Archives par mot-clé : Art

CFP : Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture

CFP : Antennae : The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture « Uncontainable natures : Southeast Asian ecologies and visual culture » 

Guest-editors: Kevin Chua, Lucy Davis, and Nora A. Taylor

For this issue of Antennae: Journal of Nature in Visual Culture, the editorial team seeks submissions from writers, artists, curators, and cultural theorists working with nature, ecology, and post-humanistic philosophy in Southeast Asia.

The past few decades have seen a resurgence of forms of containment in Southeast Asia, whether political (new governmental exclusions and repressions) or epistemological (new scientific understandings of nature). More acutely, certain governments and non-governmental organizations have utilized and underwritten a politics of nature, instrumentalizing nature for their own ends. This issue will gather papers and artistic contributions that contest this new reality. How have recent “scientific” understandings of nature in the region reaffirmed capitalism? How is nature uncontained and uncontainable in Southeast Asia?

It is a truism to say that the extended region of Southeast Asia – which encompasses the Western shores of the South China Sea, the Eastern shores of the Indian Ocean and the archipelagoes of Indonesia and the Philippines – has its own diverse yet particular ecologies. Nor is it any surprise to find various permutations of climate disasters and climate crimes in the region, from deforestation, haze, land reclamation, mudslides, to seas of plastic and flooding. This issue will propose new ways of thinking about nature as politically and epistemologically uncontainable, ungovernable, and irreducible. How have artists thought and practiced in interconnected lifeworlds – making ecology (a) practice – via an engagement with regional geographies, cultures and histories? How have artists drawn on indigenous animisms or the colonial production of “nature” to create an eco-politics of the present?

Ultimately, Uncontainable Natures seeks to push against the ever-recurring specter of anthropocentrism. From China to Singapore, technological “fixes” to climate change tend to reinstall human centrality. How have artists and exhibitions critically engaged anthropocentric tropes of colonial natural history or modern representations of the natural world? How have non-human actors intervened in or subverted modern orders of representation? How do pre-modern nonhuman agents or spirit ecosystems animate contemporary art practices in urban Asia? How have artists working with biology and new technologies in Southeast Asia troubled anthropocentric hubris, expanding our understanding of what it means to be human? How have they challenged deep-seated notions of “life,” and questioned capitalistic vitalisms of various kinds? How has our current ecological crisis brought about new porous understandings of the entanglement of nature and culture in the Southeast Asian region?

Topics considered include, but are not limited to:

Climate change, past and present
Political economics of nature
Species loss
Rights to land, air and water
Materialities
Ethno-biologies/botanies/ecologies
Ghosts, spirits, specters
Spirit lives of objects
Feminist, LGBTQ/ intersectional recuperations of ‘traditional’ eco-lore
Non-human ecological agents: animals, plants, mountains, forests, oceans
Ecological ramifications of recent archaeological research (for example the Sulawesi cave paintings) and associated art historical shifts
Non-visual sensual ecologies and knowledges: sonic, haptic, energetic fields
Urban nature cultures
New migrant species, viruses or bacteria
Critical technological interconnectivities
Critical internet ecologies and cosmologies
Science fictional and speculative ecologies
Southeast Asian eco-hack-and-tinkerings
Politics and cultures of waste

Submission guidelines:

Academic essays = length 6000-10000 words
Artists’ portfolio = 5/6 images along with 1000 words max statement/commentary
Interviews = maximum length 8000 words
Fiction = maximum length 8000 words
Roundtable discussions = 5000 words

Deadlines:
Abstracts: August 31st 2018 (Please submit a 350 words abstract along with a CV and one or two images)
Selection process is finalized and feedback sent by: October 31st
Submissions of final pieces: March 31st
Please email any questions to: Giovanni Aloi: Editor in Chief of Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture antennaeproject@gmail.com (www.antennae.org.uk)

Voir: https://www.facebook.com/168701325727/posts/10155283825675728/

Exposition Latiff Mohidin au Centre Georges Pompidou

Latiff Mohidin, « Provoke » (1965)

« National Gallery Singapore brings major show of works by Latiff Mohidin to Paris’s Centre Pompidou » by Gareth Harris, 5 /03/2018, The Art Newspaper

The exhibition of 1960s works by the Malaysian artist is part of a long-term plan to turn Euro-centric Modernism on its head

The National Gallery Singapore is going global, presenting its first show at the Centre Pompidou in Paris as part of the joint Reframing Modernism initiative launched by both institutions. The exhibition in Paris, Latiff Mohidin; Pago Pago 1960-69 (until 28 May), includes more than 70 works by the eponymous Malaysian artist and poet drawn from private and public collections in Singapore and Malaysia.

Reframing Modernism “was developed in the spirit of re-examining the currents and perspectives which have shaped existing notions of Modernism”, write Eugene Tan, the director of the National Gallery Singapore, and Bernard Blistène, director of the Centre Pompidou’s Musée national d’art moderne, in the exhibition catalogue.

Both institutions are keen to “contribute to a more nuanced understanding of interactions between southeast Asia and Euro-America from a decentralised perspective”. In 2016, the Beaubourg gallery loaned works by artists such as Picasso and Chagall to the Reframing Modernism show held at the National Gallery Singapore, putting southeast Asian works in a new global context.

Prints, poetry, sculptural objects and writings on display reflect Mohidin’s multifaceted practice during the 1960s. The co-curators—Catherine David of the Centre Pompidou and Shabbir Hussain Mustafa of the National Gallery Singapore—demonstrate how Mohidin was exposed to movements such as German Expressionism and Cubism during his time studying at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste in west Berlin from 1961 to 1964. Key works on show include Nature Morte I, Paysage de Berlin (verso; 1962), and the work on paper Un garcon (1963).

In the second half of the 1960s, Mohidin travelled across southeast Asia against a turbulent political backdrop whereby various nationalist movements had begun to prevail (Singapore split from the Malyasian Federation in 1965, for instance). The artist also forged important relationships with other avant-garde thinkers such as the writer Goenawan Mohamad in Jakarta. Mohidin dubbed this dialogue, and the new aesthetic taking shape regionally, Pago Pago.

Hussain Mustafa outlines the process, saying: “Mohidin evokes the consciousness that emerged through these travels with a phrase, Pago Pago, a manner of thinking and working that complicated Western Modernism through the initiation of dialogues with other avant-garde thinkers in southeast Asia.”

Mohidin describes how the Pago Pago works are made, saying in the exhibition catalogue: “Each Pago Pago object is constructed with a black contour… sometimes the colouring came after the shape had taken form. The bottom ground is uniformly the same colour, like the Berlin still-life paintings. In terms of the brush technique, although Pago Pago has fewer brush strokes, there is significant control over the form, the curves, the leaves.” His poetry of the time is, meanwhile, in free verse form, echoing the biomorphic aspect of his art.

Voir : https://www.theartnewspaper.com/news/national-gallery-singapore-brings-major-show-of-works-by-latiff-mohidin-to-europe-with-70-strong-survey-at-paris-s-centre-pompidou

 

Ancestors & Rituals, EUROPALIA INDONESIA

Ancestors & Rituals, Europalia Indonesia, 11/10/2017 – 14/01/2018, BOZAR/Palais des Beaux-Arts, Bruxelles

Commissaire: Daud Tanudirjo
Conseillers: Pieter ter Keurs & Francine Brinkgreve

Immense archipel de plus de 13 000 îles s’étalant sur pas  moins de 5 000 kilomètres d’est en ouest, l’Indonésie compte près de 255 millions d’habitants, 300 groupes ethniques et plus de 700 langues. Ces quelques chiffres donnent une idée de la diversité de ce pays et de la variété des cultures qui le composent.

Un point commun relie cependant une  grande majorité de ces cultures : l’importance accordée aux ancêtres. De Sumatra à la Papouasie, en passant par Java, Bornéo, Sulawesi, les petites îles de la Sonde et les Moluques : les ancêtres ont joué et jouent souvent encore un rôle de premier plan en Indonésie.

Qu’ils soient généalogiques ou mythiques, les ancêtres remplissent trois fonctions cruciales ayant trait au passé, au présent et au futur. Ils relient les vivants à leur passé, leur permettant de revendiquer une place au sein d’une lignée et de définir ainsi leur statut et position sociale. Ils sont ensuite garants de l’équilibre de la société et assurent par leur soutien et protection un présent harmonieux. Ils sont enfin source de fertilité et préservent ainsi le futur des peuples et cultures.

Les échanges avec d’autres cultures et religions ont, au fil des millénaires, influencé les arts, les identités et la manière  même d’envisager le monde des peuples indonésiens. La majeure partie des cultures de l’archipel trouvent leurs racines dans la culture austronésienne, apportée par des peuples migrateurs qui partirent de Taiwan il y a plus de 5 000 ans. La splendide culture Dong Son du nord du Vietnam, connue pour sa grande maîtrise du bronze, n’est pas non plus restée sans influence.

Enfin, un important volet de l’exposition est consacré aux surprenants rituels funéraires. Accomplis en différentes phases, parfois étalées sur plusieurs années, c’est ceux-ci qui permettent aux défunts d’accéder au statut d’ancêtres. Ceux qui leur survivent ne ménagent ni leurs efforts ni leurs finances pour les accompagner vers les mondes supérieurs et préserver ainsi l’équilibre et l’harmonie de la communauté.

La plupart des 160 trésors archéologiques et ethnographiques ont été prêtés par le Musée national d’Indonésie et sont exposés pour la première fois en Europe. Une trentaine de ceux-ci proviennent quant à eux de musées et de collections privées européennes. L’ensemble est mis en contexte à partir de photographies d’époque, de vidéos, de dessins et de peintures.

Voir : https://europalia.eu/fr/article/ancestors-rituals_1041.html

Between worlds : Raden Saleh & Juan Luna

Exposition : Between worlds : Raden Saleh & Juan Luna, 16/11/2017 – 11/03/2018, Singtel Special Exhibition Gallery C, National Gallery Singapore

Explore the extraordinary life stories of two artists who are considered national heroes in their home countries––Indonesian painter Raden Saleh (c.1811–1880) and Filipino painter Juan Luna (1857–1899). Drawing from important collections around the world, this landmark exhibition brings together more than 80 of their works for the first time.

Between Worlds takes you through significant chapters of each artist’s journey, uncovering parallels and differences in their experiences, from their emergence as artists in Java and the Philippines; to their subsequent training and participation in artistic and social circles in Europe; and their later return to Southeast Asia.

Between Worlds is part of the showcase Century of Light, which features two exciting exhibitions on art from the 19th century, a post-Enlightenment era of innovation and change. Together with Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay, the show demonstrates the range of painting styles and art movements that emerged in Europe during this formative period, which has been and continues to be influential to the development of art in Southeast Asia and around the world.

Voir : https://www.nationalgallery.sg/see-do/programme-detail/619/between-worlds-raden-saleh-and-juan-luna

Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories

Phaptawan Suwannakudt, Wat Tha Suthawat Angthong (detail), 1994. Photograph by: Aroon Permpoonsophon

Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories Symposium, 11–13 October 2017, Power Institute, University of Sydney

Studies focused on gender in Southeast Asian societies have emerged, in recent decades, in approximate concurrence with the development of regionally focused Southeast Asian art histories. The founding premise of this international symposium is that there has to date been insufficient intersection between these two fields.

As the first symposium of its kind, Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories aims to establish the parameters of current research, and to develop inter-disciplinary and transnational frameworks for future studies in the field. Bringing together a range of scholars working on the pre-modern, modern, and contemporary, we seek to consider new perspectives and methodological approaches brought to the fore in art history through studies that are attentive to gender, or how we might reassess art historical narratives through the lens of gender.

The symposium will be launched by a keynote address from Professor Ashley Thompson, the Hiram W. Woodward Chair in Southeast Asian Art at SOAS, University of London. Symposium participants and up to twelve additional attendees, on a competitive basis, will also be invited to participate in a half-day masterclass led by Professor Thompson, and a professional development workshop.

Masterclass and workshop

Introduction to the Masterclass, by Professor Ashley Thompson, with a list of readings.

Speakers

The symposium will be launched by a keynote address from Professor Ashley Thompson, the Hiram W. Woodward Chair in Southeast Asian Art at SOAS, University of London : Figuring the Buddha.

Chanon Kenji Praepipatmongkol | Ph.D. candidate, University of Michigan
Chang Saetang’s Self-Portraits and the Inversion of ‘Barami’

Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez | Assistant Professor, Department of Art Studies, University of the Philippine
Art on the Back Burner: Gender as the Elephant in the Room of SEA Art Histories

Eksuda Singhalampong | Lecturer in Art History, Silpakorn University
Picturing Femininity: Portraits of the Early Modern Siamese Women

May Adadol Ingawanij | Reader and Co-director, Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media, University of Westminster
The Essay Film as Feminist Cinema in Southeast Asia: Nguyen Trinh Thi and Anocha Suwichakornpong

Qui Ha Nguyen | PhD candidate, University of Southern California
Womanhood and Modernity: Revisiting Cinematic Representation of Women’s Social Transformation in Vietnamese Revolutionary Cinema during the Wartime (1945-1975)

Roger Nelson | Postdoctoral Fellow, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Women as Passengers, Men as Drivers? On Urban Movement in Post-Independence ‘Cambodian Arts’

Soumya James | Independent Scholar, New Haven, CT
Exploring the Feminine in Angkor’s Visual Imagery

Tina Le | PhD candidate, University of Michigan
Crafting the Indigenous: Paz Abad Santos and the Feminine Arts

Wulan Dirgantoro | Postdoctoral Fellow, Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices 2016/2017 program, Forum Transregionale Studien, Berlin, Germany
Correcting, Interrogating: A proposal for feminist framework for Indonesian visual arts

Yvonne Low | Sessional Lecturer in Asian Art, Department of Art History, University of Sydney
Recovering the Nation’s Woman (Artists): Mia Bustam and Lai Foong Moi

Programme complet et abstracts sur : http://www.powerpublications.com.au/gender-in-southeast-asian-art-histories/

 

 

Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands

Nouvelle parution : Reimar Schefold, Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands, PRIMEDIA Editions, 2017

This book presents a detailed and inspiring picture of the traditional ways of life and the impressive art of the Mentawai archipelago located off the west coast of Sumatra in Indonesia. This shamanistic culture, most notably found on the northernmost island of Siberut, maintains an ancient relationship between man and the spiritual world. Within this worldview, everything is animated. Not only do humans have souls, but so do animals, plants and objects. To please these souls and to create harmony, alluring artifacts have been created for generations. In this way life, art, ritual and esthetics are intertwined: a notion reflected in the field photographs and in the beautiful and rare objects that are described and illustrated here. Toys for the Souls reveals for the first time the richness and creative power of an artistic imagination, deeply rooted in Southeast Asian prehistory.

Voir : http://www.tribalartmagazine.com/fischbacher/art-books/?a=view&id=382&lang=en

Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories

« Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories », 14/07/2017 – 11/03/2018, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

Landmark exhibition at Asian Art Museum showcases centuries of creativity and cultural exchange

On view July 14, 2017–March 11, 2018 and presented in the Tateuchi Thematic Gallery, Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories is the result of more than a decade of study and collecting by the museum’s curatorial team — a labor of love to expand the institution’s holdings in this oft-overlooked area.

This is the first exhibition ever mounted in the United States of Philippine art spanning from the precolonial period to today. It explores the Philippines’ diverse artistic practices through twenty-five rare and compelling works: traditional carving and weaving; Islamic metalwork; Christian art from the colonial period; and modern and contemporary painting and mixed-media. This rich variety comes together to tell the sometimes unfamiliar story of how the Philippines — an island nation positioned along ancient trade routes between China and India, and, later, Europe via the Americas — has for centuries been a center for artistic exchange and innovation.

“The artistic culture of the Philippines has been marked by a history of invasion, resistance, accommodation and adaptation,” explains Natasha Reichle, who as the museum’s associate curator of Southeast Asian art spent years acquiring the artworks organized into this exhibition. “What has been fascinating is seeing how contemporary artists draw upon aspects of this complex legacy to create new works, works that are celebrated in the Philippines and valued in a global art market that is beginning to appreciate their beauty, originality and sophistication.”

“Ironically, the Philippines’ colonial history and Christian artistic legacy placed much of its art outside familiar ‘Asian art’ storylines of Hinduism or Buddhism, which may have led to its exclusion from our museum’s original founding collection,” explains Reichle. “Luckily for our visitors, this is a story that wants to be told. We have pieces in this exhibition acquired by donation, given directly from artists and collectors, even from the families of former missionaries and on-the-ground field researchers. The backstory of how we acquired every artwork mirrors the fascinating history of the Philippines.”

Lire la suite sur : http://www.asianart.org/press_releases/81

Patani semasa : pameran seni dari Patani

Exhibition : Patani Semasa : Pameran Seni dari Patani, 19/07/2017 – 14/02/2018, MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum

An exhibition on contemporary art from the Golden Peninsula. Ranging from different time periods, works of art as well as cultural representations of the « Patani region » from 27 artists have been selected – both locals and those engaged with issues relevant to the area in question.

Voir : http://www.maiiam.com/exhibition/

Site and Space in Southeast Asia

Map of Rangoon, ca. 1914. Cartographers Wagner and Debes, Leipzig.
In Karl Baedeker, Indien. Handbuch für Reisende. Verlag Karl Baedeker, Leipzig, 1914, p. 256 f

The Power Institute (Sydney) is thrilled to announce a new collaborative research initiative, Site and Space in Southeast Asia.

The project explores the intersections of urban space, art and culture in three cities—Yangon, Myanmar, Penang, Malaysia, and Huế, Vietnam—through collaborative, site-based research. With major funding from the Getty Foundation’s Connecting Art Histories Initiative and partners from within and beyond the region, including National Gallery Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, and Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Site and Space in Southeast Asia, continues our efforts to support innovative research in the art and architectural histories of the region, foster professional networks among early career scholars, and expand our engagement with an ever more global field.

Site and Space in Southeast Asia builds on the success of our first Connecting Art Histories project, Ambitious Alignments: New Histories of Southeast Asian Art. While Ambitious Alignments was centred around individual research projects exploring histories of modern art between 1950 and 1990, Site and Space expands its chronological reach, from the colonial into the postcolonial and contemporary, while shifting focus to site-based work by small teams of researchers. Engaging with cities as sites that generate cultural narratives, researchers will explore spaces of memory, interaction, and production across national and regional boundaries.

While Field Directors will lead research teams in each city, the overall program is directed by Stephen Whiteman, Lecturer in Asian Art at the University of Sydney, with professors Adrian Vickers, Director of Asian Studies, and Mark Ledbury, Director of the Power Institute. Dr Yin Ker of Nanyang Technological University will be joining the project as Field Director for Yangon, while Dr Simon Soon, a University of Sydney graduate and Senior Lecturer at the University of Malaya, will lead the Penang team. A search for the Field Director for Huế is underway; interested candidates are invited to contact Dr Whiteman at stephen.whiteman@sydney.edu.au with any enquiries.

Site and Space in Southeast Asia will launch with a mini-field school in Singapore in late autumn 2018. A call for participation will be announced in September—please spread the word!

Voir : http://www.powerpublications.com.au/site-and-space-in-southeast-asia/

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art: a Research Workshop with Tran Ky Phuong and Soumya James, 16/05/2017, CSEAS, SOAS.

Scholarship on ancient Khmer and Cham art evolved concomitantly with the French colonial project, and has long been grounded in archaeological and epigraphic study. This workshop presents new currents of research expanding the field. Tran Ky Phuong is the leading scholar of Cham art. After a first curatorial career at the Danang Museum of Cham Sculpture, he joined the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts, where he has launched research combining ethnographic and art historical methods. Soumya James represents a new generation of Southeast Asia art historians. Her work examines the representation of the divine feminine in cultural and eco-political landscape of Angkor.

Tran Ky Phuong is a former curator of the Museum of Cham Sculpture in Da Nang (1978-98); currently he is a senior research fellow with the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts; and is a researcher of the Center for Cultural Relationship Studies in Mainland Southeast Asia (CRMA Center) of Chulachomklao Royal Military Academic, Thailand and at APSARA Authority, Siem Reap, Cambodia; from 2012 until the present he has been a consultant of UNESCO World Cultural Heritages at My Son Sanctuary. He has awarded several research fellowships to study at International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden; Asia Research Institute (ARI) of National University of Singapore; Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts (CASVA), National Gallery of Arts, Washington DC.

He has published several books and articles in Vietnamese, English and Japanese, including: My Son in the History of Cham Art (1988); Vestiges of Champa Civilization (2008); Champa Iseki/Champa Ruins (co-author with Shige-eda Yutaku, 1997); The Cham of Vietnam: History, Society and Art (co-editor with Bruce Lockhart), NUS Press (2011); “The Architecture of Temple-Towers of Ancient Champa (Central Vietnam)” in Champa and the Archaeology of My Son, Vietnam (2009); “The Preservation and Management of the Monuments of Champa in Central Vietnam: The Example of My Son Sanctuary, a World Cultural Heritage Site”, in Rethinking Cultural Resource Management in Southeast Asia: Preservation, Development and Neglect (2011);“The new archaeological finds in Northeast Cambodia, Southern Laos and Central Highland of Vietnam: Considering on the significance of overland trading route and cultural interactions of the ancient kingdoms of Champa and Cambodia”, in Advancing Southeast Asian Archaeology 2013, SEAMEO SPAFA Regional Center for Archaeology and Fine Arts, Bangkok, Thailand (2015).

Soumya James is an independent Art Historian who studies premodern South and Southeast Asian art. She received her PhD in Art History from Cornell University. Her dissertation focused on the cultural and eco-political significance of the divine feminine at three Angkor period sites. Her research investigates the relationship between landscape and built form, gender and sexuality, and the art historical links between premodern South and Southeast Asia. Following her graduation, she continued her research while working as the coordinator for the Science and Society Programme at the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, India. She was a Postdoctoral Associate at the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities and a Fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center, both at Yale University. She is currently working on a book manuscript and planning her next fieldtrip to Cambodia.

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/16may2017-approaches-to-the-study-of-khmer-and-cham-art-a-research-workshop-with-tran-ky-phuong-and-.html

CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities

CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities, 16-17 August 2017, Asia Research Institute, NUS

Deadline : 30 April 2017

For Zukin (1982, 1987, 1995) culture has been central to the development of the new ‘symbolic’ or ‘creative’ economy, but she also cautions against its appropriation for urban redevelopment that can lead displacement of local communities. Castells (2010), on the other hand, suggests that cultural materials, including digital media, facilitate social change, especially in relation to social movements, because they enable social actors to redefine their subjectivities and transform the social structure. While local and regional governments are striving towards the ‘rejuvenation’ of urban spaces as a form of city branding, citizens and artists alike are seeking ways to maintain the viability of local arts and culture along with (in)tangible heritage. In many Asian cities, heritage preservation has played an important role in the democratisation of urban spaces and community building. Tensions between different interest groups have been unavoidable but mutual ground is needed for feasible policies and practices to construct inclusive and socially just urban spaces.

With the rise of local governance, and changing state-society relationships, we believe that the full potential of arts, heritage, and cultural production in the social transformation and civic participation has not yet been fully acknowledged. Given differences in urban governance, planning and civic participation in East and Southeast Asia, more nuanced research is needed to identify what kind of cultural policies and creative practices could be developed and how they might provide innovative approaches beyond the Western paradigms of ‘creative’ or ‘cultural’ cities, and gentrification. Similarly, Douglass (2015) has raised policy questions about how to strengthen civic engagement, belonging and community building in cities through the cultivation of civic participation. Innovative forms of civic participation resonate with the ‘worlding practices’ defined by Ong (2011:4) as ‘projects that attempt to establish or break established horizons of urban standards in and beyond a particular city’. The purpose of this multidisciplinary conference is thus to explore both government-led cultural policies and the organically emerging artistic and creative practices aimed at the empowerment of local communities and neighborhoods in contemporary East and Southeast Asian cities.

We invite the submission of papers from early career and established scholars, policy makers, activists, and creative practitioners to explore the role of arts, culture, and heritage in developing more progressive urban societies in East and Southeast Asia cities. We encourage applicants to consider empirical case studies and theories within comparative contexts and to extrapolate policy options for other regions apart from the East and Southeast Asia that explore innovative ways to build co-operation between varied social groups, institutions, and local governance. Questions that will guide the conference proceedings speak to integrated themes across disciplinary and geographical boundaries and include:

  • How do arts, heritage, and creative practices provide opportunities for ‘creative communities’ to resist the encroachment of the corporate economy (Douglass 2015)? What challenges do they face in asserting their right to urban space?
  • How and to what extent could ‘gentrification aesthetics’ (Chang 2014) open up new approaches for analysing both positive and negative impact of urban redevelopment?
  • What kind of innovations in governance are needed to support art communities, heritage preservation, and cultural and creative industries in ways that are socially inclusive, viable, and enhance civil participation? Can an approach based on the interconnectedness of cultural and social sustainability (Kong 2009) benefit the understanding of the collective processes emerging in cities today?
  • How does public art reflect the ways in which forms of vernacular heritage, culture, and socio-spatial identity are bound up with the representation and (re)shaping of place and landscape in cities? What controversies and political fault lines might emerge through these processes?
  • What kind of novel forms of ‘art activism’ or ‘cultural activism’ are emerging, and how do they benefit, interact, or hinder the aims of social transformations?
  • To what extent are arts, heritage, and cultural productions contributing to the development of ‘tourist cities’? How is this being resisted or embraced by local populations?
  • What new approaches are emerging that transcend purely physical space? Can intangible forms, such as digital networks, forums and sites, benefit the survival of local communities?

Plus d’informations sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Event/Detail/f767b24e-9d53-4d4b-9f72-0ec54a53689b

Obieg, no. 2 (2016) : Parallel contemporaries : the art of Southeast Asia

Obieg, no. 2 (2016) : Special Issue :  Parallel contemporaries : The art of Southeast Asia

Editor : Krzysztof Gutfranski

Obieg is a bilingual Polish-English online quarterly that deals with the humanities.

A lire sur : http://obieg.u-jazdowski.pl/en/azja

Table of content

  • Parallel Contemporaries: The Art of Southeast Asia by Krzysztof Gutfranski
  • The Distances of Our Time: Reflections on Art Criticism and Southeast Asia by Lee Weng Choy
  • Rethinking Curatorial Colonialism by Simon Soon
  • Public Play: Audience Involvement and the Decoding of Concept in Socially-engaged Southeast Asian Contemporary Art by Iola Lenzi
  • Affective Labor and the Philippine Body by Patrick D. Flores
  • Defining the Thai Territory through Monuments: The Counter-insurgency in the Highlands Border by Thanavi Chotpradit
  • Playing with National Politics: Vietnamese Artists’ Visions of War by Nora Taylor
  • The Chorus of Idle Footsteps by Ron Hanson
  • Currencies of the Contemporary: Biennials and the International in Southeast Asia by David Teh
  • Comparative Contemporaries by Lee Weng-Choy, Sue Acret, Patrick D Flores, Ho Tzu-Nyen, Ly Daravuth, Keiko Sei