The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand

Angela S. Chiu, The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand, University of Hawaii Press, 2017

For centuries, wherever Thai Buddhists have made their homes, statues of the Buddha have provided striking testament to the role of Buddhism in the lives of the people. The Buddha in Lanna offers the first in-depth historical study of the Thai tradition of donation of Buddha statues. Drawing on palm-leaf manuscripts and inscriptions, many never previously translated into English, the book reveals the key roles that Thai Buddha images have played in the social and economic worlds of their makers and devotees from the fifteenth to twentieth centuries.

Author Angela Chiu introduces stories from chronicles, histories, and legends written by monks in Lanna, a region centered in today’s northern Thailand. By examining the stories’ themes, structures, and motifs, she illuminates the complex conceptual and material aspects of Buddha images that influenced their functions in Lanna society. Buddha images were depicted as social agents and mediators, the focal points of pan-regional political-religious lineages and rivalries, indeed, as the very generators of history itself. In the chronicles, Buddha images also unified the Buddha with the northern Thai landscape, thereby integrating Buddhist and local conceptions of place. By comparing Thai Buddha statues with other representations of the Buddha, the author underscores the contribution of the Thai evidence to a broader understanding of how different types of Buddha representations were understood to mediate the “presence” of the Buddha.

The Buddha in Lanna focuses on the Thai Buddha image as a part of the wider society and history of its creators and worshippers beyond monastery walls, shedding much needed light on the Buddha image in history. With its impressive range of primary sources, this book will appeal to students and scholars of Buddhism and Buddhist art history, Thai studies, and Southeast Asian religious studies.

Voir : http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9745-9780824858742.aspx

Transformative traditions: Dana Langlois and Reaksmey Yean of Cambodia’s JavaArts – in conversation

Transformative traditions: Dana Langlois and Reaksmey Yean of Cambodia’s JavaArts – in conversation, 04/04/2017, Art Radar

Prominent Phnom Penh gallery seeks to make contemporary art accessible through initiatives. 

Based in Phnom Penh since 1998, Dana Langlois founded JavaArts in 2000. In addition to the café and gallery that makes up JavaArts, Langlois also founded experimental gallery Sala Artspace and Our City Festival.

Java Gallery’s current Curator for Creative Programmes, Reaksmey Yean worked for art organization Phare Ponleu Selpak as an Assistant to the Department of Performing Arts and Administrator of Artist Residency Programmes (EU) and Cambodian Living Arts as a Communication and Advertising Officer and Production and Logistic Officer. Yean is also the founder of Trotchaek Pneik.

Langlois and Yean talked with Art Radar about the rapid changes engulfing Cambodia’s urban capital and the echo of the country’s brutal genocide under Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, where an estimated 1.7 to 2.5 million people perished between 1975 and 1979.

Lire la suite sur : http://artradarjournal.com/2017/04/04/transformative-traditions-dana-langlois-and-reaksmey-yean-of-cambodias-javaarts-in-conversation/

Malaysia Cartoon And Comic House

There’s now a place to go to admire Malaysia’s comic book art by Daryl Goh, 03/04/2017, star2.com

The newly-opened Malaysia Cartoon And Comic House, nestled in leafy Taman Botani Perdana in Kuala Lumpur, is set to be a major attraction for comic book enthusiasts and the more curious-minded. The building, which is now home to the nation’s cartoon and comic book story, is practically packed out, wall-to-wall, with original comic book art, editorial cartoon strips, storyboard sketches, studio notes and vintage youth culture magazines, all dedicated to chronicling Malaysian comic book history and culture.

Over 500 cartoon and comic book works – spanning mid-1930s to the late 1990s – are on display now at the gallery, with Tazidi revealing that less than 10% of the Malaysia Cartoon And Comic House archive has been made public in this opening exhibition.

“Still in the Game”: The State of Indonesian Art History in the 21st Century

“Still in the Game”: The State of Indonesian Art History in the 21st Century : 3rd Cornell Modern Indonesia Project (CMIP) Conference

Cornell Southeast Asia Program with Cornell Modern Indonesia Project and the Herbert F Johnson Museum present the 3rd Cornell Modern Indonesia Project (CMIP) Conference.

18 renowned scholars from Indonesia, Australia, Europe, and America will gather in honor of the 50th anniversary of Claire Holt’s magnum opus, Art in Indonesia: Continuities and Change (Cornell University Press, 1967). The conference will be organized around the chapters of her classic text, as follows:

Friday, April 21, 2017 | Kahin Center

4:30pm  Opening Remarks by Professor Kaja McGowan, Director of Southeast Asia Program, Professor of History of Art, Cornell University

5:00 pm  The Great Debate Revisited

Saturday, April 22, 2017 | Kahin Center

10:00 am  Exploring Some Prehistoric Roots

2:00 pm  Impact of Indian Influences & Emergence of New Styles 4:00 pm  The Dance & Dance Drama

Sunday, April 23, 2017 | Johnson Museum

9:00 am  The Wayang World
11:00 am  Photography & New Media

2:00 pm  Wayang Performance of Dewaruci/ Bimasuci

A traveling exhibition of contemporary Indonesian photography at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum, curated by Brian Arnold, will further enhance the programming. Also, in honor of Benedict Anderson, an exhibition of his gifts to the museum, particularly his masks, will be on display on the 5th floor.

Details of speakers, titles of talks to follow.

Voir : https://seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/still-game-state-indonesian-art-history-21st-century

Atlas of deforestation and industrial plantations in Borneo

Atlas of deforestation and industrial plantations in Borneo : new interactive atlas developed by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

For a better Borneo, new map reveals how much terrain has changed, 15/02/2017, Forests News, CIFOR blog

New atlas displays 40 years of human impacts on forests – from fires to logging to industrial plantations and more

Incorporating 40 years of maps of Borneo (the world’s third largest island), the tool reveals both the forest remaining and what is being reshaped due to degradation and extraction industries. With the ability to search by oil palm or pulpwood concessions, and view the locations of intact peatland, as well as determine the speed with which forest is converted to plantation, the atlas offers the first significant opportunity to distinguish companies that are avoiding deforestation to a large degree.

CIFOR scientist David Gaveau, who developed the atlas, said, “The tool is an open platform for researchers, advocacy groups, journalists and anyone interested in deforestation, wildlife habitats and corporate actions.”

The data provided by the atlas is free to download, and informs whether a particular oil palm concession is certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)- the organization that implements a global standard for sustainability in the palm oil industry.

Lire la suite sur : http://blog.cifor.org/48167/for-a-better-borneo-new-map-reveals-how-much-terrain-has-changed?fnl=en

Ramayana : the divine poem as revealed by the Rajbansi masks (India, Nepal, Indonesia)

Exposition : Ramayana : the divine poem as revealed by the Rajbansi masks (India, Nepal, Indonesia), 08/04/2017 – 10/09/2017, Museo Arte Orientale di Venezia

Il Museo d’Arte Orientale di Venezia, presenta la mostra Rāmāyaa. The divine poem as revealed by the Rājbanśī masks, Museo d’Arte Orientale di Venezia, 8 aprile – 10 settembre 2017, prodotta da ICI Venice – Istituto Culturale Internazionale e dall’Association pour le Rayonnement des Cultures Himalayennes, a cura di Marta Boscolo Marchi e François Pannier, con il contributo scientifico di Stefano Beggiora.

La mostra, patrocinata dall’UNESCO, dall’Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia e dall’ICOO, Istituto di Cultura per l’Oriente e l’Occidente, offre un suggestivo percorso tra Nepal, India e Indonesia, seguendo la diffusione del Rāmāyana, testo sacro dell’induismo.

Tradizionalmente attribuito al saggio Vālmīki (fine II – inizio I sec. a.C.), il nucleo originario del grande poema venne composto in realtà tra il VI e il III secolo a.C. e trovò la sua definizione nei primi secoli della nostra era. Analogamente ai poemi omerici, il Rāmāyana è un insieme organico delle conoscenze e dei modelli culturali di un’intera civiltà.

In esposizione alcune splendide maschere in legno dipinto della collezione di Alain Rouveure, che rappresentano alcuni dei numerosi personaggi della saga di Rāma, avatāra (discesa) di Viṣṇu e furono realizzate per le sacre rappresentazioni che si tenevano nei villaggi, testimoniano il radicamento di questa tradizione presso l’etnia Rājbanśī, tra il sud del Nepal, il Bihar e il Bengala indiano.

Come si potrà vedere nel docu-film girato da Anne e Ludovic Segarra nel 1975, nel Mithila le donne continuano a dipingere le loro case con scene sacre, e nei villaggi di quella regione gli attori mettono in scena il Rāmāyana col volto semplicemente dipinto.

Dall’India il Rāmāyana si diffuse anche in Indonesia: la sua messa in scena nel teatro di figura indonesiano e in particolare nel wayang kulit, il teatro delle ombre, lo ha reso una delle storie più popolari e note del paese. Nell’ultima sala del percorso espositivo, le marionette della collezione del Museo d’Arte Orientale raffigurano molti degli stessi personaggi delle maschere Rājbanśī, creando un suggestivo legame culturale tra India e Indonesia.

Pour plus d’informations : https://icivenice.wordpress.com/2017/03/14/ramayana-the-divine-poem-as-revealed-by-the-rajbansi-masks-exhibition-museo-arte-orientale-di-venezia-exhibition-08-04-2017-10-09-2017/

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem de Linus Suryadi A. G., vendredi 28 avril 2017 à 13h, Salon Peillot, Musée Guimet

Au programme, un long poème narratif en prose : « Confidences de Pariyem. L’univers d’une femme de Java » de l’indonésien Linus Suryadi AG (1951-1999).

« Confidences de Pariyem » a paru en 1981 à Jakarta. A travers les confidences de l’héroïne au jeune Païman, c’est une description rare et puissante de la vie quotidienne et des états d’âme d’une jeune fille de la fin des années 60 qui transparaît.
Embauchée dans une vieille famille noble de Yogyakarta, dernier bastion de l’héritage culturel des cours javanaises, Pariyem nous offre avec candeur, fierté et humour un saisissant voyage.

La lecture sera ensuite prolongée par une rencontre littéraire animée par Etienne Naveau, qui donnera quelques clefs sur Java, les femmes, l’Islam et la place proéminente des écrivaines sur la scène littéraire de l’archipel.
Etienne Naveau est professeur de langue et de littérature indonésienne à l’INALCO.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/1730539373639915/

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS : The Politics of Distribution: Migrant Labour, Development and Religious Aid in Asia

Call for papers : The Politics of Distribution: Migrant Labour, Development and Religious Aid in Asia, 16-17 /11 /2017, Asian Research Institute, National University of Singapore

Deadline : 2 june 2017

Migrant labour has been viewed as an important factor in growth, productivity and poverty reduction in Asia where rapid economic development has raised many to middle income countries. However, parallel to the growth of these economies has arisen new challenges and tensions as well as continuing underdevelopment (Rigg 2015). This includes what some scholars have identified as the formation of a labour surplus population in many parts of the world, where a decline in small agriculture and new industries generating less employment has resulted in a labour over supply that has made many “redundant” in the global production system (Ferguson 2015, Li 2010). Instead, distributive practices and “relations of dependence” (Ferguson 2015) have increased in the context of not only diminishing employment opportunities but also in uncertain and precarious employment, as is in the case of migrant labour which has often been linked to abuses over working conditions and wages.

In this sense, religious aid is one significant and diverse form of distributive practice. This is particularly the case where the rise in global civil society and non-state actors make up for many of the “structural holes” (Faist 2009) in social services neglected by the State. The absence of the State in this area, particularly in the global South, has led to an opening up of a space for alternative actors to ‘fill in the gap’, including faith-based actors where religious spaces have become simultaneously humanitarian and development spaces. This is particularly the case for migrants, refugees and asylum seekers, who as ‘non-citizens’ are often marginalised in their access to formal work and social services.

The conference will engage with Ferguson’s concept of distributive practices (Ferguson 2015) to interrogate whether it is applicable to religious aid in the Asian context as a significant form of contemporary labour. This is in recognition of the fact that cultivating the social relationships which make distributive flows possible is not a passive condition, but rather the outcome of a particular type of labour (Ferguson 2015, 97). Although having always existed in the form of remittances, kin-based sharing, patronage, “corruption” and relations of dependence on others such as NGOs and corporations, distributive practices have taken on a new amplitude with the decrease in the availability and increasing precariousness of waged labour.

Lire la suite sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Event/Detail/f3f0722f-8b9f-4bd6-9414-57662eb74901

Sovereignty and the Sea: How Indonesia Became an Archipelagic State

John G. Butcher and R.E. Elson, Sovereignty and the Sea: How Indonesia Became an Archipelagic State, NUS Press, 2017

Until the mid-1950s nearly all the waters lying between the far-flung islands of the Indonesian archipelago were as open to the ships of all nations as the waters of the great oceans.  In order to enhance its failing sovereign grasp over the nation, as well as to deter perceived external threats to Indonesia’s national integrity, in 1957 the Indonesian government declared that it had “absolute sovereignty” over all the waters lying within straight baselines drawn between the outermost islands of Indonesia.  At a single step, Indonesia had asserted its dominion over a vast swathe of what had hitherto been seas open to all, and made its lands and the seas it now claimed a single unified entity for the first time.

International outrage and alarm ensued, expressed especially by the great maritime nations. Nevertheless, despite its low international profile, its relative poverty, and its often frail state capacity, Indonesia eventually succeeded in gaining international recognition for its claim when, in 1982, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea formally recognized the existence of a new category of states known as “archipelagic states” and declared that these states had sovereignty over their “archipelagic waters”.

Sovereignty and the Sea explains how Indonesia succeeded in its extraordinary claim. At the heart of Indonesia’s archipelagic campaign was a small group of Indonesian diplomats. Largely because of their dogged persistence, negotiating skills, and willingness to make difficult compromises Indonesia became the greatest archipelagic state in the world.

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/products/sovereignty-and-the-sea-how-indonesia-became-an-archipelagic-state?variant=29153544594

The Blooming Years : Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia

Pavin Chachavalpongpun (ed.), The Blooming Years : Kyoto  Review of Southeast Asia

This collection of articles from the Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia (KRSEA) is published with the financial support of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), Kyoto University. We have compiled all the English articles from Issue 13 (March 2013), to Issue 20 (September 2016). This period marked a turning point for KRSEA with the re-launch of the website in March 2013 and the new online archive of earlier issues.

A télécharger sur : https://kyotoreview.org/the-blooming-years/

Liberalism and the Postcolony: Thinking the State in 20th-Century Philippines

Lisandro E. Claudio, Liberalism and the Postcolony: Thinking the State in 20th-Century Philippines, NUS Press, 2017

Extricating liberalism from the haze of anti-modernist and anti-European caricature, this book traces the role of liberal philosophy in the building of a new nation. It examines the role of toleration, rights, and mediation in the postcolony. Through the biographies of four Filipino scholar-bureaucrats—Camilo Osias, Salvador Araneta, Carlos P. Romulo, and Salvador P. Lopez—Lisandro E. Claudio argues that liberal thought served as the grammar of Filipino democracy in the 20th century. By looking at various articulations of liberalism in pedagogy, international affairs, economics, and literature, Claudio not only narrates an obscured history of the Philippine state, he also argues for a new liberalism rooted in the postcolonial experience, a timely intervention considering current developments in politics in Southeast Asia.

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/products/liberalism-and-the-postcolony-thinking-the-state-in-20th-century-philippines?variant=29097674706

The Rise of the Octobrists in Contemporary Thailand

Kanokrak Lertchoosakul, The Rise of the Octobrists in Contemporary Thailand : Power and Conflict Among Former Left-Wing Student Activists in Thai Politics, Yale Southeast Asia Studies Monograph #65, 2017

This book chronicles the history of the “Octobrist” students in Thai politics from the 1970s to the present. It examines the reasons why these former leftist student activists have managed to remain a significant force over the past three decades despite the collapse of left-wing politics in Thailand at both the national and international levels. At the same time, it asks why the Octobrists have become increasingly divided, particularly during the last decade’s protracted conflict in Thai politics. In addition, it fills in gaps in studies of leftists in transition at the global level on the question of the historical development of leftist and progressive forces in the post–Cold War era. The book is also important for readers interested in social movement theory, demonstrating how it has influenced political actors outside the boundaries of typical social movements. Finally, political opportunity structure, resource mobilization theory, and the framing process are used to conduct a  comprehensive analysis of the origins, emergence, and transformation of the Octobrists in contemporary Thai politics.

Kanokrat Lertchoosakul completed her PhD in government at the London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom. She is a lecturer in the Faculty of Political Science, Department of Government, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Voir : http://cseas.yale.edu/rise-octobrists

Blocking Papua from the Truth

Blocking Papua from the Truth by Andre Barahamin, 28/03/2017, New Mandala

Why have Jokowi’s promises to open up Indonesia’s “forbidden island” to journalists and rights monitors flunked?

On 20 December 2016, the Legal Aid Foundation for Indonesia Press (LBH Pers) staged a press conference. It highlighted censorship by The Indonesia Ministry of Information and Communication (Kominfo) towards Suara Papua, a local news outlet based in Abepura, Papua. With no prior notification, Suara Papua was silently listed alongside 11 websites blocked by the government. Those websites allegedly violated principles of journalism by promoting hoaxes and hate.

Later that evening, Rudiantara, the Minister of Information and Communication called Asep Komarudin from LBH Pers, promising that the ban would be lifted  the next day.

On  21 December, Suara Papua could  be accessed again, but not for those using Telkomsel – the largest telecommunications service provider in Indonesia. In Papua, Telkomsel is the main player and controls more than 65 per cent of the market for mobile phone services users. When I recently published an article with Suara Papua, dozens of people told me that they could not read it due to the Kominfo block.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/blocking-papua-truth/

Andre Barahamin is researcher of PUSAKA Foundation, and member of Papua Itu Kita (Jakarta-based solidarity campaign for Papua). He is also serving as editor for IndoPROGRESS, an online platform connecting progressive scholars and activists.

Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago

Leiden Asia Year : Symposium Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago, 13 May 2017, Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden

KITLV in collaboration with Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Universitas Indonesia, will organize a symposium on the importance of storytelling in Indonesia on 13 May 2017 in Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden, 10.30 – 17.00 hrs.

Indonesia’s oft-overlooked repertoire of storytelling traditions continues to inspire the nation’s arts, cultures and social practices. Inspired by a special edition of the journal Wacana, we investigate some of the archipelago’s diverse story-texts and performance practices.

This broad-scope symposium centers on the characteristics of Indonesian stories, their embedding in storytelling traditions, and the (ritual) contexts in which these are performed. Several presentations explore how stories were – and are – composed and disseminated. Other participants bring to the fore Indonesian perspectives on storytelling beyond the boundaries of the written word, including solo- and group-performances accompanied by music, singing and dance.

We hope that this event will contribute to a renewed attention to the storytelling practices of Indonesia, fostering a more nuanced understanding of “text” in all its forms, the relevance of traditional stories in a rapidly changing society, and ongoing developments in Indonesian literature and popular culture.

Among the presenters are Aone van Engelenhove and Nazarudin (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) who will analyze [hi]stories and storytelling on the island of Kisar, Southwest Maluku, Els Bogaerts (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) with a fresh view on the well-known historical figure of Arya Penangsang in a recent theatre-play from Yogyakarta, Joachim Niess (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Südostasienwissenschaften) with a discussion of fiction in early Indonesian newspapers, and Clara Brakel-Papenhuyzen presenting recordings of Malay storytellers in North Sumatra that reflect the relationship between the interior and the coastal areas on that island. The programme also features performances of music and dance by Sundanese ensemble Dangiang Parahiangan and West Sumatran ensemble Archipelago.

Please register if you wish to attend: ln.vltik@vltik

Voir le programme complet sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/symposium-stories-storytelling-indonesian-archipelago-leiden-asia-year/

 

Framing Asia

Framing Asia is a monthly film screening and discussion on Asia during the Leiden Asia Year.

Framing Asia is organised by by the KITLV (Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean), the IIAS (International Institute for Asian Studies), the department CA-DS (Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology) and Studium Generale of University Leiden.

You are welcome to join us on Tuesday 11 April at 19.30 h at Lipsius 028. This edition will screen two films on Popcultures and subcultures.

The first film is titled That’s Wicked (11 min) and directed by Joycelyn Lee. It follows the 15 year old Martin who introduces us to the world of beatboxing in Singapore.

The second film, The Silk Road of Pop (53 min), produced by Sameer Farooq, Ursula Engel and Stijn Deklerck shows us the vibrant music scene of the Uyghur youth in Xinjiang, China.

Afterwards, Ursula Engel (co-director of The Silk Road of Pop) will join our discussion with Bart Barendregt. Bart Barendregt is an associate professor at the Leiden Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology. He has an interest in popular and digital culture, and has published on Southeast Asian performance, new and mobile media, and (Islamic) pop music.

Voir les séances précédentes, Transgender issues in Indonesia, Disaster and the failing state sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/framing-asia