Archives de catégorie : DOCUMENTATION

Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, vol. 54, n° 1, 2018

Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, vol. 54, n° 1, 2018

Table of Contents

Survey of Recent Developments

  • Can Indonesia Secure a Development Dividend from Its Resource Export Boom? by Rashesh Shrestha & Ian Coxhead

Other Articles

  • Tax Non-Compliance and Perceptions of Corruption: Policy Implications for Developing Countries by Arifin Rosid, Chris Evans & Binh Tran-Nam
  • Property-Price Determinants in Indonesia by Matthew Gnagey & Ryan Tans
  • Regional Disparity in the Body Mass Index Distribution of Indonesians: New Evidence Beyond The Mean by Toshiaki Aizawa

Note

  • Predictability, Price Bubbles, and Efficiency in the Indonesian Stock-Market by Fahad Almudhaf

Book Reviews

  • Michaela Haug, Martin Rössler, Anna-Teresa Grumblies (eds), Rethinking Power Relations in Indonesia: Transforming the Margins by Thomas P. Power
  • Hans Hägerdal, Held’s History of Sumbawa: An Annotated Translation by William G. Clarence-Smith
  • Eko Saputro, Indonesia and ASEAN Plus Three Financial Cooperation: Domestic Politics, Power Relations, and Regulatory Regionalism by Joel Rathus

Voir : https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cbie20/54/1

 

 

 

 

 

Journal of Contemporary Asia, vol. 48, n° 4, 2018

Journal of Contemporary Asia, vol. 48, n° 4, 2018
Crisis, Populism and Right-wing Politics in Asia

Table of Contents

Original Articles

  • Asia’s Conservative Moment: Understanding the Rise of the Right by Priya Chacko & Kanishka Jayasuriya
  • The Right Turn in India: Authoritarianism, Populism and Neoliberalisation by Priya Chacko
  • Imagine All the People? Mobilising Islamic Populism for Right-Wing Politics in Indonesia by Vedi R. Hadiz
  • Authoritarian Statism and the New Right in Asia’s Conservative Democracies by Kanishka Jayasuriya
  • Limited Pluralism in a Liberal Democracy: Party Law and Political Incorporation in South Korea by Erik Mobrand
  • The Australian Right in the “Asian Century”: Inequality and Implications for Social Democracy by Carol Johnson
  • Creating Surplus Labour: Neo-Liberal Transformations and the Development of Relative Surplus Population in Indonesia by Muhtar Habibi

Commentary

  • Excessive Use of Deadly Force by Police in the Philippines Before Duterte by Peter Kreuzer

Book Reviews

  • Alpa Shah, Jens Lerche, Richard Axelby, Dalel Benbabaali, Brendan Donegan, Jayaseelan Raj and Vikramaditya Thakur, Ground Down by Growth: Tribe, Caste, Class and Inequality in Twenty-First Century India by Kenneth Bo Nielsen
  • Ashley South and Mary Lall (eds), Citizenship in Myanmar: Ways of Being In and From Burma by Gerry van Klinken

Voir : https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjoc20/48/4

 

 

 

Talking Indonesia: local leadership

« Talking Indonesia: local leadership » by Bima Arya Sugiarto, 02/08/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

The 2018 regional elections brought victories for several candidates who have made a name for themselves as innovative and reform-oriented. Thanks to their successes in raising living standards, making local bureaucracies more efficient and creating urgently needed public spaces, young leaders such as Ridwan Kamil, Ganjar Pranowo, Nurdin Abdullah and Bima Arya Sugiarto won convincing election victories in some of Indonesia’s most populous regions.

But can this new breed of local leaders really change entrenched patterns of politics in Indonesia? How do they navigate established patronage channels? And how do they see their place within the broader political environment in Indonesia today?

In Talking Indonesia this week, Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these and other questions with one of these young politicians, Dr Bima Arya Sugiarto, the recently re-elected mayor of Bogor.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-local-leadership/

P’teah Cambodia project website

P’teah Cambodia project website

P’Teah Cambodia is co-directed by Drs. Miriam Stark and Alison Carter in collaboration with colleagues from the Battambang Department of Culture and the Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts, Cambodia.

Miriam Stark has worked in Cambodia since 1995, first as co-director of the Lower Mekong Archaeological Project (LOMAP) and more recently with the Greater Angkor Project. She is Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Hawaii.

Alison Carter began working with Dr. Stark and the LOMAP project in 2005 and with the Greater Angkor Project in 2011. In 2015, she co-directed an excavation of a house mound within the Angkor Wat temple enclosure. She is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oregon.

ProjecT Excavating Ancient Households

P’teah​ or ផ្ទះ is the Khmer word for house. We call our project P’teah Cambodia because we investigate ancient residential spaces from the Pre-Angkorian (6-8th centuries), Angkorian (8-15th centuries CE), and Post-Angkorian (15-17th centuries CE) periods.

Angkor is one of the largest preindustrial settlements in the world and has been the focus of substantial scholarly attention. Despite more than a century of epigraphic, art historical, and architectural research, however, we still know little about the people of Angkor: who built the temples, kept the shrines running, produced food, managed the water, and farmed the crops that supported the empire. Studying past households and their activities is important for understanding daily practices of people in the past. Our project explores the roles of households and non-elites in the Cambodian past.

Our current fieldwork takes place around Prasat Basaet, near the city of Battambang in northwest Cambodia. Most recent archaeological attention since 1995 has focused on the structure and function of the Angkorian capital (or Greater Angkor), where our project worked from 2010-2015. Greater Angkor, however, was connected to and dependent upon large provincial centers, whose administrators channeled goods and labor to the capital. Battambang was one of the most arable regions of the Angkorian polity, and has a deep record of archaeological occupation that extends into the early Holocene and perhaps before. Our work examines how provincial populations became enmeshed in the Angkorian state. Did Angkorian power in the provinces wax and wane with different rulers? What was the economic relationship between the provincial areas and the Angkorian capital? How did people in the provinces interact with their environment and deal with the climatic changes that facilitated the rise and demise of Angkor? Such information is essential to building a comprehensive history of Angkorian Cambodia.

Voir : https://sites.google.com/view/pteah-cambodia/home

No need for Magic: A simple trick for the display of a Batak manuscript

« No need for Magic: A simple trick for the display of a Batak manuscript » by Julia Poirier, 13/07/2018, Chester Beatty Conservation

Amongst the treasures at the Chester Beatty is a small collection of 51 Batak manuscripts – 45 bark books, 4 inscribed bamboos, 1 bone amulet and one paper manuscript. Hailing from North Sumatra in Indonesia, the oldest of these manuscripts is dated to the 19th century. The Batak manuscript culture encompasses written texts on various organic materials including bamboo, bone and tree bark. The bark books, also known as pustaha are divination books, although other subjects such as medicine and magic are also common.

In preparation for a rotation of the Batak display case in the Sacred Traditions gallery, I condition checked four bark manuscripts. They were all in good condition and required very little attention, with the exception of one object (CBL Sum 1102).

The bark concertina manuscripts vary in size from some which are small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, to others which are around A4 in size. They are made of two wooden covers glued to a folded textblock made from the bark of the alim tree or agarwood. The stiff bark is prepared in rice water to allow it to soften and be folded into a concertina book.

In the typical East Asian fashion, lacquer was used to seal off the raw edges of the bark at head and tail of the concertina textblock. This provided extra strength to the most vulnerable part of the exposed textblock.

Inside the textblock, the text runs vertically in plain black ink, following the folds in the concertina. There are additions of elaborate illustrations and tables within the text, sometimes highlighted in red ink.

Lire la suite sur : https://chesterbeattyconservation.wordpress.com/2018/07/13/no-need-for-magic-a-simple-trick-for-the-display-of-a-batak-manuscript/

Talking Indonesia: the 2018 regional elections

Talking Indonesia: the 2018 regional elections, 05/07/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

On 27 June, Indonesia held elections for mayors and governors in 154 districts and 17 provinces. It was the third and final round of such regional elections – referred to as pilkada – in this five year electoral cycle.

The 2018 pilkada were particularly significant, for several reasons. They included gubernatorial elections in five provinces that between them account for more than half of Indonesia’s population: West Java, Central Java, East Java, North Sumatra and South Sulawesi.

It was also the first opportunity to observe how the divisive dynamics of the 2017 Jakarta gubernatorial elections might affect future elections. And with the national legislative and presidential elections now less than a year away, in April 2019, these local elections have been watched closely for any clues as to how next year’s political contests might play out.

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae discusses this round of local elections, their results and their broader implications with a panel of leading political observers: Dr Charlotte Setijadi (ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute and Talking Indonesia co-host), Dr Philips Vermonte (executive director of the Centre for Strategic and International Studies, CSIS) and Dr Eve Warburton (ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute).

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-the-2018-regional-elections/

Burma (Myanmar) since the 1988 uprising: A select bibliography (Third edition)

Burma (Myanmar) since the 1988 uprising: A select bibliography (Third edition), 30 July 2018, Griffith Asia Institute

When nation-wide pro-democracy demonstrations were crushed by the armed forces in 1988, thrusting Myanmar (Burma) into the world’s headlines, there was a surge of public interest in the country. Aung San Suu Kyi’s 15 years under house arrest and developments like the recent Rohingya crisis have helped it remain a focus of attention.

As Matrii Aung Thwin has written, over the past 30 years numerous studies have appeared, offering ‘a variety of perspectives that reveal particular and sometimes contested perceptions of the Burmese past, present and future’. The struggle against authoritarian rule by domestic political groups and the country’s ethnic and religious minorities has been the subject of hundreds of books, research papers and scholarly articles. Close attention has been paid to Myanmar’s economy, defence policies and foreign relations. New publications have been devoted to neglected aspects of the country’s society and culture. There have also been important contributions to Myanmar studies in broader works, covering subjects such as the involvement of armed forces in politics and the development problems of ‘failed’ states.

This increased level of academic and official interest has been matched by a greater awareness of Myanmar among the populations of Western and other countries, prompting the publication of a wide range of works designed mainly for the mass market. The biggest sellers have been travel guides, albums of photographs and recipe books. The China-Burma-India theatre during the Second World War has attracted renewed interest from military historians. There has also been a flood of political tracts, most produced by exiled dissidents and foreign activist groups. Since 1988, think tanks like the International Crisis Group and organizations such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have commissioned detailed analyses of key issues. Many publications have been posted on the Internet, but most have also been released in hard copy as books, reports and research papers.

As more and more works appeared, the need arose for a bibliography or checklist of major Myanmar-related publications, not only for scholars and officials but also for the flood of foreigners who, mainly after 2011, travelled to Myanmar as tourists, consultants, aid workers and business executives.

Responding to this need, in 2012 the Griffith Asia Institute’s Andrew Selth published a select bibliography entitled Burma (Myanmar) Since the 1988 Uprising. It listed 928 books and reports that had been produced in English, and in hard copy, since 1988. In response to popular demand a second edition was published in 2015, listing 1318 works. The aim of the bibliography remained the same, namely to provide academics, officials, students and members of the general public with an easily accessible list of works on Myanmar that had been produced over the past three decades. A third edition of this bibliography has just been released, both in hard copy and online. Reflecting the continued outpouring of publications about Myanmar in English, it lists 2133 works.

Lire la suite sur : https://blogs.griffith.edu.au/asiainsights/burma-myanmar-since-the-1988-uprising-a-select-bibliography-third-edition/

Télécharger la bibliographie sur : https://www.griffith.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0032/485942/Burma-Bibliography-2018-Selth-web.pdf

Podcast : A new Malaysia ?

Podcast : A New Malaysia? #1: Meredith Weiss and Ambiga Sreenevasan, 17/07/2018, New Mandala

Synopsis

In this podcast, New Mandala’s editor Liam Gammon talks to Prof Meredith Weiss about whether Malaysia is witnessing “democratisation through elections”, and Dr Ross Tapsell, Director of the ANU Malaysia Institute, speaks with Dato’ Ambiga Sreenevasan about how civil society can hold the new government to its promises of reform.

A écouter sur : http://www.newmandala.org/new-malaysia-1-meredith-weiss-ambiga-sreenevasan/

 

Podcast : The Karen in 2017: Resilience, Aspirations and Politics

« The Karen in 2017: Resilience, Aspirations and Politics », 15 June 2017, Oxford University

A one-day workshop on ‘The Karen in 2017: Resilience, Aspirations and Politics’ was organised by Dr Matthew J. Walton was held on 15th June 2017 at St Antony’s College.

A list of papers given is provided below, please see the links for a number of audio recordings.

The Karen and the Gift of Education​
Pia Joliffe (University of Oxford)
Audio Podcast

The Karen, Education and the Diaspora
Bob Anderson (Mobile Education Partnerships)
Audio Podcast

Perinatal Depression in Migrant and Refugee Karen and Burmese women in Tak province, Thailand
Gracia Fellmeth (University of Oxford)
Audio Podcast

Coming of Age in Hpa-an: Hope and Visions of the Good Life
Justine Chambers (Australian National University)
Audio Podcast

Non-state welfare and the politics of abandonment: Northern Karen State in the shadow of the 1990s
Gerard McCarthy (Australian National University)
Audio Podcast

Vulnerability, Poverty and Displacement and the absence of Interim Arrangements: Karen Communities in Ceasefire areas of Southeast Burma/Myanmar
Tim Schroeder (Covenant Consult / Friedensau Adventist University)
Audio Podcast

From Conflict to Ceasefire: Landmines as a form of community protection in Eastern Myanmar
Greg Cathcart
Audio Podcast

Comparing the KNU and KIO ceasefire experiences
David Brenner (University of Surrey)
Audio Podcast

Humanitarian Aid and the Karen
Alexander Horstmann (Tallinn University)
Audio Podcast

‘Everything has changed’ yet ‘I have nothing’: the Transborder lives of Karen women from Hpa-an, Myanmar
Indre Calmaite (Central European University)
Audio Podcast

History of Social Suffering and the Social Agent
Father Vinai (The Seven Fountain Jesuit Regional Retreat Centre / People for Others Foundation)

Roundtable Discussion: The Future of Karen in Myanmar/Burma and the diaspora
Benedict Rogers, Martin Smith, Richard Dolan and Justine Chambers
Audio Podcast

Voir : https://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/karen-2017-resilience-aspirations-and-politics

Podcast : Gender, Rights and Justice in a Transitioning Myanmar

« Gender, Rights and Justice in a Transitioning Myanmar », 13-14 November 2017, Oxford University

A two-day workshop on ‘Gender, Rights and Justice in a Transitioning Myanmar’ organised by Drs Daw Khin Mar Mar Kyi and Matthew J. Walton was held at Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford on 13th and 14th November 2017. Part of the Oxford-Myanmar Policy Brief Series.

A list of papers given is provided below, please see the links for a number of audio recordings.

Female MPs and the Protection of Human Rights
May Win Myint (Central Executive Committee, National League of Democracy)
Audio podcast

Gender and Education
Aye Aye Chit (Mandalay Medical University)
Audio Podcast

Law and Gender Based Violence in Transitioning Myanmar
Sandra Htar Htar (Akhaya Women)
Audio Podcast

Challenges and Opportunities for Women and Girls in Myanmar
Janet Jackson (United Nations Population Fund)
Audio Podcast

Constructing Female Citizenship: Education and Activism in Transition
Elizabeth Maber (University of Amsterdam)
Audio Podcast

Ending Impunity is the Key to Combatting Gender Based Violence
Naw Wah Ku Shee (Women League of Burma)
Audio Podcast

Gender and Health
Aye Aye Chit (Mandalay Medical University)
Audio Podcast

Gender and Drug Policy
Mai Hla Aye (Central European University)
Audio Podcast

Voir : https://www.sant.ox.ac.uk/gender-rights-and-justice-transitioning-myanmar

Asian Studies Review, vol. 42, n° 2, 2018

Asian Studies Review, vol. 42, n° 2, 2018. Special issue : Competing Visions of the Rule of Law in Southeast Asia : Power, Rhetoric and Governance

Guest Editors: Melissa Curley, Björn Dressel and Stephen McCarthy

Articles

Competing Visions of the Rule of Law in Southeast Asia: Power, Rhetoric and Governance by Melissa Curley, Björn Dressel and Stephen McCarthy

ASEAN as a “Rules-based Community”: Business as Usual by Kelly Gerard

Rule of Law Expedited: Land Title Reform and Justice in Burma (Myanmar) by Stephen McCarthy

Governing Civil Society in Cambodia: Implications of the NGO Law for the “Rule of Law” by Melissa Curley

Thailand’s Traditional Trinity and the Rule of Law: Can They Coexist? by Björn Dressel

Dilemmas in the Construction of a Socialist Law-based State in Vietnam: Electoral Integrity and Reform by Thiem H. Bui

Book Reviews

Megha Amrith, Caring for strangers: Filipino medical workers in Asia by Mina Roces

Pia Jolliffe, Learning, migration and intergenerational relations: the Karen and the gift of education by Violet Cho

Hema Devare, Ganga to Mekong: a cultural voyage through textiles by Natali Jane Pearson

Voir : https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/casr20/current

 

 

Yanger : Tracing the Roots of Halmahera String Bands

Yanger : Tracing the Roots of Halmahera String Bands, 8 June 2018, Aural Archipelago

We can begin by zooming in on Halmahera, an island shaped like a pair of chromosomes, a miniature twin of the lotus-like Sulawesi to the west. One of the largest islands in Maluku, Halmahera was nonetheless historically dwarfed by the tiny island kingdoms which cling to its eastern shores: the small, volcano-studded Ternate, Tidore, and Bacan. Halmahera had its own mysterious kingdom on this western flank called Jailolo, a name so powerful it was once used to refer to the whole island. Still, it’s a peripheral place, especially in modern day Indonesia.

Spend a week in Halmahera, like I did, and you’ll find a place where traces of these rich, world-changing histories are still apparent: nutmeg trees cling to the perfect volcanic dome of Mt. Jailolo, and old colonial-era forts crumble near its black sand beaches. You’re also bound to find music: there’s tifa, booming log drums also found across Melanesia; there’s togal, music for conspicuously western dances played on a violin-like fiddle called fiol. Then there’s my favorite of all, a music at once familiar and enigmatic, a music which wraps up hundreds of years of history in a tuneful package: yanger.

Yanger, you could say, is the local take on a string band tradition that spans the Pacific. It is partly from this angle that yanger gets its familiarity: just as yanger combines upbeat lutes, rubbery bass, and major key melodies, so too do its cousins across the Melanesian and Polynesian world, from string bands in the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu all the way to joyous yospan in Papua and similar forms across the border in PNG. While Halmahera sits on the edge of the Melanesian world, yanger‘s link with this wider world of Pacific Island string bands is a mystery. While those musics seem intuitively like long-lost cousins, their histories are completely different, with those styles often being the result of Western contact during and after World War II. A different, perhaps more complex set of histories is at play here with yanger in Halmahera.

Lire la suite et écouter les enregistrements  sur : http://www.auralarchipelago.com/

 

 

Monarchical Manipulation in Cambodia

Geoffrey C. Gunn, Monarchical Manipulation in Cambodia : France, Japan, and the Sihanouk Crusade for Independence, NIAS Press, 2018

First book to explain the agency of Cambodian monarchs in the face of broader colonial manipulation and international power plays.
• Explores the historic interplay of charismatic power and political patronage in Cambodia.
• Focuses on the tumultuous wartime and early post-war events surrounding Sihanouk’s ‘crusade’ for Cambodia’s independence.

One figure strides across modern Cambodian history – Norodom Sihanouk. From his accession to the throne of Cambodia in 1941 until his extravagant funeral ceremony in 2013, the prince turned ‘king father’ in later life never dodged controversy. But this is not a biography of Sihanouk; the focus is upon the final decades of the French protectorate, the rise of a counter-elite and winning of Cambodia’s independence.
Manipulation of the 1,000-year-old monarchy comes to the heart of this book, as does indigenous resistance, Buddhist activism, French cultural creationism, the rise of radical republicanism, Thai recidivism and wartime Japanese machinations. Carried through into the postwar period, the seeds of Cambodia’s own destruction were being sown in the jungle perimeters, rubber plantations, schools and monkhood, and even in the classrooms of prestigious French institutions.
Deeply embedded Khmer cultural conventions and the interplay of charismatic power and patronage are not irrelevant to this discussion, indeed inform us as to the future and even present-day patterns of political behaviour. The skill of the young Sihanouk in navigating between Vichy France, Japanese militarists, republican opportunists, armed rural insurgency and French proconsuls is brought to life by a range of new archival documentation. A book is also a work of premonition as much inquiry, exploring how did a country of such grace and natural bounty come to be associated with the worst excesses of mass murder and genocide experienced in the twentieth century. The long political prelude as exposed in this book makes the now clichéd ‘tragedy of Cambodian history’ much more comprehensible.

Voir : http://www.niaspress.dk/books/monarchical-manipulation-cambodia

Remembering the Present : Mindfulness in Buddhist Asia

Julia L. Cassaniti, Remembering the Present : Mindfulness in Buddhist Asia, Cornell University Press, 2018

What is mindfulness, and how does it vary as a concept across different cultures? How does mindfulness find expression in practice in the Buddhist cultures of Southeast Asia? What role does mindfulness play in everyday life? J. L. Cassaniti answers these fundamental questions and more through an engaged ethnographic investigation of what it means to « remember the present » in a region strongly influenced by Buddhist thought.

Focusing on Thailand, Sri Lanka, and Myanmar, Remembering the Present examines the meanings, practices, and purposes of mindfulness. Using the experiences of people in Buddhist monasteries, hospitals, markets, and homes in the region, Cassaniti shows how an attention to memory informs how people live today and how mindfulness is intimately tied to local constructions of time, affect, power, emotion, and selfhood. By looking at how these people incorporate Theravada Buddhism into their daily lives, Cassaniti provides a signal contribution to the psychological anthropology of religious experience.

Remembering the Present heeds the call made by researchers in the psychological sciences and the Buddhist side of mindfulness studies for better understandings of what mindfulness is and can be. Cassaniti addresses fundamental questions about selfhood, identity, and how a deeper appreciation of the many contexts and complexities intrinsic in sati (mindfulness in the Pali language) can help people lead richer, fuller, and healthier lives. Remembering the Present shows how mindfulness needs to be understood within the cultural and historical influences from which it has emerged.

Ecouter l’entretien avec Julia Cassaniti sur son livre : http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?gcoi=80140107114010

 

More Than Words : Transforming Script, Agency, and Collective Life in Bali

Richard Fox, More Than Words : Transforming Script, Agency, and Collective Life in Bali, Cornell University Press, september 2018

Grounded in ethnographic and archival research on the Indonesian island of Bali, More Than Words challenges conventional understandings of textuality and writing as they pertain to the religious traditions of Southeast Asia. Through a nuanced study of Balinese script as employed in rites of healing, sorcery, and self-defense, Richard Fox explores the aims and desires embodied in the production and use of palm-leaf manuscripts, amulets, and other inscribed objects.

Balinese often attribute both life and independent volition to manuscripts and copperplate inscriptions, presenting them with elaborate offerings. Commonly addressed with personal honorifics, these script-bearing objects may become partners with humans and other sentient beings in relations of exchange and mutual obligation. The question is how such practices of « the living letter » may be related to more recently emergent conceptions of writing—linked to academic philology, reform Hinduism, and local politics—which take Balinese letters to be a symbol of cultural heritage, and a neutral medium for the transmission of textual meaning. More than Words shows how Balinese practices of apotropaic writing—on palm-leaves, amulets, and bodies—challenge these notions, and yet coexist alongside them. Reflecting on this coexistence, Fox develops a theoretical approach to writing centered on the premise that such contradictory sensibilities hold wider significance than previously recognized for the history and practice of religion in Southeast Asia and beyond.

Voir : http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140106255130&fa=author&person_id=5894#content