Archives par mot-clé : Asie du Sud-Est

10th Biennial Association for Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference

Call for papers: 10th Biennial Association for Southeast Asian Cinemas Conference, July 23-26, 2018, Yogyakarta, Indonesia: The Politics of Faith, Spirituality, and Religion in Southeast Asian Cinemas

Deadline for the submission of abstracts : 30/10/2017

Possible topics include, but are by no means limited to:
  • Representation of religion, religious themes, and spirituality in cinema
  • Faiths, identity-based politics, sectarianism
  • Cinema as a vehicle for the adaptation and continual development of religious or traditional ideologies and systems of thought
  • Cinema as a mediator between religious and political authorities and the public
  • Cinematic reference to, or quotation of, traditional systems of belief and forms of expression
  • Cinema and Institutional investment in defining and promoting tradition
  • Faith/religion and reception, exhibition, distribution (ex. themed festivals)
  • Films as interventions into religious politics/cultures and sectarian politics
  • Faith/religion/spirituality, film, and consumer culture
  • Religion and censorship
  • Islamic themed films as a contemporary phenomena in Indonesia and Malaysia (and elsewhere)

Please send an abstract (max. 300 words) and short bio (max. 100 words) to: Katinka Van Heeren (cvanheeren@hotmail.com), Patrick Campos (patrick.campos@gmail.com), and Sophia Harvey (soharvey@vassar.edu).

Voir : http://www.cseashawaii.org/deadlines/conferences/

 

Intersections of the Literary & Artistic Worlds in Myanmar & the Region in the 20th Century

Intersections of the Literary & Artistic Worlds in Myanmar & the Region in the 20th Century, 17/11/2017, Singapore

This proposed one-day symposium corresponds to the last leg of the NTU-funded project on AungSoeillustrations.org, a database of illustrations by Myanmar’s trailblazer of modern art, Bagyi Aung Soe (1923–1990).

The examination of Aung Soe’s dated illustrations, which are the only means to tracing his artistic evolution between 1948 and 1990, led to the awareness of the crucial role played by illustration in the development, dissemination and documentation of 20th-century art in Myanmar. With neither governmental support nor a developed art market, illustration in printed matter was the artist’s mobile showcase and the platform for artistic experimentations. Whether in Mandalay or Yangon, artists both mainstream and avantgarde illustrated: book covers, magazine covers, album covers, posters, illustrations and vignettes inside publications, etc.

The rise of Aung Soe in the years following the country’s political independence is inextricably linked to the support of Myanmar’s foremost literary figures: Dagon Taya (1919–2013) who initiated him to Western modernism; Min Thu Wun (1909–2004) and Zawgyi (1908–1990) who nominated him for the Indian government scholarship to study art at Visva-Bharati University founded by Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) in Santiniketan,  India, thereby mandating him with the revival of traditional Burmese art. Indeed, as in many countries in the region, Burmese writers and poets were ahead of the artists in addressing the urgency and challenges of a localised artistic modernity. Today, artists, writers, poets, publishers and filmmakers continue to work closely together in Myanmar; the divide between the literary and artistic worlds is fallacious. Specialisation is not necessarily a condition of artistic excellence in this part of the world, for an artist writes as well as publishes, and a poet paints as well as edits: the worlds of artistic creation, literature and filmmaking are symbiotic.

This symposium seeks to:

  • investigate the hitherto overlooked medium and agency of illustration in the articulation of “art” in Myanmar and the region;
  • discern geneses of “art” in Myanmar and the region from the perspective of the literary world;
  • explore ways of thinking and writing about “art” beyond that yoked to the Euramerican experience and agenda;
  • reflect on common threads and divergences in the way(s) in which modern art emerged in tandem with developments in the literary world in Myanmar and the region.

Intersections of the Literary & Artistic Worlds in Myanmar & the Region in the 20th century welcomes papers engaging with any of these four above-listed tropes. Areas of interest include but are not restricted to:

  • Illustration as a site for articulating artistic modernities in Myanmar and the region
  • Illustration as a means of making sense of constructs and paradigms of “art” in Myanmar and the region
  • Illustration as image, body and medium in “art” in Myanmar and the region
  • Writings on art and their role(s) in shaping artistic practice, production and reception in Myanmar and the region
  • Literature and the writer in art; art and the artist in literature in Myanmar and the region
  • Narratives of collaboration, dialogue, debate or/and contention between writers, artists, poets, filmmakers, editors, publishers, critics, etc. in Myanmar and the region
  • Ecosystems of writers, artists, poets, filmmakers, editors, publishers, critics, etc. in Myanmar and the region

Voir : http://ntuprojects.com/portfolio/aung-soe/symposium/

Tantrism and State Formation in Southeast Asia

Lecture: Tantrism and State Formation in Southeast Asia by Andrea Acri, 14/08/2017, Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre

About the Lecture

The socio-religious phenomenon we now call “Tantrism” dominated the religious and ritual life in much of South and Southeast Asia from around 500 CE to 1500 CE and beyond. Yet, the impact of Śaiva and Buddhist Tantric traditions on the societies and cultures of Southeast Asia remains insufficiently studied and appreciated. The talk will explore the indissoluble link between the State and Tantric ideologies/ritual systems in Southeast Asia. It will first deal with state formation, evaluating the theories of “man of prowess” and “Śaiva bhakti” elaborated by historian Oliver Wolters, then turn to the role of Tantric magic and ritual in the medieval maṇḍala polities of Sumatra, Java, and Cambodia. Finally, it will offer some concluding reflections on the link between politics, power, and the “supernatural” in modern Southeast Asia.

About the Speaker

Andrea Acri was trained at Leiden University (PhD 2011, MA 2006) and at the University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ (Laurea degree, 2005). He is Maître de conférences in Tantric Studies at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris, France. Prior to joining EPHE in late 2016 he has held research and teaching positions at Nalanda University (India), the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre, ISEAS–Yusof Ishak Institute, the Asia Research Institute (NUS), and other institutions in the Netherlands, Australia, and the UK. His main research and teaching interests are Śaiva and Buddhist Tantric traditions, Hinduism and Indian Philosophy, Yoga traditions, Sanskrit and Old Javanese philology, and the comparative religious and intellectual history of South and Southeast Asia from the premodern to the contemporary period. His publications include the monograph Dharma Pātañjala: A Śaiva Scripture from Ancient Java Studied in the Light of Related Old Javanese and Sanskrit Texts (Egbert Forsten/Brill 2011; 2nd edition Aditya Prakashan 2017), the edited volumes Spirits and Ships: Cultural Transfers in Early Monsoon Asia (ISEAS Publishing 2017, with A. Landmann and R. Blench), Esoteric Buddhism in Mediaeval Maritime Asia (ISEAS Publishing 2016), From Laṅkā Eastwards: The Rāmāyaṇa in the Literature and Visual Arts of Indonesia (2011, KITLV Press, with H. Creese and A. Griffiths).

Voir : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/events/upcoming-events/item/5838-lecture-tantrism-and-state-formation-in-southeast-asia

Writing regional and national histories of Southeast Asia

« Writing regional and national histories of Southeast Asia : potentialities and problems » by Barbara Watson Andaya and Leonard Y. Andaya, 16/08/2017, University of Sydney

One of the themes in Southeast Asian Studies concerns trends in historiography and the issues these raise for specialists. Whether we are concerned with regional or more specific national, communal or thematic histories, four questions continue to dominate this discussion:

  • How should boundaries of a study be defined and where should they be set?
  • What should be the basis for determining periodization in a non-Western area?
  • What types of sources are available, both literate and non-literate, and how should they be interpreted?
  • To what extent do the themes that may emerge from the sources distinguish a region or a national culture?

With the expanding field of world history, these questions are particularly relevant for those historians who would like to see Southeast Asia better integrated into global studies.

In this joint seminar, Leonard and Barbara Andaya will discuss the ways in which they have responded to these questions in the writing of A history of ‘early modern’ Southeast Asia (Cambridge, 2015) and in their third revised edition of A history of Malaysia (PalgraveMacmillan, 2016).

Voir : http://sydney.edu.au/sydney-southeast-asia-centre/events/Writing-regional-and-national-histories-of-Southeast-Asia.html

« Archaeologizing Heritage » ?

Michael Falser, Monica Juneja (eds), « Archaeologizing Heritage » ? Transcultural Entanglements between Local Social Practices and Global Virtual Realities, Springer, 2013.

Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Cultural Heritage and the Temples of Angkor (Chair of Global Art History, Heidelberg University, 2–5 May 2010)

This book investigates what has constituted notions of « archaeological heritage » from colonial times to the present. It includes case studies of sites in South and Southeast Asia with a special focus on Angkor, Cambodia. The contributions, the subjects of which range from architectural and intellectual history to historic preservation and restoration, evaluate historical processes spanning two centuries which saw the imagination and production of « dead archaeological ruins » by often overlooking living local, social, and ritual forms of usage on site.

Case studies from computational modelling in archaeology discuss a comparable paradigmatic change from a mere simulation of supposedly dead archaeological building material to an increasing appreciation and scientific incorporation of the knowledge of local stakeholders. This book seeks to bring these different approaches from the humanities and engineering sciences into a trans-disciplinary discussion.

Voir la table des matières sur : http://www.springer.com/la/book/9783642358692#aboutBook

A télécharger sur : http://www.asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de/en/publications/books-for-download.html

 

Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now

« Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now », 05/07/2017 – 23/10/2017, The National Art Center, Tokyo & Mori Art Museum

With its total population counting around 600 million, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-faith Southeast Asia has nurtured a truly dynamic and diverse culture. Contemporary art from the emerging economic powerhouse of Southeast Asia is currently earning widespread international attention. The “sunshower” – rain falling from clear skies – is an intriguing yet frequently-seen meteorological phenomenon in Southeast Asia, and serves as a metaphor for the vicissitudes of the region. This exhibition, the largest-ever in scale, seeks to explore the many practices of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since 1980s from 9 different perspectives. It aims to showcase its inconceivable dynamism of Southeast Asia that is somewhat nostalgic yet extraordinarily new.

Nine sections :  Fluid World, Passion and Revolution, Archiving, Diverse Identities, Day by Day, Growth and Loss, What is Art ? Why Do It ?, Medium as Meditation, Dialogue with History.

Voir la liste des artistes par pays, les oeuvres et le programme des discussions sur :  http://sunshower2017.jp/en/index.html

« Sunshower »Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks

« Stormy Weather » (2009) by Filipino artist Felix Bacolor (Image courtesy of @katrinav_)

« Sunshower Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks » by Yunyi Lau, 08/07/2017, The Artling

The tropical climate of Southeast Asia lends for torrential downpours across the year. For those not used to the weather, one can be shocked to find what was a pleasantly sunny day, suddenly turn into a very wet situation in under a minute. Known as a sunshower, this frequent meteorological phenomenon in the region is the paradox of rain falling from clear skies.

It is this phenomenon that has been the inspiration behind a major show of Southeast Asian Contemporary Art that commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The sunshower is a poetic metaphor for the developments within Southeast Asia that resulted from the post-WWII decolonisation. Despite the turmoil that many countries were thrown into, many experienced democratisation and globalisation that caused rapid economic and urban development, resulting in drastic changes that have since changed the socio-political landscape of the region.

Sunshower originally began as an idea conceived between the Director-General of the National Art Center, Tokyo and the Director of the Mori Art Museum, and was assented by The Japan Foundation. The three parties came together to set up a 14-member curatorial team, which conducted a two and a half year field research, culminating in a selection of about 180 artworks by 86 artist groups from the ten ASEAN member countries, exhibited across the two museums.

Through the works selected, the exhibition seeks to explore the development of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since the 1980s against the backdrop of the currents and fluctuations of the times from nine different perspectives, with the goal of capturing its dynamism and diversity. Below is a selection of some of the works that we suggest you check out if you plan on checking out the exhibition!

The nine sections that Sunshower is divided into include: Fluid World that looks at maps and how they reflect socio-poltical economic values, Passion and Revolution that focuses on some of the major wars that shaped the region, Archiving that looks at the development of document-collection in Southeast Asian art, Diverse Identities focuses on postcolonialism and the emergence of independence and democracy, Day by Day is a look at artists’ exploration of local everyday life, Growth and Loss is the observation of the changes of globalisation and urbanisation that have impacted Southeast Asia, What is Art? Why Do It? is a look at the development of institutions and the characteristics of the art community in the region, Medium as Meditation focuses on how local traditional culture has affected the way artists use materials as their museums, and finally, Dialogue with History is an exploration into how artists engage with their histories in the present day.

A voir sur : https://theartling.com/en/artzine/2017/07/03/sunshowers-bring-flowers-with-this-major-exhibition-of-180-southeast-asian-artworks/

[Talk] Photography and Cold War in Southeast Asia

This is a preliminary presentation, a kind of show-and-tell, based on writer, curator and artist Zhuang Wubin’s recent book, Photography in Southeast Asia: A Survey (NUS Press, 2016). Zhuang’s primary intention is to share with the audience some of the materials that he has accumulated during his decade-long fieldwork relating, directly or indirectly, to the different facets of photographic production during the Cold War period. The aim is to unpack the varying ways in which photography was being mobilised, subject to personal and institutional desires.

This talk is organised in conjunction with the exhibitions “Who wants to remember a war?” and LINES: War Drawings and Posters from the Ambassador Dato’ N. Parameswaran Collection, which features posters, woodcuts and drawings from the French phase of the Indochina war of resistance against the Americans, and drawings and sketches of life and people at the frontlines.

About the speaker
As a writer/curator, Zhuang Wubin focuses on the photographic practices in Southeast Asia. A 2010 recipient of the research grant from Prince Claus Fund (Amsterdam), Zhuang is an editorial board member of Trans-Asia Photography Review, a journal published by the Hampshire College and the University of Michigan Scholarly Publication Office. He has been invited to research residency programmes at Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong (2015) and Institute Technology of Bandung (2013). He is the contributing curator of the biennial Chiang Mai Photo Festival (2015, 2017). Published by NUS Press, Photography in Southeast Asia: A Survey (2016) is his fourth book.

As an artist, Zhuang uses photography and text to visualise the Sinophone communities in Southeast Asia.

Visual Documentary Project 2017 : Urban life in Southeast Asia

Visual Documentary Project

Call for short documentaries : Theme : Urban life in Southeast Asia

Deadline : 1st September 2017

Southeast is progressively urbanizing. By 2025 just under 50% of the region’s population will be urban. What kinds of life do people live in the rapidly transforming urban landscapes of Southeast? From life in slums to financial districts, informal settlements to gated communities, revitalization projects to mass urban restructuring, what values shape urban life in Southeast Asia? and how does cultural diversity, heritage, and aesthetics also define urban life? For 2017, we are looking for inspiring documentaries that deal with any aspect of urban life in Southeast Asia.

Kyoto :

Tokyo :

  • Date & Time:December 9, 2017
  • Venue: The Japan Foundation Hall SAKURA
Plus d’informations sur : https://vdp.cseas.kyoto-u.ac.jp/en/theme/

New Religiosities, Modern Capitalism, and Moral Complexities in Southeast Asia

Juliette Koning, Gwenaël Njoto-Feillard (eds), New Religiosities, Modern Capitalism, and Moral Complexities in Southeast Asia, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017

As Southeast Asia experiences unprecedented economic modernization, religious and moral practices are being challenged as never before. From Thai casinos to Singaporean megachurches, from the practitioners of Islamic Finance in Jakarta to Pentecostal Christians in rural Cambodia, this volume discusses the moral complexities that arise when religious and economic developments converge. In the past few decades, Southeast Asia has seen growing religious pluralism and antagonisms as well as the penetration of a market economy and economic liberalism. Providing a multidisciplinary, cross-regional snapshot of a region in the midst of profound change, this text is a key read for scholars of religion, economists, non-governmental organization workers, and think-tankers across the region.

Voir : https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9789811029684

 

Call for papers : Southeast Asian Islam : Religious Radicalism, Democracy, and Global Trends

Call for Papers : The 2nd Studia Islamika International conference 2017 :  Southeast Asian Islam : Religious Radicalism, Democracy, and Global Trends, 8-10/08/2017, Jakarta

Deadline for abstract submission : 15/05/2017

The Center for the Study of Islam and Society (PPIM) of Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University (UIN) Jakarta will carry out an international conference in August this year. This conference is dedicated to promoting Studia Islamika, an international journal published by the Center. This is the second Studia Islamika conference, and this event is expected to be held regularly in the future. In the coming conference, scholars and students on Southeast Asian Islam are invited to present their papers, research and posters. Relevant themes and topics have been selected to accommodate different research interests of the participants.

The 2nd Studia Islamika International Conference 2017 will be held as a reflection on many different aspects related to Southeast Asia. It is to look at current political trends, religious radicalism, the development of democracy, and global trends. Southeast Asia has experienced tremendous changes since its formation until today. It achieved one of the highest economic developments in the world while faith and ethnicity still play an important role in the political field. This conference will explore these various developments in the context of globalization and democratization. Theories and new research findings on Southeast Asia will be explored and discussed during the conference. The conference features research addressing the following topics:

  • Religious Radicalism: Approaches, Trends and Methods
  • Democracy, Citizenship and Identity
  • Religious Radicalism and Education
  • Globalization and Transnational Movements: Southeast Asian Islam and ISIS
  • Contemporary Islamic Economics and Tourism
  • Philanthropy and Civil Society
  • Women, Society and Representation
  • Social Media and the Contestation of the Public Sphere
  • Challenges of Urban Life: Food, Culture and Life Style
  • The Rise of Islamic Populism? Sectarian Politics in Contemporary Indonesia

Plus d’informations sur : http://conference.ppim.uinjkt.ac.id/

Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia

Ward Berenschot, Henk Schulte Nordholt and Laurens Bakker (eds), Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia, Brill, 2017

Ouvrage en ligne et en libre accès.

Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia redirects the largely western-oriented study of citizenship to postcolonial states. Providing various fascinating first-hand accounts of how citizens interpret and realize the recognition of their property, identity, security and welfare in the context of a weak rule of law and clientelistic politics, this study highlights the importance of studying citizenship for understanding democratization processes in Southeast Asia. With case studies from Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and Cambodia, this book provides a unique bottom-up perspective on the character of public life in Southeast Asia.

Table des matières 

1. Introduction: Citizenship and Democratization in Postcolonial Southeast Asia, Ward Berenschot, Henk Schulte Nordholt and Laurens Bakker

Part I: Clientelism and Citizenship
2. Citizen Participation and Decentralization in the Philippines, Emma Porio
3. Everyday Citizenship in Village Java, Takeshi Ito
4. Elections and Emerging Forms of Citizenship in Cambodia, Astrid Norén-Nilsson
5. Sosialisasi, Citizenship and Street Vendors in Yogyakarta, Sheri Lynn Gibbings

Part II: Identity and Citizenship
6. Militias, Security and Citizenship in Indonesia, Laurens Bakker
7. Custom and Citizenship in the Philippine Uplands, Oona Thommes Paredes
8. Citizenship and Islam in Malaysia and Indonesia, David Kloos and Ward Berenschot

Part III: Middle Classes Engaging the State
9. Digital Media and Malaysia’s Electoral Reform Movement, Merlyna Lim
10. Citizenship, Rights and Adversarial Legalism in Thailand, Wolfram Schaffar
11. Defending Indonesia’s Migrant Domestic Workers, Mary Austin
12. The Yellow Shirts versus the Red Shirts and the Rise of a New Middle Class in Thailand, Apichat Satitniramai

A télécharger sur : http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/9789004329669

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, no. 21, March 2017 : Political assassinations in Southeast Asia

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, no. 21, March 2017 : Political assassinations in Southeast Asia

Sommaire :

  • Political assassinations in Southeast Asia by guest editor Jafar Suryomenggolo
  • Murder without Progress in Siam: From Hired Gunmen to Men in Uniform by Prajak Kongkirati
  • Assassination in Thai Local Politics: A Decade of Decentralization (2000-2009) by Nuttakorn Vititanon
  • Wars of Extinction: The Lumad Killings in Mindanao, Philippines by Arnold P.  Alamon
  • Killing for whom? Extrajudicial killing cases in the Philippines by Bub Mo Jung
  • Why Does Indonesia Kill Us? Political Assassination of KNPB Activists in Papua by Budi Hernawan

A lire sur : https://kyotoreview.org/issue-21/political-assassinations-in-southeast-asia/

New Perspectives in Southeast Asian and Pacific Prehistory

Philip J. Piper, Hirofumi Matsumura, David Bulbeck (eds), New Perspectives in Southeast Asian and Pacific Prehistory,  ANU Press, Terra Australis 45

Ouvrage en ligne et en libre accès

Table des matières :

  1. Professor Peter Bellwood’s Ongoing Journey in Archaeology by Hsiao-chun Hung
  2. Initial Movements of Modern Humans in East Eurasia by Naruya Saitou, Timothy A. Jinam, Hideaki Kanzawa-Kiriyama and Katsushi Tokunaga
  3. Ancient DNA Analysis of Palaeolithic Ryukyu Islanders by Ken-ichi Shinoda and Noboru Adachi
  4. Mid-Holocene Hunter-Gatherers ‘Gaomiao’ in Hunan, China: The First of the Two-layer Model in the Population History of East/Southeast Asia by Hirofumi Matsumura, Hsiao-chun Hung  Nguyen Lan Cuong, Ya-feng Zhao, Gang He and Zhang Chi
  5. Using Dental Metrical Analysis to Determine the Terminal Pleistocene and Holocene Population History of Java by Sofwan Noerwidi
  6. Terminal Pleistocene and Early Holocene Human Occupation in the Rainforests of East Kalimantan by Karina Arifin
  7. Understanding the Callao Cave Depositional History by Armand Salvador Mijares
  8. Traditions of Jars as Mortuary Containers in the Indo-Malaysian Archipelago by David Bulbeck
  9. An Son Ceramics in the Neolithic Landscape of Mainland Southeast Asia by Carmen Sarjeant
  10. The Ryukyu Islands and the Northern Frontier of Prehistoric Austronesian Settlement by Mark J. Hudson
  11. The Western Route Migration: A Second Probable Neolithic Diffusion to Indonesia by Truman Simanjuntak
  12. Enter the Ceramic Matrix: Identifying the Nature of the Early Austronesian Settlement in the Cagayan Valley, Philippines by Helen Heath, Glenn R. Summerhayes and Hsiao-chun Hung
  13. Colonisation and/or Cultural Contacts: A Discussion of the Western Micronesian Case by Michiko Intoh
  14. Integrating Experimental Archaeology, Phytolith Analysis and Ethnographic Fieldwork to Study the Origin of Farming in China by Tracey L.-D. Lu
  15. The Origins and Arrival of the Earliest Domestic Animals in Mainland and Island Southeast Asia: A Developing Story of Complexity by Philip J. Piper
  16. Historical Linguistics and Archaeology: An Uneasy Alliance by Robert Blust
  17. Were the First Lapita Colonisers of Remote Oceania Farmers as Well as Foragers? by Andrew Pawley
  18. The Sa Huynh Culture in Ancient Regional Trade Networks: A Comparative Study of Ornaments by Nguyen Kim Dung
  19. Austronesian Migration to Central Vietnam: Crossing over the Iron Age Southeast Asian Sea by Mariko Yamagata and Hirofumi Matsumura
  20. Matting Impressions from Lo Gach: Materiality at Floor Level by Judith Cameron
  21. The Prehistoric House: A Missing Factor in Southeast Asia by Charles Higham

A télécharger sur : http://press.anu.edu.au/publications/series/terra-australis/new-perspectives-southeast-asian-and-pacific-prehistory-terra/download

CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities

CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities, 16-17 August 2017, Asia Research Institute, NUS

Deadline : 30 April 2017

For Zukin (1982, 1987, 1995) culture has been central to the development of the new ‘symbolic’ or ‘creative’ economy, but she also cautions against its appropriation for urban redevelopment that can lead displacement of local communities. Castells (2010), on the other hand, suggests that cultural materials, including digital media, facilitate social change, especially in relation to social movements, because they enable social actors to redefine their subjectivities and transform the social structure. While local and regional governments are striving towards the ‘rejuvenation’ of urban spaces as a form of city branding, citizens and artists alike are seeking ways to maintain the viability of local arts and culture along with (in)tangible heritage. In many Asian cities, heritage preservation has played an important role in the democratisation of urban spaces and community building. Tensions between different interest groups have been unavoidable but mutual ground is needed for feasible policies and practices to construct inclusive and socially just urban spaces.

With the rise of local governance, and changing state-society relationships, we believe that the full potential of arts, heritage, and cultural production in the social transformation and civic participation has not yet been fully acknowledged. Given differences in urban governance, planning and civic participation in East and Southeast Asia, more nuanced research is needed to identify what kind of cultural policies and creative practices could be developed and how they might provide innovative approaches beyond the Western paradigms of ‘creative’ or ‘cultural’ cities, and gentrification. Similarly, Douglass (2015) has raised policy questions about how to strengthen civic engagement, belonging and community building in cities through the cultivation of civic participation. Innovative forms of civic participation resonate with the ‘worlding practices’ defined by Ong (2011:4) as ‘projects that attempt to establish or break established horizons of urban standards in and beyond a particular city’. The purpose of this multidisciplinary conference is thus to explore both government-led cultural policies and the organically emerging artistic and creative practices aimed at the empowerment of local communities and neighborhoods in contemporary East and Southeast Asian cities.

We invite the submission of papers from early career and established scholars, policy makers, activists, and creative practitioners to explore the role of arts, culture, and heritage in developing more progressive urban societies in East and Southeast Asia cities. We encourage applicants to consider empirical case studies and theories within comparative contexts and to extrapolate policy options for other regions apart from the East and Southeast Asia that explore innovative ways to build co-operation between varied social groups, institutions, and local governance. Questions that will guide the conference proceedings speak to integrated themes across disciplinary and geographical boundaries and include:

  • How do arts, heritage, and creative practices provide opportunities for ‘creative communities’ to resist the encroachment of the corporate economy (Douglass 2015)? What challenges do they face in asserting their right to urban space?
  • How and to what extent could ‘gentrification aesthetics’ (Chang 2014) open up new approaches for analysing both positive and negative impact of urban redevelopment?
  • What kind of innovations in governance are needed to support art communities, heritage preservation, and cultural and creative industries in ways that are socially inclusive, viable, and enhance civil participation? Can an approach based on the interconnectedness of cultural and social sustainability (Kong 2009) benefit the understanding of the collective processes emerging in cities today?
  • How does public art reflect the ways in which forms of vernacular heritage, culture, and socio-spatial identity are bound up with the representation and (re)shaping of place and landscape in cities? What controversies and political fault lines might emerge through these processes?
  • What kind of novel forms of ‘art activism’ or ‘cultural activism’ are emerging, and how do they benefit, interact, or hinder the aims of social transformations?
  • To what extent are arts, heritage, and cultural productions contributing to the development of ‘tourist cities’? How is this being resisted or embraced by local populations?
  • What new approaches are emerging that transcend purely physical space? Can intangible forms, such as digital networks, forums and sites, benefit the survival of local communities?

Plus d’informations sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Event/Detail/f767b24e-9d53-4d4b-9f72-0ec54a53689b