Archives de catégorie : DOCUMENTATION

Asian Studies Review, vol. 42, n° 1 (March 2018)

Asian Studies Review, vol. 42, n° 1 (March 2018) 
Special Issue: Contestations of Gender, Sexuality and Morality in Contemporary Indonesia

Guest Editors: Maria Platt, Sharyn Graham Davies and Linda Rae Bennett

Introduction

  • Contestations of Gender, Sexuality and Morality in Contemporary Indonesia by Maria Platt, Sharyn Graham Davies and Linda Rae Bennett

Articles

  • Moralising Rhetoric and Imperfect Realities: Breastfeeding Promotions and the Experiences of Recently Delivered Mothers in Urban Yogyakarta, Indonesia by Belinda Rina Marie Spagnoletti, Linda Rae Bennett, Michelle Kermode and Siswanto Agus Wilopo
  • Virtually (Im)moral: Pious Indonesian Muslim Women’s Use of Facebook by Hanny Savitri Hartono
  • From Divine Instruction to Human Invention: The Constitution of Indonesian Christian Young People’s Sexual Subjectivities through the Dominant Discourse of Sexual Morality by Teguh Wijaya Mulya
  • Skins of Morality: Bio-borders, Ephemeral Citizenship and Policing Women in Indonesia by Sharyn Graham Davies
  • Migration, Moralities and Moratoriums: Female Labour Migrants and the Tensions of Protectionism in Indonesia by Maria Platt

Other Articles (ASE)

  • The Trap of Neo-patrimonialism: Social Accountability and Good Governance in Cambodia by Danilo Vuković and Marija Babović
  • Contesting Disciplinary Power: Transnational Domestic Labour in the Global South by Linda A. Lumayag

Book Reviews (ASE)

  • Ronit Ricci, Exile in colonial Asia: kings, convicts, commemoration by Anthony H. Johns
  • Asmah Haji Omar (ed.), Languages in the Malaysian education system: monolingual strands in multilingual settings by Zuwati Hasim
  • Ann Wigglesworth, Activism and aid: young citizens’ experiences of development and democracy in Timor-Leste by Natali Jane Pearson
  • Natasha Pairaudeau, Mobile citizens: French Indians in Indochina, 1858–1954 by Robert Aldrich

Voir : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/casr20/42/1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, vol. 53, n° 3 (December 2017)

Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, vol. 53, n° 3 (December 2017)

Survey of recent developments

  • Saving not spending: Indonesia’s domestic demand problem by Raden Pardede and Shirin Zahro

Indonesian Politics in 2017

  • Indonesia’s year of democratic setbacks: towards a new phase of deepening illiberalism? by Vedi R. Hadiz

Other Articles

  • The economic cost of violent conflict: the case of Maluku province in Indonesia by Maheshwar Rao and Yogi Vidyattama
  • Gravity models of interregional migration in Indonesia by Nashrul Wajdi, Sri Moertiningsih Adioetomo and Clara H. Mulder
  • Non-tariff trade regulations in Indonesia: nominal and effective rates of protection by Stephen V. Marks

Book Reviews

  • Peter McCawley, Banking on the Future of Asia and the Pacific: 50 Years of the Asian Development Bank by Heath McMichael
  • Michael T. Rock, Dictators, Democrats, and Development in Southeast Asia: Implications for the Rest by Edmund Malesky
  • Leo Suryadinata, The Rise of China and the Chinese Overseas: A Study of Beijing’s Changing Policy in Southeast Asia and Beyond by Ari Kokko
  • Hal Hill, Jayant Menon (eds), Managing Globalization in the Asian Century: Essays in Honour of Prema-Chandra Athukorala by Sjamsu Rahardja

Voir : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cbie20/53/3

 

 

 

Religion and society, vol. 8, n° 1 (sept. 2017)

Religion and society : advances in research, vol. 8, n° 1 (sept. 2017)

Special section : Towards a comparative anthropology of buddhism

  • Introduction : Legacies, Trajectories, and Comparison in the Anthropology of Buddhism by Nicolas Sihlé and Patrice Ladwig
  • Ritual Tattooing and the Creation of New Buddhist Identities : An Inquiry into the Initiation Process in a Burmese Organization of Exorcists by Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière
  • The Ethics of Collective Sponsorship : Virtuous Action and Obligation in Contemporary Tibet by Jane Caple
  • Belonging in a New Myanmar : The Cosmopolitics of an Apparently Non-religious Practice by Juliane Schober
  • The White Cotton Robe : Charisma and Clothes in Tibetan Buddhism Today by Magdalena Maria Turek
  • Rethinking Anthropological Models of Spirit Possession and Theravada Buddhism by Erick White
  • Afterword : So What Is the Anthropology of Buddhism About? by David N. Gellner

Voir : https://www.berghahnjournals.com/view/journals/religion-and-society/8/1/religion-and-society.8.issue-1.xml

 

 

 

 

Islam and the Limits of the State

R. Michael Feener, David Kloos and Annemarie Samuels (eds), Islam and the Limits of the State : Reconfigurations of Practice, Community and Authority in Contemporary Aceh, Brill, 2015

This book examines the relationship between the state  implementation of Shariʿa and diverse lived realities of everyday Islam in contemporary Aceh, Indonesia. With chapters covering topics ranging from NGOs and diaspora politics to female ulama and punk rockers, the volume opens new perspectives on the complexity of Muslim discourse and practice in a society that has experienced tremendous changes since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. These detailed accounts of and critical reflections on how different groups in Acehnese society negotiate their experiences and understandings of Islam highlight the complexity of the ways in which the state is both a formative and a limited force with regard to religious and social transformation.

A télécharger sur : http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/9789004304864

 

Chinese Ways of Being Muslim

Yew Wai Heng, Chinese Ways of Being Muslim : Negotiating Ethnicity and Religiosity in Indonesia, NIAS Press, 2017

Many recent works on Muslim societies have pointed to the development of ‘de-culturalization’ and ‘purification’ of Islamic practices. Instead, by exploring architectural designs, preaching activities, cultural celebrations, social participations and everyday practices, this book describes and analyses the formation and contestation of Chinese Muslim cultural identities in today’s Indonesia. Chinese Muslim leaders strategically promote their unique identities by rearticulating their histories and cultivating ties with Muslims in China. Yet, their intentional mixing of Chineseness and Islam does not reflect all aspects of the multilayered and multifaceted identities of ordinary Chinese Muslims – there is not a single ‘Chinese way of being Muslim’ in Indonesia. Moreover, the assertion of Chinese identity and Islamic religiosity does not necessarily imply racial segregation and religious exclusion, but can act against them.
The study thus helps us to understand better the cultural politics of Muslim and Chinese identities in Indonesia, and gives insights into the possibilities and limitations of ethnic and religious cosmopolitanism in contemporary societies.

Voir : http://www.niaspress.dk/books/chinese-ways-being-muslim

 

The Balinese Digital Library

The Balinese Digital Library

Almost all of the writings in Balinese were digitized and preserved here in 2011 by the Internet Archive from their major library in Denpasar, Bali. A official in the cultural ministry said that this collection is « 90% of all writings in Balinese. » Most of the Balinese literature is written on palm leaves, or Lontar. Some were not digitized because of the culturally sensitive materials they contain. This makes the Balinese the first to have their complete literature online and available for free.

Bali has a rich tradition of literature that dates back several hundreds years. Balinese writings encompass the ancient literary texts composed in the old Javanese language of Kawi and Sanskrit; many based on the famous Indian epics of Ramayana and Mahabharata. The island’s literary works were mostly recorded on dried and treated palm leaves. The writings were incised in both sides of the leaf with a sharp knife and the script is then blackened with soot. The leaves are held and linked together by a string that passes through the central holes and knotted at the outer ends.

The lontar manuscripts range from ordinary texts to Bali’s most sacred writings. They include texts on religion, holy formulae, rituals, family genealogies, law codes, treaties on medicine (usadha), arts and architecture, calendars, prose, poems and even magic. Many lontar manuscripts contain information on important issues such as medicines and village regulations that are used as daily guidance.

Voir la collection de manuscrits sur lontars : https://archive.org/details/Bali&tab=collection

In Plain Sight : Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand

Tyrell Haberkorn, In Plain Sight : Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand, University of Wisconsin Press, 2018

Following a 1932 coup d’état in Thailand that ended absolute monarchy and established a constitution, the Thai state that emerged has suppressed political dissent through detention, torture, forced reeducation, disappearances, assassinations, and massacres. In Plain Sight shows how these abuses, both hidden and occurring in public view, have become institutionalized through a chronic failure to hold perpetrators accountable. Tyrell Haberkorn’s deeply researched revisionist history of modern Thailand highlights the legal, political, and social mechanisms that have produced such impunity and documents continual and courageous challenges to state domination.

Tyrell Haberkorn is an associate professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She is the author of Revolution Interrupted: Farmers, Students, Law, and Violence in Northern Thailand.

Voir : https://uwpress.wisc.edu/books/5453.htm

Of Beggars and Buddhas

Katherine A. Bowie, Of Beggars and Buddhas : The Politics of Humor in the Vessantara Jataka in Thailand, University of Wisconsin Press, 2017

An exploration of the subversive politics of humor in the most important story in Theravada Buddhism

The 547 Buddhist jatakas, or verse parables, recount the Buddha’s lives in previous incarnations. In his penultimate and most famous incarnation, he appears as the Prince Vessantara, perfecting the virtue of generosity by giving away all his possessions, his wife, and his children to the beggar Jujaka. Taking an anthropological approach to this two-thousand-year-old morality tale, Katherine A. Bowie highlights significant local variations in its interpretations and public performances across three regions of Thailand over 150 years.

The Vessantara Jataka has served both monastic and royal interests, encouraging parents to give their sons to religious orders and intimating that kings are future Buddhas. But, as Bowie shows, characterizations of the beggar Jujaka in various regions and eras have also brought ribald humor and sly antiroyalist themes to the story. Historically, these subversive performances appealed to popular audiences even as they worried the conservative Bangkok court. The monarchy sporadically sought to suppress the comedic recitations. As Thailand has changed from a feudal to a capitalist society, this famous story about giving away possessions is paradoxically being employed to promote tourism and wealth.

Katherine A. Bowie is a professor of anthropology and the director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She is the author of Rituals of National Loyalty: An Anthropology of the State and the Village Scout Movement in Thailand.

Voir : https://uwpress.wisc.edu/books/5446.htm

Talking Indonesia: Pornography

Talking Indonesia: Pornography with Helen Pausacker, 18/01/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

The prohibition of pornography has been a controversial area of law in Indonesia, attracting the attention both of Islamic conservatives and activists promoting freedom of expression. Several public figures have been investigated and prosecuted under questionable circumstances, raising concerns that the law is being applied arbitrarily. Recently, the police investigation of Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) leader Rizieq Shihab and his female follower Firza Hussein over a leaked salacious Whatsapp chat has put prohibitions of pornography back in the headlines. The case has gained attention both because FPI has been one of the main groups pushing for pornography prosecutions, and because the investigation has been widely perceived as politically motivated, following Rizieq’s role in the protests against former Jakarta Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama.

How does Indonesia regulate pornography, how have its anti-pornography laws been applied, and what determines who gets charged and convicted? How do debates over pornography reflect broader questions of morality and Islam in Indonesian society? In the first Talking Indonesia episode for 2018, Dr Dave McRae explores these issues with Dr Helen Pausacker, deputy director of the Centre for Indonesian Law, Islam and Society (CILIS) at Melbourne Law School.

In 2018, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey  from Monash University, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-pornography/

New Books Southeast Asian studies

Podcast : New Books Network – Southeast Asian Studies

Interviews par Nick Cheesman (Fellow at the College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University) des auteurs d’ouvrages récemment publiés sur l’Asie du Sud-Est.

Derniers podcasts :

Tam T. T. Ngo, The New Way : Protestantism and the Hmong in Vietnam, University of Washington Press, 2016

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/tam-t-t-ngo-the-new-way-protestantism-and-the-hmong-in-vietnam-u-washington-press-2016/

Roderic Broadhurst, Thierry Bouhours and Brigitte Bouhours, Violence and the Civilising Process in Cambodia, Cambridge University Press, 2015

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/roderic-broadhurst-et-al-violence-and-the-civilising-process-in-cambodia-cambridge-up-2015/

Eric J. Pido, Migrant Returns : Manila, Development, and Transnational Connectivity, Duke University Press, 2017

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/eric-j-pido-migrant-returns-manila-development-and-transnational-connectivity-duke-up-2017/

Astrid Noren-Nilsson, Cambodia’s Second Kingdom : Nation, Imagination, and Democracy, Cornell South East Program, 2016

A écouter sur : http://newbooksnetwork.com/astrid-noren-nilsson-cambodias-second-kingdom-nation-imagination-and-democracy-cornell-southeast-asia-program-2016/

Patricia Sloane-White, Corporate Islam : Sharia and the Modern Workplace, Cambridge University Press, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

NUSA, vol. 62 (March 2017)

NUSA : Linguistic studies of languages in and around Indonesia, vol. 62 (March 2017)
Contact and substrate in the languages of Wallacea Part 1

Editor: Antoinette Schapper

Articles

  • Contact and substrate in the languages of Wallacea: Introduction by Antoinette Schapper
  • Tone and language contact in southern Cenderawasih Bay by David Kamholz
  • Roon ve, DO/GIVE Coexpression, and Language Contact in Northwest New Guinea by David Gil
  • Papuan-Austronesian Language Contact on Yapen Island: A Preliminary Account by Emily Gasser
  • A unified system of spatial orientation in the Austronesian and non-Austronesian languages of Halmahera by Gary Holton

Voir : http://www.aa.tufs.ac.jp/en/publications/nusa

The Killing Season : A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66

Geoffrey Robinson, A Killing Season : A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66, Princeton University Press, 2018

The Killing Season explores one of the largest and swiftest, yet least examined, instances of mass killing and incarceration in the twentieth century—the shocking antileftist purge that gripped Indonesia in 1965–66, leaving some five hundred thousand people dead and more than a million others in detention.

An expert in modern Indonesian history, genocide, and human rights, Geoffrey Robinson sets out to account for this violence and to end the troubling silence surrounding it. In doing so, he sheds new light on broad and enduring historical questions. How do we account for instances of systematic mass killing and detention? Why are some of these crimes remembered and punished, while others are forgotten? What are the social and political ramifications of such acts and such silence?

Challenging conventional narratives of the mass violence of 1965–66 as arising spontaneously from religious and social conflicts, Robinson argues convincingly that it was instead the product of a deliberate campaign, led by the Indonesian Army. He also details the critical role played by the United States, Britain, and other major powers in facilitating mass murder and incarceration. Robinson concludes by probing the disturbing long-term consequences of the violence for millions of survivors and Indonesian society as a whole.

Based on a rich body of primary and secondary sources, The Killing Season is the definitive account of a pivotal period in Indonesian history. It also makes a powerful contribution to wider debates about the dynamics and legacies of mass killing, incarceration, and genocide.

Geoffrey B. Robinson is professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles. His books include The Dark Side of Paradise: Political Violence in Bali and “If You Leave Us Here, We Will Die”: How Genocide Was Stopped in East Timor (Princeton).

Voir : https://press.princeton.edu/titles/11135.html

Talking Indonesia : Being Chinese and Muslim

 Talking Indonesia : Being Chinese and Muslim with Dr Hew Wai Weng, 01/02/2018, Indonesia at Melbourne

Ethnic Chinese make up less than three percent of Indonesia’s population. Of this group, a tiny minority are Muslim. As such, ethnic Chinese Muslims occupy a unique and significant position where the religious majority intersects with this ethnic minority, which has long assumed a role of economic middleman and been used as political scapegoat. In many ways, Chinese Muslims in Indonesia disturb both their religious and ethnic identity groups. At its best, their position in society serves to highlight the inclusivity and diversity possible within Indonesian nationalism, and at its worst, to expose the undeniable limitations therein.

Who are Indonesia’s ethnic Chinese Muslims? What is their history and situation in contemporary Indonesia? Is there a Chinese way of being Muslim? What can their story tell us about religious tolerance and cultural diversity in Indonesia today?

In this week’s podcast Jemma Purdey explores these issues with Dr Hew Wai Weng, a fellow in the Institute of Malaysian and International Studies, National University of Malaysia (UKM).

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-being-chinese-and-muslim/

 

 

Genealogies of Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Burma

Genealogies of Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Burma with Alicia Turner, Southeast Asia Crossroads Podcast

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/seacrossroads/genealogies-of-religious-tolerance-and-intolerance-in-burma-with-alicia-turner-1?

Vous trouverez la liste des podcasts de Southeast Asia Crossroads ici : https://soundcloud.com/seacrossroads

Derniers podcasts :

  • Facebook, Leapfrogging, and the Dark Side in Myanmar with Lisa Brooten
  • Transnationalizing Cambodian Buddhism with John Marston
  • Archaeology and the Underpinnings of Ancient Vietnam with Nam Kim

 

Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, vol. 49, n° 1 (February 2018)

Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, vol. 49, n° 1 (February 2018)

Table of contents

Editorial

Editorial Foreword by Maitrii Aung-Thwin

Research Articles

Parsi theatrical networks in Southeast Asia: The contrary case of Burma by Kathryn Hansen

The historical vicissitudes of the Vessantara Jataka in mainland Southeast Asia by Katherine A. Bowie

Personhood and political subjectivity through ritual enactment in Isan (northeast Thailand) by Visisya Pinthongvijayakul

Mixed views on the Philippines’ Ifugao Rice Terraces: ‘Good’ versus ‘beautiful’ in the management of a UNESCO World Heritage site by Kathrine Ann D. Cagat

Stagnating yields, unyielding profits: The political economy of Malaysia’s rice sector by Jamie S. Davidson

Review Article

Ethnicity and the galactic polity: Ideas and actualities in the history of Bangkok by Justin Thomas McDaniel

Book Reviews

Voir : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-southeast-asian-studies/latest-issue