Archives de catégorie : VIE ARTISTIQUE

Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories

« Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories », 14/07/2017 – 11/03/2018, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

Landmark exhibition at Asian Art Museum showcases centuries of creativity and cultural exchange

On view July 14, 2017–March 11, 2018 and presented in the Tateuchi Thematic Gallery, Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories is the result of more than a decade of study and collecting by the museum’s curatorial team — a labor of love to expand the institution’s holdings in this oft-overlooked area.

This is the first exhibition ever mounted in the United States of Philippine art spanning from the precolonial period to today. It explores the Philippines’ diverse artistic practices through twenty-five rare and compelling works: traditional carving and weaving; Islamic metalwork; Christian art from the colonial period; and modern and contemporary painting and mixed-media. This rich variety comes together to tell the sometimes unfamiliar story of how the Philippines — an island nation positioned along ancient trade routes between China and India, and, later, Europe via the Americas — has for centuries been a center for artistic exchange and innovation.

“The artistic culture of the Philippines has been marked by a history of invasion, resistance, accommodation and adaptation,” explains Natasha Reichle, who as the museum’s associate curator of Southeast Asian art spent years acquiring the artworks organized into this exhibition. “What has been fascinating is seeing how contemporary artists draw upon aspects of this complex legacy to create new works, works that are celebrated in the Philippines and valued in a global art market that is beginning to appreciate their beauty, originality and sophistication.”

“Ironically, the Philippines’ colonial history and Christian artistic legacy placed much of its art outside familiar ‘Asian art’ storylines of Hinduism or Buddhism, which may have led to its exclusion from our museum’s original founding collection,” explains Reichle. “Luckily for our visitors, this is a story that wants to be told. We have pieces in this exhibition acquired by donation, given directly from artists and collectors, even from the families of former missionaries and on-the-ground field researchers. The backstory of how we acquired every artwork mirrors the fascinating history of the Philippines.”

Lire la suite sur : http://www.asianart.org/press_releases/81

Eduardo Masferré : People of the Philippine Cordillera

A densely populated southern Kalinga village with sugar cane growing among the houses.
Saklit, Tinglayan, Kalinga 1950

Collection de photographies du Museum fünf Kontinente  : Eduardo Masferré : People of the Philippine Cordillera

Eduardo Masferré (1909–1995) was a Filippino-Catalan photographer who made important documentary reports about the lifestyle of the people of the Philippine Cordillera in the middle of the 20th century. He is regarded as the Father of Philippine photography.

Eduardo was born in Sagada in the Mountain Province of Northern Luzon as the son of Jaime Masferré, a Spanish soldier whose family had emigrated from Spain in the late 19th century. Jaime married Mercedes Langkew, a local woman from Sagada and became a farmer and eventually an Episcopalian priest. From 1914 to 1922 the family went back to Catalonia so that their children could study there, but then they returned to the Philippines and Eduardo finished his studies there. In his early years he became interested in photography, he was a self-taught photographer and when World War II ended, he opened a photographic studio in Bontok. The first exhibitions of his photographs were held in Manila in 1982 and 1983 and subsequently in Europe, Japan and the United States.

“Eduardo Masferré is an artist who did the right thing at the right time for the right reasons. A photographer with remarkable foresight, Masferré understood that change is inevitable. So with his camera, his eye and his heart, he kept the Cordillera’s proud, ancient soul visible and timeless amidst the changes.
With passion and with dedication, Masferré made a creative record of the life around him, realizing its importance. He is a Filippino who loved Filippinos in their everyday, ordinary setting. This is evident in his photographs, which are intensely felt and imbued with the spiritual element of creativity. The world’s way of gauging civilization and the value placed on Filippino ethnic heritage have only recently caught with the vision Masferré had over fifty years ago”, said Felice Sta. Maria, the President and Trustee of the Metropolitan Museum of Manila, in a message to Masferré’s book People of the Philippine Cordillera: Photographs 1934 – 1956 which was published in 1988.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/pg/museumfuenfkontinente/photos/?tab=album&album_id=781120092013130

Voir les 90 photos d’Eduardo Masferré sur le site du musée : http://www.museum-fuenf-kontinente.de/museum/emuseumplus.html

‘Land of Freedom’: Heri Dono’s First Solo Exhibition in Hong Kong

« Joko Tarub Bathe in the Lake, Attacked by Terrorists, Protected by 7 Bidadari » (2016) by Heri Dono. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Contemporary Art

« Land of Freedom » : Heri Dono’s First Solo Exhibition in Hong Kong by Valencia Tong, 07/07/2017, the Artling

As one of Indonesia’s most celebrated contemporary artists, Heri Dono is known for his satirical political commentary in his paintings and installations. Earlier on, The Artling interviewed the Yogyakarta-based artist back in 2015 during his residency at STPI in Singapore, before his solo installation at the Indonesian Pavillion for the Venice Biennale. Fast-forward to 2017, Heri Dono is showing his works at Tang Contemporary Art in his first solo gallery exhibition in Hong Kong.

The artworks on view seem humorous at first glance, yet they deal with serious sociopolitical issues, such as those in the Brexit and Trump era. To illustrate the complexities of the global political scene, strange-looking mythological creatures are juxtaposed against political caricatures. In Super Trump – Land, US president Donald Trump is depicted as a superhero-like figure with three eyes.

The artist, born in 1960 in Jakarta, Indonesia, is inspired by wayang kulit, a form of traditional shadow puppet play in Indonesia. Symbols of animals, mythological beasts, machines, spaceships and parodies of world leaders are commonly found in his work.

Lire la suite sur : https://theartling.com/en/artzine/2017/07/07/land-of-freedom-heri-donos-first-solo-exhibition-in-hong-kong/

The tamarind is always sour

Keane Shum, « The tamarind is always sour » in Granta 138 : Journeys, Essays and Memoir

My job is to follow the movements of refugees across Southeast Asia so that we know where and how they might seek asylum, and what kind of needs they will have when they do. For the last few years, by far the largest group of refugees moving across Southeast Asia have been the Rohingya, an ethnic minority from Myanmar. The Rohingya are Muslims who have lived for generations in the western Myanmar state of Rakhine, but are considered by virtually all other Myanmarese – most of whom are Buddhists – to be interlopers from neighbouring Bangladesh.

By law, the more than one million Rohingya in Myanmar are almost all excluded from Myanmar citizenship, making them the largest stateless group in the world. They are cut off from livelihoods, medical care and schools. Systematic discrimination, punctuated by occasional eruptions of violent conflict, has pushed hundreds of thousands of Rohingya to seek refuge across a vast expanse stretching from Saudi Arabia and Pakistan to Bangladesh and Malaysia. There are anywhere between two to three million Rohingya in the world, and the large majority of them do not exist on paper.

When I first started talking to Rohingya refugees in 2014, most of them were fleeing Myanmar by boat because they are generally prohibited by local authorities from crossing by road into even the next town. Every month, thousands of Rohingya were committing $2,000 a head to a multinational network of Myanmarese, Bangladeshi, Thai and Malaysian people smugglers whom they entrusted to bring them across the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea to Malaysia. My team and I interviewed hundreds of Rohingya who made this journey, and their testimonies were remarkably consistent and consistently terrifying. The only more inhumane crossing I have ever heard or read about is the Middle Passage, the part of the slave journey across the Atlantic that killed millions of Africans between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Lire la suite sur : https://granta.com/tamarind-always-sour/

Banda : Heritage for Indonesia

« Banda : Heritage for Indonesia : a seminar and an exhibition about Banda, nutmeg and the treaty of Breda 1667-2017 », 31/07/2017 – 31/08/2017, Erasmus Huis, Jakarta

2017 marks the 350th anniversary of the Treaty of Breda. This Treaty, named after the Dutch city where it was signed on 31 July 1667, ended the Second Anglo-Dutch war (1665–1667) during which England and the Netherlands had fought over maritime hegemony and world trade. Through signing the Treaty of Breda, the Dutch accepted English rule over what is now New York (New Amsterdam), while the British accepted Dutch rule over Suriname and Run, the remotest of the Banda islands. However, the Banda islands had been an international trade centre long before the Portuguese were the first Europeans to visit Banda. It was after their arrival to the islands that various European powers attempted to monopolize the worldwide trade in nutmeg. These disputes turned the Banda islands into a lively, yet often violent stage for world politics. After the Dutch, led by J.P. Coen, unleashed a lethal expedition against the Bandanese in 1621, a Dutch monopoly on the spice was secured even though the British maintained their claim on Run until 1667.

This exhibition traces this fascinating history behind the Treaty of Breda. Through the presentation of historical maps, images and objects, Banda’s multi-faceted history will be highlighted. The visitor gets acquainted with nutmeg and its characteristics, Banda as a centre of international trade and world politics.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/bartelegallery/photos/a.157149674310864.41895.111961525496346/2010751102284036/?type=3&theater

Deep South ‘Patani arts’ opens in the North

« Deep South ‘Patani arts’ opens in the North » by Kong Rithdee, 20/07/2017, Bangkok Post

A major contemporary art exhibition about the Deep South is on display at a museum in Chiang Mai, one of the biggest gatherings of artists from the region, with the addition of others whose works touch on the stories of conflicts and violence in the southernmost provinces.

« Patani Semasa » opened last night at MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum in San Kamphaeng, Chiang Mai. It features 27 artists who work in painting, photography, installation pieces and video art.

The majority are from « Patani », the generic and historic name of the provinces of the Deep South. Many are women, and while the exhibition generally showcases the development of contemporary art in the region, the dominant theme at this show is the loss, reflection and hope that come with the protracted unrest plaguing the region for decades, particularly since 2004.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.bangkokpost.com/lifestyle/art/1290594/deep-south-patani-arts-opens-in-the-north

 

“Never take the unchanging province for granted”

ASEAN Film Festival winner Kirsten Tan: “Never take the unchanging province for granted”, 26/07/2017, The Isaan Record

A weary man approaches the camera, his purple umbrella barely reaching the eyes of the elephant beside him. There is no rain for the umbrella, but it shields him from the harsh sun as he travels from the country’s urban center to a rural border province in Isaan. The journey is demanding, not just physically but emotionally in a trip down memory lane.

Pop Aye, the debut feature by Kirsten Tan, a Singaporean filmmaker based in New York, follows a Bangkok architect’s journey to his hometown in Loei Province. The protagonist, Thana, explores his past amidst a midlife crisis alongside his childhood companion, the film’s titular elephant.

Tan was raised in Singapore and lived in South Korea and Thailand before moving to New York. She completed a Master’s in Film Production at New York University. Her work has been showcased in over 40 international film festivals, including Sundance Film Festival 2017, where Pop Aye won the Special Jury Prize in Screenwriting.

In May, Pop Aye went on to win the Grand Jury Prize at ASEAN Film Festival 2017 in Bangkok, where the film premiered in Thailand.

The Isaan Record talks to Tan about Pop Aye’s portrayal of the urban-rural divide in Thailand and the nostalgia Thana and Pop Aye’s travels evoke.

Lire la suite sur : http://isaanrecord.com/2017/07/26/asean-film-festival-kirsten-tan/

Passion and procession : art of the Philippines

Passion and procession : art of the Philippines, 24/06/2017 – 12/11/2017, Art Gallery New South Wales

Celebrating the diverse and vibrant art of the Philippines.

Passion and procession brings together painting, sculpture, video and installation works from ten contemporary Filipino artists, revealing their very personal responses to faith, history, politics and life in the Philippines.

The works draw on folk mythology, family archives, nature and religious ceremony to reconsider established narratives of history and nation. The artists have used found as well as ritual objects, plant specimens and symbols of precolonial histories to address the ambiguities of faith and science, social inequality and relationship to place. In doing so, they demonstrate a belief in the potential of art to inspire, heal and effect social change.

The artists include Santiago Bose, Marina Cruz, Alfredo Esquillo Jr, Nona Garcia, Renato Habulan, Geraldine Javier, Mark Justiniani, Alwin Reamillo, Norberto Roldan and Rodel Tapaya.

Accompanying their works is a selection of textiles and sculptural objects from the Philippines given to the Gallery in 2005 by Dr John Yu and Dr George Soutter.

This exhibition is part of the Bayanihan Philippine Art Project, a collaboration between the Art Gallery of NSW, Blacktown Arts Centre, Mosman Art Gallery, Peacock Gallery (Auburn) and Campbelltown Arts Centre in association with Museums & Galleries of NSW, to celebrate the art and culture of the Philippines through a series of exhibitions, performances, creative writing and community programs across multiple venues.

The last issue of TAASA Review : The Journal of the Asian Arts Society of Australia (vol. 26, n° 2, June 2017) is dedicated to the Bayanihan Philippine Art Project, and the art and culture of the Philippines.

Voir : https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/passion-and-procession/

Patani semasa : pameran seni dari Patani

Exhibition : Patani Semasa : Pameran Seni dari Patani, 19/07/2017 – 14/02/2018, MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum

An exhibition on contemporary art from the Golden Peninsula. Ranging from different time periods, works of art as well as cultural representations of the « Patani region » from 27 artists have been selected – both locals and those engaged with issues relevant to the area in question.

Voir : http://www.maiiam.com/exhibition/

Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now

« Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now », 05/07/2017 – 23/10/2017, The National Art Center, Tokyo & Mori Art Museum

With its total population counting around 600 million, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-faith Southeast Asia has nurtured a truly dynamic and diverse culture. Contemporary art from the emerging economic powerhouse of Southeast Asia is currently earning widespread international attention. The “sunshower” – rain falling from clear skies – is an intriguing yet frequently-seen meteorological phenomenon in Southeast Asia, and serves as a metaphor for the vicissitudes of the region. This exhibition, the largest-ever in scale, seeks to explore the many practices of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since 1980s from 9 different perspectives. It aims to showcase its inconceivable dynamism of Southeast Asia that is somewhat nostalgic yet extraordinarily new.

Nine sections :  Fluid World, Passion and Revolution, Archiving, Diverse Identities, Day by Day, Growth and Loss, What is Art ? Why Do It ?, Medium as Meditation, Dialogue with History.

Voir la liste des artistes par pays, les oeuvres et le programme des discussions sur :  http://sunshower2017.jp/en/index.html

« Sunshower »Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks

« Stormy Weather » (2009) by Filipino artist Felix Bacolor (Image courtesy of @katrinav_)

« Sunshower Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks » by Yunyi Lau, 08/07/2017, The Artling

The tropical climate of Southeast Asia lends for torrential downpours across the year. For those not used to the weather, one can be shocked to find what was a pleasantly sunny day, suddenly turn into a very wet situation in under a minute. Known as a sunshower, this frequent meteorological phenomenon in the region is the paradox of rain falling from clear skies.

It is this phenomenon that has been the inspiration behind a major show of Southeast Asian Contemporary Art that commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The sunshower is a poetic metaphor for the developments within Southeast Asia that resulted from the post-WWII decolonisation. Despite the turmoil that many countries were thrown into, many experienced democratisation and globalisation that caused rapid economic and urban development, resulting in drastic changes that have since changed the socio-political landscape of the region.

Sunshower originally began as an idea conceived between the Director-General of the National Art Center, Tokyo and the Director of the Mori Art Museum, and was assented by The Japan Foundation. The three parties came together to set up a 14-member curatorial team, which conducted a two and a half year field research, culminating in a selection of about 180 artworks by 86 artist groups from the ten ASEAN member countries, exhibited across the two museums.

Through the works selected, the exhibition seeks to explore the development of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since the 1980s against the backdrop of the currents and fluctuations of the times from nine different perspectives, with the goal of capturing its dynamism and diversity. Below is a selection of some of the works that we suggest you check out if you plan on checking out the exhibition!

The nine sections that Sunshower is divided into include: Fluid World that looks at maps and how they reflect socio-poltical economic values, Passion and Revolution that focuses on some of the major wars that shaped the region, Archiving that looks at the development of document-collection in Southeast Asian art, Diverse Identities focuses on postcolonialism and the emergence of independence and democracy, Day by Day is a look at artists’ exploration of local everyday life, Growth and Loss is the observation of the changes of globalisation and urbanisation that have impacted Southeast Asia, What is Art? Why Do It? is a look at the development of institutions and the characteristics of the art community in the region, Medium as Meditation focuses on how local traditional culture has affected the way artists use materials as their museums, and finally, Dialogue with History is an exploration into how artists engage with their histories in the present day.

A voir sur : https://theartling.com/en/artzine/2017/07/03/sunshowers-bring-flowers-with-this-major-exhibition-of-180-southeast-asian-artworks/

Vintage Photographs Capture the Beauty of Classical Dance – Avec les danseuses royales du Cambodge

Photos of Khmer classical dancers printed on canvas are exhibited at the Institut Francais. (Siv Channa/The Cambodia Daily)

Vintage Photographs Capture the Beauty of Classical Dance by Michelle Vachon, 15/06/2017, The Cambodia Daily

When George Groslier first approached Nou Nam in March 1927 with the idea of photographing her while she performed Khmer classical dance, she refused. “People no longer know how to dance, she told me with disdain,” he later wrote.

A few minutes later, the dancer—a favorite of both King Norodom and King Sisowath—relented.

Then in her 50s, Nou Nam agreed to help the photographer archive Khmer classical dance movements in photographic form.

As he began to capture the former star dancer, George Groslier realized that “the hand stops two centimeters higher than on Wednesday, and the head turns two degrees more than in Nou Nam’s day,” showing how the dance form had evolved.

For Khmer classical dancers whose slightest movements are painstakingly executed, this was profoundly troubling. Master dancers watching Nou Nam became agitated, he wrote.

Capturing these changing styles for posterity was Groslier’s goal. He wanted to provide a historical record for generations to come.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.cambodiadaily.com/news/vintage-photographs-capture-the-beauty-of-classical-dance-131369/

Exposition :  « Avec les danseuses royales du Cambodge », 15/06/2017 au 07/09/2017, Galerie de l’Institut Français du Cambodge

En 1927, George Groslier, directeur du musée National, entreprend pour conserver la mémoire des postures de danse du ballet royal, un exceptionnel travail de documentation photographique. Longtemps resté à l’écart, le corpus de négatifs sur verre a été récemment catalogué et numérisé. Après leur présentation au Musée National du Cambodge en 2012 puis à New York, Paris et Siem Reap, ces photographies sont exposées à l’Institut Français du Cambodge.

Exposition conçue par le MNC et l’EFEO à Phnom Penh (avec le soutien de l’IFC et de l’UNESCO)

Voir : https://institutfrancais-cambodge.com/expo-avec-les-danseuses-royales-du-cambodge/

Birmanie, le pouvoir des moines

Birmanie, le pouvoir des moines
un film de Joël Curtz et Benoît Grimont
 
Myanmar, die Macht der Mönche
ein film von Joël Curtz und Benoît Grimont
sera diffusé sur ARTE
auf ARTE ausgestrahlt wird
le mardi 20 JUIN à 23h20
en France et en Belgique
und
am Dienstag 20. Juni um 23h20Uhr
in Deutschland und Österreich
 
 

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder, chronique édifiante du discours de la haine par Frédéric Strauss,  20/05/2017, Télérama

Dans un documentaire exemplaire car méthodique, présenté en séance spéciale à Cannes, le Suisse Barbet Schroeder part à la rencontre de Wirathu. Ce moine birman qui, par ses sermons extrémistes, a encouragé le massacre des musulmans dans son pays. Quand le bouddhisme confine au fascisme.

Le film sortira en France le 7 juin 2017.

Il a la haine. Les vieux arbres qui gardaient ses plus beaux souvenirs, à côté de chez lui, le voisin les a fait couper. Pour oublier ce crime, Barbet Schroeder part à Mandalay, en Birmanie, où il découvrit, à 20 ans, le bouddhisme. Une religion qui apprend à vivre sans haine. S’il n’a pas perdu la foi, le cinéaste ne croit cependant plus aux miracles. Le but de son voyage est de rencontrer un moine qui, tel un pompier pyromane, allume des incendies, attise les flammes d’un fanatisme meurtrier : le vénérable et pourtant détestable Wirathu.

Sous ses allures de bonze, c’est une sorte d’héritier d’Hitler qu’on découvre, tout entier voué à la persécution et à l’extermination d’une population : les musulmans de Birmanie, et particulièrement la minorité des Rohingyas. Wirathu les compare à des animaux sauvages qui se reproduisent comme des lapins, se dévorent entre eux et détruisent l’environnement. Monstrueux et glaçant, son discours veut faire naître chez les Birmans bouddhistes « la peur de la disparition de la race », titre d’un de ses livres. Il faut éliminer les musulmans, ou ils seront, eux, éliminés… Face à cet apôtre de la haine, Barbet Schroeder garde un étonnant sang-froid. Son regard droit, objectif, rend la confrontation impressionnante. Avec ce film, il clôt une « trilogie du Mal », commencée avec les documentaires Général Idi Amin Dada : autoportrait (1974) et L’Avocat de la terreur (2007), sur Jacques Vergès…

Lire la suite et voir la bande annonce sur : http://www.telerama.fr/festival-de-cannes/2017/cannes-2017-le-venerable-w-de-barbet-schroeder-chronique-edifiante-du-discours-de-la-haine,158235.php