Archives par mot-clé : Thaïlande

Manuscript Studies, vol. 2, n° 1, Spring 2017, Special Issue on Thai and Siamese Manuscripts Studies

Manuscript Studies : A Journal of the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, Vol. 2, N° 1, Spring 2017

Special Issue : Thai and Siamese Manuscripts Studies

The new Spring 2017 special issue constitutes the first major scholarly resource for the field of Thai and Siamese manuscripts studies. It examines collections and the history of collectors of these manuscripts, including rare and historically important ones, in Thailand and in major archives and museums around the world. Tracing the history of these collections and collectors provides new perspectives on the history of orientalism and on economic, religious, and diplomatic history.

Table of contents

  • Illuminating Archives: Collectors and Collections in the History of Thai Manuscripts by Justin McDaniel 
  • Henry D. Ginsburg and the Thai Manuscripts Collection at the British Library and Beyond by Jana Igunma
  • Cultural Goods and Flotsam: Early Thai Manuscripts in Germany and Those Who Collected Them by Barend Jan Terwiel
  • Thai Manuscripts in Italian Libraries: Three Manuscripts from G. E. Gerini’s Collection Kept at the University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ by Claudio Cicuzza
  • Manuscripts in Central Thailand: Samut Khoi from Phetchaburi Province by Peter Skilling and Santi Pakdeekham
  • Manuscripts from the Kingdom of Siam in Japan by Toshiya Unebe
  • The Chester Beatty Collection of Siamese Manuscripts in Ireland by Justin McDaniel
  • Siamese Manuscript Collections in the United States by Susanne Ryuyin Kerekes and Justin McDaniel

Pour plus d’informations voir : http://mss.pennpress.org/home/

TRANSNATIONALISM AND ITS LIMITS: MOBILITY AND CONTEMPORANEITY IN THAI ART

Tate Modern Talk : Transnationalism and its limits : mobility and contemporaneity in Thai art, 22 June 2017, Tate Modern

Hear David Teh, author of Thai Art: Currencies of the Contemporary​, discuss the possibilities and constraints of transnationalism.

In this seminar, David Teh gives artistic mobility a discrete history with reference to the contemporary art of Thailand, a nation on edge after decades of sovereign insecurity, economic boom and bust, and constitutional meltdown. While Thai artists reflect these tribulations in their work, since the 1990s many have downplayed their identity and become conspicuously mobile. What can their excursions tell us about the transnationalism of contemporary art? Their mobility allows them to dodge local limitations, but it also recalls a much older spatial imaginary, a worldliness that is no symptom of art’s globalisation but a condition of its possibility.

Teh’s paper is followed by a response from May Adadol Ingawanij. The subsequent panel discussion is chaired by Lucy Steeds.

Biographies

May Adadol Ingawanij is a moving image theorist and curator. She is currently writing a book titled Animistic Cinema: Moving Image Performance and Ritual in Thailand. Her publications include Long Walk to Life: the Films of Lav Diaz (2015); Animism and the Performative Realist Cinema of Apichatpong Weerasethakul, (2013). May’s curatorial projects include Lav Diaz Journeys (London, 2017), and Attachments and Unknowns (Phnom Penh, 2017). She teaches at CREAM, University of Westminster.

Lucy Steeds is Reader in Art Theory and Exhibition Histories at Central Saint Martins (CSM), University of the Arts London (UAL). She is Senior Research Fellow for Afterall at CSM – leading on the Exhibition Histories strand – and she teaches on the MRes Art: Exhibition Studies course. Her recent books include The Curatorial Conundrum (co-edited with Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson), MIT Press, 2016; and Exhibition (for the Documents of Contemporary Art series), Whitechapel Gallery and MIT Press, 2014.

David Teh is a curator and researcher based at the National University of Singapore. His essays have appeared in Afterall Journal, Third Text, ARTMargins and Theory, Culture and Society, and his book Thai Art: Currencies of the Contemporary was published this year by MIT Press. His most recent curatorial project, Misfits: Pages from a loose-leaf modernity, is showing at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin until 3 July.

Voir : http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/talk/transnationalism-limits

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank by Denis D. Gray, 16/04/2017, Nikkei Asian Review

Evolution of Thai northern city into creative hub fuels hopes of gaining UNESCO status.

The millions of tourists who flock to the ancient, mountain-ringed city of Chiang Mai in northern Thailand might not immediately notice, but the alleys, riversides and Bohemian cafes here are percolating with striking imagery, innovative design and digital wizardry. It is a heady brew that has prompted some to predict a real explosion — a creative one, that is.

The city is already home to more than 40 art galleries and a world-class contemporary arts museum, with others planned. It hosts design and arts festivals and was listed on a widely consulted digital nomad website as No. 1 of 991 places in the world for roving techies to plug in their computers. A creative resource guide to the city runs to 199 pages, focusing on venues ranging from the Wandering Moon Theater to Chiang Mai University’s College of Arts, Media and Technology.

Among a growing base of arts enthusiasts, Chiang Mai has become Thailand’s Left Bank, a part of Paris long known for its artistic and intellectual community.

Lire la suite sur : http://asia.nikkei.com/Life-Arts/Arts/Chiang-Mai-Thailand-s-modern-day-Left-Bank?page=1

Payut Ngaokrachang: cartoons for the United States Information Service

Payut Ngaokrachang: cartoons for USIS, Part 1, 24/01/2017, propagandainsoutheastasia

Payut Ngaokrachang was a Thai cartoonist who worked for most of his career with the United States Information Service (USIS). He was originally from a rural background, born in Wako, in the province of Prachuap Khiri Khan. In 1955 Payut created his first animated short film, Haed Mahasajan [The Miracle Incident] in which a traffic policeman causes a pile up due to some questionable dancing on the job. According to Jonathan Clements, Payut was subsequently spotted by USIS who awarded him roughly $400 and the opportunity to spend 6 months either at the Walt Disney Studios in California or Toei in Japan. He chose the later, meaning he was in many ways there at the very start of the Japanese anime industry. His time there resulted in his first (and as it happens last) propaganda film, completed in 1957.

Hanuman in Danger

Hanuman Phachoen Phai [Hanuman in danger], takes its principal character from the Ramayana, a classic Hindu epic that is also the basis for the classic Thai text the Ramakien. Hanuman, who is the God-King of the apes, was one of major characters who fought with Rama [Phra Ram] against the Devil King Ravana [Totsapak], and is therefore highly revered. In the propaganda film, Hanuman is depicted with a white face, and is based in the countryside. The film starts with him at home as his sons watch the television. They are watching a dancing competition, commenting on the prettiness of female dancer, when her partner the screen morphs from a handsome young man into a brutal looking dictator, who begins to spout what is supposed to be Communist ideology. He instructs the audience that they no longer need to respect their mothers, fathers, religion or King Rama [Phra Ram].

Lire la suite sur : https://propagandainsoutheastasia.wordpress.com/

Web of relations in the Moken’s world

Web of relations: the way of giving, taking and reciprocating in the Moken’s world by Narumon Arunotai, 28/04/2017, Chulalongkorn University

This talk reflects diverse worldviews of different groups towards a cluster of islands in southwestern Thailand, namely Surin Islands in Phang-nga Province.  It also reflects how government policies are based on certain set of worldviews about “nature”.  Surin Islands have been a home, stopover point, foraging ground and burial site for the Moken indigenous people for centuries.  The Moken have mobile homes and their residence are on different islands in the Mergui archipelago, from the present day southern Myanmar to southern Thailand.   At the start of Thai state dominant power on the Surin Islands, the surrounding waters fell into a concession of petroleum exploration issued to a private foreign company.  Later it was proposed as a site for Indochina refugee camp, but the proposal was rejected by the Royal Forestry Department.   In 1984, state power is more apparent as the Islands have been declared a Marine National Park with supporting budget and resources.  Later a unit under the Department of Fisheries and another under Royal Thai Navy have been established.  Though all of these groups share their lives (or part of their lives) on Surin Islands, their worldviews and their missions/mandates towards “nature” on the Islands are quite different.  Through looking at the web of relations, especially the way of giving, taking and reciprocating in the Moken’s world, we can understand the mode of thinking, practicing, and policying of other units and groups undertaking their “duties” on the Islands as well.

The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand

Angela S. Chiu, The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand, University of Hawaii Press, 2017

For centuries, wherever Thai Buddhists have made their homes, statues of the Buddha have provided striking testament to the role of Buddhism in the lives of the people. The Buddha in Lanna offers the first in-depth historical study of the Thai tradition of donation of Buddha statues. Drawing on palm-leaf manuscripts and inscriptions, many never previously translated into English, the book reveals the key roles that Thai Buddha images have played in the social and economic worlds of their makers and devotees from the fifteenth to twentieth centuries.

Author Angela Chiu introduces stories from chronicles, histories, and legends written by monks in Lanna, a region centered in today’s northern Thailand. By examining the stories’ themes, structures, and motifs, she illuminates the complex conceptual and material aspects of Buddha images that influenced their functions in Lanna society. Buddha images were depicted as social agents and mediators, the focal points of pan-regional political-religious lineages and rivalries, indeed, as the very generators of history itself. In the chronicles, Buddha images also unified the Buddha with the northern Thai landscape, thereby integrating Buddhist and local conceptions of place. By comparing Thai Buddha statues with other representations of the Buddha, the author underscores the contribution of the Thai evidence to a broader understanding of how different types of Buddha representations were understood to mediate the “presence” of the Buddha.

The Buddha in Lanna focuses on the Thai Buddha image as a part of the wider society and history of its creators and worshippers beyond monastery walls, shedding much needed light on the Buddha image in history. With its impressive range of primary sources, this book will appeal to students and scholars of Buddhism and Buddhist art history, Thai studies, and Southeast Asian religious studies.

Voir : http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9745-9780824858742.aspx

The Rise of the Octobrists in Contemporary Thailand

Kanokrak Lertchoosakul, The Rise of the Octobrists in Contemporary Thailand : Power and Conflict Among Former Left-Wing Student Activists in Thai Politics, Yale Southeast Asia Studies Monograph #65, 2017

This book chronicles the history of the “Octobrist” students in Thai politics from the 1970s to the present. It examines the reasons why these former leftist student activists have managed to remain a significant force over the past three decades despite the collapse of left-wing politics in Thailand at both the national and international levels. At the same time, it asks why the Octobrists have become increasingly divided, particularly during the last decade’s protracted conflict in Thai politics. In addition, it fills in gaps in studies of leftists in transition at the global level on the question of the historical development of leftist and progressive forces in the post–Cold War era. The book is also important for readers interested in social movement theory, demonstrating how it has influenced political actors outside the boundaries of typical social movements. Finally, political opportunity structure, resource mobilization theory, and the framing process are used to conduct a  comprehensive analysis of the origins, emergence, and transformation of the Octobrists in contemporary Thai politics.

Kanokrat Lertchoosakul completed her PhD in government at the London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom. She is a lecturer in the Faculty of Political Science, Department of Government, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Voir : http://cseas.yale.edu/rise-octobrists

Sin Cities: Unlock Bangkok with Prabda Yoon

Sin Cities: Unlock Bangkok with Prabda Yoon, 13/03/2017, Asia House, London

Sponsored by Cockayne Grants for the Arts, a donor advised fund of the London Community Foundation, Asia House introduces its brand new series, Sin Cities: Vice & Virtue Across Asia’s Urban Landscapes, with Unlock Bangkok with Prabda Yoon.

Translated from the Thai by Mui Poopoksakul and published in English for the first time by Tilted Axis Press, Prabda Yoon’s new collection of postmodern short-stories titled The Sad Part Was will be launched at this entertaining talk chaired by Rachel Harrison, Professor of Thai Cultural Studies at SOAS.

Winner of a PEN Translates grant and selected as a “a book to look for in 2017” by The Guardian and BuzzFeed Books, The Sad Part Was comprises twelve highly literary and entrancing short-stories which deliver narratives that offer an oblique reflection of contemporary Bangkok life, exploring the bewildering contradictions of a modernity that is mismatched with many traditional Thai ideas on relationships, family, school and work.

They dip into pop culture, push the boundaries of punctuation, dally with sci-fi and, in a metafictional twist, mock Yoon’s own position as omnipotent author. Don’t be fooled by the title, you’re guaranteed to crack a smile!

Voir : http://asiahouse.org/events/sin-cities-unlock-bangkok-prabda-yoon/

Page chez l’éditeur : http://www.tiltedaxispress.com/the-sad-part-was/

Péninsule, no. 72, 2016 (1)

Péninsule, no. 72, 2016 (1)

Sommaire

I. Rencontres et échanges

Avec le monde indo-musulman

  • À propos des musulmans et d’Ayudhya (1350-1767) par Gilles Delouche
  • Le chant occulte des pantouns, interprétations de poèmes malais dans l’œuvre d’Henri Fauconnier par Yann Quero

Entre nationalismes asiatiques

  • Bùi Quang Chiêu à Calcutta (1928), le miroir brisé des nationalismes vietnamien et indien par Agathe Larcher-Goscha

II. Dents noires et sang rouge : représentations et interdits

  • Le chasseur, sa femme et les interdictions par Bernard Dupaigne
  • Le noircissement des dents chez les chiqueurs de bétel vietnamiens. Quelques observations préliminaires de la documentation par Nguyen Xuân Hiên, Jane D. Chang & Margret J. Vlaar

Comptes rendus

Plus d’informations sur : http://peninsule.free.fr/pages/peninsule_72pag.html