Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands

Nouvelle parution : Reimar Schefold, Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands, PRIMEDIA Editions, 2017

This book presents a detailed and inspiring picture of the traditional ways of life and the impressive art of the Mentawai archipelago located off the west coast of Sumatra in Indonesia. This shamanistic culture, most notably found on the northernmost island of Siberut, maintains an ancient relationship between man and the spiritual world. Within this worldview, everything is animated. Not only do humans have souls, but so do animals, plants and objects. To please these souls and to create harmony, alluring artifacts have been created for generations. In this way life, art, ritual and esthetics are intertwined: a notion reflected in the field photographs and in the beautiful and rare objects that are described and illustrated here. Toys for the Souls reveals for the first time the richness and creative power of an artistic imagination, deeply rooted in Southeast Asian prehistory.

Voir : http://www.tribalartmagazine.com/fischbacher/art-books/?a=view&id=382&lang=en

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 22 (September 2017)

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 22 (September 2017)

Thai cosmic politics : locating power in a diverse kingdom

Table of contents

  • Thai cosmic politics : locating power in a diverse kingdom by Edoardo Siani
  • In the name of the people : magic and the enigma of health governance in Thailand by Daena Funahashi
  • Land and lordship : royal devotion, spirit cults and the geo-body by Andrew Alan Johnson
  • “Raya kita” : Malay Muslims of Southern Thailand and the King by Annusorn Unno
  • A Christmas mourning : catholicism in post-Bhumibol Thailand by Giuseppe Bolotta
  • Good, clean mourning in Thailand cosmopolitan cosmos by Matthew Philipps

A lire sur : https://kyotoreview.org/

 

Inside Indonesia, n° 129 (Jul. – Sep. 2017) : Citizenship

Inside Indonesia n° 129 (Jul. – Sep. 2017) : Citizenship

“I am an Indonesian citizen!” by Ward Berenschot and Gerry van Klinken

What does exercising citizenship in Indonesia’s democracy look like?

 Digital citizenship by M. Zamzam Fauzanafi

Online corruption talk in Banten can be vitriolic

Labour takes a citizenship approach by Hari Nugroho

Despite the impressive activism of Pekalongan’s labour union, its political clout remains limited

Indonesia’s diaspora citizens by Yearry Panji Setianto

After decades of neglect, Indonesia’s diaspora demands more rights

From mother to citizen by Vita Febriany

The New Order actively promoted citizenship of a particular kind for women

 “We are natural-born children, you are adopted” by Safrudin Amin   

Locals contest national citizenship rights in North Maluku

When “home” is not home by Laila Kholid Alfirdaus

Locals react coolly to ex-transmigrants who return to Java after fleeing violence elsewhere

 Islam and citizenship by Chris Chaplin

Organisations like Wahdah Islamiyah envision an ‘Islamic’ citizenship for Indonesia

A lire sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/edition-129-jul-sep-2017-2

 

 

 

 

 

Southeast Asian Studies : Rural Northeast Thailand in Transition

Southeast Asian Studies, vol. 6, n° 2 (August 2017), special issue, Rural Northeast Thailand in Transition: Recent Changes and Their Implications for the Long-Term Transformation of the Region

Guest Editors: Kono Yasuyuki, Arunee Promkhambut, and A. Terry Rambo

Table of contents

Introduction by Yasuyuki Kono, Promkhambut Arunee , A. Terry Rambo

The Agrarian Transformation in Northeastern Thailand: A Review of Recent Research by A. Terry Rambo

Household Dynamics, the Capitalist Economy, and Agricultural Change in Rural Thailand by Podhisita Chai

Household Structure and Sources of Income in a Rice-Growing Village in Northeast Thailand by Yuko Shirai and A. Terry Rambo

Improvement in Rainfed Rice Production during an Era of Rapid National Economic Growth: A Case Study of a Village in Northeast Thailand by Kazuo Watanabe 

Factors Influencing Variations in the Density, Extent of Canopy Cover, and Origin of Trees in Paddy Fields in a Rainfed Rice-Farming Village in Northeast Thailand by Moriaki Watanabe, Vityakon Patma and A. Terry Rambo

Multiple Cropping after the Rice Harvest in Rainfed Rice Cropping Systems in Khon Kaen Province, Northeast Thailand by Promkhambut Arunee and A. Terry Rambo

Trends in Hybrid Tomato Seed Production under Contract Farming in Northeast Thailand by Gedgaew Chalee, Simaraks  Suchint and A. Terry Rambo

Recent Changes in Agricultural Land Use in the Riverine Area of Nakhon Phanom Province, Northeast Thailand by  Praweenwongwuthi Sorat, Kaewmuangmoon Tewin,  Choenkwan Sukanlaya and A. Terry Rambo

Book Reviews

Jamie S. Davidson, “Indonesia’s Changing Political Economy: Governing the Roads” by Tetsu Konishi

Porphant Ouyyanont, “Rural Thailand: Change and Continuity” by Jonathan Rigg

Mikael Gravers and Flemming Ytzen (eds), “Burma/Myanmar: Where Now?” ; Renaud Egreteau and François Robinne (eds), “Metamorphosis: Studies in Social and Political Change in Myanmar” by Ward Keeler

Soon Chuan Yean, “Tulong: An Articulation of Politics in the Christian Philippines” by Wataru Kusaka

Christine Bacareza Balance, “Tropical Renditions: Making Musical Scenes in Filipino America” by Anjeline de Dios

Juliet Lee Uytanlet, “The Hybrid Tsinoys: Challenges of Hybridity and Homogeneity as Sociocultural Constructs among the Chinese in the Philippines” by Richard T. Chu

Michael Herzfeld, “Siege of the Spirits: Community and Polity in Bangkok” by Sophorntavy Vorng

Pamela D. McElwee, “Forests Are Gold: Trees, People, and Environmental Rule in Vietnam” by Michitake Aso

A lire sur : https://englishkyoto-seas.org/2017/08/vol-6-no-2-of-southeast-asian-studies-volumes/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

La Galigo manuscript – UNESCO heritage – digitally available

La Galigo manuscript – UNESCO heritage – digitally available, 27/07/2017, Leiden University

The La Galigo manuscript at Leiden University Libraries (UBL) has been digitized. The manuscript, which was inscribed in 2011 on UNESCO’s ‘Memory of the World’ Register, is now freely available online and can be used for teaching and research. La Galigo is the world’s longest epic, written in the Buginese language and script. The UBL holds one of the most extensive and valuable La Galigo manuscripts. The digitization of the Leiden La Galigo manuscript was made possible with support from Yayasan La Galigo.

Leiden manuscript
The Leiden manuscript (NBG-Boeg 188) consists of twelve parts and includes the first part of the Buginese epic poem. It tells the story about the origins of mankind according to South Sulawesi tradition. It is the longest fragment of the manuscript in existence. It was transcribed in Makassar, approximately in 1852-1858, by order of Colliq Pujie (Arung Pancana Toa), Queen Mother of Tanete, a small kingdom in South Sulawesi (Indonesia). The manuscript is part of the Makassarese Buginese manuscript collection of the Nederlands Bijbelgenootschap (Dutch Bible Society) and has been on permanent loan since 1905.

World Heritage
The majority of La Galigo manuscripts that have been preserved are located in Indonesia and the Netherlands. Along with one other La Galigo manuscript, which is kept at the La Galigo Museum in Makassar, the Leiden manuscript was inscribed in 2011 on the UNESCO’s ‘Memory of the World’ Register. This entry underlines the global significance and importance of the La Galigo manuscript.

Accessibility
The digitized La Galigo manuscript can be found in Leiden’s digital collections: https://digitalcollections.universiteitleiden.nl/LaGaligo. In addition, transcripts of the Buginese text in Dutch are available, as are relevant documents, maps and images taken from Leiden’s special collections. The digitized text can also be downloaded.

Inspiration
La Galigo is also known as a musical work by the American avant-garde theatre director and artist Robert Wilson. His La Galigo-based performance premiered in Singapore in 2004 and has been performed in many cities worldwide. In the UBL’s online video series World Treasures, Gert Oostindie, director of the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV) and Professor of History at Leiden University, gives more background and discusses the importance of the Leiden manuscript.

Festive meeting in Makassar
On Saturday 19 August, the digital La Galigo manuscript was officially made available online at the Hasanuddin University in Makassar. This event was combined with the launch of the reprints of Volume 1 and 2 and the new print of Volume 3.  The seminar was attended by more than 250 interested participants and representatives of local Indonesian governmental institutions, Hasanuddin University and Leiden University.

Voir : https://www.library.universiteitleiden.nl/news/2017/08/la-galigo-manuscript—unesco-heritage-%E2%80%93-digitally-available

Call for papers : Sacred Sites/Sacred Stories: Global Perspectives

Call for papers : Sacred Sites/Sacred Stories: Global Perspectives, 5-7 April 2018, ANU College of Asia & the Pacific, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia

Abstract Deadline: 15 October 2017

The study of sacred sites is a prominent feature in a number of disciplines. Sacred sites and stories and pilgrimage are the theme of the conference. Topics of enquiry range from the role of sacred sites in religious traditions, through to how sacred sites form part of the development of modern tourist industries, the role of sacred sites in international relations and the ways in which sacred sites can be the focus for disputes. At a time when many sacred sites and their stories face challenges due to economic development, environmental change and the impact of mass pilgrimage and tourism the conference offers an opportunity for wide-ranging discussions of the past, present and future of sacred sites and stories and their significance in the world today.

The conference will have the following panels:

•    Pilgrimage and Tourism
•    Historical Perspectives
•    Visual Arts and Architecture
•    Indigenous Traditions
•    Competition and Contestation

We welcome proposals for paper presentations that address the theme of one of these panels. Individual papers that are relevant to the main theme but are not aligned with any of the proposed panel streams will also be considered for presentation.

Panel Proposals : while proposals for individual papers are welcome, applicants are also encouraged to collaborate with peers to propose panels of 3-4 papers that converge on a particular theme.

In view of the major role that Australia and the Asia Pacific region plays in national and international discussions about sacred sites and sacred stories we particularly welcome panels on Asian, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Pacific perspectives on sacred sites. We also welcome papers covering a range of time frames, from pre-history to the contemporary era, and from all traditions and locations.

Plus d’informations sur : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/cap-events/2017-10-15/sacred-sitessacred-stories-global-perspectives-abstract-deadline

Feminist Fiction From the Philippines, Written 50 Years Ago

« Feminist Fiction From the Philippines, Written 50 Years Ago » by Melissa Chadburn, 01/09/2017, The New York Times

To enter the world of “The Woman Who Had Two Navels and Tales of the Tropical Gothic,” your faith must bend to the following: Time travel exists. Shapeshifting is possible. And a woman could be in power.

Nick Joaquin is considered one of the Philippines’ greatest writers. By introducing him here, the publisher Elda Rotor continues her careful curation of Filipino classics for Penguin’s roster. With authoritarian threats surging in both his home country and the United States, Joaquin’s re-emergence feels especially timely. Born in 1917, and a young man during World War II, he depicts war’s effects on a population still capable of rebellious celebration. Fluent in Spanish, Tagalog, and street slang, Joaquin wrote in English but summoned a space between languages. He was not a joiner but a man of singular pursuits. “I have no hobbies, no degrees; belong to no party, club or association,” he once said. “I like long walks … Dickens and Booth Tarkington, the old Garbo pictures, anything with Fred Astaire.” He was also defiant, even against dictatorship: When he was named National Artist of the Philippines in 1976, he said he would accept the honor only if Ferdinand Marcos freed the imprisoned poet Jose F. Lacaba. Marcos obliged.

Drafted in an age of strongmen, during the first two decades of the country’s postcolonial period between 1946 and 1965, the 11 works collected in this volume — 10 stories and a play — read as feminist. The story “Three Generations” presents a battle of two masculine wills, but a woman’s inner life drives it: The patriarch is mystified “by a certain nakedness in his wife’s mind; in the minds of all women, for that matter. You took them for what they appeared: shy, reticent, bred by nuns, but after marriage, though they continued to look demure, there was always in their attitude toward sex, an amused irony, even a deliberate coarseness.” Though they may lack the trappings of external power, women maintain the emotional and sexual self-possession to direct Joaquin’s narrative outcomes.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/books/review/nick-joaquin-the-woman-who-had-two-navels-and-tales-of-the-tropical-gothic.html