Archives par mot-clé : Thaïlande

Will democracy in the Philippines go the way of Thailand?

Will democracy in the Philippines go the way of Thailand? by Michael Vatikiotis, 14/09/2017, The Economist

Rodrigo Duterte bears many similarities to Thaksin Shinawatra

WHEN Filipinos attempt to explain the political success of their tough-guy president, Rodrigo Duterte, they tend to point to local precursors. Joseph Estrada, a former matinée idol who had often played Robin Hood types, rose to the presidency by promising to be hard on bad guys and good to the poor. And then there is Ferdinand Marcos, who cultivated an image as a war hero to win election before assuming dictatorial powers, and whose reputation Mr Duterte is doing his best to restore.

Both these comparisons make Mr Duterte’s knack of casting himself as a friend of the people while giving short shrift to the niceties of democracy seem like a function of Philippine politics, in which populists occasionally attempt to stir up resentment against the hereditary caste of landowners who dominate government and the economy. After all, despite regular elections and much talk of reform, the 40 best-connected families still control about three-quarters of the Philippines’ wealth. Poverty is equally entrenched, as a visit to Manila’s slums or the southern, partly Muslim island of Mindanao makes clear.

But the Philippines is not the only country in South-East Asia with an entrenched establishment presiding over profound inequality. Most are blighted by single-party rule, or by a political churn which does not seem to have much impact on local power structures. Thailand, with a monarchy manipulated by the elites, is a case in point. The purpose of 12 military coups, two in the past 12 years, has been, as Michael Vatikiotis argues in “Blood and Silk”, a perceptive new book on the region, to maintain “an imposing if arcane edifice of power and [cultivate] a conservative mindset that has prevented the devolution of power and autonomy to ordinary people.”

Lire la suite sur : https://www.economist.com/news/asia/21728953-rodrigo-duterte-bears-many-similarities-thaksin-shinawatra-will-democracy-philippines-go?frsc=dg%7Ce

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 22 (September 2017)

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, n° 22 (September 2017)

Thai cosmic politics : locating power in a diverse kingdom

Table of contents

  • Thai cosmic politics : locating power in a diverse kingdom by Edoardo Siani
  • In the name of the people : magic and the enigma of health governance in Thailand by Daena Funahashi
  • Land and lordship : royal devotion, spirit cults and the geo-body by Andrew Alan Johnson
  • « Raya kita » : Malay Muslims of Southern Thailand and the King by Annusorn Unno
  • A Christmas mourning : catholicism in post-Bhumibol Thailand by Giuseppe Bolotta
  • Good, clean mourning in Thailand cosmopolitan cosmos by Matthew Philipps

A lire sur : https://kyotoreview.org/

 

Malay manuscripts from Patani

« Malay manuscripts from Patani » by Annabel Teh Gallop, 04/08/2017, Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library)

Patani is a culturally Malay-Muslim region located on the northeast coast of the Malay peninsula, in the southern part of Thailand. It has long been renowned as a cradle of Malay art and culture, and especially as a centre for Islamic learning, with close links with the Holy Cities of Arabia. Patani has produced many notable Islamic scholars, the most prominent being Daud bin Abdullah al-Patani (1769-1847), who lived and wrote in Mecca in the first half of the 19th century. scholars, and Wan Ahmad al-Patani (1856-1908), the first Superintendent of the Malay press in Mecca. Patani is one of the great centres of the Malay manuscript tradition, and many manuscripts from Patani are now held in the National Library of Malaysia and the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur.

The British Library holds two manuscripts probably from Patani, both of which may have been copied very recently, and which have been fully digitised. One contains a well-known Malay tale, Hikayat Raja Khandak dan Raja Badar (Or.16128), set during the early wars of Islam, in which the eponymous villain, Raja Khandak (known in some versions as Raja Handak or Raja Handik) and his son Raja Badar battle against the forces of the Prophet. It was a very popular story, and is also found in Javanese, Sundanese, Acehnese and Makassar versions.

The second manuscript aquired from the same source, Or. 16129, consists of only 11 folios and contains an unidentified religious work (or fragment of a work) by Imām Aḥmad (the Sunni jurist Aḥmad bin Ḥanbal, 780-855) on the shahādah (profession of faith), set within frames with a commentary written in the margins. The main text has a colophon stating that it was written on 24 Muharam 1[2]60 (14 February 1844) in Mecca. This manuscript is also written in a small neat hand with a ‘modern’ feel, but in this case modern influences are clearly manifest in the use of certain punctuation elements such as brackets and numbered points within the text, indicating a date of production in the 20th century and perhaps even suggesting that the manuscript might have been copied from a printed source.

Lire la suite et accéder aux manuscrits sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2017/08/malay-manuscripts-from-patani.html?

Deep South ‘Patani arts’ opens in the North

« Deep South ‘Patani arts’ opens in the North » by Kong Rithdee, 20/07/2017, Bangkok Post

A major contemporary art exhibition about the Deep South is on display at a museum in Chiang Mai, one of the biggest gatherings of artists from the region, with the addition of others whose works touch on the stories of conflicts and violence in the southernmost provinces.

« Patani Semasa » opened last night at MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum in San Kamphaeng, Chiang Mai. It features 27 artists who work in painting, photography, installation pieces and video art.

The majority are from « Patani », the generic and historic name of the provinces of the Deep South. Many are women, and while the exhibition generally showcases the development of contemporary art in the region, the dominant theme at this show is the loss, reflection and hope that come with the protracted unrest plaguing the region for decades, particularly since 2004.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.bangkokpost.com/lifestyle/art/1290594/deep-south-patani-arts-opens-in-the-north

 

“Never take the unchanging province for granted”

ASEAN Film Festival winner Kirsten Tan: “Never take the unchanging province for granted”, 26/07/2017, The Isaan Record

A weary man approaches the camera, his purple umbrella barely reaching the eyes of the elephant beside him. There is no rain for the umbrella, but it shields him from the harsh sun as he travels from the country’s urban center to a rural border province in Isaan. The journey is demanding, not just physically but emotionally in a trip down memory lane.

Pop Aye, the debut feature by Kirsten Tan, a Singaporean filmmaker based in New York, follows a Bangkok architect’s journey to his hometown in Loei Province. The protagonist, Thana, explores his past amidst a midlife crisis alongside his childhood companion, the film’s titular elephant.

Tan was raised in Singapore and lived in South Korea and Thailand before moving to New York. She completed a Master’s in Film Production at New York University. Her work has been showcased in over 40 international film festivals, including Sundance Film Festival 2017, where Pop Aye won the Special Jury Prize in Screenwriting.

In May, Pop Aye went on to win the Grand Jury Prize at ASEAN Film Festival 2017 in Bangkok, where the film premiered in Thailand.

The Isaan Record talks to Tan about Pop Aye’s portrayal of the urban-rural divide in Thailand and the nostalgia Thana and Pop Aye’s travels evoke.

Lire la suite sur : http://isaanrecord.com/2017/07/26/asean-film-festival-kirsten-tan/

Thai Art Archives

Thai Art Archives

Thai Art Archives is an independent, not-for-profit « knowledge platform » for the recovery, study, preservation, and exhibition of Thai modern and contemporary art and ephemera.

Welcome to Thailand’s only heritage-preservation organization that actively identifies, collects, catalogues, preserves, and exhibits the historically valuable ephemera—professional documents, personal papers, photographs, notebooks, sketchbooks and other studio-based items—of Thailand’s renowned modern and contemporary artists, independent/artist-run (« alternative ») art spaces, and related Thai “avant-garde” phenomena.

Unlike primary works of art, such as painting and sculpture, comparatively “ephemeral” materials are frequently lost or destroyed on the passing of a prominent Thai artist, or even during her/his lifetime. Given this potential loss to Thai cultural heritage, the Thai Art Archives’ mission is to proactively identify, recover, study, document, and preserve such materials for the benefit of future generations.

  • Exhibitions (Modern & Contemporary)
  • Educational & Public Events/Programs
  • Curatorial & Museum Studies for University Students
  • Student Internships
  • Knowledge Hub & Research Platform
  • Residencies for Visiting Scholars
  • Oral History Initiative
  • Publications, Special Projects, Cataloguing
  • Cataloguing of Private Collections

The Thai Art Archives aims in all its programs to explore and enrich cultural exchange, to promote global access to transcultural histories, and to encourage regional and international dialogues over the research into, the writing, and the documentation of diverse perspectives on the most progressive currents in modern and contemporary art since the early 20th century to the present.

A explorer sur : http://www.thaiartarchives.mono.net/

Thailand’s triple threat: culture, politics, and security

Podcast : Panel on Nicholas Farrelly’s « Thailand’s triple threat: culture, politics, and security », 30/06/2017, New Mandala

New Mandala co-founder Nicholas Farrelly joined an expert panel comprising Tyrell Haberkorn (ANU), Sunai Phasuk (Human Rights Watch), and John Blaxland (ANU) to discuss his paper, Thailand’s triple threat: culture, politics, and securityto be published by the Lowy Institute for International Affairs. The event was hosted by the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia, and was moderated by the Lowy Institute’s Matthew Busch.

The Lowy Institute have made audio available via SoundCloud, which can be played below.

A écouter sur : http://www.newmandala.org/panel-discussion-thailands-triple-threat-culture-politics-security/

The literary advancement before the 1932 Revolution

The first volume of Suphapburut magazine (photo from: Museum Thailand)

The literary advancement before the 1932 Revolution by Kittinun Klongyai, 04/07/2017, Prachatai

The 1932 Siamese Revolution was heralded in part by stories, novels and writing groups. The ideals of the People’s Party were nothing new, compared to movements that had already taken place in the literary field.

The 1930s in Thailand have been recognised as a time of change marking the transition from absolute monarchy to democracy, as well as the birth of the first constitution. But the power of writing was given to the people earlier than the power of self-rule. Works from the period are now, in some ways, memorial plaques of the literary revolution that contributed in turn to political revolt.

Revolutionary literature

Preedee Hongsaton, a historian teaching at Thammasat University, told Prachatai that literature must not only entertain, but also reflect the intellect, values, and perspectives of society, conveying efforts to strive towards progress and equality.

During the 1930s, a number of writing groups such as « The Gentleman » or Khana Suphapburut rooted their works in the ideal of equality, just as the People’s Party or Khana Ratsadon stated in their manifesto that, “Everyone will have work to do. Everyone will have equal rights and be free from the slavery of the aristocrats”.

The works of Kularb Saipradit Sri Burapha, the head of Khana Suphapburut, for instance, center around love between classes. “A Real Man” or Luk Phu Chai (1928) stood out in particular as a novel preaching that people should be judged by their own deeds, rather than their family’s fame.

The writer Sri Burapha, a pen-name, deconstructed Thailand’s class system by depicting villains from noble families, showing a disjuncture between class and virtue. Sri Burapha, however, was also skeptical of trends from the Western world, and played with them critically.

Lire la suite sur : http://prachatai.org/english/node/7248

Patani semasa : pameran seni dari Patani

Exhibition : Patani Semasa : Pameran Seni dari Patani, 19/07/2017 – 14/02/2018, MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum

An exhibition on contemporary art from the Golden Peninsula. Ranging from different time periods, works of art as well as cultural representations of the « Patani region » from 27 artists have been selected – both locals and those engaged with issues relevant to the area in question.

Voir : http://www.maiiam.com/exhibition/

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: Research among the Karen, Past and Present [Part 2]

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: « Research among the Karen, Past and Present » [Part 2]

Pia Jolliffe interviews anthropologist Mikael Gravers.

This week on Tea Circle, we’re pleased to feature a two-part interview with anthropologist Mikael Gravers, an expert on nationalism, ethnic conflict, and peace and reconciliation, with extensive experience working among Karen communities in Thailand and Myanmar. He is the author of a number of books on Burma/Myanmar, including Burma/Myanmar— Where Now?, Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Burma, and Nationalism as Political Paranoia in Burma. He is also a researcher on the project “Everyday Justice and Security in the Myanmar Transition”.

Lire l’article sur : https://teacircleoxford.com/2017/07/06/a-conversation-with-mikael-gravers-research-among-the-karen-past-and-present-part-2/

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: Research among the Karen, Past and Present [Part 1]

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: « Research among the Karen, Past and Present » [Part 1]

Pia Jolliffe interviews anthropologist Mikael Gravers.

This week on Tea Circle, we’re pleased to feature a two-part interview with anthropologist Mikael Gravers, an expert on nationalism, ethnic conflict, and peace and reconciliation, with extensive experience working among Karen communities in Thailand and Myanmar. He is the author of a number of books on Burma/Myanmar, including Burma/Myanmar— Where Now?, Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Burma, and Nationalism as Political Paranoia in Burma. He is also a researcher on the project “Everyday Justice and Security in the Myanmar Transition”.

Lire https://teacircleoxford.com/2017/07/05/a-conversation-with-mikael-gravers-research-among-the-karen-past-and-present-part-1/

 

Mounting threats to Thailand’s order

Thailand’s King Maha Vajiralongkorn watches the annual Royal Ploughing Ceremony in central Bangkok on May 12. © Reuters

Mounting threats to Thailand’s order by Nicholas Farrelly, 11/07/2017, Nikkei Asian Review

A new king, old generals and southern conflict play on country’s anxieties.

These are nervous times for Thailand. After the death in October of King Bhumibol Adyulyadej, and with his son King Maha Vajiralongkorn on the Chakri throne, anxiety about the country’s long-term direction is building among those who wonder whether the current crop of military rulers has any real appetite for surrendering control.

Since seizing power in May 2014, the generals have sought to stamp out dissent from groups aggrieved at the abandonment of democratic principles. The strongman Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha and his team worry that forces allied to deposed former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra still wait in the shadows for their chance to re-take power.

 For Prayuth, in his preferred role as guardian of the realm, this prospect encourages a blunt approach to opposing views. The defense of the new king — a man with a reputation for erratic behavior — has been steadfast. The country’s strict lese-majeste law is used to tackle critics and threaten those who question the orthodoxy of royalist-military dominance.

Prayuth’s alternative to free-flowing debate is a narrow vision of Thai values, ordained from on high and proliferated through a propaganda apparatus well-honed in the grim arts of manipulating public opinion. While much of the military’s attention focuses on what happens in Bangkok, there is no hiding from the darkest shadow hanging over the kingdom.

In the southernmost provinces of Yala, Pattani and Narathiwat a long-running conflict between local Malay-Muslims and the central government has seen over 6,500 deaths. In this war of attrition, the insurgency shows no signs of losing momentum: It has been regularly attacking symbols of Thai state authority since 2004. Attacks outside the Muslim rebellion’s usual zones of operation are a significant new development.

Lire la suite sur : http://asia.nikkei.com/Viewpoints/Nicholas-Farrelly/Mounting-threats-to-Thailand-s-order

The Anniversary of a Massacre and the Death of a Monarch

The Anniversary of a Massacre and the Death of a Monarch by Tyrell Haberkorn in The Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 76, n° 2 (mai 2017)

As part of this year’s anniversary of the October 6, 1976, massacre at Thammasat University, an outdoor exhibit of photographs of the violence and the three preceding years of student and other social movements was displayed upon the very soccer field in the center of campus where students were beaten, shot, lynched, and murdered forty years prior. Several of the photographs were printed on large sheets of acrylic and positioned such that the images of the buildings in the photographs were aligned with the actual buildings, which remain largely unchanged. The most striking of these was a photograph of hundreds of students stripped to the waist who were lying face down on the soccer field prior to being arrested and taken away. At the edge of the image was the top of the university’s iconic dome building, which lined up with the existing building. The organizers explained that their intention was “to reflect a perspective on the past through the eyes of people in the present in order to show the cruelty of humans to one another.” The proximity generated by the image was underlined by the fact that the fortieth anniversary of the massacre and coup in 1976 that led to twelve years of dictatorship was taking place under yet another dictatorship, that of a military junta calling itself the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO), which seized power on May 22, 2014, in the twelfth coup since the end of the absolute monarchy on June 24, 1932. Suchada Chakphisut, founding editor of Sarakadee magazine and Thai Civil Rights and Investigative Journalism, who was a first-year Thammasat student during the massacre, began her autobiographical account of the day, written for the anniversary this year, by writing: “We meet every year when 6 October comes around, and with it an inexplicable sadness always takes hold of my psyche. It has grown even more devastating since the 22 May 2014 coup, in which we must face the news of the arrest and detention of activists and those who oppose dictatorship.” This was not a commemoration after dictatorship such as those of the same era held in Argentina or Chile during recent years of democratization, but memories of dictatorship in situ.

A télécharger sur : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-asian-studies/article/anniversary-of-a-massacre-and-the-death-of-a-monarch/4FD9FA295086CE51B654BCAD342D1F88

A Lexicon of Repression in Thailand

A Lexicon of Repression in Thailand by Tyrell Haberkorn, 14/06/2017, AsiaNow (AAS blog)

In an essay for the May 2017 issue of the Journal of Asian Studies (“The Anniversary of a Massacre and the Death of a Monarch,” currently free to download), I reflect on the fortieth anniversary of the 6 October 1976 massacre, when state and para-state forces brutally murdered unarmed students at Thammasat University in Bangkok. Unresolved questions about the possible role of the institution of the monarchy in the massacre have been a primary factor both ensuring impunity for the perpetrators and constricting public discussion about the massacre. The anniversary events, held under the military regime of the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) and marked by calls for recognition of the humanity of those killed, directly challenged the ongoing impunity of the perpetrators of the massacre. One week after the anniversary, Rama IX, Bhumipol Adulyadej, died and the crown prince, Maha Vajiralongkorn, was named his successor as Rama X.

One of the primary features of the NCPO’s regime has been a sharp spike in prosecution of alleged cases of lèse-majesté, the very accusation used to catalyze the 6 October 1976 massacre. Rightists alleged that the students had staged a mock hanging of the crown prince. My JAS essay on the fortieth anniversary ends with what was then an open question about how the use of the accusation of lèse-majesté may or may not change during the reign of Rama X.

As another anniversary passes, the question is now a markedly less open one. On 22 May 2017, the third anniversary of the coup by the NCPO passed in Thailand. After three years of military rule and the naming of Maha Vajiralongkorn as Rama X, there are no signs of a return to democracy or a letup in the use of the accusation of lèse-majesté to quash dissent anytime soon.

The third anniversary of the 22 May 2014 coup by the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) passed as the vast majority of nearly 70 million Thais went to work and school as usual and the several million tourists who visit each month continued to flow across the borders into the country. But the veneer of daily life hides the quiet battle taking place between the NCPO and those who want to see a return to democracy. Rather than the streets that figured in previous anniversary protests, the very lexicon used to describe the NCPO’s rule is the new terrain of struggle. The NCPO would like to erase the keyword most central to its existence: “coup.”

Lire la suite sur : http://www.asian-studies.org/asia-now/entryid/58/a-lexicon-of-repression-in-thailand

Thailand’s 2010 crackdowns: truth for justice

Thailand’s 2010 crackdowns: truth for justice by Kwanravee Wangudom, 20/06/2017, New Mandala

On the 7th anniversary of the 2010 government crackdown on the Red Shirts, People’s Information Center for the April-May 2010 Crackdowns (PIC) has released an English-language edition of its original 1,398-page long fact-finding report, available for free download.

Truth for Justice, the original fact-finding report of the PIC, was published in Thai in 2012two years after the crackdown on the Red Shirts by the Abhisit Vejjajiva government, which resulted in over 90 deaths and 2,000 injuries. The report came out amidst growing criticisms towards the workings of the two major fact-finding bodies: the government-initiated Truth for Reconciliation Commission of Thailand (TRCT), headed by Kanit Na Nakorn; and the controversial National Human Rights Commission, chaired by Amara Pongsapich.

The aim of the PIC original fact-finding report is to document what occurred in the crackdown. PIC believes that this is the first step to ending the deeply-entrenched culture of impunity in Thailand.

The English-language edition, consisting of six selected chapters from the original report, with added clarifications, is produced in the hope that it will stimulate a wider global discussion on truth, justice and reconciliation in the deeply-divided Thai society, and perhaps elsewhere.

To access the PIC original fact-finding report (in Thai), click here.

For the English-language edition, please follow this link.

Kwanravee Wangudom is a human rights professional and activist. She is the Editor of the English translation of the report.

Voir : http://www.newmandala.org/2010-thai-crackdown-truth-justice/