottery jars alongside other forms of container for the interment of the dead. The dating of the site combined with the fact that this burial practice is present over such a wide geographic area suggests a widespread belief system during the Neolithic period across much of Southeast Asia.

A télécharger sur : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/pain-haka-burial-ground-on-flores-indonesian-evidence-for-a-shared-neolithic-belief-system-in-southeast-asia/314A2E3F53E1D81908983446B369855A

Nahdlatul Ulama and the politics trap

« Nahdlatul Ulama and the politics trap » by Greg Fealy, 11 July 2018, New Mandala

At first glance, Indonesia’s largest Islamic organisation, Nahdlatul Ulama (NU), has never been in a stronger position. It has a record number of members in cabinet. It enjoys close relations with the president, Joko Widodo (Jokowi), has privileged access to the corridors of power and is the beneficiary of increasingly generous largesse from the state, all of which are boosting the range of services and opportunities that it can provide to its vast membership. NU’s president, Ma’ruf Amin, is also the chairman of the influential Indonesian Ulama Council (MUI) and numerous other senior nahdliyyin (NU members) hold strategic positions in the bureaucracy, state-owned enterprises and the corporate sector. NU’s campaign to promote its “moderate”, culturally embedded Islam Nusantara (Archipelagic Islam) concept has won government endorsement and attracted international attention. In short, NU’s status as the pre-eminent Islamic organisation in Indonesia has never seemed more secure.

A closer look, however, suggests that the organisation’s position is more vulnerable and its future more uncertain than its current exuberant confidence might indicate. Indeed, NU is to an extent emblematic of some of the challenges facing Indonesia’s civil society more broadly. Among these are the increasing influence of conservative views at the grassroots, the hazards of engagement with party politics, and the increasingly blurred boundary between the state and civil society as the latter seeks to capture state resources, and governments seek to co-opt civic organisations such as NU to service their goals.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/nahdlatul-ulama-politics-trap/

Yanger : Tracing the Roots of Halmahera String Bands

Yanger : Tracing the Roots of Halmahera String Bands, 8 June 2018, Aural Archipelago

We can begin by zooming in on Halmahera, an island shaped like a pair of chromosomes, a miniature twin of the lotus-like Sulawesi to the west. One of the largest islands in Maluku, Halmahera was nonetheless historically dwarfed by the tiny island kingdoms which cling to its eastern shores: the small, volcano-studded Ternate, Tidore, and Bacan. Halmahera had its own mysterious kingdom on this western flank called Jailolo, a name so powerful it was once used to refer to the whole island. Still, it’s a peripheral place, especially in modern day Indonesia.

Spend a week in Halmahera, like I did, and you’ll find a place where traces of these rich, world-changing histories are still apparent: nutmeg trees cling to the perfect volcanic dome of Mt. Jailolo, and old colonial-era forts crumble near its black sand beaches. You’re also bound to find music: there’s tifa, booming log drums also found across Melanesia; there’s togal, music for conspicuously western dances played on a violin-like fiddle called fiol. Then there’s my favorite of all, a music at once familiar and enigmatic, a music which wraps up hundreds of years of history in a tuneful package: yanger.

Yanger, you could say, is the local take on a string band tradition that spans the Pacific. It is partly from this angle that yanger gets its familiarity: just as yanger combines upbeat lutes, rubbery bass, and major key melodies, so too do its cousins across the Melanesian and Polynesian world, from string bands in the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu all the way to joyous yospan in Papua and similar forms across the border in PNG. While Halmahera sits on the edge of the Melanesian world, yanger‘s link with this wider world of Pacific Island string bands is a mystery. While those musics seem intuitively like long-lost cousins, their histories are completely different, with those styles often being the result of Western contact during and after World War II. A different, perhaps more complex set of histories is at play here with yanger in Halmahera.

Lire la suite et écouter les enregistrements  sur : http://www.auralarchipelago.com/

 

 

Pirates lands: Governance and maritime piracy

Seminar : « Pirates lands : Governance and maritime piracy » by Ursula Daxecker, 21 June 2018, KITLV

Abstract
Piracy—like civil war, terrorism, and other organized crime—is a problem of weak and fragile states. But while helpful in identifying the countries most affected by maritime piracy, focusing on the weakness of entire countries does little to further our understanding of why piracy clusters close to some coastal communities but not to others. Our book argues that local governance and infrastructural development help explain pirate location. Pirate operations require substantial upfront investments, aided by proximity to markets and infrastructure. For sophisticated attacks, a group leader or boss provides pirates with a boat, fuel, equipment, and money to bribe officials. We therefore expect that in weak or failed states, pirates will operate in coastal areas where local governance is weak enough to incentivize collusion among pirates and authorities, yet strong enough to ensure that infrastructure and markets are sufficiently developed to permit the organization of sustained piracy. We examine our arguments empirically in quantitative analyses of local governance patterns and piracy in Indonesia. Field research conducted in Indonesia’s Riau Islands helps us to further assess the plausibility of theoretical mechanisms. Interviews with former pirates, community members, and journalists highlight the importance of access to markets and infrastructure for pirate operations, and also provided us with numerous examples of tacit and active collusion by local governance providers and the community.

Speaker
Ursula Daxecker is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam and a member of the Amsterdam Institute of Social Science Research. Her work explores the determinants of election violence and organized crime. She is currently completing a book manuscript on maritime piracy (co-authored with Brandon Prins). She also recently completed a four-year research project collecting disaggregated data on electoral contention and violence funded by the Dutch Science Foundation and the EC’s Marie Curie actions. She is associate editor at European Journal of International Relations and International Interactions. Her work is published in British Journal of Political Science, Journal of Peace Research, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Public Choice, Electoral Studies, among others.

Voir : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/seminar-piracy-riau-ursula-daxecker/