Archives par mot-clé : Asie du Sud-Est

Asian Studies Review, vol. 42, n° 2, 2018

Asian Studies Review, vol. 42, n° 2, 2018. Special issue : Competing Visions of the Rule of Law in Southeast Asia : Power, Rhetoric and Governance

Guest Editors: Melissa Curley, Björn Dressel and Stephen McCarthy

Articles

Competing Visions of the Rule of Law in Southeast Asia: Power, Rhetoric and Governance by Melissa Curley, Björn Dressel and Stephen McCarthy

ASEAN as a “Rules-based Community”: Business as Usual by Kelly Gerard

Rule of Law Expedited: Land Title Reform and Justice in Burma (Myanmar) by Stephen McCarthy

Governing Civil Society in Cambodia: Implications of the NGO Law for the “Rule of Law” by Melissa Curley

Thailand’s Traditional Trinity and the Rule of Law: Can They Coexist? by Björn Dressel

Dilemmas in the Construction of a Socialist Law-based State in Vietnam: Electoral Integrity and Reform by Thiem H. Bui

Book Reviews

Megha Amrith, Caring for strangers: Filipino medical workers in Asia by Mina Roces

Pia Jolliffe, Learning, migration and intergenerational relations: the Karen and the gift of education by Violet Cho

Hema Devare, Ganga to Mekong: a cultural voyage through textiles by Natali Jane Pearson

Voir : https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/casr20/current

 

 

Buddhism Illuminated through Southeast Asian Manuscript Art (1)

Front cover of Buddhism Illuminated: Manuscript Art from Southeast Asia, London: British Library 2018.

Buddhism Illuminated through Southeast Asian Manuscript Art (1), 08/06/2018, Asian and African Studies Blog, British Library

Buddhism Illuminated: Manuscript Art from Southeast Asia is a lavishly-illustrated book which has just been published by the British Library, in collaboration with Washington University Press. The book, by two curators in the British Library’s Southeast Asia section, is dedicated to the memory of the Library’s former Curator of Thai, Lao and Cambodian collections, Dr Henry D. Ginsburg (1940-2007), who was a leading expert and one of the pioneers of research on Buddhist manuscript art in Southeast Asia. The purpose of this book is to share many years of research on the British Library’s unique collection of Southeast Asian manuscripts on Buddhism, which illustrate not only the life and teachings of the historical Buddha, but also everyday Buddhist practice, life within the monastic order, festivals, cosmology, and ethical principles and values.

The book contains six chapters and over 200 high-quality coloured photographs of manuscripts which have mostly been digitised with generous funding from Henry Ginsburg’s Legacy. The illustrations are mainly from eighteenth and nineteenth century Burmese and Thai manuscripts, and the book provides detailed background information on Theravada Buddhism in general and Buddhist art in mainland Southeast Asia in particular.

San San May and Jana Igunma, Buddhism Illuminated: Manuscript Art from Southeast Asia, London: British Library 2018. (ISBN 978 0 7123 5206 2)

Lire la suite sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2018/06/buddhism-illuminated-through-southeast-asian-manuscript-art-1.html

Songs from Southeast Asia

Songs from Southeast Asia, SOAS radio

Thant Sin, Almira and Cuong travel across Southeast Asia to bring to you a unique collection of popular songs with each episode focusing on one country from around the region, from the classics to the contemporary. Whether you are from the region or someone who does not know anything about it, we invite you to join us in our musical journey.

SfSEA – Longing for the Past: The 78RPM Era in SEA Thu, 2018-06-07 23:44

In this episode, Almira shares her top picks from the collection of 90 tracks in David Murray’s 4-CD Box Set / Book ‘Longing for the Past: The 78RPM Era in Southeast Asia’.

  1. Danse Ancienne
  2. Ba Ba Win by Pyi Hla Hpe / Sein Wai Hlan-
  3. Ogingo Mamangka Vuhan by Irene Tungou
  4. Kitjir Kitjir by Jetty & Suhairi / Orkes Gambang Keromong
  5. Miss Whiskey by U Myat Lay
  6. Maung Kyaw Ei Sandaya Nyunt by Sandaya Maung Kyaw
  7. Khmer Kroak by Wohar Sam
  8. Lam Khaen by Phloen Phromdaen
  9. Cikajangan
  10. Ka Abdi by Upit Sarimanah

A écouter sur : https://soasradio.org/music/episodes/sfsea-longing-for-the-past-the-78rpm-era-in-sea

28 podcasts à écouter sur : https://soasradio.org/music/podcasts/sfsea

Journal of Contemporary Asia, vol. 48, n° 2, 2018

Journal of Contemporary Asia, vol. 48, n° 2, 2018

Who Governs and How? Non-State Actors and Transnational Governance in Southeast Asia

Table of contents

Original articles

  • Who Governs and How? Non-State Actors and Transnational Governance in Southeast Asia by Shaun Breslin and Helen E. S. Nesadurai
  • New Constellations of Social Power: States and Transnational Private Governance of Palm Oil Sustainability in Southeast Asia by Helen E. S. Nesadurai
  • Building Governance from Scratch: Myanmar and the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative by Marco Bünte
  • Governing the Safety and Security of the Malacca Strait: The Nippon Foundation between States and Industry by Alice D. Ba
  • Governing Domestic Worker Migration in Southeast Asia: Public–Private Partnerships, Regulatory Grey Zones and the Household by Juanita Elias
  • Economic Governance Beyond State and Market: Islamic Capital Markets in Southeast Asia by Lena Rethel

Research articles

  • The Limits of Gender Quotas: Women’s Parliamentary Representation in Indonesia by Ben Hillman

Book review

  • Chris Baker and Pasuk Phongpaichit, A History of Ayutthaya: Siam in the Early Modern Period by Robert H. Taylor

Voir: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00472336.2017.1375137

Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies, vol. 10, n° 2 (2017)

Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies, vol. 10, n° 2 (2017)
Philanthropy, Giving, and Development

Open Access

ASEAS 10(2) focuses on the evolving state of philanthropy in Southeast Asia. Collectively, the contributions provide an overview of the trends and tensions in this sector, which is being shaped by often conflicting notions of charity, development, and business. Two of the articles refer to the decreasing presence and changing nature of funding from philanthropic foundations from the United States, such as the Ford Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation. Their tradition of context-specific strategic grant-making in the region is being challenged by the paradigmatic shift underway globally, which is being triggered by the establishment of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and other ‘technocratic’ foundations. Articles focusing on the entire region as well as on specific countries (Myanmar, Thailand, and Indonesia) highlight home-grown philanthropy and how new forms of personal and institutionalized giving are emerging as a result of a growing middleclass and accumulated wealth. Pressure is also growing on local companies and corporate actors to show a socially conscious image by funding projects and contributing to sustainable development. Professionalization of faith-based giving is further leading to new philanthropic models such as the rise of Islamic grant-making foundations in Indonesia and other countries with Muslim communities as described by two of the articles. A question running through the issue is the extent to which this growth and diversification of philanthropy is conducive to equitable and inclusive development and democratization of society.

Table of contents

  • Philanthropy, Giving, and Development in Southeast Asia by Rosalia Sciortino

Current Research on Southeast Asia

  • Philanthropy in Southeast Asia: Between Charitable Values, Corporate Interests, and Development Aspirations by Rosalia Sciortino
  • Legacies of Cultural Philanthropy in Asia by Mary Zurbuchen
  • Moving Beyond Charity to Philanthropy? The Case of Charitable Giving in Thailand by Natalie Phaholyothin
  • Giving Trends in Myanmar: More Than Merit Making by Cavelle Dove
  • Islamic Philanthropy in Indonesia: Modernization, Islamization, and Social Justice by Amelia Fauzia
  • Addressing Unfortunate Wayfarer: Islamic Philanthropy and Indonesian Migrant Workers in Hong Kong by Hilman Latief

Research Workshop

  • Analyzing International Migrant Responses to Crisis Situations in the Context of Floods in Thailand by Teeranong Sakulsri, Reena Tadee, Alexander Trupp

In Dialogue

  • Qatari Philanthropy and Out-of-School Children in Southeast Asia: An Interview With the Director of Educate A Child by Michael Morrissey

Network Southeast Asia

  • SEA Junction: Our Venue to Connect on Southeast Asia by Patrick McCormick
  • Reflection on the Special Gender Stream: 2017 Timor-Leste Studies Association Conference by Sara Niner

Voir : http://www.seas.at/our-journal-aseas/browse-issues/aseas-102-philanthropy-giving-and-development/

Workshop : Rice in Southeast Asia – past and present

Early Rice Workshop : Rice in Southeast Asia – Past and Present, 4-6 January 2018, Sirindhorn Anthropology Centre

Archaeobotanists! A three-day workshop on human-plant relations has been organized by UCL’s Institute of Archaeology and Silpakorn University. The workshop aims to disseminate information on the Early Rice Project, but also research from scientists and archaeologists working in Southeast Asia. Topics include climate change, human-plant interactions, ethnobotany, and agricultural systems. A one-day practical session on archaeobotanical techniques will take place on the 6th of January for field archaeologists and students who wish to learn the basics of archaeobotanical sampling. Please email sirilucky.k@gmail.com (Sililuck Kantrasri) or criscastillo7@yahoo.com (Cristina Castillo) before the 15th of December if you are interested in attending either the seminar series or the practicals. Places are limited.

Speakers include Jane Carlos (UP Diliman), Cristina Castillo (UCL, Institute of Archaeology, London; Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, Kobe), Akkaneewut Chabangborn (Department of Geology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok), Nigel Chang (College of Arts, Society & Education, James Cook University, Queensland), Michelle S. Eusebio (Archaeological Studies Program, University of the Philippines, Manila; Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Florida), Dorian Fuller (UCL, Institute of Archaeology, London), Thanik Lertcharnrit (Department of Archaeology, Silpakorn University, Bangkok), Nguyen Mai Huong (Institute of Archaeology, Hanoi), Nguyen Thuy Duong (Historical Geology Department, Faculty of Geology, VNU University of Science, Hanoi), Nathsuda Pumijumnong (Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University), Paramita Punwong (Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom; York Institute of Tropical Ecosystems, Environment Department, University of York, York), Rasmi Shoocongdej (Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University, Bangkok), Sasivimon Swangpol (Department of Plant Science, Faculty of Science Mahidol University, Bangkok), Joyce White (Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology, Philadelphia).

Voir: https://www.facebook.com/ISEAArchaeology/photos/a.257018854458060.1073741830.233573613469251/848954788597794/?type=3&theater

Antropologia, vol. 4, n° 2, 2017

Antropologia, vol. 4, n° 2, 2017

Special Focus- Independent Children

Introduction

  • Independent Children and their Fields of Relatedness by Giuseppe Bolotta, Silvia Vignato

Articles sur l’Asie du Sud-Est

  • Orphans, Victims and Families: An Ethnography of Children in Aceh by Silvia Vignato
  • “God’s Beloved Sons”: Religion, Attachment, and Children’s Self-Formation in the Slums of Bangkok by Giuseppe Bolotta
  • Yogyakarta Street Careers – Feelings of Belonging and Dealing with Sticky Stigma by Thomas Stodulka

 

Dreams of Prosperity

Silvia Vignato (ed.), Dreams of Prosperity: Inequality and Integration in Southeast Asia, EFEO, Silkworm Books, 2017

Dreams of Prosperity offers a critical composite reflection on Southeast Asia as a progressively integrated and globalized space of production, exchange, and circulation within and beyond national boundaries. Through a broad array of contexts united by the theme of integration, the essays describe the successful or unsuccessful entry of specific individuals or groups into wider markets and networks in their quest for prosperity—in Thailand, by Lua peasant farmers, slum families, the last century’s teak laborers, and ethnic tour hosts; in Indonesia, by the urban poor and communities resisting environmental destruction; and in Vietnam, by human trafficking returnees. The authors examine how these groups are socially and symbolically defined and redefined in the process of integration, and consider the imaginaries of future that enable both active participation and unmitigated manipulation. Two key topics are the cognitive struggle that peasants and laborers face with their material environment and the process of sense-making that characterizes many destitute people in urban contexts.

Contributors are Matteo Carlo Alcano, Amnuayvit Thitibordin, Monika Arnez, Giuseppe Bolotta, Olivier Evrard, Karnrawee Sratongno, Runa Lazzarino, Manoj Potapohn, Amalia Rossi, Sakkarin Na Nan, and Silvia Vignato.

Contents 

  1. Green Aspirations and the Dynamics of Integration in Two East Kalimantan Cities— Monika Arnez 
  2. Neoliberalism and the Integration of Labor and Natural Resources: Contract Farming and Biodiversity Conservation in Northern Thailand—Amalia Rossi and Sakkarin Na Nan 
  3. Integration and Marginality in the Tourist Economy: The Geopolitics of Trekking in Chiang Mai Province—Olivier Evrard, Manoj Potapohn, and Karnrawee Stratongno 
  4. Migration and the Ethnic Division of Labor in Siam’s Teak Business, 1880s–1910s— Amnuayvit Thitibordin 
  5. After the Shelter: The Nuances of Reintegrating Human Trafficking Returnees in Northern Vietnam—Runa Lazzarino 
  6. Playing the NGO System: How Mothers and Children Design Political Change in the Slums of Bangkok—Giuseppe Bolotta 
  7. Making Sense of Poverty in Aceh and Surabaya—Silvia Vignato and Matteo Carlo Alcano 

Symposium: Tradition and Contemporaneity in the Arts of Asia

Symposium: Tradition and Contemporaneity in the Arts of Asia, 09/11/2017, Department of Art & Art History, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

About the Talk

Modern and contemporary artists in Asia have had to cope with many challenges, from the influx of Western artistic priorities often intent on redefining or even erasing local artistic traditions, to the wholesale destruction of national infrastructure through unstable political systems and devastating wars. That artists have successfully risen to these challenges, as well as the resilience of local artistic systems and values, is eminently manifest in the vibrant contemporary arts of Asia today.

This symposium will explore the inspirational potential of traditional materials, methods, and styles of art making among modern and contemporary artists of India, China, Korea, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Thailand. It will feature illustrated presentations by three eminent scholars of modern and contemporary Asian art, followed by a moderated discussion, all focusing on the various ways regional “traditions” of art and culture function as inspiration, catalyst, or foil, some times honoring them, other times contrasting and even undermining them, often with humorous or ironic intent.

Speakers & Presentation Titles

headshot of Joan Kee

Joan Kee, “Tradition as ‘Contemporaneity’s Raw Materials’: Korea, China, and the Philippines”
Kee is an art historian specializing in art and law, with special research focus on modern and contemporary East and Southeast Asian art. She teaches at the University of Michigan, where she is Associate Professor in the History of Art. She is author of Contemporary Korean Art: Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method (2013), curated the exhibition From All Sides: Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method (2014), and serves as contributing editor to Artforum.

headshot of Sonal Khullar

Sonal Khullar, “The Pearl Divers and Shipwrecks of Marine Drive: History, Tradition, and Modernism in India.” Khullar is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Washington. Her research focus is on Indian art of the eighteenth century to the present, with additional teaching and research interests in transnational histories of art, feminist theory, and postcolonial studies. Publications include the award-winning Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930-1990 (2015).

Headshot of Iola Lenzi

Iola Lenzi, ““Not Nostalgia: How Tradition is Critically Co-opted in Thai and Vietnamese Contemporary Art” Lenzi is a Singapore-based curator, lecturer, and critic specializing in contemporary arts of Southeast Asia. She has curated exhibitions in in Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta and Bangkok, serves as lecturer for the Asian Art Histories MA program at Lasalle College, Singapore, and as regional correspondent for Asian Art, London. She is author of Museums of Southeast Asia (2005).

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.cseashawaii.org/event/symposium-tradition-and-contemporaneity-in-the-arts-of-asia/

 

Muharram practices and colonial histories at the cutting edge of a forgotten scroll

Muharram practices and colonial histories at the cutting edge of a forgotten scroll by Julia Byl and David Lunn, 16/11/2017, IIAS, Leiden

The lecture

The Syair Tabut, or ‘Poem of the tomb effigies’, is a recently rediscovered Malay-language, Jawi-script narrative poem on Muharram in 1864. In this talk, we explore the literary, linguistic, and performative aspects of the syair, focusing on what it reveals to us about cultural and religious linkages between and around South and Southeast Asia in the 19th century.

This hybrid lithograph/manuscript scroll offers a wealth of details on the practice of Muharram in the region, and contains in its stanzas direct evidence of linguistic and cultural exchange between the various communities that populated the region in that period.

We introduce the poem and its author, Encik Ali, using excerpts from our recent translation that range through colourful costumes and petty vandalism, fervent devotion and violinists intoxicated by their own music. Through this reading, we demonstrate how an engagement with the poem’s nuances opens up a window onto histories of performance, language, and inter-communal interactions in the context of colonial-era contestations over public religiosity.

The speakers

Julia Byl is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of Alberta. Her research interests have centered around musical performance in north Sumatra, and have recently spread to the broader Malay world and to East Timor, where she is beginning a study of music, the individual and the institution.

David Lunn is the Simon Digby Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. His research interests span the literary, cultural, and intellectual history of modern South and, increasingly, Southeast Asia, with a particular focus on the politics of language.

Voir : https://iias.asia/event/scroll

Between earth and water: Mainamati and Vikrampur in South and East Bengal

Masterclass : Between earth and water: Mainamati and Vikrampur in South and East Bengal by Claudine Bautze-Picron, 10/11/2017, Leiden University

Mainamati was the most important Buddhist settlement in Southeast Bengal from the eighth century onwards, being the gateway to the land of the Buddha for monks and merchants having navigated from insular Southeast Asia and for those who came on foot from various regions of nearby Burma.

Its position was inherited by Vikrampur, a vast area located South of Dhaka, which was a major political centre in South and Southeast Bengal from the eleventh up to the early thirteenth century. Although it was also located on the road followed by Buddhist monks and pilgrims when travelling from the region of Chittagong, with its port open on the Bay of Bengal, up to Bihar and thus partly inherited the position earlier held by Mainamati, Vikrampur  was a stronghold of Brahmanism, offering thus a radical departure with the religious situation encountered up to the 10th century.

The artistic production of this region between Vikrampur, Mainamati and Chittagong had a huge impact on the transfer of iconographic models towards Southeast Asia: Eleventh and twelfth-century murals in the temples of Bagan prove the existence of trade relations with Southeast Bengal, and cast images from the region of Mainamati were exported to Java in the eighth and ninth centuries, opening a way which was going to be followed up to the early thirteenth century with images found in Sumatra and Java that are clearly inspired from models created in Vikrampur.

A careful scrutiny of the artistic material found in continental and insular Southeast Asia proves the importance of the Mainamati-Vikrampur region as source of inspiration but also shows how these ‘imported’ models were assimilated before becoming part of the local culture. Moreover, these testimonies might help in trying to get a better understanding of how images were regarded in Bengal: besides the fact that they were worshipped, could they have had other functions? Could they inform about the way the Buddhist community perceived itself in the cultural landscape of the time?

Dr Claudine Bautze-Picron studied at the Universities of Brussels (MA), Lille, Jawaharlal Nehru in New Delhi (M.Phil. in Indian History) and Aix-en-Provence (“Thèse d’État” = Ph.D.). She was a research fellow at the National Centre of Scientific Research (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) in Paris, UMR 7528 (“Mondes Iranien et Indien”) and Lecturer at the Free University of Brussels (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

Research and publications:

Her research has focused for a long period on the art of Eastern India (Bihar/West Bengal/Bangladesh) from the 8th to the 12th c. and on various issues related to Buddhist iconography in India.  This work culminated also in the publication of the catalogue of the collection of eastern Indian sculpture in the Museum of Asian Art, Berlin (Eastern Indian Sculpture in the Museum of Indian Art, Berlin, Berlin, 1998) and of two books concerned with the image of the bejewelled or crowned Buddha in India and Burma (The Bejewelled Buddha from India to Burma, New Considerations, New Delhi, 2010) and with the Buddhist site of Kurkihar in Bihar (The forgotten Place, Stone Sculpture at Kurkihar, New Delhi: Archaeological Survey of India, 2014).

Since nearly 15 years, she has also been working on the murals of Pagan (Burma) from the 10th to the 13th c. (The Buddhist Murals of Pagan, Timeless vistas of the cosmos, Bangkok, 2003).

Voir : https://iias.asia/event/between-earth-water-mainamati-vikrampur-south-east-bengal

CFP : 5th SYMPOSIUM OF THE ICTM STUDY GROUP ON PERFORMING ARTS OF SOUTHEAST ASIA

CFP : 5th Symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Performing Arts of Southeast Asia (PASEA), 16-22/07/2018, Sabah Museum, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia

Deadline for the submission of abstracts : 01 December 2017

Thème I: Crossing Borders through Popular Performance Genres in Southeast Asia

Thème II:  Tourism and the Performing Arts in Southeast Asia

Thème III: New Research

Plus d’informations sur : https://sites.google.com/site/paseastudygroup/announcements/call-for-papers-2018-symposium

 

Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia

International Conference Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia, 10-11/11/2017, Binghamton University, The State University of New York

Plenary lectures by:

ERIC TAGLIACOZZO (Cornell University)
Ghosts in the Machine: Technology and Maritime Imperialism in Southeast Asia
ANAND YANG (University of Washington)
Empire of Labor: Indian Convict Workers in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Southeast Asia
ANGELA SCHOTTENHAMMER (University of Salzburg)
Surgeons and Physicians on the Move in the Indo-Pacific Waters (15th to 18th Centuries)
RANABIR SAMADDAR (Calcutta Research Group)
Rohingyas: The Emergence of a Stateless Population

The celebrated author AMITAV GHOSH will deliver the keynote address:
Embattled Earth: Commodities, Conflict and Climate Change in the Indian Ocean Region
5 pm, Friday, November 10, 2017
Chamber Hall, Anderson Center, main campus of Binghamton University

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.binghamton.edu/iaad/conference/index.html

 

 

 

Southeast Asia Stakes Its Claim in the Art World

Htein Lin’s “A Show of Hands,” 2013–present, features hundreds of white plaster casts of raised right hands, each one an index of a political prisoner like himself. Credit Maria Baranova-Suzuki

Southeast Asia Stakes Its Claim in the Art World by Jason Farago, 27/09/2017, New York Times

Until recently — the 1990s, let’s say — an American critic keeping tabs on new art would concentrate on New York’s museums and galleries; cast an occasional, often dismissive eye on Western Europe; and perhaps try to visit Los Angeles now and again. No longer. By the ’90s the idea of a single avant-garde was dead and buried, and in its place arose a pluralist art ecosystem that spans the planet. It makes larger intellectual demands than ever, and requires us to accept that we’ll never see everything or understand it completely. In the new global art world, even we New Yorkers are provincials.

Perhaps nowhere benefited as much from this shift to a pluralist art world as Asia, where the 1990s saw an explosion of biennials and triennials. The Gwangju Biennale, Asia’s most important such exhibition, began in 1995 in South Korea, and was soon followed by large-scale shows in Shanghai, Taipei, Fukuoka, Yokohama, Singapore, Jakarta, and a half dozen other Asian megacities — all of which introduced Asian audiences to foreign art and pushed their own region’s figures to the international forefront. In these exhibitions, as well as in the new museums and art schools that arose around them, traditional styles of painting, drawing, pottery or calligraphy fell by the wayside, and installation, video and performance served as lingua franca.

The art in “After Darkness: Southeast Asian Art in the Wake of History,” at the Asia Society on Park Avenue, is the fruit of this global shift. The work here comes from Indonesia, Myanmar (or Burma) and Vietnam, though with just seven artists and one collective, it’s small enough to avoid the curse of the “regional show” and doesn’t force any unity on a diverse lineup. Not every work here is a masterpiece, but all of them plumb the roiling past and fractured present of places that, with a combined population of nearly 400 million, we have no excuse to be clueless about.

Lire la suite et voir les oeuvres sur : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/arts/design/southeast-asian-art-asia-society.html

 

Southeast of Now, vol. 1, n° 2, October 2017

Southeast of Now : Directions in Contemporary and Modern Art in Asia,  vol. 1, n° 2, October 2017

Numéro en libre accès

Table of contents

  • Editorial : Discomfort

Articles

  • Felicitous « Misalignments »: Bagyi Aung Soe’s Manaw Maheikdi Dat Pangyi by Yin Ker
  • The Painting of Prostitutes in Indonesian Modern Art by Matt Cox
  • Rites of Change: Artistic Responses to Recent Street Protests in Kuala Lumpur by Fiona Lee
  • The Third Avant-garde: Messages of Discontent by Leonor Veiga

Curatorial Intervention

  • Queering Postnational Tendencies in Contemporary Art from Thailand by Brian Curtin

Translations

  • « We Know Where We Will Be Taking Indonesian Art », 1948 by Sindudarsono Sudjojono translated by Brigitta Isabella
  • « Untitled Letter to Editor », Jakarta, 25 December 1942 by Sindudarsono Sudjojono translated by Matt Cox

Review

  • Michelle Antoinette, « Reworlding Art History: Contemporary Southeast Asian Art after 1990 » by Clare Veal

Short Response

  • A Flimsy Image: A Case Study for Learning to Listen by Fiona Amundsen

Articles à télécharger sur : https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/37275