Lee Kong Chian Research Fellowship – Singapor

Lee Kong Chian Research Fellowship

The Lee Kong Chian (LKC) Research Fellowship aims to facilitate new research and publishing about Singapore and Southeast Asian culture, economy and heritage. This will enrich the Southeast Asia-centric collections and resources of the Lee Kong Chian Reference Library at the National Library of Singapore (NLS) and the National Archives of Singapore (NAS).

We welcome talented scholars and researchers to use our resources and services, and to collaborate with us on joint research projects to create new knowledge.

Research Area

Preference is given to the following fields of research for 2018:

  • Early printing history in Singapore – relating to Malay press and colonial history
  • Peranakan literary works – literature in Malay by the Straits Chinese of Singapore and Malaysia
  • Critical inquiry on Singapore contemporary literature/ writers (or any art genres) post 1965
  • Comparative studies between colonial and post-independence Singapore and/or Southeast Asia
  • Social history of Singapore from the mid-19th century to the early 20th century through legal documents of the Koh Seow Chuan Collection
  • Study of Japanese occupation through the Lim Shao Bin collection
  • Business history through the use of NLS’s donor collections
  • Early textbooks in twentieth century Singapore
  • Asian diaspora in the Southeast Asia with special reference to Singapore, Malaysia & Indonesia
  • Study of colonial governors and administrators in Singapore
  • Maritime development in early Singapore
  • Social history of early communities in Singapore
  • Early land transaction in Singapore
  • Singapore music
  • In-depth study or comparative study of early Singapore newspapers
  • Study of the Royal Air Force Seletar Association archives from the NAS collections
  • Research on Chinese dialect group using the oral history collection
  • Social history of Singapore through NLS’s photographs collection (from donors and private collections from NLS and NAS)

Who Can Apply?

The LKC Research Fellowship is open to both local and foreign applicants who are able to undertake prescribed research topics that raise awareness of our collections. Successful applicants should have scholarly and research credentials or their equivalent. Applicants could be curators, historians, academics or independent researchers who should preferably have an established record of achievement in their chosen field of research and the potential to excel further.

Terms of the Award

The award of the Fellowship is for a period of six months.

A stipend of up to a maximum of S$2,000 per month will be provided to help LKC Research Fellows meet living expenses, local transportation and photocopying expenses.

In addition to the stipend, overseas Fellows will be provided with a one-time relocation package of $1,500, a one-time return airfare of up to $1500 (reimbursement basis), and monthly accommodation allowance of up to $2,500 (reimbursement basis).

For foreign applicants, please click here to download a guide for overseas candidates.

For further information/How to Apply, please click here for more details.

Applications should be emailed to LKCRF@nlb.gov.sg or mailed to the following address by 27 April 2018.

Attn: The Administrator

Lee Kong Chian Research Fellowship
National Library Headquarters
National Library Board
100 Victoria Street,
#14-01
Singapore 188064

Late or incomplete applications will not be accepted. Notification of acceptance or rejection will be made known within 3 months of the closing date.

For further information about the Fellowship, please contact:

The Administrator, Lee Kong Chian Research Fellowship
Tel: 6718 3247
Email: LKCRF@nlb.gov.sg

Call for papers : « Civil Society and Authoritarianism in Cold War Southeast Asia » [Leeds, septembre 2018]

« Civil Society and Authoritarianism in Cold War Southeast Asia, »

at the United Kingdom Association of Southeast Asian Studies annual conference at the University of Leeds, from September 5 to 7, 2018.

Paper proposals on Vietnam are especially welcome, but please pass on this announcement to any colleagues working on relevant topics from any part of Southeast Asia.

Proposal abstracts of approx. 250 words should be submitted to Sean Fear at s.fear@leeds.ac.uk by May 31, 2018.

The recent history of Southeast Asia has long been understood in the popular imagination through the lens of the Cold War; indeed, even the term “Southeast Asia” itself became prominent as a strategic geographical designation by Allied forces during the Second World War and its aftermath. But although somewhat subsumed in English-language scholarship by events such as the U.S.-Soviet rivalry or the Vietnam War, the region’s postwar history has been characterised by complex relations between authoritarian governments and a range of civil society groups. Far from superpower proxies, both governments and opposition repurposed and exploited Cold War rhetoric and foreign intervention to pursue domestic political ends.

Growing access to local archives, however, has contributed to new research which challenges previous superpower-driven narratives, and highlights local agency. This panel builds on these  promising lines of inquiry by exploring the complex and evolving relationship between state and civil society in Cold War Southeast Asia. We welcome papers which focus on the impact of international or transnational networks; the mobility of people and information; the rise of grassroots political and religious movements; the role of authoritarian government; political journalism; or the impact of the environment on political and social change, among other themes.

The full panel outline is available here and information about ASEAS-UK and the Leeds conference can be found here.

A small travel stipend can be available for travel within the UK. Please feel free to contact Sean Fear for more information, or if you have any questions.

ASEAS Conference : Discourses of development in Laos

Here is an abstract for a panel co-convened by Phill Wilcox (University of London) and Sonemany Nigole (Université Libre de Bruxelles) at the ASEAS conference, which will be held at the University of Leeds on September 5-7 this year:

http://www.polis.leeds.ac.uk/events/2018/conference-of-the-association-of-southeast-asian-studies-aseas-southeast-asia-meets-global-challenges

Discourses of development in Laos

Sonemany Nigole, Laboratoire d’Anthropologie des Mondes Contemporaines, Université Libre de Bruxelles  sonemany.nigole@gmail.com
Phill Wilcox, Anthropology Department, Goldsmiths, University of London

phillwilcox@hotmail.com

What does it mean to be one of the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) in the world? This status, created by the United Nations (UN) in 1971, counts within its members the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, which has intended to depart from LDC status since 1996 (the new exit target is by 2030). Meeting the objectives of the UN Millennium Development Goals is a preoccupation of the Lao authorities and an often-repeated statement across the country in official discourse. To whom is this rhetoric addressed? Moreover, how to fulfill these objectives and at the same time meet the goals of other public or private institutions (ASEAN, Foreign Direct Investment from China, Vietnam and Thailand) in which Laos is similarly engaged?

Laos has been “under an Aid Regime” for numerous years, yet the LDC status also carries with it certain advantages such as receiving help for international trade, for debt reduction, and public assistance for development. Therefore, what does “development” mean for the actors of change (Lao State, officials, NGO and international cooperation members, funders, beneficiaries, etc.)? What does it produce in terms of legitimacy, national identity and policies?

This panel takes these broad themes as its starting point, exploring what is meant by development and modernity in Laos, agendas of development from different points of view, who the various actors and agents of change are, the uniqueness (or not) of the context, and the implications and consequences of development programs and initiatives within and beyond Laos.

Format for Abstracts: 

Please submit your abstracts as a Word document with the following format: Title of abstract, Your name, institution & email address, Body of abstract (max. 250 words).

If you are interested please contact us before the 15th of Maysonemany.nigole@gmail.com or phillwilcox@hotmail.com

 

High-tin bronze bowls and copper drums

« High-tin bronze bowls and copper drums: Non-ferrous archaeometallurgical evidence for Khao Sek’s involvement and role in regional exchange systems »

FREE access until May 2nd of this article by Pryce and Bellina on high-tin bronze bowls and copper drums from Khao Sek (ISEAA)

https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1WiZm8MrPrspSW

Photomicrograph is from a ‘Dong Son drum’ ( SEALIP/TH/KS/2) showing equi-axed cored microstructure, image courtesy of Pira Venunan.The article demonstrates Upper Thai-Malay Peninsula’s Bay of Bengal and the South China Sea interaction spheres. The analysis of copper-base artifacts also contributes to defining the political and economic organization of the early trading-polities that emerged during the first millennium BC.

The McConnell Foundation Scholarship for SAIL 2018

The McConnell Foundation Scholarship for SAIL 2018!

Program Date: June 27 – July 31, 2018

The Center for Lao Studies is very please to announce that through the generous support of The McConnell Foundation, we will be offering up to four (4) fellowships for exceptional applicants to attend SAIL program for this summer.

Continuer la lecture de The McConnell Foundation Scholarship for SAIL 2018