Archives par mot-clé : Politique

Careful What You Wish For: Salafi Islamisation and the Shifting Structures of the Malaysian State

Lily Zubaidah Rahim, « Careful What You Wish For: Salafi Islamisation and the Shifting Structures of the Malaysian State », 31/05/2017, ANU Malaysia Institute

Abstract

Malaysia appears to be fragmenting under the weight of salafiIslamisation – threatening the country’s secular and democratic constitutional foundations. Initially instigated by state-led Islamisation initiatives under the Mahathir administration, the promotion of salafi Islam has become increasing assertive, particularly since the 2013 general elections. In this election, the UMNO-led Barisan Nasional (BN) government lost the popular vote. More recently, UMNO and the conservative opposition Islamist party PAS have attempted to introduce hudud (sharia penal code) legislation through the Federal parliament – further reconstructing the character of the post-colonial state. The lecture examines Malaysia’s salafiIslamisation in conjunction with the broader socio-political and economic pressures confronting the ruling BN government. The ambiguous and fragmented responses of the predominantly Muslim-led opposition parties (Amanah, Parti Keadilan Rakyat and Bersatu) towards salafi Islamisation will also be considered. After sixty years of independence, Malaysians continue to be challenged by the following questions: What is the constitutional status of sharia law?; How should the dual legal jurisdictions (civil and codified sharia) be managed?; Can traditional interpretations of sharia genuinely accommodate principles such as citizenship rights, gender equality and democratic constitutionalism?

Bio-profile

Lily Zubaidah Rahim is an Assoc Professor at the Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney. She is a specialist in authoritarian governance, ethnic politics and democratisation in Southeast Asia and political Islam in Muslim-majority states. Her publications include The Singapore Dilemma: The Political and Educational Marginality of the Malay Community, (Oxford University Press 1998/2001; translated to Malay by the Malaysian National Institute for Translation); Singapore in the Malay World: Building and Breaching Regional Bridges (Routledge, 2009); Muslim Secular Democracy (PalgraveMacmillan, 2013) and The Politics of Islamism: Diverging Visions and Trajectories(PalgraveMacmillan, 2017, Forthcoming). Lily is completing her fifth book on governance reform in Singapore. She has published in international journals such as Democratization,Contemporary Politics, Journal of Contemporary Asia andAustralian Journal of International Affairs. Her sole-authored journal article ‘Governing Muslims in Singapore’s Secular Authoritarian State’ was short-listed for the Boyer Prize by the Australian Journal of International Affairs (AJIA) in 2011.

Voir : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/cap-events/2017-05-31/careful-what-you-wish-salafi-islamisation-and-shifting-structures-malaysian

Ahok’s defeats and public debate in Indonesia

Ward Berenschot, Ahok’s defeats and public debate in Indonesia, 18/05/2017, New Mandala

Basuki Thahaja Purnama’s (‘Ahok’) electoral defeat in Jakarta’s gubernatorial election on 19 April was stunning in itself. And then Jakarta’s sitting governor was dealt a further blow on 9 May when he was convicted to a two year jail sentence for blasphemy. Both events are a setback for those campaigning for a tolerant and pluralist Indonesia. As the election campaign focused on Ahok’s Chinese-Christian background and the purported threat he posed to Islam, the election results and the subsequent court ruling suggest that the appeal and the power of hardliner Islamic organisations is growing.

So far the interpretations of these events have focused on the considerations of Indonesian voters. Some attributed Ahok’s electoral defeat to a growing concern about social inequality, pointing to his low vote-share among poor Jakartans. Others focused on the impact that religious identity has on voting behaviour. Compared to other groups, Muslims were much less likely to vote for Ahok. These views suggest that a complex interplay of class and religion brought about Ahok’s defeat.

These analyses all focus on the considerations that individual voters may have. But at least as significant is what Ahok’s defeat says about the character of public debate in Indonesia. The Jakarta elections and Ahok’s conviction throw up a number of puzzles that suggest that we need to take a closer look at how public opinion is shaped, and by whom. The nature of Ahok’s defeat raises concerns about the increasingly closed character of Indonesia’s public sphere, and points to the importance of informal, personal networks in spreading and legitimising ideas.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/ahoks-defeats-say-public-debate-indonesia/

The Rise of the Octobrists in Contemporary Thailand

Kanokrak Lertchoosakul, The Rise of the Octobrists in Contemporary Thailand : Power and Conflict Among Former Left-Wing Student Activists in Thai Politics, Yale Southeast Asia Studies Monograph #65, 2017

This book chronicles the history of the “Octobrist” students in Thai politics from the 1970s to the present. It examines the reasons why these former leftist student activists have managed to remain a significant force over the past three decades despite the collapse of left-wing politics in Thailand at both the national and international levels. At the same time, it asks why the Octobrists have become increasingly divided, particularly during the last decade’s protracted conflict in Thai politics. In addition, it fills in gaps in studies of leftists in transition at the global level on the question of the historical development of leftist and progressive forces in the post–Cold War era. The book is also important for readers interested in social movement theory, demonstrating how it has influenced political actors outside the boundaries of typical social movements. Finally, political opportunity structure, resource mobilization theory, and the framing process are used to conduct a  comprehensive analysis of the origins, emergence, and transformation of the Octobrists in contemporary Thai politics.

Kanokrat Lertchoosakul completed her PhD in government at the London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom. She is a lecturer in the Faculty of Political Science, Department of Government, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Voir : http://cseas.yale.edu/rise-octobrists

BIES: Read our latest free-access collection

BIES: Read our latest free-access collection

Each year, the editors of the Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies (BIES) make six recently published articles free to access online. Their selections for 2017 are below.

Jokowi and the New Developmentalism by Eve Warburton
December 2016 (52.3)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1249262

Authoritarian Legacies in Post–New Order Indonesia: Evidence from a New Dataset by Sharon Poczter and Thomas B. Pepinsky April 2016 (52.1)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2015.1129051

 Village Governance, Community Life, and the 2014 Village Law in Indonesia by Hans Antlöv, Anna Wetterberg, and Leni Dharmawan
August 2016 (52.2)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00074918.2015.1129047

Consistency between Sakernas and the IFLS for Analyses of Indonesia’s Labour Market: A Cross-Validation Exercise by Sarah Xue Dong
December 2016 (52.3)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1228828

Could a Resource Export Boom Reduce Workers’ Earnings? The Labour-Market Channel in Indonesia by Ian Coxhead and Rashesh Shrestha
August 2016 (52.2)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1184745

How Robust Is Indonesia’s Poverty Profile? Adjusting for Differences in Needs by Jan Priebe
August 2016 (52.2)

 

Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, vol. 52, no. 3 (december 2016)

Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, vol. 52, no. 3 (december 2016)

Site : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cbie20/52/3

Table of contents

Survey of Recent Developments

  • Taxing Times in Indonesia: The Challenge of Restoring Competitiveness and the Search for Fiscal Space by Natasha Hamilton-Hart and Günther G. Schulze

Indonesian Politics in 2016

  • Jokowi and the New Developmentalism by Eve Warburton

Other Articles

  • The Macro Forecasting Record of the Indonesian Financial Authorities, 2004–15 by Lloyd R. Kenward
  • Consistency between Sakernas and the IFLS for Analyses of Indonesia’s Labour Market: A Cross-Validation Exercise by Sarah Xue Dong
  • The Development of Inequality and Poverty in Indonesia, 1932–2008 by Bas van Leeuwen and Péter Földvári

Book Reviews

Talking Indonesia – Indonesia at Melbourne

Podcast : Talking Indonesia sur le blog Indonesia at Melbourne

The Indonesia at Melbourne blog was launched in July 2015 to present analysis, research and commentary on contemporary Indonesia from academics and postgraduate students affiliated with the University of Melbourne. It aims to stimulate debate and provide a forum for exchange of information and opinion on current events in Indonesia.

The emphasis is on politics but the blog also covers law, anthropology, culture, history, economics, architecture and public health, reflecting the diversity of expertise on contemporary Indonesia at the university.

Indonesia at Melbourne is edited by Tim Mann. Professor Tim Lindsey, Director of CILIS, and Dr Dave McRae, from The Asia Institute, serve on the blog’s advisory board.

Plus d’informations sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/about/

In 2017, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University. Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes (link is external) or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

Talking Indonesia: Ahok, race, religion & democracy (part 2)

In the race for Jakarta’s next governor, Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama’s ethnic Chinese and Christian identity has become a controversial feature of the campaign. As Dave McRae discussed with Dr Nadirsyah Hosen in November, complaints from the Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) about comments Ahok made on the campaign trail late last year sparked a series of mass protests opposing the governor. Charges of blasphemy were eventually laid against Ahok and he is now on trial.

Ahok is the first ethnic Chinese governor of Jakarta and one of very few ethnic Chinese Indonesians to have reached positions of high public office since the fall of New Order. But just how much is the controversy around Ahok related to his ethnicity and religion and how much is it about popular politics in Indonesia today? How has Ahok’s own political style played a part? What does racism look like almost 20 years after the fall of the New Order?

Jemma Purdey discusses these issues and more with Professor Ariel Heryanto, formerly professor at the School of Culture, History and Language of Australian National University and the incoming Herb Feith professor for the study of Indonesia at Monash University.

Voir l’ensemble des épisodes sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/topic/talking-indonesia/

 

 

 

 

Stone dragging and politics in Sumba

Stone dragging and politics in Sumba by Jacqueline Vel, 10/02/2017, New Mandala

Jacqueline Vel takes a look at the revival of an extravagant and outdated burial tradition in eastern Indonesia, and why it may be a worrying sign for local democracy.

When I asked about the stone dragging, I was told that the person in charge of the huge event was Umbu Neka Jarawoli — the chairman of the district parliament in Central Sumba and member for the Democratic Party (Partai Demokrat).  It would seem that stone dragging has become the bedrock of his politicking…

What we see happening here is a local prominent man mixing traditional and modern means and symbols as part of his strategy to obtain the office of district head. This office is very important in Sumba, because it is the most powerful position in providing access to state resources like subsidies and employment opportunities, of which more than 90 per cent derives from the national government…

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/stone-dragging-politics-sumba/

Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, vol. 35, no. 3 (2016)

giga_philippines_duterte_july2016_reuters_erik_de_castro_rtx2j6zd

Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, vol. 35, no. 3 (2016)

The Early Duterte Presidency in the Philippines

Télécharger les PDF sur  : http://journals.sub.uni-hamburg.de/giga/jsaa

Table of contents

Introduction

Research Articles
  • The Dark Side of Electoralism: Opinion Polls and Voting in the 2016 : Philippine Presidential Election by Ronald D. Holmes
  • Bloodied Democracy: Duterte and the Death of Liberal Reformism in the Philippines by Mark R. Thompson
  • Duterte’s Resurgent Nationalism in the Philippines: A Discursive Institutionalist Analysis by Julio C. Teehankee
  • Politics of Anxiety, Politics of Hope: Penal Populism and Duterte’s Rise to Power by Nicole Curato
  • The Spectacle of Violence in Duterte’s “War on Drugs” by Danilo Andres Reyes
  • The Duterte Administration’s Foreign Policy: Unravelling the Aquino Administration’s Balancing Agenda on an Emergent China by Renato Cruz De Castro
  • Divided Politics and Economic Growth in the Philippines by Eric Vincent C. Batalla

Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 37, no. 3, december 2016

rpsj20-v037-i03-cover

Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 37, no. 3, december 2016

Table of contents

Articles

  • The relationship between IRA and local government expenditures: evidence from a cross-section of Philippine cities by Tristan Canare
  • The erosion of the political dominance of an entrenched political clan: the case of the Felix political clan of Cainta, Rizal by Raymund John P. Rosuelo
  • “The greatest workers of the world” : Philippine labor out-migration and the politics of labeling in Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo’s presidential rhetoric by Oscar Tantoco Serquiña Jr

Year-end Country Report

  • The Philippines in 2015: the calm before the political storm by Julio C. Teehankee

Book Reviews

Voir : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rpsj20/37/3

 

Divide and rule: the racist roots of Malaysia’s Redshirt movement

wh_53105143

« Divide and rule: the racist roots of Malaysia’s Redshirt movement » by Paul Millar, 03/01/2017, Southeast Asia Globe

With an election looming and the 1MDB scandal still hanging over Najib Razak’s head, the Redshirt movement has proved a useful pawn in silencing dissent.

Ross Tapsell, a lecturer and researcher at Australian National University’s College of Asia and the Pacific, said the Redshirt movement had been cynically created to drive a wedge between Malaysian voters.

“The Redshirts and their backers are trying to polarise Malaysian politics further, mostly on ethnic and religious grounds, by claiming the Bersih supporters, or ‘Yellowshirts’, are predominantly opposition voters of Chinese heritage, and the Redshirts are the ‘pro-Malay’ group,” he said.

Rather than allow Bersih’s demands for clean elections to resonate with the public, Tapsell said, the Redshirt movement had redrawn the battle lines into something more closely resembling a tribal brawl – with predictable consequences. “Bersih’s goals and the ethnic background of their supporters are much more diverse than the Redshirts give them credit for, but the effect has been to make these protests [about] free and fair elections to be more of a street ‘battle’ between coloured shirts of political parties – think Thailand,” he said.

According to Gerhard Hoffstaedter, a lecturer in anthropology at the University of Queensland and the author of Modern Muslim Identities: Negotiating Religion and Ethnicity in Malaysia, it is a tactic that has been used to stifle real reform for more than half a century.

“By collapsing important human rights issues and the demand for free elections into the racial politics that have dominated Malaysian politics since independence, the Redshirts aim to discredit universal claims to freedoms and mire their demand in a zero-sum game,” he said. “That game rests on pitting ethnic groups against each other and has proven a potent electoral tool.”

Lire la suite : http://sea-globe.com/malaysia-redshirt-movement/