Archives de catégorie : Ressources

Podcast : The Karen in 2017: Resilience, Aspirations and Politics

« The Karen in 2017: Resilience, Aspirations and Politics », 15 June 2017, Oxford University

A one-day workshop on ‘The Karen in 2017: Resilience, Aspirations and Politics’ was organised by Dr Matthew J. Walton was held on 15th June 2017 at St Antony’s College.

A list of papers given is provided below, please see the links for a number of audio recordings.

The Karen and the Gift of Education​
Pia Joliffe (University of Oxford)
Audio Podcast

The Karen, Education and the Diaspora
Bob Anderson (Mobile Education Partnerships)
Audio Podcast

Perinatal Depression in Migrant and Refugee Karen and Burmese women in Tak province, Thailand
Gracia Fellmeth (University of Oxford)
Audio Podcast

Coming of Age in Hpa-an: Hope and Visions of the Good Life
Justine Chambers (Australian National University)
Audio Podcast

Non-state welfare and the politics of abandonment: Northern Karen State in the shadow of the 1990s
Gerard McCarthy (Australian National University)
Audio Podcast

Vulnerability, Poverty and Displacement and the absence of Interim Arrangements: Karen Communities in Ceasefire areas of Southeast Burma/Myanmar
Tim Schroeder (Covenant Consult / Friedensau Adventist University)
Audio Podcast

From Conflict to Ceasefire: Landmines as a form of community protection in Eastern Myanmar
Greg Cathcart
Audio Podcast

Comparing the KNU and KIO ceasefire experiences
David Brenner (University of Surrey)
Audio Podcast

Humanitarian Aid and the Karen
Alexander Horstmann (Tallinn University)
Audio Podcast

‘Everything has changed’ yet ‘I have nothing’: the Transborder lives of Karen women from Hpa-an, Myanmar
Indre Calmaite (Central European University)
Audio Podcast

History of Social Suffering and the Social Agent
Father Vinai (The Seven Fountain Jesuit Regional Retreat Centre / People for Others Foundation)

Roundtable Discussion: The Future of Karen in Myanmar/Burma and the diaspora
Benedict Rogers, Martin Smith, Richard Dolan and Justine Chambers
Audio Podcast

Voir : https://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/karen-2017-resilience-aspirations-and-politics

Podcast : Gender, Rights and Justice in a Transitioning Myanmar

« Gender, Rights and Justice in a Transitioning Myanmar », 13-14 November 2017, Oxford University

A two-day workshop on ‘Gender, Rights and Justice in a Transitioning Myanmar’ organised by Drs Daw Khin Mar Mar Kyi and Matthew J. Walton was held at Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford on 13th and 14th November 2017. Part of the Oxford-Myanmar Policy Brief Series.

A list of papers given is provided below, please see the links for a number of audio recordings.

Female MPs and the Protection of Human Rights
May Win Myint (Central Executive Committee, National League of Democracy)
Audio podcast

Gender and Education
Aye Aye Chit (Mandalay Medical University)
Audio Podcast

Law and Gender Based Violence in Transitioning Myanmar
Sandra Htar Htar (Akhaya Women)
Audio Podcast

Challenges and Opportunities for Women and Girls in Myanmar
Janet Jackson (United Nations Population Fund)
Audio Podcast

Constructing Female Citizenship: Education and Activism in Transition
Elizabeth Maber (University of Amsterdam)
Audio Podcast

Ending Impunity is the Key to Combatting Gender Based Violence
Naw Wah Ku Shee (Women League of Burma)
Audio Podcast

Gender and Health
Aye Aye Chit (Mandalay Medical University)
Audio Podcast

Gender and Drug Policy
Mai Hla Aye (Central European University)
Audio Podcast

Voir : https://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/gender-rights-and-justice-transitioning-myanmar

Yanger : Tracing the Roots of Halmahera String Bands

Yanger : Tracing the Roots of Halmahera String Bands, 8 June 2018, Aural Archipelago

We can begin by zooming in on Halmahera, an island shaped like a pair of chromosomes, a miniature twin of the lotus-like Sulawesi to the west. One of the largest islands in Maluku, Halmahera was nonetheless historically dwarfed by the tiny island kingdoms which cling to its eastern shores: the small, volcano-studded Ternate, Tidore, and Bacan. Halmahera had its own mysterious kingdom on this western flank called Jailolo, a name so powerful it was once used to refer to the whole island. Still, it’s a peripheral place, especially in modern day Indonesia.

Spend a week in Halmahera, like I did, and you’ll find a place where traces of these rich, world-changing histories are still apparent: nutmeg trees cling to the perfect volcanic dome of Mt. Jailolo, and old colonial-era forts crumble near its black sand beaches. You’re also bound to find music: there’s tifa, booming log drums also found across Melanesia; there’s togal, music for conspicuously western dances played on a violin-like fiddle called fiol. Then there’s my favorite of all, a music at once familiar and enigmatic, a music which wraps up hundreds of years of history in a tuneful package: yanger.

Yanger, you could say, is the local take on a string band tradition that spans the Pacific. It is partly from this angle that yanger gets its familiarity: just as yanger combines upbeat lutes, rubbery bass, and major key melodies, so too do its cousins across the Melanesian and Polynesian world, from string bands in the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu all the way to joyous yospan in Papua and similar forms across the border in PNG. While Halmahera sits on the edge of the Melanesian world, yanger‘s link with this wider world of Pacific Island string bands is a mystery. While those musics seem intuitively like long-lost cousins, their histories are completely different, with those styles often being the result of Western contact during and after World War II. A different, perhaps more complex set of histories is at play here with yanger in Halmahera.

Lire la suite et écouter les enregistrements  sur : http://www.auralarchipelago.com/

 

 

Songs from Southeast Asia

Songs from Southeast Asia, SOAS radio

Thant Sin, Almira and Cuong travel across Southeast Asia to bring to you a unique collection of popular songs with each episode focusing on one country from around the region, from the classics to the contemporary. Whether you are from the region or someone who does not know anything about it, we invite you to join us in our musical journey.

SfSEA – Longing for the Past: The 78RPM Era in SEA Thu, 2018-06-07 23:44

In this episode, Almira shares her top picks from the collection of 90 tracks in David Murray’s 4-CD Box Set / Book ‘Longing for the Past: The 78RPM Era in Southeast Asia’.

  1. Danse Ancienne
  2. Ba Ba Win by Pyi Hla Hpe / Sein Wai Hlan-
  3. Ogingo Mamangka Vuhan by Irene Tungou
  4. Kitjir Kitjir by Jetty & Suhairi / Orkes Gambang Keromong
  5. Miss Whiskey by U Myat Lay
  6. Maung Kyaw Ei Sandaya Nyunt by Sandaya Maung Kyaw
  7. Khmer Kroak by Wohar Sam
  8. Lam Khaen by Phloen Phromdaen
  9. Cikajangan
  10. Ka Abdi by Upit Sarimanah

A écouter sur : https://soasradio.org/music/episodes/sfsea-longing-for-the-past-the-78rpm-era-in-sea

28 podcasts à écouter sur : https://soasradio.org/music/podcasts/sfsea

Talking Indonesia: 20 years of military reform

Talking Indonesia: 20 years of military reform, 07/06/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

The military has always played a prominent role in the Indonesian nation. Under the New Order, it was elevated to the dual role (dwifungsi) of maintaining law and order and participating in governance but was also guilty of gross human rights abuses. After the fall of the New Order in 1998, the military was forced to undergo extensive reforms, which included the withdrawal of the military from civilian and governmental affairs. However, 20 years after the beginning of post-Suharto reforms, the military has yet to acknowledge or come to terms with its role in some of the darkest moments in Indonesian history, such as the anti-communist killings of 1965-66.

Over recent years, analysts have noticed the military’s growing influence over political and civilian affairs. The popularity of former military leaders like Prabowo Subianto has also led many to comment that there seems to be a nostalgia for a more militaristic style of leadership among the public. Are we witnessing the return of the military in Indonesian politics? How has the military been able to maintain its centrality in Indonesian society over the decades?

I explore these issues with historian Dr Jess Melvin, Postdoctoral Associate at the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre at the University of Sydney. Dr Melvin was previously Henry Hart Rice Faculty Fellow in Southeast Asian Studies and a Postdoctoral Fellow in Genocide Studies at Yale University. Dr Melvin’s first book “The Army and the Indonesian Genocide: Mechanics of Mass Murder”, was published in early 2018 by Routledge.

The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Charlotte Setijadi  from the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore, Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey  from Monash University, and Dr Dirk Tomsa  from La Trobe University.

Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-20-years-of-military-reform/

 

Conferences of The Human Sciences Encounters in Phnom Penh

Conferences of The Human Sciences Encounters in Phnom Penh

We inform you of the transfer of the activities and data of the network Human Sciences Encounters in Phnom Penh (HSEPP) to the Center for Khmer Studies.
As you know, the HSEPP network was created informally in 2008 in order to deal with a feeling of isolation within the discipline and a need for scientific exchange and debate around social science research in Cambodia. Today it counts 1200 members.
As we pass on the baton to CKS, we think it interesting to bring together in a booklet a history of the different conferences we have hosted over the past ten years.The khmer version is in annex .

The booklet is in open access :
http://classiques.uqac.ca/contemporains/Hancart_Petitet_Pascale/Social_sciences_in_Cambodia/Social_sciences_in_Cambodia.html

Cet ouvrage clôture 10 ans d’activités du réseau des HSEPP dont la mission était aussi de rendre visible et accessible la recherche SHS au Cambodge.

Cet ouvrage rassemble les 82 résumés des conférences organisées par le réseau Human Sciences Encounters in Phnom Penh HSEPP Cambodge entre 2008 et 2017 et qui se décline selon six chapitres thématiques:

– L’histoire précédant les années 1970, qu’il s’agisse de la période angkorienne ou de l’époque coloniale
– Les conflits armés des années 1970-1980, et plus précisément la période du régime Khmer Rouge
– La religion, les arts, la culture et l’éducation
– Les problèmes de développement et de pauvreté
– La santé
– Les minorités « autochtones »

Le document est bilingue (anglais/ khmer)

The CKS will continue dissemination activities as part of our collaboration. You can contact them to this email address center@khmerstudies.org, and visit their web site http://www.khmerstudies.org/

Thanking you for your interest in social sciences in Cambodia
With warm regards
Pascale Hancart Petitet, Um Vutha et Steven Prigent

Voir : http://www.shs-encounters-cambodia.ird.fr/

Javanese Manuscripts from Yogyakarta Digitisation Project

Opening of Serat Jaya Lengkara Wulang, 1803

« Javanese Manuscripts from Yogyakarta Digitisation Project launched by Sri Sultan Hamengku Buwono X » by Annabel Teh Gallop, 21/03/2018, Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library)

On 20 March 2018 Sri Sultan Hamengku Buwono X, Governor of the Special Region of Yogyakarta, visited the British Library to launch the Javanese Manuscripts from Yogyakarta Digitisation Project. Through the generous support of Mr S P Lohia, over the next twelve months 75 Javanese manuscripts from Yogyakarta now held in the British Library will be digitised, and will be made fully and freely accessible online through the British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts website. On completion of the project in March 2019, complete sets of the 30,000 digital images will be presented to the Libraries and Archives Board of Yogyakarta (Badan Perpustakaan dan Arsip Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta) and to the National Library (Perpustakaan Nasional) of Indonesia in Jakarta. The manuscripts will also be accessible through Mr Lohia’s website, SPLRareBooks.

The 75 Javanese manuscripts to be digitised include 70 known or believed to have been taken by British troops following an armed assault on the Palace (Kraton) of Yogyakarta in June 1812 by forces under the command of the Lieutenant-Governor of Java, Thomas Stamford Raffles, as well as five other related manuscripts. The manuscripts primarily comprise works on Javanese history, literature and ethics, Islamic stories and compilations of wayang (shadow theatre) tales, as well as court papers, written in Javanese in both Javanese characters (hanacaraka) and in modified Arabic script (pegon), on European and locally-made Javanese paper (dluwang). Some of these manuscripts are by now well known, such as the Babad bedah ing Ngayogyakarta, Add. 12330, a personal account by Pangéran Arya Panular (ca. 1771-1826) of the British attack on the Kraton and its aftermath, published by Peter Carey (1992), and the Babad ing Sangkala, ‘Chronogram chronicle’, MSS Jav 36(B), dated 1738 and identified by Merle Ricklefs (1978) as the oldest surviving original copy of a Javanese chronicle so far known. Peter Carey (1980 & 2000) has also published the Archive of Yogyakarta, two volumes of court documents, correspondence and legal papers. However, many of the other manuscripts have never been published.

Certains de ces manuscrits sont d’ores et déjà accessibles en ligne sur le site de la British Library (voir ci-dessous).

Lire la suite sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2018/03/javanese-manuscripts-from-yogyakarta-digitisation-project-launched-by-sri-sultan-hamengku-buwono-x.html

The Balinese Digital Library

The Balinese Digital Library

Almost all of the writings in Balinese were digitized and preserved here in 2011 by the Internet Archive from their major library in Denpasar, Bali. A official in the cultural ministry said that this collection is « 90% of all writings in Balinese. » Most of the Balinese literature is written on palm leaves, or Lontar. Some were not digitized because of the culturally sensitive materials they contain. This makes the Balinese the first to have their complete literature online and available for free.

Bali has a rich tradition of literature that dates back several hundreds years. Balinese writings encompass the ancient literary texts composed in the old Javanese language of Kawi and Sanskrit; many based on the famous Indian epics of Ramayana and Mahabharata. The island’s literary works were mostly recorded on dried and treated palm leaves. The writings were incised in both sides of the leaf with a sharp knife and the script is then blackened with soot. The leaves are held and linked together by a string that passes through the central holes and knotted at the outer ends.

The lontar manuscripts range from ordinary texts to Bali’s most sacred writings. They include texts on religion, holy formulae, rituals, family genealogies, law codes, treaties on medicine (usadha), arts and architecture, calendars, prose, poems and even magic. Many lontar manuscripts contain information on important issues such as medicines and village regulations that are used as daily guidance.

Voir la collection de manuscrits sur lontars : https://archive.org/details/Bali&tab=collection

Talking Indonesia: Pornography

Talking Indonesia: Pornography with Helen Pausacker, 18/01/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

The prohibition of pornography has been a controversial area of law in Indonesia, attracting the attention both of Islamic conservatives and activists promoting freedom of expression. Several public figures have been investigated and prosecuted under questionable circumstances, raising concerns that the law is being applied arbitrarily. Recently, the police investigation of Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) leader Rizieq Shihab and his female follower Firza Hussein over a leaked salacious Whatsapp chat has put prohibitions of pornography back in the headlines. The case has gained attention both because FPI has been one of the main groups pushing for pornography prosecutions, and because the investigation has been widely perceived as politically motivated, following Rizieq’s role in the protests against former Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama.

How does Indonesia regulate pornography, how have its anti-pornography laws been applied, and what determines who gets charged and convicted? How do debates over pornography reflect broader questions of morality and Islam in Indonesian society? In the first Talking Indonesia episode for 2018, Dr Dave McRae explores these issues with Dr Helen Pausacker, deputy director of the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society (CILIS) at Melbourne Law School.

In 2018, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey  from Monash University, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-pornography/

New Books Southeast Asian studies

Podcast : New Books Network – Southeast Asian Studies

Interviews par Nick Cheesman (Fellow at the College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University) des auteurs d’ouvrages récemment publiés sur l’Asie du Sud-Est.

Derniers podcasts :

Tam T. T. Ngo, The New Way : Protestantism and the Hmong in Vietnam, University of Washington Press, 2016

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/tam-t-t-ngo-the-new-way-protestantism-and-the-hmong-in-vietnam-u-washington-press-2016/

Roderic Broadhurst, Thierry Bouhours and Brigitte Bouhours, Violence and the Civilising Process in Cambodia, Cambridge University Press, 2015

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/roderic-broadhurst-et-al-violence-and-the-civilising-process-in-cambodia-cambridge-up-2015/

Eric J. Pido, Migrant Returns : Manila, Development, and Transnational Connectivity, Duke University Press, 2017

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/eric-j-pido-migrant-returns-manila-development-and-transnational-connectivity-duke-up-2017/

Astrid Noren-Nilsson, Cambodia’s Second Kingdom : Nation, Imagination, and Democracy, Cornell South East Program, 2016

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/astrid-noren-nilsson-cambodias-second-kingdom-nation-imagination-and-democracy-cornell-southeast-asia-program-2016/

Patricia Sloane-White, Corporate Islam : Sharia and the Modern Workplace, Cambridge University Press, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Talking Indonesia : Being Chinese and Muslim

 Talking Indonesia : Being Chinese and Muslim with Dr Hew Wai Weng, 01/02/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

Ethnic Chinese make up less than three percent of Indonesia’s population. Of this group, a tiny minority are Muslim. As such, ethnic Chinese Muslims occupy a unique and significant position where the religious majority intersects with this ethnic minority, which has long assumed a role of economic middleman and been used as political scapegoat. In many ways, Chinese Muslims in Indonesia disturb both their religious and ethnic identity groups. At its best, their position in society serves to highlight the inclusivity and diversity possible within Indonesian nationalism, and at its worst, to expose the undeniable limitations therein.

Who are Indonesia’s ethnic Chinese Muslims? What is their history and situation in contemporary Indonesia? Is there a Chinese way of being Muslim? What can their story tell us about religious tolerance and cultural diversity in Indonesia today?

In this week’s podcast Jemma Purdey explores these issues with Dr Hew Wai Weng, a fellow in the Institute of Malaysian and International Studies, National University of Malaysia (UKM).

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-being-chinese-and-muslim/

 

 

Genealogies of Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Burma

Genealogies of Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Burma with Alicia Turner, Southeast Asia Crossroads Podcast

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/seacrossroads/genealogies-of-religious-tolerance-and-intolerance-in-burma-with-alicia-turner-1?

Vous trouverez la liste des podcasts de Southeast Asia Crossroads ici : https://soundcloud.com/seacrossroads

Derniers podcasts :

  • Facebook, Leapfrogging, and the Dark Side in Myanmar with Lisa Brooten
  • Transnationalizing Cambodian Buddhism with John Marston
  • Archaeology and the Underpinnings of Ancient Vietnam with Nam Kim

 

Piety, Celebrity, Sociality: A Forum on Islam and Social Media in Southeast Asia

Piety, Celebrity, Sociality: A Forum on Islam and Social Media in Southeast Asia 
Edited by Martin Slama and Carla Jones

Nov 08, 2017

En libre accès sur le site de l’American Ethnological Society

Many of the essays in this collection were initially presented at the workshop « Social Media and Islamic Practice in Southeast Asia, » which took place in April 2016, in Vienna, Austria. The workshop was an initiative of the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) project « Islamic (Inter)Faces of the Internet: Emerging Socialities and Forms of Piety in Indonesia, » which is directed by Martin Slama at the Institute for Social Anthropology, Austrian Academy of Sciences.

Table of contents

  • Introduction : Piety, Celebrity, Sociality by Carla Jones (University of Colorado Boulder) and Martin Slama (Institute for Social Anthropology at the Austrian Academy of Sciences)
  • Sufi Sociality in Social Media by Ismail Fajrie Alatas (New York University)
  • The Revival of Riya’: Displaying Muslim Piety Online in Indonesia by Fatimah Husein (State Islamic University Yogyakarta)
  • Circulating Modesty: The Gendered Afterlives of Networked Images by Carla Jones (University of Colorado Boulder)
  • The Digital Sound of Southeast Asian Islam by Bart Barendregt (Leiden University)
  • Prince of Heaven: Blogging the Concerns of Great Muslimah by Dayana Lengauer (Institute for Social Anthropology at the Austrian Academy of Sciences)
  • Heart to Heart on Social Media: Affective Aspects of Islamic Practice by Martin Slama (Institute for Social Anthropology at the Austrian Academy of Sciences)
  • Capital Subjects: Debating Islamic Finance, Online and Off by Daromir Rudnyckyj (University of Victoria)
  • Paths to Celebrity Status: The Significance of Social Media for Islamic Preachers from South Sulawesi by Wahyuddin Halim (State Islamic University Makassar)
  • The Allure of “One Day One Juz” by Eva Nisa (Victoria University of Wellington)
  • Sincerity and Scandal: The Cultural Politics of “Fake Piety » in Indonesia by James B. Hoesterey (Emory University)
  • Understanding Piety and Anger in Indonesia’s 2016 Islamic Mass Rallies by Saskia Schäfer (Freie Universität Berlin)
  • Tweeting Religion in Indonesia: When Political Arenas Go Viral by John Postill (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University) and Leonard Chrysostomos Epafras (Indonesian Consortium for Religious Studies)

A télécharger sur :  http://americanethnologist.org/features/collections/piety-celebrity-sociality

New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts

Subi Reef, Spratly Islands

New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts

A two-day workshop on ‘New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts’, organised by Drs Nagamuttu Ravindranathan and Matthew J. Walton was held at St Antony’s College and the University of Oxford China Centre on 19th and 20th October 2017.

A list of papers given is provided below; please see the links for a number of powerpoint slides and audio recordings. 

  • Concrete proposals for the resolution of conflicts between the Philippines and China
    Jay Batongbacal (University of the Philippines)
    Full Paper / Slides / Audio Podcast 
  • ASEAN and Regional Cooperation in the South China Sea
    Robert Beckman (National University of Singapore)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Philippines-China arbitration: How would any lessons learnt shape the future peaceful resolution of conflicts?
    Antonio Carpio (Supreme Court of the Republic of Philippines)
    Talk Outline
  • A neglected resolution for the conflicts in the South China Sea arising from the original claims of the Republic of China in 1947
    Charles I-hsin Chen (University of Cambridge)
  • South China Sea Conflicts or Cooperation: UNCLOS design and reality
    Fu Kuen-Chen (Xiamen University)
  • Base points and equity applicable to the resolution of conflicts
    Robin Cleverly (Marbdy Consulting)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Thinking of the unthinkable
    Jerome Cohen (New York University)
    Audio Podcast
  • What role will international law play in the resolution of South China Sea disputes?
    Stephen Fietta (Fietta LLP)
  • Functional cooperative management in the South China Sea
    Vivian Forbes (National Institute for South China Sea Studies)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Peace in our time – considering Helsinki accords and Alpha in East Asia
    Kimie Hara (University of Waterloo)
  • ​What’s wrong with the status quo?
    Bill Hayton (British Broadcasting Corporation)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • UNCLOS and the South China Sea Conflicts
    Nong Hong (Institute for China America Studies)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • A Practical Solution in Resolving Conflicts in the South China Sea Between Malaysia and China as a Feasible Solution: Perspectives from Malaysia
    Jalila Abdul Jalil (Maritime Institute of Malaysia)
  • Philippines-China arbitration: What lessons are there in other East Asian conflicts?
    Zou Keyuan (University of Central Lancashire)
  • South China Sea – Vietnam’s view after the July 2016 Award
    Nguyễn Hồng Thao (National University of Hanoi)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Will naval power close the South China Sea chapter?
    Alessio Patalano (King’s College London)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Does there have to be an escalation of conflict in the South China Sea?
    John Ross (Chongyang Institute, Renmin University)
    Slides
  • China’s Maritime Policies
    Alexandre Sheldon-Duplaix (French Defence Historical Service)
    Slides / Audio Podcast – to come
  • Concrete proposals for conflict settlements of the South China Sea disputes: Review and assessment
    Zheng Wang (Seton Hall University)
    Audio Podcast
  • Current conflicts and the future
    Wu Shicun (National Institute for South China Sea Studies)