Archives par mot-clé : Cinéma

10th Biennial Association for Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference

Call for papers: 10th Biennial Association for Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference, July 23-26, 2018, Yogyakarta, Indonesia: The Politics of Faith, Spirituality, and Religion in Southeast Asian Cinemas

Deadline for the submission of abstracts : 30/10/2017

Possible topics include, but are by no means limited to:
  • Representation of religion, religious themes, and spirituality in cinema
  • Faiths, identity-based politics, sectarianism
  • Cinema as a vehicle for the adaptation and continual development of religious or traditional ideologies and systems of thought
  • Cinema as a mediator between religious and political authorities and the public
  • Cinematic reference to, or quotation of, traditional systems of belief and forms of expression
  • Cinema and Institutional investment in defining and promoting tradition
  • Faith/religion and reception, exhibition, distribution (ex. themed festivals)
  • Films as interventions into religious politics/cultures and sectarian politics
  • Faith/religion/spirituality, film, and consumer culture
  • Religion and censorship
  • Islamic themed films as a contemporary phenomena in Indonesia and Malaysia (and elsewhere)

Please send an abstract (max. 300 words) and short bio (max. 100 words) to: Katinka Van Heeren (cvanheeren@hotmail.com), Patrick Campos (patrick.campos@gmail.com), and Sophia Harvey (soharvey@vassar.edu).

Voir : http://www.cseashawaii.org/deadlines/conferences/

 

“Never take the unchanging province for granted”

ASEAN Film Festival winner Kirsten Tan: “Never take the unchanging province for granted”, 26/07/2017, The Isaan Record

A weary man approaches the camera, his purple umbrella barely reaching the eyes of the elephant beside him. There is no rain for the umbrella, but it shields him from the harsh sun as he travels from the country’s urban center to a rural border province in Isaan. The journey is demanding, not just physically but emotionally in a trip down memory lane.

Pop Aye, the debut feature by Kirsten Tan, a Singaporean filmmaker based in New York, follows a Bangkok architect’s journey to his hometown in Loei Province. The protagonist, Thana, explores his past amidst a midlife crisis alongside his childhood companion, the film’s titular elephant.

Tan was raised in Singapore and lived in South Korea and Thailand before moving to New York. She completed a Master’s in Film Production at New York University. Her work has been showcased in over 40 international film festivals, including Sundance Film Festival 2017, where Pop Aye won the Special Jury Prize in Screenwriting.

In May, Pop Aye went on to win the Grand Jury Prize at ASEAN Film Festival 2017 in Bangkok, where the film premiered in Thailand.

The Isaan Record talks to Tan about Pop Aye’s portrayal of the urban-rural divide in Thailand and the nostalgia Thana and Pop Aye’s travels evoke.

Lire la suite sur : http://isaanrecord.com/2017/07/26/asean-film-festival-kirsten-tan/

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence by Maggie Lee, 21/05/2017, Variety

Something invigorating and full-bodied is brewing in Indonesia, and it’s not a cup of mocha java. It’s a cinematic resurgence, the biggest since the early 2000s, when Rudy Soedjarwo’s 2002 teen romance Apa ada dengan cinta? (What’s With Love?) rocked the Southeast Asia market while in the same year Riri Riza’s Eliana Eliana stunned the festival circuit with femme-centric social realism.

In September 2016, Warkop DKI Reborn: Jangkrik Boss Part 1, a reboot of a police slapstick comedy by 1980s comic trio Dono, Kasino and Indro (DKI), became the most-viewed Indonesian film in history, with 6.8 million tickets sold. For the first time, the top 10 domestic films enjoyed more than 1 million admissions, with horror Danur taking the top spot in 2017. According to Korean industry giant CJ CGV, exhibition of local films at its theatrical chain in Indonesia rose from 5% to 23% last year.

The arthouse scene is also flourishing, with second-generation directors Edwin, Joko Anwar, Lucky Kuswandi and Teddy Soeriaatmadja turning up at top festivals alongside relative newcomers including Eddie Cahyono (Siti) and Yosep Anggi Noen (Solo Solitude). In fact, there is talk of a new wave, or neo-neorealism, that explores gritty contemporary subjects about politics or gender with stylized, poetic film language.

A new height has been scored by the selection of Marlina, the Murderer in Four Acts in this year’s Directors’ Fortnight, the third Indonesian feature to bow in Cannes. It is also the third feature by Mouly Surya, whose sophomore feature, What They Don’t Talk About When They Talk About Love, premiered at Sundance 2013.

Australia-educated Surya, whose auteur influences are Stanley Kubrick, Michael Haneke and Abbas Kiarostami, cites Garin Nugroho’s Of Love and Eggs and Sjumandjaja’s biopic of women’s rights champion R.A. Kartini as her entry point to national cinema. It was Nugroho, the country’s most distinguished filmmaker, who proposed her to direct Marlina, based on a treatment developed from his visit to Sumba Island, an isolated, arid territory that resembles Texas.

Taking cues from Japanese samurai and Chinese martial arts that fused Western elements, she refashioned the Italo-American genre into a vehicle to examine male violence and patriarchal dominance in Southeast Asian backwaters such as Sumba, while highlighting the indigenous women’s unique air of mystery, sensuality and reliance. The women in Surya’s films bleed in key moments and there will be blood in Marlina, too.

“In my debut Fiksi [written by Joko Anwar], the heroine lost her virginity; in my second film, the blind protagonist had her first period,” Surya says. “Marlina doesn’t spill her own blood, but that of others, symbolizing the strength of women from Sumba. My female characters have grown up. Marlina is a full-grown woman, a widow who finds strength in grief.”

Voir : http://variety.com/2017/film/asia/indonesia-film-industry-recognized-at-cannes-1202437479/

 

Nang Magazine, n° 2 : Scars and Death

NANG Magazine, n° 2 : Scars and Death

Guest-editors  : Yoo Un-Seong & John Torres

NANG is an English-language 10-issue magazine which covers cinema and cinema cultures in the Asian world with passion and insight.

Issue 2 is dedicated to Scars and Death. We asked writers, filmmakers, scholars, bloggers, and artists from Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, the USA, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, India, and Kazakhstan to pitch in without feeling the need to conform to a particular form or tone of writing. Write about scars and death. Die for the piece and swear by it. For the scarred workers, the dedicated, the desperate enough, for those dying to be offered another chance. For the films we have lost, the scenes that are scarred by time, those missing frames, abrupt endings and low resolutions. For the ones who died on- and off-screen, for deaths we haven’t seen. For those who risk life savings for a fictional piece. For all others who toil away, INT/EXT, their bodies taking it, DAY/NIGHT.

Yoo Un-Seong is a film critic, co-publisher of OKULO (a quarterly magazine on cinema and the moving image), and Lecturer at the Korea National University of Arts (K’ARTS). He worked as a programmer of the Jeonju International Film Festival from 2004 to 2012.

John Torres is a filmmaker, writer, musician. Does filmmaking workshops and hosts talks for independently run film and artist space “Los Otros” (with Shireen Seno). Feature films include Todo Todo Teros (2006) and Lukas the Strange (2013). Singer for Taggu nDios, working on their debut EP.

Vous pouvez suivre NANG sur son blog ou vous abonner à sa Newsletter, excellente source sur les ressources et les événements concernant le cinéma d’Asie.

Vous pouvez également aller feuilleter la revue à Paris, à la Librairie du Cinéma du Panthéon.

Site : https://www.nangmagazine.com/

Framing Asia

Framing Asia is a monthly film screening and discussion on Asia during the Leiden Asia Year.

Framing Asia is organised by by the KITLV (Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean), the IIAS (International Institute for Asian Studies), the department CA-DS (Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology) and Studium Generale of University Leiden.

You are welcome to join us on Tuesday 11 April at 19.30 h at Lipsius 028. This edition will screen two films on Popcultures and subcultures.

The first film is titled That’s Wicked (11 min) and directed by Joycelyn Lee. It follows the 15 year old Martin who introduces us to the world of beatboxing in Singapore.

The second film, The Silk Road of Pop (53 min), produced by Sameer Farooq, Ursula Engel and Stijn Deklerck shows us the vibrant music scene of the Uyghur youth in Xinjiang, China.

Afterwards, Ursula Engel (co-director of The Silk Road of Pop) will join our discussion with Bart Barendregt. Bart Barendregt is an associate professor at the Leiden Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology. He has an interest in popular and digital culture, and has published on Southeast Asian performance, new and mobile media, and (Islamic) pop music.

Voir les séances précédentes, Transgender issues in Indonesia, Disaster and the failing state sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/framing-asia

Lav Diaz : Journeys

Lav Diaz : Journeys, 27/01/2017 – 12/03/2017, London Gallery West

London Gallery West is proud to be the first London venue to present six films by Lav Diaz, one of the greatest radical artists of contemporary cinema. For this exhibition the gallery space will be transformed into an inviting cinema environment to screen a rotating programme of Diaz’s extraordinary epics.

Independent Filipino filmmaker Diaz describes himself as a storyteller who makes films about the struggles of his people. His films tell quiet tales of everyday sorrow and resilience, and of the existential quest of a people betrayed by the postcolonial nation state. His films demonstrate a radical reworking of melodrama that extends the possibilities of cinema by combining physical cinematic realism with poetry, modernist literature, painterly landscape, musical improvisation, theatrical performance, ritual intensity and duration.

Shot mostly in black and white, Diaz makes notoriously long films with the economy of means afforded by digital. Diaz’s method of filmmaking exemplifies an organic process that merges fictional storytelling with the material density and tempo of the locality of shooting. Astonishing rhythmic pacing creates a powerful dialectic between the microscopic gestures and steadfast movements of powerless bodies, the immensity of natural and historical forces, and spectral presence.

Diaz was winner of the Golden Lion at the 2016 Venice Film Festival, the Silver Bear Alfred Bauer award at the 2016 Berlin Film Festival, among other prestigious prizes. He is a Radcliffe–Harvard Film Study Center Fellow. Retrospectives of his work have recently been held at the Jeu de Paume Museum, Courtisane Festival, and the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

A programme of talks will take place throughout the exhibition and Diaz will be in attendance in March for an international symposium on his films and artistic practice hosted by the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media.

For the screening programme schedule, Gallery talks and symposium see : https://www.westminster.ac.uk/news-and-events/events/lav-diaz-journeys

La femme qui est partie, Lav Diaz

109459-jpg-r_1920_1080-f_jpg-q_x-xxyxx

La femme qui est partie, Lav Diaz (2016)

Le dernier film de Lav Diaz, qui a remporté le Lion d’Or lors de la 73e Mostra de Venise, sort aujourd’hui, 1er février 2017, sur les écrans en France.

Synopsis

Horacia Somorostro sort de prison en 1997 après avoir passé trente ans derrière les verrous pour un crime qu’elle n’a pas commis. Alors qu’elle retrouve sa fille, Horacia apprend que son mari est mort et que son fils a disparu. Elle comprend rapidement que son ancien amant, le riche Rodrigo Trinidad, fait partie de ceux qui ont conspiré pour la faire arrêter. Trinidad vit désormais reclus chez lui, dans la terreur d’être victime d’un enlèvement. Horacia commence alors à fomenter un plan pour se venger…

Lire la critique de Pierre Murat et voir la bande-annonce officielle sur : http://www.telerama.fr/cinema/films/la-femme-qui-est-partie,512185.php