Archives de catégorie : ACCUEIL

Podcast : Cambodia’s Cultural Revival, The Cultural frontline, BBC World Service

Podcast : Cambodia’s Cultural Revival, The Cultural frontline, 15/04/2017, BBC World Service

Four decades after the Khmer Rouge genocide during which almost 90 percent of the country’s finest artists, musicians and intellectuals were wiped out, an extraordinary cultural revival and vibrant contemporary arts scene is emerging in Cambodia. We hear from the young artists at the forefront of this revival.

Kavich Neang, one of Cambodia’s hottest young filmmakers discusses his forthcoming film about the iconic White Building in Phnom Penh whose evolution tells the story of modern Cambodia.

The young radio host, relationship guru and social media celebrity DJ Nana describes how her outspoken advice on sex and relationships is breaking social taboos and has earned her a UN award for empowering young women.

Arn Chorn-Pound, musician, Khmer Rouge survivor and founder of Cambodian Living Arts explains why it’s important to pass on the traditional Cambodian arts to a new generation and how music has saved his life.

Channthy Kak, dubbed Cambodia’s Amy Winehouse and the lead singer of the rock group Cambodian Space Project, talks about her rise to fame from a poor village girl with no education or musical training.

And Sok Sangvar, in charge of tourism at Angkor Wat, explains how he is reducing the impact of tourism on the ancient temples that represent the soul of Cambodian culture.

A télécharger sur : http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04yzrqp

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS : RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP GRANT 2017-2018, ASIAN CIVILISATIONS MUSEUM SINGAPORE

Call for applications : research fellowship grant 2017-2018, Asian Civilisations Museum Singapore

The Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) invites scholars to apply for fellowships in:
1. Southeast Asian jewellery;
2. Southeast Asian Islamic art;
3. Austronesian art;
4. Peranakan art;
5. Research relating to Asian port cities

Applications close on 30 April 2017.

The ACM prizes multi-disciplinary work, cross-cultural studies, and research on ongoing projects at the museum. Research related to the collections at the ACM would be an advantage.

The research fellowship supports in-depth original study and writing on specialised aspects of Asian culture. Applications will be screened by a committee of curators and scholars.

Plus d’informations sur : http://acm.org.sg/collections/research/fellowship

Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology : Openings for PhD students

Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology : Openings for PhD students

The International Max Planck Research School for the Anthropology, Archaeology and History of Eurasia (IMPRS ANARCHIE), a cooperation between the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, offers Openings for PhD students starting 1st of October 2017.

The projects of the fourth cohort of the IMPRS ANARCHIE will be devoted to the topic of Representing Domination.

Deadline for Applications : 30 avril 2017

Doctoral students shall investigate how various modes and processes of communication and contestation with regard to (legitimate) domination are determined by practices of representation and by the (usually heterogeneous and often conflictual) dynamics that have shaped these practices of representation through space and time. Students will tackle varying forms of representation, approached as a basic form of human social interaction, by examining and comparing their spatio-temporal variability in past and present Eurasia. We especially invite projects which are dealing with the following topics and their relation to the issue of domination:

  • Representation of power
  • Representation of space and collective identities
  • Representation of status, rank, prestige
  • Representation through roles
  • Representing the past
  • Representing the dea

The aim of ANARCHIE is to renew transdisciplinary agendas in fields where social and cultural anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians have much to gain from cross-fertilisation. For the purposes of ANARCHIE, Eurasia is defined as the super-continent which comprises the whole of Asia and the whole of Europe and the Mediterranean. Previous projects have ranged from Britain and Spain to Mongolia and Vietnam. The IMPRS ANARCHIE is open to students from all countries and offers an international three-year (with the possibility of extension) PhD program in a stimulating research environment. Highly motivated students possessing a Masters degree in Socio-Cultural Anthropology, Archaeology, History or a related discipline are encouraged to apply.

Plus d’informations sur : https://recruitingapp-5034.de.umantis.com/Vacancies/308/Description/1

Call for proposals : The 9th “Engaging with Vietnam : An Interdisciplinary Dialogue” Conference

Call for proposals : The 9th “Engaging with Vietnam : An Interdisciplinary Dialogue” Conference, Touring Vietnam: Exploring “Development”, “Tourism” and “Sustainability” in Vietnam from Multi-disciplinary and Multi-directional Perspectives, Part IDecember 28-31, 2017: Ho Chi Minh City,Part IIDecember 31, 2017: Train from HCMC to Tuy Hoa, Phu Yen, Part III: January 1-4, 2018: Tuy Hoa, Phu Yen

Co-hosting organizations: University of Social Science and Humanities – Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City and University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Conference Co-Chairs and Co-Convenors : Prof. Dr. Phan Lê Hà (University of Hawai’i at Manoa), Associate Prof. Dr. Liam C. Kelley (University of Hawai’i at Manoa), Associate Prof. Dr. Võ Văn Sen (President, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City), Assistant Prof. Dr. Jamie Gillen (National University of Singapore)

Deadline for proposal submission: 31 August 2017

The 9th Engaging with Vietnam conference with three joined parts will bring about a completely new experience to those who have so far participated and will participate in our conference series. With the theme of exploring “development,” “tourism,” and “sustainability” in/of Vietnam from multi-disciplinary and multi-directional perspectives, the 9th EWV conference will introduce various activities, ranging from keynote sessions and academic presentations to exhibitions, idea contests, a policy forum, Q&A sessions, curriculum development, sightseeing, field observations, and music performances that are all integrated to offer participants opportunities to feel, think, engage, try out and live the conference theme.

Other distinctive features of EWV9 are its length and location. Its length is innovative, as the complete experience will take place over a period of almost 10 days, from December 27 2017 to January 4 2018. Its location is also innovative, as the conference will be held at two places and participants will “tour” from South (Ho Chi Minh City) to Central Vietnam (Tuy Hoa, Phu Yen), a connection that will entail an enjoyable evening tour on the Thống Nhất (Reunification) express train. Participants will celebrate together New Year’s Eve and welcome 2018 on “tàu Thống Nhất,” whereby their explorations of and engagement with Vietnam’s “development,” “tourism” and “sustainability” will continue.

As usual, our keynote sessions and featured panels with speakers from several disciplines will lay out larger (re)conceptualisations, interdisciplinary bodies of scholarship, contradicting arguments, methodologies, and questions that invite everyone to (re)think about “development,” “tourism,” and “sustainability.” Examples include:

  1. How has the past been packaged in terms of history, heritage, and memory?
  2. In what ways have tourism and development always been tied up with the past?
  3. What is the relationship between education, development, and sustainability?
  4. How and to what extent do the globalisation, regionalisation, internationalisation and nationalisation of “development,” “tourism,” and “sustainability” pose challenges and create new knowledge(s) and discourses for academic disciplines, legal practices, and policy making?
  5. Why and in what ways have (foreign) language policies and educational reforms been used to justify development?
  6. What are some major responses from schools, higher education institutions, think tanks, and relevant organisations to such challenges, discourses, policies and reforms raised in the above questions?

We expect to showcase several featured exhibitions highlighting community-engaged projects dedicated to well-rounded “development,” “tourism” and “sustainability” values and practices. We also envision another joint exhibition from artists, students and academics that showcases the various stages of modern Vietnam’s heritage and traditional festival making processes. All of this is really exciting, isn’t it?

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.engagingwithvietnam.net/home

 

New Religiosities, Modern Capitalism, and Moral Complexities in Southeast Asia

Juliette Koning, Gwenaël Njoto-Feillard (eds), New Religiosities, Modern Capitalism, and Moral Complexities in Southeast Asia, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017

As Southeast Asia experiences unprecedented economic modernization, religious and moral practices are being challenged as never before. From Thai casinos to Singaporean megachurches, from the practitioners of Islamic Finance in Jakarta to Pentecostal Christians in rural Cambodia, this volume discusses the moral complexities that arise when religious and economic developments converge. In the past few decades, Southeast Asia has seen growing religious pluralism and antagonisms as well as the penetration of a market economy and economic liberalism. Providing a multidisciplinary, cross-regional snapshot of a region in the midst of profound change, this text is a key read for scholars of religion, economists, non-governmental organization workers, and think-tankers across the region.

Voir : https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9789811029684

 

The Mists of Ramanna : The Legend That Was Lower Burma

Michael A. Aung-Thwin, The Mists of Ramanna : The Legend That Was Lower Burma, University of Hawaii Press, 2005

Scholars have long accepted the belief that a Theravada Buddhist Mon kingdom, Ramannadesa, flourished in coastal Lower Burma until it was conquered in 1057 by King Aniruddha of Pagan—which then became, in essence, the new custodian and repository of Mon culture in the Upper Burmese interior. This scenario, which Aung-Thwin calls the “”Mon Paradigm,”” has circumscribed much of the scholarship on early Burma and significantly shaped the history of Southeast Asia for more than a century. Now, in a masterful reassessment of Burmese history, Michael Aung-Thwin reexamines the original contemporary accounts and sources without finding any evidence of an early Theravada Mon polity or a conquest by Aniruddha. The paradigm, he finds, cannot be sustained. Aung-Thwin meticulously traces the paradigm’s creation to the merging of two temporally, causally, and contextually unrelated Mon and Burmese narratives.

A télécharger sur Oapen Library : http://oapen.org/search?identifier=625896#.WPAx4CBr-mw.email

2016 Wang Gungwu Prize

2016 Wang Gungwu Prize : Burma–Bengal Crossings: Intercolonial Connections in Pre-Independence India by Devleena Ghosh in Asian Studies Review, vol. 40, no. 2

Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA) president Professor Kent Anderson announced that Devleena Ghosh, an associate professor at the University of Technology Sydney, had been awarded the prestigious annual award for the best article in Asian Studies Review in 2016.

The article explores cultural and personal flows across the Bay of Bengal and the modern states of Burma, West Bengal and Bangladesh.

Abstract :

The large-scale movement of people between Burma and Bengal in the early twentieth century has been explored recently by authors such as Sugata Bose and Sunil Amrith who locate Burma within the wider migratory culture of the Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal and Southeast Asia. This article argues that the long and historical connections between Bengalis and Burmese were transformed by the British colonisation of the region. Through an analysis of selected literary texts in Bengali, some by well-known and others by obscure writers, this article shows that, for Indians, Burma constituted an elsewhere where the fantastic and superhuman were within reach, and caste and religious constraints could be circumvented and radical possibilities enabled by masquerade and disguise.

Cet article est disponible sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10357823.2016.1158237

Call for papers : Southeast Asian Islam : Religious Radicalism, Democracy, and Global Trends

Call for Papers : The 2nd Studia Islamika International conference 2017 :  Southeast Asian Islam : Religious Radicalism, Democracy, and Global Trends, 8-10/08/2017, Jakarta

Deadline for abstract submission : 15/05/2017

The Center for the Study of Islam and Society (PPIM) of Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University (UIN) Jakarta will carry out an international conference in August this year. This conference is dedicated to promoting Studia Islamika, an international journal published by the Center. This is the second Studia Islamika conference, and this event is expected to be held regularly in the future. In the coming conference, scholars and students on Southeast Asian Islam are invited to present their papers, research and posters. Relevant themes and topics have been selected to accommodate different research interests of the participants.

The 2nd Studia Islamika International Conference 2017 will be held as a reflection on many different aspects related to Southeast Asia. It is to look at current political trends, religious radicalism, the development of democracy, and global trends. Southeast Asia has experienced tremendous changes since its formation until today. It achieved one of the highest economic developments in the world while faith and ethnicity still play an important role in the political field. This conference will explore these various developments in the context of globalization and democratization. Theories and new research findings on Southeast Asia will be explored and discussed during the conference. The conference features research addressing the following topics:

  • Religious Radicalism: Approaches, Trends and Methods
  • Democracy, Citizenship and Identity
  • Religious Radicalism and Education
  • Globalization and Transnational Movements: Southeast Asian Islam and ISIS
  • Contemporary Islamic Economics and Tourism
  • Philanthropy and Civil Society
  • Women, Society and Representation
  • Social Media and the Contestation of the Public Sphere
  • Challenges of Urban Life: Food, Culture and Life Style
  • The Rise of Islamic Populism? Sectarian Politics in Contemporary Indonesia

Plus d’informations sur : http://conference.ppim.uinjkt.ac.id/

Early Views of Indonesia: Drawings from the British Library

Annabel Teh Gallop, Early Views of Indonesia: Drawings from the British Library, London : The British Library, Jakarta : Yayasan Lontar, 1995, p. 132.

Annabel Gallop’s bilingual book, Early Views of Indonesia: Drawings from the British Library, is now available free online. This book is the catalogue of an exhibition held in Jakarta in 1995 to mark the presentation to the National Library of Indonesia of a complete set of facsimile reproductions of 510 archaeological drawings of Indonesia in the British Library. The presentation was a gift from the British government to the people of the Republic of Indonesia to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Indonesian independence.

A lire sur : http://library.lontar.org/flipbooks/Early Views Of Indonesia/Early Views Of Indonesia.html#/1/

Recalling a forgotten kingdom in Venice Biennale

Recalling a forgotten kingdom in Venice Biennale by Helmi Yusof, 14/04/2017, The Business Times

Zai Kuning will be showcasing Dapunta Hyang: Transmission of Knowledge at the Singapore Pavilion of the 57th Venice Biennale from May 13 to Nov 26, 2017.

After18 years criss-crossing South-east Asia, Zai Kuning’s artistic journey is now going beyond the region to make a stop at the most important art event in the world: the Venice Biennale.

There, at the Singapore Pavilion in Arsenale, Zai is constructing a massive Phinisi ship out of rattan, string and beeswax. It will be 17 metres long – a metre perhaps for each year he’s spent exploring the history of Malays in South-east Asia – and it will be surrounded by 100 books that have been dipped in wax, never to be opened and read again, a metaphor for lost histories.

Since 1999, the artist has been obsessed with the meta-historical questions of: “Who am I? Where do I come from? Whom do I belong to? Whom do I answer to?” He’s less interested in issues of national identity and family genealogy than the broader field of the ethnogenesis and migration of Malays. The central figure in his research is Dapunta Hyang, the first ruler of the Srivijaya kingdom that dominated the Malay Archipelago from the 8th to the 12th century. As a Malay Buddhist, Dapunta Hyang also helped spread Buddhism throughout his kingdom.

At the Venice showcase, Zai will be putting up 30 photographic portraits of living mak yong performers on a facing wall running parallel to the ship. An audio recording of a mak yong master speaking in an ancient Malay dialect will also be played on loop.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/lifestyle/arts/recalling-a-forgotten-kingdom-in-venice-biennale

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art: a Research Workshop with Tran Ky Phuong and Soumya James, 16/05/2017, CSEAS, SOAS.

Scholarship on ancient Khmer and Cham art evolved concomitantly with the French colonial project, and has long been grounded in archaeological and epigraphic study. This workshop presents new currents of research expanding the field. Tran Ky Phuong is the leading scholar of Cham art. After a first curatorial career at the Danang Museum of Cham Sculpture, he joined the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts, where he has launched research combining ethnographic and art historical methods. Soumya James represents a new generation of Southeast Asia art historians. Her work examines the representation of the divine feminine in cultural and eco-political landscape of Angkor.

Tran Ky Phuong is a former curator of the Museum of Cham Sculpture in Da Nang (1978-98); currently he is a senior research fellow with the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts; and is a researcher of the Center for Cultural Relationship Studies in Mainland Southeast Asia (CRMA Center) of Chulachomklao Royal Military Academic, Thailand and at APSARA Authority, Siem Reap, Cambodia; from 2012 until the present he has been a consultant of UNESCO World Cultural Heritages at My Son Sanctuary. He has awarded several research fellowships to study at International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden; Asia Research Institute (ARI) of National University of Singapore; Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts (CASVA), National Gallery of Arts, Washington DC.

He has published several books and articles in Vietnamese, English and Japanese, including: My Son in the History of Cham Art (1988); Vestiges of Champa Civilization (2008); Champa Iseki/Champa Ruins (co-author with Shige-eda Yutaku, 1997); The Cham of Vietnam: History, Society and Art (co-editor with Bruce Lockhart), NUS Press (2011); “The Architecture of Temple-Towers of Ancient Champa (Central Vietnam)” in Champa and the Archaeology of My Son, Vietnam (2009); “The Preservation and Management of the Monuments of Champa in Central Vietnam: The Example of My Son Sanctuary, a World Cultural Heritage Site”, in Rethinking Cultural Resource Management in Southeast Asia: Preservation, Development and Neglect (2011);“The new archaeological finds in Northeast Cambodia, Southern Laos and Central Highland of Vietnam: Considering on the significance of overland trading route and cultural interactions of the ancient kingdoms of Champa and Cambodia”, in Advancing Southeast Asian Archaeology 2013, SEAMEO SPAFA Regional Center for Archaeology and Fine Arts, Bangkok, Thailand (2015).

Soumya James is an independent Art Historian who studies premodern South and Southeast Asian art. She received her PhD in Art History from Cornell University. Her dissertation focused on the cultural and eco-political significance of the divine feminine at three Angkor period sites. Her research investigates the relationship between landscape and built form, gender and sexuality, and the art historical links between premodern South and Southeast Asia. Following her graduation, she continued her research while working as the coordinator for the Science and Society Programme at the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, India. She was a Postdoctoral Associate at the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities and a Fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center, both at Yale University. She is currently working on a book manuscript and planning her next fieldtrip to Cambodia.

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/16may2017-approaches-to-the-study-of-khmer-and-cham-art-a-research-workshop-with-tran-ky-phuong-and-.html

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java in ResearchWorks Archive of the University of Washington Libraries

The University of Washington Libraries collaborated with Anthropology Ph.D. student, Evi Sutrisno, who was conducting her dissertation field research on Chinese Indonesian Confucianism, to digitize the rare and fragile Sino-Malay literature owned by two temple libraries in Java. The first project was conducted in Boen Bio (Wen Miao) – a Confucian temple of Surabaya, East Java – in 2010-2011. The temple was founded in 1907 and had a collection of religious books and magazines in Chinese and Malay languages in its abandoned library. The second project was conducted in the Hok An Kiong temple, Muntilan, Central Java in 2014-2016. The temple was founded in 1898 and had became the religious, social and learning space for the Chinese in the area. As in the case of Boen Bio, the Hok An Kiong also has an abandoned library, where popular Sino-Malay novels and magazines were collected.

Between 1967 and1998 Confucian practices and Chinese identity were severely repressed under the Indonesian New Order regime, so these materials were hidden away in the corners of dark and humid storage rooms to avoid state confiscation. Due to climate conditions, biological pests, and lack of appropriate storage facilities, the collection was in great danger and in urgent need of preservation. These projects are parts of a larger effort to identify materials in all known collections belonging to temples and private collections in four cities: Jakarta/Tangerang, Bandung, Solo, and Pontianak, where the Confucian communities during the period of 1900s to 1940s were vibrant. The first project consists of about 5,000 pages scanned from the collections of the Boen Bio temple and three other private collections in Surabaya. The second digitizes about 12,500 pages from the collection of the Hok An Kiong temple in Muntilan. Each project has been done in collaboration with other scholars and the temple communities who are interested in preserving the precious documents and history of the Chinese-Indonesians. For the second project, Evi Sutrisno would like to thank Sutrisno Murtiyoso of Tarumanegara University, Jakarta, Endy Saputro of State College for Islamic Studies, Surakarta and Elizabeth Chandra of Keio University, Tokyo for their supports and collaborations. Thanks also to Laurie Sears for her decision to provide funding. For further description of the project and the importance of the materials preserved, see: Evi Sutrisno. Forgotten Confucian Periodicals in Indonesia, CORMOSEA Bulletin, no 34 (Summer 2016): 8-14.

Vous pouvez faire des recherches dans la collection et consulter la liste des deniers documents mis en ligne sur : https://digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/21474

River Cities: Water Space in Urban Development and History

River Cities: Water Space in Urban Development and History, 11-12/12/2017, Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia

Supported by the Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA), Airlangga University, and the International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden, the Netherlands

Conveners: Dr Paul Rabé, Adrian Perkasa (M.A.) and Dr Rita Padawangi

Deadline: 1 May 2017

Introduction

Cities and water can be said to have a love-hate relationship (1), and this is especially true of rivers in cities in Asia. Many Asian cities, like their cousins in the rest of the world, owe their locations to rivers and the trading opportunities and water sources these rivers provided.  In recent years, cities across China are beautifying their water fronts, and cities as diverse as Singapore and Seoul are turning their rivers into assets as part of urban redevelopment schemes or restoring them in an effort to bring nature back to the city. But many other cities in Asia have their backs turned to their rivers. Where rivers were once trading and transport arteries, nowadays many of them have suffered neglect as roads and evolving trading patterns have supplanted the rivers’ economic and social functions. Their decline has been accompanied by environmental destruction, as their waters have become polluted and serve as the dumping ground for solid waste. Moreover, riverbank settlements evolved into legally ambiguous spaces, as old settlements were detached from land formalization regimes and were subjected to environmental deterioration from the rivers. Far from being an asset, these rivers have become an eyesore—and occasionally also a threat, owing to flooding exacerbated by poor planning and a poor understanding of the place of these water bodies in the wider regional eco-system.

Symposium objectives

This symposium seeks to uncover the relationship between rivers and cities from a multi-disciplinary perspective in the humanities and the social sciences. The symposium welcomes both scholars and practitioners. It aims to contribute innovative ways of thinking about how to better integrate rivers, creeks and canals—including their environmental, historical, social, political, cultural and economic dimensions—into the fabric of contemporary cities.  The focus is on cities in Asia, but papers on other parts of the world will also be considered if they make explicit their relevance to Asian cities.

Papers are welcomed in four categories of investigation:

  1. Rivers and cities in historical perspective (history, heritage, culture, and geography)
  2. Neighborhoods and social life of riverine communities
  3. Evaluating experiences with riverfront and riverbank settlement and design interventions in Asia
  4. Urban policy perspectives and innovations

Plus d’informations sur : http://iias.asia/event/river-cities-water-space-urban-development-history

Iswadi Pratama, an auteur of Indonesian theatre

Iswadi Pratama, an auteur of Indonesian theatre by Caranissa Djatmiko, 12/04/2017, Inside Indonesia

Indonesia’s foremost theatre director, the internationally acclaimed Iswadi Pratama, staged an extraordinary eight productions in 2016.

There is no simple way of describing Iswadi Pratama. He claims to be a self-taught artist, yet his exceptional talents seem to suggest otherwise. Having spent most of his life bringing realities to the stage he insists that he only has the books he reads (stacked quite untidily at his private library) and the mentors who have guided him in the past to thank. Yet, after staging eight ambitious productions in 2016, it would be hard to dispute the fact that he has revolutionised Indonesian theatre.

The 45-year old poet and theatre director always knew that art was his true calling. He considers it to be the only space where he can express himself unapologetically, while also being a vehicle for helping others. ‘Everything that I do is motivated by an awareness that art must make people find their turning points in life,’ he says. ‘So I always choose projects based on [various] priorities: to what extent do the people involved in a certain program require my ability and capacity, and the relevance of it to my creative work and my vision regarding social transformation.’

Pratama’s plays have been showcased around the globe. His play Nostalgia di Sebuah Kota (Nostalgia in a City) was translated and performed in Germany in 2010. He has worked with some of the best artists in the world including American director Julie Taymor (Frida, The Lion King stage musical) who mentored Pratama when he became the first Indonesian to be a part of the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/iswadi-pratama-an-auteur-of-indonesian-theatre

The Sixth International Symposium On The Languages Of Java

The Sixth International Symposium on the Languages of Java, 18-19/05/2017, Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia

Keynote Speakers:
Zane Goebel (La Trobe University)
Hartono Samidjan (Suara Merdeka)

Co-sponsors:
Universitas Dian Nuswantoro
University of Maryland
University of Iowa
University of British Columbia

Co-organizers:
Thomas Conners, University of Maryland
William Davies, University of Iowa
Jozina Vander Klok, University of British Columbia

Programme :