Archives de catégorie : Expositions

Voices of Transition : Contemporary Art from Myanmar

Exhibition : Voices of Transition : Contemporary Art from Myanmar, 16/11/2017 – 03/12/2017, Lunn + Sgarbossa Gallery, Londres

Lunn+Sgarbossa presents ‘Voices of Transition: Contemporary Art from Myanmar’, an exhibition of unprecedented size, scale and scholarly ambition in Europe to display contemporary artists from Myanmar.

In our curation, we aim to communicate the dynamic experiences of artists in Myanmar from the inception of contemporary art in Myanmar in the 1980’s to the present day. Our title – ‘Voices of Transition’ – demonstrates our enquiry into the transitional context for contemporary artists, understanding the oppression of state censorship, and how artists have boldly fought to have their voices heard. We also place the work in a broader, non-artistic context and challenge the reality of the often quoted ‘transition to democracy’ of Myanmar post-2015. In essence, ‘Voices of Transition’ asks how we reconcile individual voices and national context, in order to understand societal ‘transition’.

Visitors to the exhibition will be exposed to a carefully curated set of media and practises. Moe Satt (b. 1983) presents his captivating video-art ‘Hands around in Yangon’ (2017), which deals poignantly with the daily tasks of many pairs of hands, revealing through its hypnotic pace the inner-workings of a day in the life of Yangon. Aye Ko (b.1963), winner of the Joseph Balestier Freedom of the Art’s Prize 2017, prints striking and tortured self-depictions, through which we are able to reflect on his time as a political prisoner. Nge Lay’s (b.1979) visceral and disarming photography explores the effects of time on the bodies of the female role models from her personal life, illustrating a central curatorial tenet of the exhibition, the departure of the old and the emergence of a new generation.

The exhibition will display major new works from the ‘father of Burmese modern art’, artist Aung Myint (b.1946), whose artworks have been collected by the Guggenheim. Until the 2000s, the colours red and gold were largely censored in art and film for political and religious reasons. Aung Myint’s use of colour and reinterpretation of traditional calligraphic and mural techniques are radical acts of rebellion. Acclaimed performance artists from Myanmar will be performing in person at the exhibition. Performance art, requiring minimal tools beyond the artist’s own body, has been a crucial medium of social-political participation, protest and solidarity in the struggle for a democratic Myanmar. While paintings can be symbolic, performance art is a direct action of defiance.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.lunnsgarbossa.com/current/

Southeast Asia Stakes Its Claim in the Art World

Htein Lin’s “A Show of Hands,” 2013–present, features hundreds of white plaster casts of raised right hands, each one an index of a political prisoner like himself. Credit Maria Baranova-Suzuki

Southeast Asia Stakes Its Claim in the Art World by Jason Farago, 27/09/2017, New York Times

Until recently — the 1990s, let’s say — an American critic keeping tabs on new art would concentrate on New York’s museums and galleries; cast an occasional, often dismissive eye on Western Europe; and perhaps try to visit Los Angeles now and again. No longer. By the ’90s the idea of a single avant-garde was dead and buried, and in its place arose a pluralist art ecosystem that spans the planet. It makes larger intellectual demands than ever, and requires us to accept that we’ll never see everything or understand it completely. In the new global art world, even we New Yorkers are provincials.

Perhaps nowhere benefited as much from this shift to a pluralist art world as Asia, where the 1990s saw an explosion of biennials and triennials. The Gwangju Biennale, Asia’s most important such exhibition, began in 1995 in South Korea, and was soon followed by large-scale shows in Shanghai, Taipei, Fukuoka, Yokohama, Singapore, Jakarta, and a half dozen other Asian megacities — all of which introduced Asian audiences to foreign art and pushed their own region’s figures to the international forefront. In these exhibitions, as well as in the new museums and art schools that arose around them, traditional styles of painting, drawing, pottery or calligraphy fell by the wayside, and installation, video and performance served as lingua franca.

The art in “After Darkness: Southeast Asian Art in the Wake of History,” at the Asia Society on Park Avenue, is the fruit of this global shift. The work here comes from Indonesia, Myanmar (or Burma) and Vietnam, though with just seven artists and one collective, it’s small enough to avoid the curse of the “regional show” and doesn’t force any unity on a diverse lineup. Not every work here is a masterpiece, but all of them plumb the roiling past and fractured present of places that, with a combined population of nearly 400 million, we have no excuse to be clueless about.

Lire la suite et voir les oeuvres sur : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/arts/design/southeast-asian-art-asia-society.html

 

Ancestors & Rituals, EUROPALIA INDONESIA

Ancestors & Rituals, Europalia Indonesia, 11/10/2017 – 14/01/2018, BOZAR/Palais des Beaux-Arts, Bruxelles

Commissaire: Daud Tanudirjo
Conseillers: Pieter ter Keurs & Francine Brinkgreve

Immense archipel de plus de 13 000 îles s’étalant sur pas  moins de 5 000 kilomètres d’est en ouest, l’Indonésie compte près de 255 millions d’habitants, 300 groupes ethniques et plus de 700 langues. Ces quelques chiffres donnent une idée de la diversité de ce pays et de la variété des cultures qui le composent.

Un point commun relie cependant une  grande majorité de ces cultures : l’importance accordée aux ancêtres. De Sumatra à la Papouasie, en passant par Java, Bornéo, Sulawesi, les petites îles de la Sonde et les Moluques : les ancêtres ont joué et jouent souvent encore un rôle de premier plan en Indonésie.

Qu’ils soient généalogiques ou mythiques, les ancêtres remplissent trois fonctions cruciales ayant trait au passé, au présent et au futur. Ils relient les vivants à leur passé, leur permettant de revendiquer une place au sein d’une lignée et de définir ainsi leur statut et position sociale. Ils sont ensuite garants de l’équilibre de la société et assurent par leur soutien et protection un présent harmonieux. Ils sont enfin source de fertilité et préservent ainsi le futur des peuples et cultures.

Les échanges avec d’autres cultures et religions ont, au fil des millénaires, influencé les arts, les identités et la manière  même d’envisager le monde des peuples indonésiens. La majeure partie des cultures de l’archipel trouvent leurs racines dans la culture austronésienne, apportée par des peuples migrateurs qui partirent de Taiwan il y a plus de 5 000 ans. La splendide culture Dong Son du nord du Vietnam, connue pour sa grande maîtrise du bronze, n’est pas non plus restée sans influence.

Enfin, un important volet de l’exposition est consacré aux surprenants rituels funéraires. Accomplis en différentes phases, parfois étalées sur plusieurs années, c’est ceux-ci qui permettent aux défunts d’accéder au statut d’ancêtres. Ceux qui leur survivent ne ménagent ni leurs efforts ni leurs finances pour les accompagner vers les mondes supérieurs et préserver ainsi l’équilibre et l’harmonie de la communauté.

La plupart des 160 trésors archéologiques et ethnographiques ont été prêtés par le Musée national d’Indonésie et sont exposés pour la première fois en Europe. Une trentaine de ceux-ci proviennent quant à eux de musées et de collections privées européennes. L’ensemble est mis en contexte à partir de photographies d’époque, de vidéos, de dessins et de peintures.

Voir : https://europalia.eu/fr/article/ancestors-rituals_1041.html

Between worlds : Raden Saleh & Juan Luna

Exposition : Between worlds : Raden Saleh & Juan Luna, 16/11/2017 – 11/03/2018, Singtel Special Exhibition Gallery C, National Gallery Singapore

Explore the extraordinary life stories of two artists who are considered national heroes in their home countries––Indonesian painter Raden Saleh (c.1811–1880) and Filipino painter Juan Luna (1857–1899). Drawing from important collections around the world, this landmark exhibition brings together more than 80 of their works for the first time.

Between Worlds takes you through significant chapters of each artist’s journey, uncovering parallels and differences in their experiences, from their emergence as artists in Java and the Philippines; to their subsequent training and participation in artistic and social circles in Europe; and their later return to Southeast Asia.

Between Worlds is part of the showcase Century of Light, which features two exciting exhibitions on art from the 19th century, a post-Enlightenment era of innovation and change. Together with Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay, the show demonstrates the range of painting styles and art movements that emerged in Europe during this formative period, which has been and continues to be influential to the development of art in Southeast Asia and around the world.

Voir : https://www.nationalgallery.sg/see-do/programme-detail/619/between-worlds-raden-saleh-and-juan-luna

Exposition : Les Mentawai d’Indonésie : Trésors de la réserve

Exposition : Les Mentawai d’Indonésie : trésors de la réserve, 21/10/2017 – 28/05/2018, Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden

Dans cette exposition, des objets uniques nous racontent l’histoire des traditions séculaires et de la culture d’aujourd’hui des Mentawai (Indonésie). Dans quelle mesure des traditions comme celles des Mentawai continuent-elles à être observées à une époque où la modernité s’est frayé un chemin jusque dans leur île ? Dans quelle mesure les Mentawai sont-ils prêts à faire partie d’un monde globalisé ? Les anciennes traditions sont-elles compatibles avec la vie au 21e siècle ?

C’est grâce au don de Reimar Schefold, ancien professeur d’anthropologie de l’Indonésie à l’Université de Leyde, que le Museum Volkenkunde peut disposer d’une collection d’art et d’objets Mentawai.

Lire la suite : https://volkenkunde.nl/nl/tentoonstelling-schatten-depot-mentawai-uit-indonesie

 

Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories

« Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories », 14/07/2017 – 11/03/2018, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

Landmark exhibition at Asian Art Museum showcases centuries of creativity and cultural exchange

On view July 14, 2017–March 11, 2018 and presented in the Tateuchi Thematic Gallery, Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories is the result of more than a decade of study and collecting by the museum’s curatorial team — a labor of love to expand the institution’s holdings in this oft-overlooked area.

This is the first exhibition ever mounted in the United States of Philippine art spanning from the precolonial period to today. It explores the Philippines’ diverse artistic practices through twenty-five rare and compelling works: traditional carving and weaving; Islamic metalwork; Christian art from the colonial period; and modern and contemporary painting and mixed-media. This rich variety comes together to tell the sometimes unfamiliar story of how the Philippines — an island nation positioned along ancient trade routes between China and India, and, later, Europe via the Americas — has for centuries been a center for artistic exchange and innovation.

“The artistic culture of the Philippines has been marked by a history of invasion, resistance, accommodation and adaptation,” explains Natasha Reichle, who as the museum’s associate curator of Southeast Asian art spent years acquiring the artworks organized into this exhibition. “What has been fascinating is seeing how contemporary artists draw upon aspects of this complex legacy to create new works, works that are celebrated in the Philippines and valued in a global art market that is beginning to appreciate their beauty, originality and sophistication.”

“Ironically, the Philippines’ colonial history and Christian artistic legacy placed much of its art outside familiar ‘Asian art’ storylines of Hinduism or Buddhism, which may have led to its exclusion from our museum’s original founding collection,” explains Reichle. “Luckily for our visitors, this is a story that wants to be told. We have pieces in this exhibition acquired by donation, given directly from artists and collectors, even from the families of former missionaries and on-the-ground field researchers. The backstory of how we acquired every artwork mirrors the fascinating history of the Philippines.”

Lire la suite sur : http://www.asianart.org/press_releases/81

‘Land of Freedom’: Heri Dono’s First Solo Exhibition in Hong Kong

« Joko Tarub Bathe in the Lake, Attacked by Terrorists, Protected by 7 Bidadari » (2016) by Heri Dono. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Contemporary Art

« Land of Freedom » : Heri Dono’s First Solo Exhibition in Hong Kong by Valencia Tong, 07/07/2017, the Artling

As one of Indonesia’s most celebrated contemporary artists, Heri Dono is known for his satirical political commentary in his paintings and installations. Earlier on, The Artling interviewed the Yogyakarta-based artist back in 2015 during his residency at STPI in Singapore, before his solo installation at the Indonesian Pavillion for the Venice Biennale. Fast-forward to 2017, Heri Dono is showing his works at Tang Contemporary Art in his first solo gallery exhibition in Hong Kong.

The artworks on view seem humorous at first glance, yet they deal with serious sociopolitical issues, such as those in the Brexit and Trump era. To illustrate the complexities of the global political scene, strange-looking mythological creatures are juxtaposed against political caricatures. In Super Trump – Land, US president Donald Trump is depicted as a superhero-like figure with three eyes.

The artist, born in 1960 in Jakarta, Indonesia, is inspired by wayang kulit, a form of traditional shadow puppet play in Indonesia. Symbols of animals, mythological beasts, machines, spaceships and parodies of world leaders are commonly found in his work.

Lire la suite sur : https://theartling.com/en/artzine/2017/07/07/land-of-freedom-heri-donos-first-solo-exhibition-in-hong-kong/

Banda : Heritage for Indonesia

« Banda : Heritage for Indonesia : a seminar and an exhibition about Banda, nutmeg and the treaty of Breda 1667-2017 », 31/07/2017 – 31/08/2017, Erasmus Huis, Jakarta

2017 marks the 350th anniversary of the Treaty of Breda. This Treaty, named after the Dutch city where it was signed on 31 July 1667, ended the Second Anglo-Dutch war (1665–1667) during which England and the Netherlands had fought over maritime hegemony and world trade. Through signing the Treaty of Breda, the Dutch accepted English rule over what is now New York (New Amsterdam), while the British accepted Dutch rule over Suriname and Run, the remotest of the Banda islands. However, the Banda islands had been an international trade centre long before the Portuguese were the first Europeans to visit Banda. It was after their arrival to the islands that various European powers attempted to monopolize the worldwide trade in nutmeg. These disputes turned the Banda islands into a lively, yet often violent stage for world politics. After the Dutch, led by J.P. Coen, unleashed a lethal expedition against the Bandanese in 1621, a Dutch monopoly on the spice was secured even though the British maintained their claim on Run until 1667.

This exhibition traces this fascinating history behind the Treaty of Breda. Through the presentation of historical maps, images and objects, Banda’s multi-faceted history will be highlighted. The visitor gets acquainted with nutmeg and its characteristics, Banda as a centre of international trade and world politics.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/bartelegallery/photos/a.157149674310864.41895.111961525496346/2010751102284036/?type=3&theater

Deep South ‘Patani arts’ opens in the North

« Deep South ‘Patani arts’ opens in the North » by Kong Rithdee, 20/07/2017, Bangkok Post

A major contemporary art exhibition about the Deep South is on display at a museum in Chiang Mai, one of the biggest gatherings of artists from the region, with the addition of others whose works touch on the stories of conflicts and violence in the southernmost provinces.

« Patani Semasa » opened last night at MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum in San Kamphaeng, Chiang Mai. It features 27 artists who work in painting, photography, installation pieces and video art.

The majority are from « Patani », the generic and historic name of the provinces of the Deep South. Many are women, and while the exhibition generally showcases the development of contemporary art in the region, the dominant theme at this show is the loss, reflection and hope that come with the protracted unrest plaguing the region for decades, particularly since 2004.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.bangkokpost.com/lifestyle/art/1290594/deep-south-patani-arts-opens-in-the-north

 

Passion and procession : art of the Philippines

Passion and procession : art of the Philippines, 24/06/2017 – 12/11/2017, Art Gallery New South Wales

Celebrating the diverse and vibrant art of the Philippines.

Passion and procession brings together painting, sculpture, video and installation works from ten contemporary Filipino artists, revealing their very personal responses to faith, history, politics and life in the Philippines.

The works draw on folk mythology, family archives, nature and religious ceremony to reconsider established narratives of history and nation. The artists have used found as well as ritual objects, plant specimens and symbols of precolonial histories to address the ambiguities of faith and science, social inequality and relationship to place. In doing so, they demonstrate a belief in the potential of art to inspire, heal and effect social change.

The artists include Santiago Bose, Marina Cruz, Alfredo Esquillo Jr, Nona Garcia, Renato Habulan, Geraldine Javier, Mark Justiniani, Alwin Reamillo, Norberto Roldan and Rodel Tapaya.

Accompanying their works is a selection of textiles and sculptural objects from the Philippines given to the Gallery in 2005 by Dr John Yu and Dr George Soutter.

This exhibition is part of the Bayanihan Philippine Art Project, a collaboration between the Art Gallery of NSW, Blacktown Arts Centre, Mosman Art Gallery, Peacock Gallery (Auburn) and Campbelltown Arts Centre in association with Museums & Galleries of NSW, to celebrate the art and culture of the Philippines through a series of exhibitions, performances, creative writing and community programs across multiple venues.

The last issue of TAASA Review : The Journal of the Asian Arts Society of Australia (vol. 26, n° 2, June 2017) is dedicated to the Bayanihan Philippine Art Project, and the art and culture of the Philippines.

Voir : https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/passion-and-procession/

Patani semasa : pameran seni dari Patani

Exhibition : Patani Semasa : Pameran Seni dari Patani, 19/07/2017 – 14/02/2018, MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum

An exhibition on contemporary art from the Golden Peninsula. Ranging from different time periods, works of art as well as cultural representations of the « Patani region » from 27 artists have been selected – both locals and those engaged with issues relevant to the area in question.

Voir : http://www.maiiam.com/exhibition/

Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now

« Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now », 05/07/2017 – 23/10/2017, The National Art Center, Tokyo & Mori Art Museum

With its total population counting around 600 million, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-faith Southeast Asia has nurtured a truly dynamic and diverse culture. Contemporary art from the emerging economic powerhouse of Southeast Asia is currently earning widespread international attention. The “sunshower” – rain falling from clear skies – is an intriguing yet frequently-seen meteorological phenomenon in Southeast Asia, and serves as a metaphor for the vicissitudes of the region. This exhibition, the largest-ever in scale, seeks to explore the many practices of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since 1980s from 9 different perspectives. It aims to showcase its inconceivable dynamism of Southeast Asia that is somewhat nostalgic yet extraordinarily new.

Nine sections :  Fluid World, Passion and Revolution, Archiving, Diverse Identities, Day by Day, Growth and Loss, What is Art ? Why Do It ?, Medium as Meditation, Dialogue with History.

Voir la liste des artistes par pays, les oeuvres et le programme des discussions sur :  http://sunshower2017.jp/en/index.html

« Sunshower »Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks

« Stormy Weather » (2009) by Filipino artist Felix Bacolor (Image courtesy of @katrinav_)

« Sunshower Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks » by Yunyi Lau, 08/07/2017, The Artling

The tropical climate of Southeast Asia lends for torrential downpours across the year. For those not used to the weather, one can be shocked to find what was a pleasantly sunny day, suddenly turn into a very wet situation in under a minute. Known as a sunshower, this frequent meteorological phenomenon in the region is the paradox of rain falling from clear skies.

It is this phenomenon that has been the inspiration behind a major show of Southeast Asian Contemporary Art that commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The sunshower is a poetic metaphor for the developments within Southeast Asia that resulted from the post-WWII decolonisation. Despite the turmoil that many countries were thrown into, many experienced democratisation and globalisation that caused rapid economic and urban development, resulting in drastic changes that have since changed the socio-political landscape of the region.

Sunshower originally began as an idea conceived between the Director-General of the National Art Center, Tokyo and the Director of the Mori Art Museum, and was assented by The Japan Foundation. The three parties came together to set up a 14-member curatorial team, which conducted a two and a half year field research, culminating in a selection of about 180 artworks by 86 artist groups from the ten ASEAN member countries, exhibited across the two museums.

Through the works selected, the exhibition seeks to explore the development of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since the 1980s against the backdrop of the currents and fluctuations of the times from nine different perspectives, with the goal of capturing its dynamism and diversity. Below is a selection of some of the works that we suggest you check out if you plan on checking out the exhibition!

The nine sections that Sunshower is divided into include: Fluid World that looks at maps and how they reflect socio-poltical economic values, Passion and Revolution that focuses on some of the major wars that shaped the region, Archiving that looks at the development of document-collection in Southeast Asian art, Diverse Identities focuses on postcolonialism and the emergence of independence and democracy, Day by Day is a look at artists’ exploration of local everyday life, Growth and Loss is the observation of the changes of globalisation and urbanisation that have impacted Southeast Asia, What is Art? Why Do It? is a look at the development of institutions and the characteristics of the art community in the region, Medium as Meditation focuses on how local traditional culture has affected the way artists use materials as their museums, and finally, Dialogue with History is an exploration into how artists engage with their histories in the present day.

A voir sur : https://theartling.com/en/artzine/2017/07/03/sunshowers-bring-flowers-with-this-major-exhibition-of-180-southeast-asian-artworks/

Vintage Photographs Capture the Beauty of Classical Dance – Avec les danseuses royales du Cambodge

Photos of Khmer classical dancers printed on canvas are exhibited at the Institut Francais. (Siv Channa/The Cambodia Daily)

Vintage Photographs Capture the Beauty of Classical Dance by Michelle Vachon, 15/06/2017, The Cambodia Daily

When George Groslier first approached Nou Nam in March 1927 with the idea of photographing her while she performed Khmer classical dance, she refused. “People no longer know how to dance, she told me with disdain,” he later wrote.

A few minutes later, the dancer—a favorite of both King Norodom and King Sisowath—relented.

Then in her 50s, Nou Nam agreed to help the photographer archive Khmer classical dance movements in photographic form.

As he began to capture the former star dancer, George Groslier realized that “the hand stops two centimeters higher than on Wednesday, and the head turns two degrees more than in Nou Nam’s day,” showing how the dance form had evolved.

For Khmer classical dancers whose slightest movements are painstakingly executed, this was profoundly troubling. Master dancers watching Nou Nam became agitated, he wrote.

Capturing these changing styles for posterity was Groslier’s goal. He wanted to provide a historical record for generations to come.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.cambodiadaily.com/news/vintage-photographs-capture-the-beauty-of-classical-dance-131369/

Exposition :  « Avec les danseuses royales du Cambodge », 15/06/2017 au 07/09/2017, Galerie de l’Institut Français du Cambodge

En 1927, George Groslier, directeur du musée National, entreprend pour conserver la mémoire des postures de danse du ballet royal, un exceptionnel travail de documentation photographique. Longtemps resté à l’écart, le corpus de négatifs sur verre a été récemment catalogué et numérisé. Après leur présentation au Musée National du Cambodge en 2012 puis à New York, Paris et Siem Reap, ces photographies sont exposées à l’Institut Français du Cambodge.

Exposition conçue par le MNC et l’EFEO à Phnom Penh (avec le soutien de l’IFC et de l’UNESCO)

Voir : https://institutfrancais-cambodge.com/expo-avec-les-danseuses-royales-du-cambodge/

Indonésie, les fermiers du miel

Exposition : Indonésie, les fermiers du miel, du 20/05/2017 au 27/11/2017, Musée de l’Homme, Balcon des Sciences

Par Nicolas Césard, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle

Au détour de la forêt indonésienne, à Bornéo, découvrez comment des hommes se rendent en haut des arbres, en pleine nuit, pour récolter le miel produit par la plus grande des abeilles mellifères, Apis dorsata.

Cette apicollecte évolue vers une apiculture par l’aménagement d’emplacements favorables à l’installation des essaims sauvages. Ainsi, la destruction des abeilles est limitée et la récolte du miel est rendue plus aisée. Ces nouvelles pratiques permettent une gestion plus durable des ressources mellifères.

À travers des objets, des spécimens et des reconstitutions, et grâce à plusieurs dispositifs multimédias – jeux interactifs et vidéos de terrain -, cette exposition présente les diverses techniques et outils utilisé par ces fermiers du miel, et explore les relations entre les sociétés et les abeilles en Indonésie.

Voir : http://www.museedelhomme.fr/fr/visitez/agenda/exposition/indonesie-fermiers-miel