Archives de catégorie : Ouvrages

« Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash » by Eka Kurniawan

Eka Kurniawan, Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash by Tim Hannigan, 14/09/2017, Asian Review of Books

Eka Kurniawan is the Quentin Tarantino of Indonesian literature: a brash wunderkind, delivering gleeful references to pulp fiction, lashings of stylized violence, and an array of characters and scenarios that far surpass the tropes and clichés which inspire them. But as with Quentin Tarantino, one might occasionally wonder just how much substance lies beneath the indisputably stylish surface.

Vengeance is Mine, All Others Pay Cash (a peculiar rendering of the Indonesian title, Seperti Dendam, Rindu Harus Dibayar Tuntas, which might be better translated as “like revenge, longing must be paid in full”) is Kurniawan’s third novel to be translated into English. It follows his acclaimed debut, the surreal historical epic, Beauty is a Wound, and the short, sharp Man Tiger. As with the previous books there is plenty of sex, brutality and outrageous humor. But this time around there is no direct engagement with Indonesian history and few overtly supernatural elements. What we have instead is the violently quixotic odyssey of a man who can’t get an erection.

The book begins with the protagonist—street thug and sometime assassin Ajo Kawir—sitting on the edge of his bed, staring forlornly at his flaccid penis, “nestling like a newly hatched baby bird—curled into itself, looking hungry and cold”. And the opening dialogue is the first of Ajo Kawir’s many one-sided conversations with his unresponsive member:

He whispered to it, get up, Bird. Get up, you Wretch. You can’t just sleep forever. You have to get up. But that damn little bird didn’t want to get up.

Lire la suite sur : http://asianreviewofbooks.com/content/vengeance-is-mine-all-others-pay-cash-by-eka-kurniawan/

A télécharger : Architects of Buddhist Leisure

A télécharger : Justin Thomas McDaniel, Architects of Buddhist Leisure : Socially Disengaged Buddhism in Asia’s Museums, Monuments, and Amusement Parks, University of Hawaii Press, 2016

Buddhism, often described as an austere religion that condemns desire, promotes denial, and idealizes the contemplative life, actually has a thriving leisure culture in Asia. Creative religious improvisations designed by Buddhists have been produced both within and outside of monasteries across the region—in Nepal, Japan, Korea, Macau, Hong Kong, Singapore, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Justin McDaniel looks at the growth of Asia’s culture of Buddhist leisure—what he calls “socially disengaged Buddhism”—through a study of architects responsible for monuments, museums, amusement parks, and other sites. In conversation with noted theorists of material and visual culture and anthropologists of art, McDaniel argues that such sites highlight the importance of public, leisure, and spectacle culture from a Buddhist perspective and illustrate how “secular” and “religious,” “public” and “private,” are in many ways false binaries. Moreover, places like Lek Wiriyaphan’s Sanctuary of Truth in Thailand, Suối Tiên Amusement Park in Saigon, and Shi Fa Zhao’s multilevel museum/ritual space/tea house in Singapore reflect a growing Buddhist ecumenism built through repetitive affective encounters instead of didactic sermons and sectarian developments. They present different Buddhist traditions, images, and aesthetic expressions as united but not uniform, collected but not concise: together they form a gathering, not a movement.

Despite the ingenuity of lay and ordained visionaries like Wiriyaphan and Zhao and their colleagues Kenzo Tange, Chan-soo Park, Tadao Ando, and others discussed in this book, creators of Buddhist leisure sites often face problems along the way. Parks and museums are complex adaptive systems that are changed and influenced by budgets, available materials, local and global economic conditions, and visitors. Architects must often compromise and settle at local optima, and no matter what they intend, their buildings will develop lives of their own. Provocative and theoretically innovative, Architects of Buddhist Leisure asks readers to question the very category of “religious” architecture. It challenges current methodological approaches in religious studies and speaks to a broad audience interested in modern art, architecture, religion, anthropology, and material culture.

A télécharger sur : http://oapen.org/search?identifier=626388

Hearing Allah’s call : preaching and performance in Indonesian islam

Parution : Julian Millie, Hearing Allah’s call : preaching and performance in Indonesian Islam, Cornell University Press, 2017

Hearing Allah’s Call changes the way we think about Islamic communication. In the city of Bandung in Indonesia, sermons are not reserved for mosques and sites for Friday prayers. Muslim speakers are in demand for all kinds of events, from rites of passage to motivational speeches for companies and other organizations. Julian Millie spent fourteen months sitting among listeners at such events, and he provides detailed contextual description of the everyday realities of Muslim listening as well as preaching. In describing the venues, the audience, and preachers—many of whom are women—he reveals tensions between entertainment and traditional expressions of faith and moral rectitude.

The sermonizers use in-jokes, double entendres, and mimicry in their expositions, playing on their audiences’ emotions, triggering reactions from critics who accuse them of neglecting listeners’ intellects. Millie focused specifically on the listening routines that enliven everyday life for Muslims in all social spaces—imagine the hardworking preachers who make Sunday worship enjoyable for rural as well as urban Americans—and who captivate audiences with skills that attract criticism from more formal interpreters of Islam. The ethnography is rich and full of insightful observations and details. Hearing Allah’s Call will appeal to students of the practice of anthropology as well as all those intrigued by contemporary Islam.

Plus d’informations sur :  http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100973660

 

Viet Thanh Nguyen : Le sympathisant

Nouvelle parution : Viet Thanh Nguyen, Le sympathisant, Belfond, 2017

À la fois fresque épique, reconstitution historique et oeuvre politique, un premier roman à l’ampleur exceptionnelle, qui nous mène du Saigon de 1975 en plein chaos au Los Angeles des années 1980. Saisissant de réalisme et souvent profondément drôle, porté par une prose électrique, un véritable chef-d’oeuvre psychologique. La révélation littéraire de l’année.
Je suis un espion, une taupe, un agent secret, un homme au visage double.

Ainsi commence l’hallucinante confession de cet homme qui ne dit jamais son nom. Un homme sans racines, bâtard né en Indochine coloniale d’un père français et d’une mère vietnamienne, élevé à Saigon mais parti faire ses études aux États-Unis. Un capitaine au service d’un général de l’armée du Sud Vietnam, un aide de camp précieux et réputé d’une loyauté à toute épreuve.
Et, en secret, un agent double au service des communistes. Un homme déchiré, en lutte pour ne pas dévoiler sa véritable identité, au prix de décisions aux conséquences dramatiques. Un homme en exil dans un petit Vietnam reconstitué sous le soleil de L.A., qui transmet des informations brûlantes dans des lettres codées à ses camarades restés au pays. Un homme seul, que même l’amour d’une femme ne saurait détourner de son idéal politique…

SYMPATHISANT n. m. : personne qui approuve les idées et les actions d’un parti sans y adhérer.

Voir : http://www.belfond.fr/livre/litterature-contemporaine/le-sympathisant-viet-thanh-nguyen

Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands

Nouvelle parution : Reimar Schefold, Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands, PRIMEDIA Editions, 2017

This book presents a detailed and inspiring picture of the traditional ways of life and the impressive art of the Mentawai archipelago located off the west coast of Sumatra in Indonesia. This shamanistic culture, most notably found on the northernmost island of Siberut, maintains an ancient relationship between man and the spiritual world. Within this worldview, everything is animated. Not only do humans have souls, but so do animals, plants and objects. To please these souls and to create harmony, alluring artifacts have been created for generations. In this way life, art, ritual and esthetics are intertwined: a notion reflected in the field photographs and in the beautiful and rare objects that are described and illustrated here. Toys for the Souls reveals for the first time the richness and creative power of an artistic imagination, deeply rooted in Southeast Asian prehistory.

Voir : http://www.tribalartmagazine.com/fischbacher/art-books/?a=view&id=382&lang=en

Asian Highlands Perspectives, vol. 48 (2017)

Asian Highlands Perspectives, vol. 48 (2017)

Asian Highlands Perspectives is pleased to announce the publication of Volume 48 : Great Lords of the Sky: Burma’s Shan Aristocracy by Sao Sanda Simms. Written from a Tai/Shan perspective, the intricate and often unsettled realities that existed in the Shan States from early times up to the military coup in 1962 are described in a comprehensive overview of the stresses and strains that the Shan princes endured from early periods of monarchs and wars, under British rule and Japanese occupation, and Independence and Bamar military regime. Part One covers chronological events relating them to the rulers, the antagonists, and the people and the continuing conflict in the Shan State. Part Two deals with the 34 Tai/Shan rulers, describing their histories, lives, and work. Included are photographs and family trees of the princes, revealing a span of Shan history, before being lost in the mists of time. The past is explained in order that the present political situations may be understood and resolved amicably between the Bamar government, the Tatmadaw, and the ethnic nationalities.

Télécharger la version PDF sur : https://tibetanplateau.wikischolars.columbia.edu/file/view/AHP48GreatLordsOfTheSkyFinal24July2017reduced.pdf/

Indonesian Textiles at The Tropen Museum

Book Launch : Indonesian Textiles at The Tropen Museum, 13/10/2017, Tropenmuseum Studio

The Tropenmuseum Amsterdam cares for an internationally renowned collection of textiles from Indonesia. Numbering approximately 12,000 objects the majority of these textiles were acquired during the period that Indonesia was a Dutch colony, the former Netherlands East Indies. These textiles originate from all over the archipelago, from Aceh on Sumatra, to Tanimbar in the east. A small part of the collection was even made in the Netherlands for artistic or commercial reasons.

Indonesian Textiles at the Tropenmuseum explores this collection within a broader framework of Dutch colonial and scientific history. It examines the stories of those who made and used them, those who collected and brought them to the Netherlands, as well as those who have studied and exhibited them.

About the author
Itie van Hout is former Curator of Textiles of the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam, and is now retired. She is the author of Batik Drawn in Wax: 200 Years of Batik Art from Indonesia in the Tropenmuseum Collection (2001) and Beloved Burden: Baby Carriers in Different Countries (2011).

Co-author is Sonja Wijs, anthropologist and researcher. She also is the co-author of Africa at the Tropenmuseum (2011).

Voir : http://materialculture.nl/en/events/indonesian-textiles-at-the-tropenmuseum

« Archaeologizing Heritage » ?

Michael Falser, Monica Juneja (eds), « Archaeologizing Heritage » ? Transcultural Entanglements between Local Social Practices and Global Virtual Realities, Springer, 2013.

Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Cultural Heritage and the Temples of Angkor (Chair of Global Art History, Heidelberg University, 2–5 May 2010)

This book investigates what has constituted notions of « archaeological heritage » from colonial times to the present. It includes case studies of sites in South and Southeast Asia with a special focus on Angkor, Cambodia. The contributions, the subjects of which range from architectural and intellectual history to historic preservation and restoration, evaluate historical processes spanning two centuries which saw the imagination and production of « dead archaeological ruins » by often overlooking living local, social, and ritual forms of usage on site.

Case studies from computational modelling in archaeology discuss a comparable paradigmatic change from a mere simulation of supposedly dead archaeological building material to an increasing appreciation and scientific incorporation of the knowledge of local stakeholders. This book seeks to bring these different approaches from the humanities and engineering sciences into a trans-disciplinary discussion.

Voir la table des matières sur : http://www.springer.com/la/book/9783642358692#aboutBook

A télécharger sur : http://www.asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de/en/publications/books-for-download.html

 

Siamese Melting Pot: Ethnic Minorities in the Making of Bangkok

Edward van Roy, Siamese Melting Pot: Ethnic Minorities in the Making of Bangkok, ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute / Silkworm Books, 2017

Ethnic minorities historically comprised a solid majority of Bangkok’s population. They played a dominant role in the city’s exuberant economic and social development. In the shadow of Siam’s prideful, flamboyant Thai ruling class, the city’s diverse minorities flourished quietly. The Thai-Portuguese; the Mon; the Lao; the Cham, Persian, Indian, Malay, and Indonesian Muslims; and the Taechiu, Hokkien, Hakka, Hainanese, and Cantonese Chinese speech groups were particularly important. Others, such as the Khmer, Vietnamese, Thai Yuan, Sikhs, and Westerners, were smaller in numbers but no less significant in their influence on the city’s growth and prosperity.

In tracing the social, political, and spatial dynamics of Bangkok’s ethnic pluralism through the two-and-a-half centuries of the city’s history, this book calls attention to a long-neglected mainspring of Thai urban development. While the books primary focus is on the first five reigns of the Chakri dynasty (1782–1910), the account extends backward and forward to reveal the continuing impact of Bangkok’s ethnic minorities on Thai culture change, within the broader context of Thai development studies. It provides an exciting perspective and unique resource for anyone interested in exploring Bangkok’s evolving cultural milieu or Thailand’s modern history.

Voir table des matières : https://bookshop.iseas.edu.sg/publication/2248

Imagination and Narrative: Lexical and Cultural Translation in Buddhist Asia

Peter Skilling and Justin Thomas McDaniel (eds), Imagination and Narrative: Lexical and Cultural Translation in Buddhist Asia, Silkworm Books, 2017

The essays in this volume highlight the movement of Buddhist ideas and practices across Asia and how the encounter of far-flung cultures and personalities encouraged adaptation and transformation. At times this meant textual translation and transmission, as seen in the chapters about Chinese and Japanese Buddhist texts and their authors, or the analysis of Buddhist manuscripts in northern Thailand. Other cases entailed cultural translation—local adaptations of jataka tales, the evolution of legal notions within the framework of Theravada Buddhist teachings, localizations embedded in material culture seen through inscriptions and archaeological traces. Some themes go beyond Buddhism writ small to explore the broad canvas of engagement: the East-West encounter in the British geographical and anthropological exploration of Burma, and the place of Brahmanism in early Buddhist thought as expressed through the jatakas.

This expertly curated selection of scholarship shows that the diffusion of ideas and religious thought is much more than a tale of decline and loss or cultural appropriation and impoverishment. The fresh perspectives presented here—all drawn on primary sources—give an overall impression of a singular diversity that somehow participates in an unacknowledged unity. Beyond the fragmentations of sectarian and cultural divides, disparate Buddhist and non-Buddhist traditions have gone beyond arbitrary boundaries and flourished through their simultaneity.

Contributors: Olivier de Bernon, Frédéric Girard, Iyanaga Nobumi, François Lagirarde, Jacques Leider, Michel Lorrillard, Justin McDaniel, Kumkum Roy, Peter Skilling, Warangkana Srikamnerd.

Voir : https://silkwormbooks.com/products/imagination-and-narrative

 

Myanmar contemporary art 1

Launch: Myanmar Contemporary Art 1

Now available for purchase at Myanmart! After 2 years of hard work and many brilliant collaborators and donors, the translation, redesign and publication of Myanmar Contemporary Art 1 (MCA1) is complete! Originally published in Burmese language in 2009 under censorship, the new edition was raised through crowdfunding. We hope this book allows more people to learn about and understand a part of Myanmar's art history between 1960-1990.30 USD per book/40,000 MMK. Special discount for artists! All proceeds go towards a future publication of a book about contemporary art in Myanmar. Copies available at Myanmart – 98 Bogalay Zay street, 3rd floor, Botataung township, Yangon OR by special order. Please email nathalie.johnston@gmail.com for more details or message us here.

Publié par Myanm/art sur dimanche 2 juillet 2017

 

Myanmar Contemporary Art 1 : traduction anglaise d’un ouvrage publié en birman en 2009 sous la censure et consacré à l’histoire de l’art birman entre 1960 et 1990. Il sera suivi de deux autres volumes.

Myanmar Contemporary Art 1 is the first volume of a trilogy on contemporary Burmese art.  Since 1885, when Burma fell under British colonial rule, the traditional practices of Burmese art were overshadowed by the influence of Western art trends–particularly the traditions of academic painting and the Impressionist movement.  This book records the progression of Burmese modern art after its encounter with Modernism, focusing on the influence of key individual artists.   Democratic rule ended in 1962, and between 1974 and 1988, when Modernism was evolving to a Post-Modern world, Burma adopted a strict isolationist policy during which only three books on art were published:  The Quest for Beauty by Paw Thit, From Tradition to Modern by Bagyi Aung Soe and Abstract Painting by Khin One.  The end of the closed door policy in 1988 allowed for artists to gain perspective on the international art world and embrace new developments and media.  Artists who worked outside the trajectory of Burmese modern art movements such as Lun Gywe, Maung Nyo Wing, Maung Maung Hla Myint and Tun Sein are also included in the book, as well as those who left to work in other countries (See the chapter « Some early practitioners »).   This volume focuses on modern artists active from 1962 to 1988.  The next volume of Myanmar Contemporary Art will focus on the artists who came after 1988.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/MyanmarArtEvolution/?

Copies available at Myanmart – 98 Bogalay Zay street, 3rd floor, Botataung township, Yangon OR by special order. Please email nathalie.johnston@gmail.com for more details or message us here.

 

 

Liberalism Disavowed: Communitarianism and State Capitalism in Singapore

Chua Beng Huat, Liberalism Disavowed: Communitarianism and State Capitalism in Singapore, NUS Press, 2017

In Liberalism Disavowed, Chua Beng Huat examines the rejection of Western-style liberalism in Singapore and the way the People’s Action Party has forged an independent non-Western ideology.

This book explains the evolution of this communitarian ideology, with focus on three areas: public housing, multiracialism and state capitalism, each of which poses different challenges to liberal approaches. With the passing of the first Prime Minister, Lee Kuan Yew and the end of the Cold War, the party is facing greater challenges from an educated populace that demands greater voice. This has led to liberalization of the cultural sphere, greater responsiveness and shifts in political rhetoric, but all without disrupting the continuing hegemony of the PAP in government.

Table of contents

Introduction
Chapter 1     Contextualizing Singapore: Antipathy to Liberalism
Chapter 2     Singapore State Formation in the Cold War Era
Chapter 3     Liberalism Disavowed
Chapter 4     Disrupting Private Property Rights: National Public Housing Program
Chapter 5     Disrupting Free Market: State Capitalism and Social Distribution
Chapter 6     Governing Race: State Multiracialism and Social Stability
Chapter 7     Cultural Liberalization without Liberalism
Conclusion  An Enduring System

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/products/liberalism-disavowed-communitarianism-and-state-capitalism-in-singapore?

 

Digital Indonesia: Connectivity and Divergence

Edwin Jürriens, Ross Tapsell (eds), Digital Indonesia: Connectivity and Divergence, ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute, 2017

This book places Indonesia at the forefront of the global debate about the impact of « disruptive » digital technologies. Digital technology is fast becoming the core of life, work, culture and identity. Yet, while the number of Indonesians using the internet has followed the upward global trend, some groups — the poor, the elderly, women, the less well-educated, people living in remote communities  — are disadvantaged. This interdisciplinary collection of essays by leading researchers and scholars, as well as e-governance and e-commerce insiders, examines the impact of digitalisation on the media industry, governance, commerce, informal sector employment, education, cybercrime, terrorism, religion, artistic and cultural expression, and much more. It presents groundbreaking analysis of the impact of digitalisation in one of the worlds most diverse, geographically vast nations. In weighing arguments about the opportunities and challenges presented by digitalisation, it puts the very idea of a technological revolution into critical perspective.

Voir la table des matières sur : https://bookshop.iseas.edu.sg/publication/2245

Thailand’s 2010 crackdowns: truth for justice

Thailand’s 2010 crackdowns: truth for justice by Kwanravee Wangudom, 20/06/2017, New Mandala

On the 7th anniversary of the 2010 government crackdown on the Red Shirts, People’s Information Center for the April-May 2010 Crackdowns (PIC) has released an English-language edition of its original 1,398-page long fact-finding report, available for free download.

Truth for Justice, the original fact-finding report of the PIC, was published in Thai in 2012two years after the crackdown on the Red Shirts by the Abhisit Vejjajiva government, which resulted in over 90 deaths and 2,000 injuries. The report came out amidst growing criticisms towards the workings of the two major fact-finding bodies: the government-initiated Truth for Reconciliation Commission of Thailand (TRCT), headed by Kanit Na Nakorn; and the controversial National Human Rights Commission, chaired by Amara Pongsapich.

The aim of the PIC original fact-finding report is to document what occurred in the crackdown. PIC believes that this is the first step to ending the deeply-entrenched culture of impunity in Thailand.

The English-language edition, consisting of six selected chapters from the original report, with added clarifications, is produced in the hope that it will stimulate a wider global discussion on truth, justice and reconciliation in the deeply-divided Thai society, and perhaps elsewhere.

To access the PIC original fact-finding report (in Thai), click here.

For the English-language edition, please follow this link.

Kwanravee Wangudom is a human rights professional and activist. She is the Editor of the English translation of the report.

Voir : http://www.newmandala.org/2010-thai-crackdown-truth-justice/

Living sharia : law and practice in Malaysia

Timothy P. Daniels, Living sharia : law and practice in Malaysia, University of Washington Press, december 2017

Drawing on ethnographic research, Living Sharia examines the role of sharia in the sociopolitical processes of contemporary Malaysia. The book traces the contested implementation of Islamic family and criminal laws and sharia economics to provide cultural frameworks for understanding sharia among Muslims and non-Muslims. Timothy Daniels explores how the way people think about sharia is often entangled with notions about race, gender equality, nationhood, liberal pluralism, citizenship, and universal human rights. He reveals that Malaysians’ ideas about sharia are not isolated from-nor always opposed to-liberal pluralism and secularism.

Timothy P. Daniels is professor of anthropology at Hofstra University. He is the author of Islamic Spectrum in Java and Building Cultural Nationalism in Malaysia, and editor of Performance, Popular Culture, and Piety in Muslim Southeast Asia.