Archives de catégorie : Ressources

Javanese Manuscripts from Yogyakarta Digitisation Project

Opening of Serat Jaya Lengkara Wulang, 1803

« Javanese Manuscripts from Yogyakarta Digitisation Project launched by Sri Sultan Hamengku Buwono X » by Annabel Teh Gallop, 21/03/2018, Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library)

On 20 March 2018 Sri Sultan Hamengku Buwono X, Governor of the Special Region of Yogyakarta, visited the British Library to launch the Javanese Manuscripts from Yogyakarta Digitisation Project. Through the generous support of Mr S P Lohia, over the next twelve months 75 Javanese manuscripts from Yogyakarta now held in the British Library will be digitised, and will be made fully and freely accessible online through the British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts website. On completion of the project in March 2019, complete sets of the 30,000 digital images will be presented to the Libraries and Archives Board of Yogyakarta (Badan Perpustakaan dan Arsip Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta) and to the National Library (Perpustakaan Nasional) of Indonesia in Jakarta. The manuscripts will also be accessible through Mr Lohia’s website, SPLRareBooks.

The 75 Javanese manuscripts to be digitised include 70 known or believed to have been taken by British troops following an armed assault on the Palace (Kraton) of Yogyakarta in June 1812 by forces under the command of the Lieutenant-Governor of Java, Thomas Stamford Raffles, as well as five other related manuscripts. The manuscripts primarily comprise works on Javanese history, literature and ethics, Islamic stories and compilations of wayang (shadow theatre) tales, as well as court papers, written in Javanese in both Javanese characters (hanacaraka) and in modified Arabic script (pegon), on European and locally-made Javanese paper (dluwang). Some of these manuscripts are by now well known, such as the Babad bedah ing Ngayogyakarta, Add. 12330, a personal account by Pangéran Arya Panular (ca. 1771-1826) of the British attack on the Kraton and its aftermath, published by Peter Carey (1992), and the Babad ing Sangkala, ‘Chronogram chronicle’, MSS Jav 36(B), dated 1738 and identified by Merle Ricklefs (1978) as the oldest surviving original copy of a Javanese chronicle so far known. Peter Carey (1980 & 2000) has also published the Archive of Yogyakarta, two volumes of court documents, correspondence and legal papers. However, many of the other manuscripts have never been published.

Certains de ces manuscrits sont d’ores et déjà accessibles en ligne sur le site de la British Library (voir ci-dessous).

Lire la suite sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2018/03/javanese-manuscripts-from-yogyakarta-digitisation-project-launched-by-sri-sultan-hamengku-buwono-x.html

The Balinese Digital Library

The Balinese Digital Library

Almost all of the writings in Balinese were digitized and preserved here in 2011 by the Internet Archive from their major library in Denpasar, Bali. A official in the cultural ministry said that this collection is « 90% of all writings in Balinese. » Most of the Balinese literature is written on palm leaves, or Lontar. Some were not digitized because of the culturally sensitive materials they contain. This makes the Balinese the first to have their complete literature online and available for free.

Bali has a rich tradition of literature that dates back several hundreds years. Balinese writings encompass the ancient literary texts composed in the old Javanese language of Kawi and Sanskrit; many based on the famous Indian epics of Ramayana and Mahabharata. The island’s literary works were mostly recorded on dried and treated palm leaves. The writings were incised in both sides of the leaf with a sharp knife and the script is then blackened with soot. The leaves are held and linked together by a string that passes through the central holes and knotted at the outer ends.

The lontar manuscripts range from ordinary texts to Bali’s most sacred writings. They include texts on religion, holy formulae, rituals, family genealogies, law codes, treaties on medicine (usadha), arts and architecture, calendars, prose, poems and even magic. Many lontar manuscripts contain information on important issues such as medicines and village regulations that are used as daily guidance.

Voir la collection de manuscrits sur lontars : https://archive.org/details/Bali&tab=collection

Talking Indonesia: Pornography

Talking Indonesia: Pornography with Helen Pausacker, 18/01/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

The prohibition of pornography has been a controversial area of law in Indonesia, attracting the attention both of Islamic conservatives and activists promoting freedom of expression. Several public figures have been investigated and prosecuted under questionable circumstances, raising concerns that the law is being applied arbitrarily. Recently, the police investigation of Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) leader Rizieq Shihab and his female follower Firza Hussein over a leaked salacious Whatsapp chat has put prohibitions of pornography back in the headlines. The case has gained attention both because FPI has been one of the main groups pushing for pornography prosecutions, and because the investigation has been widely perceived as politically motivated, following Rizieq’s role in the protests against former Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama.

How does Indonesia regulate pornography, how have its anti-pornography laws been applied, and what determines who gets charged and convicted? How do debates over pornography reflect broader questions of morality and Islam in Indonesian society? In the first Talking Indonesia episode for 2018, Dr Dave McRae explores these issues with Dr Helen Pausacker, deputy director of the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society (CILIS) at Melbourne Law School.

In 2018, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey  from Monash University, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-pornography/

New Books Southeast Asian studies

Podcast : New Books Network – Southeast Asian Studies

Interviews par Nick Cheesman (Fellow at the College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University) des auteurs d’ouvrages récemment publiés sur l’Asie du Sud-Est.

Derniers podcasts :

Tam T. T. Ngo, The New Way : Protestantism and the Hmong in Vietnam, University of Washington Press, 2016

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/tam-t-t-ngo-the-new-way-protestantism-and-the-hmong-in-vietnam-u-washington-press-2016/

Roderic Broadhurst, Thierry Bouhours and Brigitte Bouhours, Violence and the Civilising Process in Cambodia, Cambridge University Press, 2015

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/roderic-broadhurst-et-al-violence-and-the-civilising-process-in-cambodia-cambridge-up-2015/

Eric J. Pido, Migrant Returns : Manila, Development, and Transnational Connectivity, Duke University Press, 2017

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/eric-j-pido-migrant-returns-manila-development-and-transnational-connectivity-duke-up-2017/

Astrid Noren-Nilsson, Cambodia’s Second Kingdom : Nation, Imagination, and Democracy, Cornell South East Program, 2016

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/astrid-noren-nilsson-cambodias-second-kingdom-nation-imagination-and-democracy-cornell-southeast-asia-program-2016/

Patricia Sloane-White, Corporate Islam : Sharia and the Modern Workplace, Cambridge University Press, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Talking Indonesia : Being Chinese and Muslim

 Talking Indonesia : Being Chinese and Muslim with Dr Hew Wai Weng, 01/02/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

Ethnic Chinese make up less than three percent of Indonesia’s population. Of this group, a tiny minority are Muslim. As such, ethnic Chinese Muslims occupy a unique and significant position where the religious majority intersects with this ethnic minority, which has long assumed a role of economic middleman and been used as political scapegoat. In many ways, Chinese Muslims in Indonesia disturb both their religious and ethnic identity groups. At its best, their position in society serves to highlight the inclusivity and diversity possible within Indonesian nationalism, and at its worst, to expose the undeniable limitations therein.

Who are Indonesia’s ethnic Chinese Muslims? What is their history and situation in contemporary Indonesia? Is there a Chinese way of being Muslim? What can their story tell us about religious tolerance and cultural diversity in Indonesia today?

In this week’s podcast Jemma Purdey explores these issues with Dr Hew Wai Weng, a fellow in the Institute of Malaysian and International Studies, National University of Malaysia (UKM).

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-being-chinese-and-muslim/

 

 

Genealogies of Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Burma

Genealogies of Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Burma with Alicia Turner, Southeast Asia Crossroads Podcast

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/seacrossroads/genealogies-of-religious-tolerance-and-intolerance-in-burma-with-alicia-turner-1?

Vous trouverez la liste des podcasts de Southeast Asia Crossroads ici : https://soundcloud.com/seacrossroads

Derniers podcasts :

  • Facebook, Leapfrogging, and the Dark Side in Myanmar with Lisa Brooten
  • Transnationalizing Cambodian Buddhism with John Marston
  • Archaeology and the Underpinnings of Ancient Vietnam with Nam Kim

 

Piety, Celebrity, Sociality: A Forum on Islam and Social Media in Southeast Asia

Piety, Celebrity, Sociality: A Forum on Islam and Social Media in Southeast Asia 
Edited by Martin Slama and Carla Jones

Nov 08, 2017

En libre accès sur le site de l’American Ethnological Society

Many of the essays in this collection were initially presented at the workshop « Social Media and Islamic Practice in Southeast Asia, » which took place in April 2016, in Vienna, Austria. The workshop was an initiative of the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) project « Islamic (Inter)Faces of the Internet: Emerging Socialities and Forms of Piety in Indonesia, » which is directed by Martin Slama at the Institute for Social Anthropology, Austrian Academy of Sciences.

Table of contents

  • Introduction : Piety, Celebrity, Sociality by Carla Jones (University of Colorado Boulder) and Martin Slama (Institute for Social Anthropology at the Austrian Academy of Sciences)
  • Sufi Sociality in Social Media by Ismail Fajrie Alatas (New York University)
  • The Revival of Riya’: Displaying Muslim Piety Online in Indonesia by Fatimah Husein (State Islamic University Yogyakarta)
  • Circulating Modesty: The Gendered Afterlives of Networked Images by Carla Jones (University of Colorado Boulder)
  • The Digital Sound of Southeast Asian Islam by Bart Barendregt (Leiden University)
  • Prince of Heaven: Blogging the Concerns of Great Muslimah by Dayana Lengauer (Institute for Social Anthropology at the Austrian Academy of Sciences)
  • Heart to Heart on Social Media: Affective Aspects of Islamic Practice by Martin Slama (Institute for Social Anthropology at the Austrian Academy of Sciences)
  • Capital Subjects: Debating Islamic Finance, Online and Off by Daromir Rudnyckyj (University of Victoria)
  • Paths to Celebrity Status: The Significance of Social Media for Islamic Preachers from South Sulawesi by Wahyuddin Halim (State Islamic University Makassar)
  • The Allure of “One Day One Juz” by Eva Nisa (Victoria University of Wellington)
  • Sincerity and Scandal: The Cultural Politics of “Fake Piety » in Indonesia by James B. Hoesterey (Emory University)
  • Understanding Piety and Anger in Indonesia’s 2016 Islamic Mass Rallies by Saskia Schäfer (Freie Universität Berlin)
  • Tweeting Religion in Indonesia: When Political Arenas Go Viral by John Postill (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University) and Leonard Chrysostomos Epafras (Indonesian Consortium for Religious Studies)

A télécharger sur :  http://americanethnologist.org/features/collections/piety-celebrity-sociality

New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts

Subi Reef, Spratly Islands

New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts

A two-day workshop on ‘New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts’, organised by Drs Nagamuttu Ravindranathan and Matthew J. Walton was held at St Antony’s College and the University of Oxford China Centre on 19th and 20th October 2017.

A list of papers given is provided below; please see the links for a number of powerpoint slides and audio recordings. 

  • Concrete proposals for the resolution of conflicts between the Philippines and China
    Jay Batongbacal (University of the Philippines)
    Full Paper / Slides / Audio Podcast 
  • ASEAN and Regional Cooperation in the South China Sea
    Robert Beckman (National University of Singapore)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Philippines-China arbitration: How would any lessons learnt shape the future peaceful resolution of conflicts?
    Antonio Carpio (Supreme Court of the Republic of Philippines)
    Talk Outline
  • A neglected resolution for the conflicts in the South China Sea arising from the original claims of the Republic of China in 1947
    Charles I-hsin Chen (University of Cambridge)
  • South China Sea Conflicts or Cooperation: UNCLOS design and reality
    Fu Kuen-Chen (Xiamen University)
  • Base points and equity applicable to the resolution of conflicts
    Robin Cleverly (Marbdy Consulting)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Thinking of the unthinkable
    Jerome Cohen (New York University)
    Audio Podcast
  • What role will international law play in the resolution of South China Sea disputes?
    Stephen Fietta (Fietta LLP)
  • Functional cooperative management in the South China Sea
    Vivian Forbes (National Institute for South China Sea Studies)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Peace in our time – considering Helsinki accords and Alpha in East Asia
    Kimie Hara (University of Waterloo)
  • ​What’s wrong with the status quo?
    Bill Hayton (British Broadcasting Corporation)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • UNCLOS and the South China Sea Conflicts
    Nong Hong (Institute for China America Studies)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • A Practical Solution in Resolving Conflicts in the South China Sea Between Malaysia and China as a Feasible Solution: Perspectives from Malaysia
    Jalila Abdul Jalil (Maritime Institute of Malaysia)
  • Philippines-China arbitration: What lessons are there in other East Asian conflicts?
    Zou Keyuan (University of Central Lancashire)
  • South China Sea – Vietnam’s view after the July 2016 Award
    Nguyễn Hồng Thao (National University of Hanoi)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Will naval power close the South China Sea chapter?
    Alessio Patalano (King’s College London)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Does there have to be an escalation of conflict in the South China Sea?
    John Ross (Chongyang Institute, Renmin University)
    Slides
  • China’s Maritime Policies
    Alexandre Sheldon-Duplaix (French Defence Historical Service)
    Slides / Audio Podcast – to come
  • Concrete proposals for conflict settlements of the South China Sea disputes: Review and assessment
    Zheng Wang (Seton Hall University)
    Audio Podcast
  • Current conflicts and the future
    Wu Shicun (National Institute for South China Sea Studies)

Adat Aceh: royal Malay statecraft in the 17th century

Adat Aceh: royal Malay statecraft in the 17th century by Annabel Gallop, 13/11/2017, Asian and African Studies blog

When I am asked which is the most important Malay manuscript in the British Library, there is no simple answer. Should I cite the two copies we hold of the Sejarah Melayu, ‘Malay Annals’(Or 14734 and Or 16214), recounting the founding of the 15th-century kingdom of Melaka, and arguably the single most famous Malay text? Or the oldest known manuscript of the earliest historical chronicle in Malay, the Hikayat Raja Pasai, ‘Chronicle of the Kings of Pasai’ (Or 14350)? Or one of the finest illuminated Malay manuscripts known, a copy of the Taj al-Salatin, ‘The Crown of Kings’, written in Penang in 1824 (Or 13295)? Unmissable from this list of the great and the good of Malay writing is the Adat Aceh, ‘The Statecraft of Aceh’ (MSS Malay B.11), a compendium of court customs, regulations and practice from the greatest Muslim sultanate in Southeast Asia in the 17th century.

Lire la suite sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2017/11/adat-aceh-royal-malay-statecraft-in-the-17th-century.html

FOUND Cambodia : an archive of everyday Cambodian photography

1992, Kratie Province, Girl with an umbrella

‘FOUND Cambodia’ is a project that traces some of the sociocultural changes Cambodia has witnessed since 1979. It is a constantly growing archive of everyday Cambodian photography, brought to light from individuals’ and families’ drawers, albums, and closets. The images provide a vernacular lens to how individuals in post-Khmer Rouge Cambodia have experienced the social and cultural revival following the regime’s fall. Further, the project also includes photographs taken before the Khmer Rouge came into power. These images serve as poignant testimonies of the effects that macroscopic socio-political changes bear on the individual. A unique glimpse into Cambodians’ day-to-day lives over the past four decades, ‘FOUND Cambodia’ serves as a visual archive for anyone interested in understanding societal changes through the eyes of an individual.

A explorer sur : http://foundcambodia.com/

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive, Sejarah Nusantara, Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia

The paper archives created by the Dutch East India Company (VOC, 1602-1799) and dealing with its commercial operations in Asian waters are preserved in the national archives of Indonesia, the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, South Africa and India. In particular, the archives in Jakarta contain thousands of documents originating from Asian persons, including many local rulers from around the Indonesian archipelago. The most voluminous collections spanning 2,000 metres are in the Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia (ANRI). On 9 March 2004, the archives of the VOC were included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.

The 2.000 metres of archives in ANRI can be roughly divided into two sections:
1) The archives created in and formerly kept at Batavia Castle, the former headquarters of the VOC in Asia. This is the archive of the Supreme Government (the Governor-General and the ordinary Councillors of Dutch Asia).
2) The archives of local private and public institutions in Batavia.

For this digitalization and public access project, a selection had to be made. The Daily Journals of Batavia Castle which can be found in the archives of the Supreme Government were digitalized and published first. This series reflects the principle concerns of the Supreme Government.  Prominent here were internal Company affairs in matters as diverse as the general management of trade, personnel and financial affairs, shipping and logistics. The Supreme Government also dealt with all political and diplomatic affairs, the administration of justice and correspondence with other VOC factories in Asia as well as the VOC Chambers and their Governing Board, theso-called Gentlemen Seventeen (Heren XVII) or Directors of the VOC  in the Dutch Republic. The Daily Journals were created to maintain an ongoing overview of such activities.

During the course of the eighteenth century, the Resolution Books of the Supreme Government became more and more important and voluminous while the registration of correspondence in the Daily Journals gradually declined. In particular, the handling of all matters to do with the regional establishments of the Company were included in the General Resolution Books. In 1743, such matters were recorded in a separate yearbook, giving birth to a separate series: the General (Foreign) Affairs Books (Net-Generale Besogneboeken).

Another, hitherto unresearched and historically unique series are the Appendices to the General Resolution Books. These total together some 742 volumes numbering some 550,000 folio pages. This series contain a variety of documents which may gradually become accessible via a special database. The first document descriptions for this database were started in 2013 by ANRI’s Content Team (see organisation).

Liste des archives consultables moyennant une inscription sur le site:

  • General Resolutions of Batavia Castle 1613-1810
  • Realia 1610-1808
  • Appendices to General Resolutions 1686-1811
  • The Placards of Batavia Castle 1602-1808
  • Daily Journals of Batavia Castle 1624-1806
  • Marginalia to the Daily Journals 1659-1807
  • Diplomatic Letters 1625-1812
  • Corpus Diplomaticum 1595-1799

Plus d’informations sur : https://sejarah-nusantara.anri.go.id/archive/

 

Podcast : Islamist politics and political survival in Malaysia

Podcast Malaysian’dreamings: Islamist politics and political survival in Malaysia with Clive Kessler and Norani Othman, Sidney Southeast Asia Center

The rise of using Islam for political survival in Malaysia as its ruling party and leadership are mired in a multi-billion dollar global corruption scandal. And how the long-term agenda of the Islamist Pas party crashes into the secular founding of Malaysia, and the threats to the Federal Constitution and the future of the nation. Speakers, in order, are: Professor Clive Kessler, emeritus UNSW; and Professor Norani Othman, emeritus UKM and co-founder Sisters in Islam. Introduced by Dr Lis Kramer, moderated by Kean Wong. Hosted by Sydney University’s SouthEast Asia Research Centre, and globalbersih.org.

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/matrokr/islamist-politics-political-survival-in-malaysia-w-profs-clive-kessler-norani-othman

Vous trouverez sur la même page d’autres podcasts de la collection Malaysian’dreamings à laquelle vous pouvez vous abonner sur SoundCloud.

 

 

Indonesia Update 2017 : GLOBALISATION, NATIONALISM AND SOVEREIGNTY

ANU Indonesia Project Blog : Indonesia Update 2017 : Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty, 15-16/09/2017, The Australian National University

Today, globalisation is more complex than ever. The effects of the global financial crisis and increased inequality have, in many countries, spurred anti-global sentiment and encouraged the adoption of populist and inward-looking policies. Discontent has manifested in some surprising results: Brexit, Trump, and possibly more to come. In Indonesia, it has led to rising protectionism, a rejection of foreign interference in the name of nationalism, and economic policies dominated by calls for self-sufficiency. Meanwhile, human trafficking and the abuse of migrant workers have shown the other side of globalisation.

Againts this background the ANU Indonesia Project held its 35th Indonesia Update conference on 15 and 16 September in Canberra. As usual, the coference kicked off with the updates on politic and economic development. Then centered on the theme “Indonesia in the New World: Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty”, fourteen papers were presented to the audience of more than 500 during the one-and-half-day event. The topics included the historical dynamics of Indonesia’s engagement with the global world, its stance in the South China Sea, and the emergence of new nationalism. Speakers also examined nationalism in practice (for example, food sovereignty and resource nationalism) and the impact of and response to globalisation, as well as poverty, inequality, and gender issues.

Following the Canberra conference, we held two “Mini Indonesia Updates” on 18 September, in Sydney (in collaboration with the Lowy Institute) and in Adelaide (in collaboration with the University of Adelaide’s Institute for International Trade).

The papers presented in the conference will be published in the Indonesia Update book series and will be launched next year, in collaboration with the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS)/ Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore.

Vous trouverez sur cette page les vidéos des conférences suivantes :

Political Update : Indonesia’s year of democratic setback: toward a new era of deepening illiberalism? by Vedi Hadiz (University of Melbourne)

Economic Update : Effectivity of policy reform in democracy and regional autonomy regime by Raden Pardede (CReco Consulting)

Globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty: the Indonesian experience by Anthony Reid (ANU), Edward Aspinall (ANU), Shafiah Muhibat (Nanyang Technological University) with an Overview by Mari Pangestu (Universitas Indonesia)

Nationalism in practice by Jeffrey Neilson (The University of Sydney), Eve Warburton (ANU), Yose Rizal Damuri (Centre for Strategic and International Studies)

Poverty, inequality and gender issues by Arief Anshory Yusuf (Padjadjaran University), Peter Warr (ANU), Janneke Pieters (Wageningen University), Robert Sparrow (Wageningen University)

The human face of globalisation by Anis Hidayah (Migrant CARE), Dominggus Elcid Li (Institute of Resource Governance and Social Change)

Response to globalisation by Manggi Habir (Bank Danamon Indonesia), Titik Anas (Presisi Indonesia)

Concluding remarks: navigating the new globalisation by Hal Hill (ANU), Deasy Pane (ANU), Danny Quah (National University of Singapore)

A voir sur : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/blogs/indonesiaproject/?page_id=8559

Muslim NGOs and civil society in Indonesia

Podcast: Muslim NGOs and civil society in Indonesia
Religion and NGOs

Produced by R. Michael Feener

While the service provision activities of some religious NGOs complement and enhance systems of low state capacity, in others they compete with state services and in still others service delivery by religious NGOs is associated with political parties and forms part of their electoral strategies. Across diverse engagements, then, religious NGOs depend on their ability to elude, enrol, and subvert the state institutions – while states themselves adjust to the impact of these new actors in turn. In this interview with Robert Hefner about his research on Muslim NGOs in the Javanese city of Yogyakarta, and what his findings can show us about Islam and civil society in contemporary Southeast Asia.

Since the turn of the twenty-first century, there has been a remarkable surge of interest among both academics and policy makers in the effects that religion has on international aid and development. Within this broad field, the work of ‘religious NGOs’ or ‘Faith-Based Organisations’ (FBOs) has garnered considerable attention. This series of podcasts for The Religious Studies Project seeks to explore how the discourses, practices, and institutional forms of both religious actors and purportedly secular NGOs intersect, and how these engagements result in changes in our understanding of both ‘religion’ and ‘development’. These interviews with leading scholars working on the topic across diverse contexts in Asia (and beyond) have been conducted by Dr. Catherine Scheer & Dr. Giuseppe Bolotta of the National University of Singapore’s Asia Research Institute. Our work on this has been generously supported by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

Podcast et transcription de l’interview de Robert W. Hefner sur : http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/podcast/muslim-ngos-and-civil-society-in-indonesia/?