Archives par mot-clé : archéologie

Asian Review of World Histories, vol. 5, n° 2, 2017

Asian Review of World Histories, vol. 5, n° 2, 2017

Table of contents

  • Introduction.  Ancient Studies in Vietnam: The Late Professor Nishimura’s Area Studies and the Integration of Archaeology and History by John N. Miksic
  • Preface by Nishino Noriko
  • An Introduction to Dr. Nishimura Masanari’s Research on the Lung Khe Citadel by Nishino Noriko
  • A Reconsideration of the Leilou – Longbian Debate: A Continuation of Research by Nishimura Masanari by Lê Huy Phạm
  • Lung Khe and the Cultural Relationship between Northern and Southern Vietnam by Thi Liên Lê
  • Champa Citadels: An Archaeological and Historical Study by Trường Giang Đỗ, Tomomi Suzuki, Văn Quảng Nguyễn and Mariko Yamagata
  • Nishimura Masanari’s Study of the Earliest Known Shipwreck Found in Vietnam by Nishino Noriko,  Aoyama Toru, Kimura Jun, Nogami Takenori and Le Thi Lien
  • The International Ceramics Trade and Social Change in the Red River Delta in the Early Modern Period : A Case Study of Bát Tràng and Kim Lan Villages by Ueda Shinya and Nishino Noriko
  • The Keyi Mappila Muslim Merchants of Tellicherry and the Making of Coastal Cosmopolitanism on the Malabar Coast by Santosh Abraham

Book Reviews

  • Jürgen Osterhammel, The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by David E. L. Beecher
  • Miriam Gross, Farewell to the God of Plague: Chairman Mao’s Campaign to Deworm China by Margaret Mih Tillman

Voir : http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22879811/5/2

Ancient Guardian Statue Recovered at the Tonle Snguot Hospital site

« Ancient Guardian Statue Recovered at the Tonle Snguot Hospital site », 02/08/2017, Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre

An ancient guardian statue was recovered at the Tonle Snguot hospital site north of Angkor Thom by the APSARA Authority and Singapore’s ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute’s Nalanda – Sriwijaya Centre (NSC) Archaeological Field School team. This is a unique find because the statue is almost complete. It is a late 12th century sandstone statue and measures approximately two meters in height. The statue belongs to the famed Bayon style. Bayon style is associated with King Jayavarman VII. It was recovered on the second day of research by the archaeology team (29 July 2017) after being identified by APSARA archaeologists working with the NSC Field School.

There are often two guardian statues (or carved images) depicted in front of ancient temples. Although Jayavarman VII was a Buddhist, the statues are usually associated with both ancient Buddhism and Brahmanism (Hindu) in Cambodian temples. The archaeology team was there to investigate ancient hospital activities, habitation and structures. There is often a temple that likely served for spiritual healing and praying area. The treatment area is possibly a separate location in the complex. Medical treatment is depicted on the stone carvings at the Bayon temple. Ancient inscriptions also describe the nurses, doctors, guards, cooks and other people.

The statue will be transported to the Preah Norodom Sihanouk Angkor Museum because of its importance. This was in collaboration with the APSARA Heritage Police and local community authorities.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/notes/nalanda-sriwijaya-centre/ancient-guardian-statue-recovered-at-the-tonle-snguot-hospital-site/1487299751348403/

Pinle (Maingmaw): Research at an Ancient Pyu City, Myanmar

Archeology Report Series : Pinle (Maingmaw): Research at an  Ancient Pyu City, Myanmar by Myo Nyunt and  Kyaw Myo Win, Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre, ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute

The walled Pinle (Maingmaw) occupies a special place in the early urbanisation of Myanmar with this collaborative publication being the first solely focused on the site. It follows the NSC Archaeology Unit Report on Beikthano (Thein Lwin 2016). The present publication is an edited translation of two excavation reports of Pinle with editors’ comments adding background to the documentation of the unearthing of a brick structure and gate as well as exploration of potential sites in the surrounding region. Pinle was one of the network of independent Pyu polities in the first millennium CE, larger than Halin, one of the Pyu Ancient Cities. The importance of the Pinle region continued through the 9th to 13th centuries CE Bagan period. A significant multi-lingual inscription of the late 11th century was unearthed in Myittha, 14 km to the north and a contemporaneous walled rice fort is located south of Pinle. These details underline the fertility and strategic location of Pinle, vital in understanding the prosperity of Pyu cities of the first millennium CE and the formation of the first Myanmar state at Bagan.

Télécharger le rapport sur : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/images/pdf/AU6%20Pinle%202-reduced.pdf

The 2nd Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History with a focus on Hindu and Buddhist art and archaeology of central Java (8-9th Century CE)

Pour en savoir plus

The 2nd Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History with a focus on Hindu and Buddhist art and archaeology of central Java (8-9th Century CE) will be taking place in Yogyakarta, Central Java, July 27–2 August 2017. It is jointly run by SOAS University of London and Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM).

Programme Overview

In 2016, a pioneering Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History and Conservation focusing on premodern Javanese Art was held in Trawas (East Java). In 2017, the second edition of the Programme will be held in Yogyakarta, the iconic royal city of Central Java. It will focus on Central Javanese Hindu and Buddhist Art History in both its local and translocal dimensions. The period covered is from the early 8th to the late 9th century—the heyday of the Central Javanese civilisation.

Continuer la lecture de The 2nd Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History with a focus on Hindu and Buddhist art and archaeology of central Java (8-9th Century CE)