Archives par mot-clé : Littérature

« Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash » by Eka Kurniawan

Eka Kurniawan, Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash by Tim Hannigan, 14/09/2017, Asian Review of Books

Eka Kurniawan is the Quentin Tarantino of Indonesian literature: a brash wunderkind, delivering gleeful references to pulp fiction, lashings of stylized violence, and an array of characters and scenarios that far surpass the tropes and clichés which inspire them. But as with Quentin Tarantino, one might occasionally wonder just how much substance lies beneath the indisputably stylish surface.

Vengeance is Mine, All Others Pay Cash (a peculiar rendering of the Indonesian title, Seperti Dendam, Rindu Harus Dibayar Tuntas, which might be better translated as “like revenge, longing must be paid in full”) is Kurniawan’s third novel to be translated into English. It follows his acclaimed debut, the surreal historical epic, Beauty is a Wound, and the short, sharp Man Tiger. As with the previous books there is plenty of sex, brutality and outrageous humor. But this time around there is no direct engagement with Indonesian history and few overtly supernatural elements. What we have instead is the violently quixotic odyssey of a man who can’t get an erection.

The book begins with the protagonist—street thug and sometime assassin Ajo Kawir—sitting on the edge of his bed, staring forlornly at his flaccid penis, “nestling like a newly hatched baby bird—curled into itself, looking hungry and cold”. And the opening dialogue is the first of Ajo Kawir’s many one-sided conversations with his unresponsive member:

He whispered to it, get up, Bird. Get up, you Wretch. You can’t just sleep forever. You have to get up. But that damn little bird didn’t want to get up.

Lire la suite sur : http://asianreviewofbooks.com/content/vengeance-is-mine-all-others-pay-cash-by-eka-kurniawan/

Spatializing Enlightened Civilization in the Era of Translating Vernacular Modernity: Colonial Vietnamese Intellectuals’ Adventure Tales and Travelogues, 1910s–1920s

« Spatializing Enlightened Civilization in the Era of Translating Vernacular Modernity: Colonial Vietnamese Intellectuals’ Adventure Tales and Travelogues, 1910s–1920s » by Yufeng Chang in The Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 73, n° 3, August 2017

This article examines the strategy of literary spatialization employed by colonial subjects to imaginatively engage with colonial civilizing projects. It analyzes twelve adventure stories written between the 1910s and 1920s by colonial Vietnamese reformed scholars, whose lives were impacted by the pan-Asian reform movements that swept Japan, China, and Vietnam between the 1860s and 1900s. They reflected their experiences with Enlightened civilization as they were pushing for vernacularization and modernization through translating the Chinese transculturation of Japanese texts into Latin-based quốc ngữ script while constructing a national literature. Adventure tales and travelogues were considered suitable for aspiring writers to translatively imitate Western literature as presented in Chinese translation of Japanese texts. The authors negotiated with the French version of Enlightened Civilization by employing two East Asian literary tropes: the dangerous but exciting Rivers-and-Lakes World, where the protagonist ventures to search for văn minh, and the peaceful and other-worldly Peach Blossom Spring utopia, where the true qualities of văn minh are realized. These stories reveal colonial subjects’ admiration for and anxiety regarding the French mission civilisatrice, and their literary efforts to imagine a Vietnamese văn minh that would both impress and surpass the original models.

Voir : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-asian-studies/article/spatializing-enlightened-civilization-in-the-era-of-translating-vernacular-modernity-colonial-vietnamese-intellectuals-adventure-tales-and-travelogues-1910s1920s/878B6571DC96BFDD288864B169756EA5

Viet Thanh Nguyen : Le sympathisant

Nouvelle parution : Viet Thanh Nguyen, Le sympathisant, Belfond, 2017

À la fois fresque épique, reconstitution historique et oeuvre politique, un premier roman à l’ampleur exceptionnelle, qui nous mène du Saigon de 1975 en plein chaos au Los Angeles des années 1980. Saisissant de réalisme et souvent profondément drôle, porté par une prose électrique, un véritable chef-d’oeuvre psychologique. La révélation littéraire de l’année.
Je suis un espion, une taupe, un agent secret, un homme au visage double.

Ainsi commence l’hallucinante confession de cet homme qui ne dit jamais son nom. Un homme sans racines, bâtard né en Indochine coloniale d’un père français et d’une mère vietnamienne, élevé à Saigon mais parti faire ses études aux États-Unis. Un capitaine au service d’un général de l’armée du Sud Vietnam, un aide de camp précieux et réputé d’une loyauté à toute épreuve.
Et, en secret, un agent double au service des communistes. Un homme déchiré, en lutte pour ne pas dévoiler sa véritable identité, au prix de décisions aux conséquences dramatiques. Un homme en exil dans un petit Vietnam reconstitué sous le soleil de L.A., qui transmet des informations brûlantes dans des lettres codées à ses camarades restés au pays. Un homme seul, que même l’amour d’une femme ne saurait détourner de son idéal politique…

SYMPATHISANT n. m. : personne qui approuve les idées et les actions d’un parti sans y adhérer.

Voir : http://www.belfond.fr/livre/litterature-contemporaine/le-sympathisant-viet-thanh-nguyen

Feminist Fiction From the Philippines, Written 50 Years Ago

« Feminist Fiction From the Philippines, Written 50 Years Ago » by Melissa Chadburn, 01/09/2017, The New York Times

To enter the world of “The Woman Who Had Two Navels and Tales of the Tropical Gothic,” your faith must bend to the following: Time travel exists. Shapeshifting is possible. And a woman could be in power.

Nick Joaquin is considered one of the Philippines’ greatest writers. By introducing him here, the publisher Elda Rotor continues her careful curation of Filipino classics for Penguin’s roster. With authoritarian threats surging in both his home country and the United States, Joaquin’s re-emergence feels especially timely. Born in 1917, and a young man during World War II, he depicts war’s effects on a population still capable of rebellious celebration. Fluent in Spanish, Tagalog, and street slang, Joaquin wrote in English but summoned a space between languages. He was not a joiner but a man of singular pursuits. “I have no hobbies, no degrees; belong to no party, club or association,” he once said. “I like long walks … Dickens and Booth Tarkington, the old Garbo pictures, anything with Fred Astaire.” He was also defiant, even against dictatorship: When he was named National Artist of the Philippines in 1976, he said he would accept the honor only if Ferdinand Marcos freed the imprisoned poet Jose F. Lacaba. Marcos obliged.

Drafted in an age of strongmen, during the first two decades of the country’s postcolonial period between 1946 and 1965, the 11 works collected in this volume — 10 stories and a play — read as feminist. The story “Three Generations” presents a battle of two masculine wills, but a woman’s inner life drives it: The patriarch is mystified “by a certain nakedness in his wife’s mind; in the minds of all women, for that matter. You took them for what they appeared: shy, reticent, bred by nuns, but after marriage, though they continued to look demure, there was always in their attitude toward sex, an amused irony, even a deliberate coarseness.” Though they may lack the trappings of external power, women maintain the emotional and sexual self-possession to direct Joaquin’s narrative outcomes.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/books/review/nick-joaquin-the-woman-who-had-two-navels-and-tales-of-the-tropical-gothic.html

The literary advancement before the 1932 Revolution

The first volume of Suphapburut magazine (photo from: Museum Thailand)

The literary advancement before the 1932 Revolution by Kittinun Klongyai, 04/07/2017, Prachatai

The 1932 Siamese Revolution was heralded in part by stories, novels and writing groups. The ideals of the People’s Party were nothing new, compared to movements that had already taken place in the literary field.

The 1930s in Thailand have been recognised as a time of change marking the transition from absolute monarchy to democracy, as well as the birth of the first constitution. But the power of writing was given to the people earlier than the power of self-rule. Works from the period are now, in some ways, memorial plaques of the literary revolution that contributed in turn to political revolt.

Revolutionary literature

Preedee Hongsaton, a historian teaching at Thammasat University, told Prachatai that literature must not only entertain, but also reflect the intellect, values, and perspectives of society, conveying efforts to strive towards progress and equality.

During the 1930s, a number of writing groups such as « The Gentleman » or Khana Suphapburut rooted their works in the ideal of equality, just as the People’s Party or Khana Ratsadon stated in their manifesto that, “Everyone will have work to do. Everyone will have equal rights and be free from the slavery of the aristocrats”.

The works of Kularb Saipradit Sri Burapha, the head of Khana Suphapburut, for instance, center around love between classes. “A Real Man” or Luk Phu Chai (1928) stood out in particular as a novel preaching that people should be judged by their own deeds, rather than their family’s fame.

The writer Sri Burapha, a pen-name, deconstructed Thailand’s class system by depicting villains from noble families, showing a disjuncture between class and virtue. Sri Burapha, however, was also skeptical of trends from the Western world, and played with them critically.

Lire la suite sur : http://prachatai.org/english/node/7248

Truth and Fiction in the Age of the Strongman: Filipino Writers on Rodrigo Duterte’s Philippines

Truth and Fiction in the Age of the Strongman: Filipino Writers on Rodrigo Duterte’s Philippines, 05/06/2017, SOAS

Miguel Syjuco & Candy Gourlay

This panel discussion looks at the interconnections between Philippine Fiction Writing and Journalism in the time of “tokhang,” schizophrenic populism and Duterte’s unique brand of nationalism. Filipino writers in the diaspora will seek to interrogate the ideas of Post-modernist knowledge construction and its end-games, activism and protest in a post-truth world and the role of fiction in a democracy.

Speaker Biography

Miguel Syjuco’s debut novel, Ilustrado (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010), won the Carlos Palanca Memorial Award for Literature, the Filipino Readers’ Choice Award, the Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction, and the Man Asian Literary Prize and has been translated into more than 10 languages. Miguel, who earned a PhD in literature from the University of Adelaide, was a writing fellow at the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard in 2013 and is currently a visiting professor in the Literature and Creative Writing department at New York University, Abu Dhabi. He is the literary editor of the Manila Review, a member of the Folio Prize Academy and regularly writes for the New York Times International.

Discussant Biography

Candy Gourlay  is a Filipino author based in the United Kingdom. Her debut novel Tall Story (2010) won the National Children’s Book Award of the Philippines in 2012 and the Crystal Kite Award for Europe in 2011. Tall Story was shortlisted for 13 prizes, notably: the Waterstone’s Children’s Book Prize and the Branford Boase Award. Her second novel Shine (2013) was long-listed for the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize. It won the Crystal Kite Award for the British Isles and Ireland in 2014. Candy was born and raised in the Philippines. From 1984 to 1989, she worked as a journalist in the Philippines, notably as a staff-writer and later associate editor of the weekly opposition tabloid Mr & Ms Special Edition, which played a significant role in the overthrow of the 21 year regime of Filipino dictator Ferdinand Marcos

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/05jun2017-truth-and-fiction-in-the-age-of-the-strongman-filipino-writers-on-rodrigo-dutertes-philipp.html

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem de Linus Suryadi A. G., vendredi 28 avril 2017 à 13h, Salon Peillot, Musée Guimet

Au programme, un long poème narratif en prose : « Confidences de Pariyem. L’univers d’une femme de Java » de l’indonésien Linus Suryadi AG (1951-1999).

« Confidences de Pariyem » a paru en 1981 à Jakarta. A travers les confidences de l’héroïne au jeune Païman, c’est une description rare et puissante de la vie quotidienne et des états d’âme d’une jeune fille de la fin des années 60 qui transparaît.
Embauchée dans une vieille famille noble de Yogyakarta, dernier bastion de l’héritage culturel des cours javanaises, Pariyem nous offre avec candeur, fierté et humour un saisissant voyage.

La lecture sera ensuite prolongée par une rencontre littéraire animée par Etienne Naveau, qui donnera quelques clefs sur Java, les femmes, l’Islam et la place proéminente des écrivaines sur la scène littéraire de l’archipel.
Etienne Naveau est professeur de langue et de littérature indonésienne à l’INALCO.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/1730539373639915/

 

 

Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago

Leiden Asia Year : Symposium Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago, 13 May 2017, Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden

KITLV in collaboration with Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Universitas Indonesia, will organize a symposium on the importance of storytelling in Indonesia on 13 May 2017 in Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden, 10.30 – 17.00 hrs.

Indonesia’s oft-overlooked repertoire of storytelling traditions continues to inspire the nation’s arts, cultures and social practices. Inspired by a special edition of the journal Wacana, we investigate some of the archipelago’s diverse story-texts and performance practices.

This broad-scope symposium centers on the characteristics of Indonesian stories, their embedding in storytelling traditions, and the (ritual) contexts in which these are performed. Several presentations explore how stories were – and are – composed and disseminated. Other participants bring to the fore Indonesian perspectives on storytelling beyond the boundaries of the written word, including solo- and group-performances accompanied by music, singing and dance.

We hope that this event will contribute to a renewed attention to the storytelling practices of Indonesia, fostering a more nuanced understanding of “text” in all its forms, the relevance of traditional stories in a rapidly changing society, and ongoing developments in Indonesian literature and popular culture.

Among the presenters are Aone van Engelenhove and Nazarudin (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) who will analyze [hi]stories and storytelling on the island of Kisar, Southwest Maluku, Els Bogaerts (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) with a fresh view on the well-known historical figure of Arya Penangsang in a recent theatre-play from Yogyakarta, Joachim Niess (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Südostasienwissenschaften) with a discussion of fiction in early Indonesian newspapers, and Clara Brakel-Papenhuyzen presenting recordings of Malay storytellers in North Sumatra that reflect the relationship between the interior and the coastal areas on that island. The programme also features performances of music and dance by Sundanese ensemble Dangiang Parahiangan and West Sumatran ensemble Archipelago.

Please register if you wish to attend: ln.vltik@vltik

Voir le programme complet sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/symposium-stories-storytelling-indonesian-archipelago-leiden-asia-year/

 

Historicizing fiction, fictionalizing history

Historicizing fiction, fictionalizing history by Taufiq Hanafi, 31/03/2017, KITLV Blog

Sometimes fiction tells the truth and history perpetuates a fiction. This blog tells us about how history has been used to serve the creation of a national mythology, while fiction has allowed a space for more difficult histories to be worked out.

Similarly, the bleakest moment in Indonesian history is ignored and silenced. Almost all Indonesian written history skips over the mass killings of the communists and left-wing sympathizers after the aborted coup blamed on the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) in 1965.

Take the obligatory read for elementary students in the 1990s, Pendidikan Sejarah Perjuangan Bangsa (The History of the National Struggle). We Indonesians were so accustomed to this that we thought the historical events presented in the book were all objectively true. The book instructed students to show admiration for the Indonesian Army for their outstanding success in crushing the September movement of the PKI. It also wanted us to believe that the anti-communist purge was the right thing to do in order to support the national struggle for the just and prosperous society under Pancasila. Furthermore, it created a make-believe world in which Soeharto was a hero who had so much love and respect for his people and his country. As for the massacre, the book remained silent.

In fiction, however, the killings were made (more) clear. Ahmad Tohari in the Ronggeng Dukuh Paruk (Dancer of Paruk Hamlet) trilogy narrates the mass killings in Central Java, and describes the close cooperation between the army and paramilitary groups. Mencoba Tidak Menyerah (Trying not to Surrender) by Yudhistira ANM Masardi vividly portrays the systematic massacre and politics of fear through the eyes of a small boy who is searching for his father after he was made to disappear due to his affiliation with the communists. Ashadi Siregar centers his novel, Jentera Lepas, on students who were massacred by the army after the aborted coup, while Umar Kayam in Bawuk questions how society has been dehumanized for not having the courage to address the issue.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/blog-historicizing-fiction-fictionalizing-history/

Sin Cities: Unlock Bangkok with Prabda Yoon

Sin Cities: Unlock Bangkok with Prabda Yoon, 13/03/2017, Asia House, London

Sponsored by Cockayne Grants for the Arts, a donor advised fund of the London Community Foundation, Asia House introduces its brand new series, Sin Cities: Vice & Virtue Across Asia’s Urban Landscapes, with Unlock Bangkok with Prabda Yoon.

Translated from the Thai by Mui Poopoksakul and published in English for the first time by Tilted Axis Press, Prabda Yoon’s new collection of postmodern short-stories titled The Sad Part Was will be launched at this entertaining talk chaired by Rachel Harrison, Professor of Thai Cultural Studies at SOAS.

Winner of a PEN Translates grant and selected as a “a book to look for in 2017” by The Guardian and BuzzFeed Books, The Sad Part Was comprises twelve highly literary and entrancing short-stories which deliver narratives that offer an oblique reflection of contemporary Bangkok life, exploring the bewildering contradictions of a modernity that is mismatched with many traditional Thai ideas on relationships, family, school and work.

They dip into pop culture, push the boundaries of punctuation, dally with sci-fi and, in a metafictional twist, mock Yoon’s own position as omnipotent author. Don’t be fooled by the title, you’re guaranteed to crack a smile!

Voir : http://asiahouse.org/events/sin-cities-unlock-bangkok-prabda-yoon/

Page chez l’éditeur : http://www.tiltedaxispress.com/the-sad-part-was/