Archives par mot-clé : Littérature

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem de Linus Suryadi A. G., vendredi 28 avril 2017 à 13h, Salon Peillot, Musée Guimet

Au programme, un long poème narratif en prose : « Confidences de Pariyem. L’univers d’une femme de Java » de l’indonésien Linus Suryadi AG (1951-1999).

« Confidences de Pariyem » a paru en 1981 à Jakarta. A travers les confidences de l’héroïne au jeune Païman, c’est une description rare et puissante de la vie quotidienne et des états d’âme d’une jeune fille de la fin des années 60 qui transparaît.
Embauchée dans une vieille famille noble de Yogyakarta, dernier bastion de l’héritage culturel des cours javanaises, Pariyem nous offre avec candeur, fierté et humour un saisissant voyage.

La lecture sera ensuite prolongée par une rencontre littéraire animée par Etienne Naveau, qui donnera quelques clefs sur Java, les femmes, l’Islam et la place proéminente des écrivaines sur la scène littéraire de l’archipel.
Etienne Naveau est professeur de langue et de littérature indonésienne à l’INALCO.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/1730539373639915/

 

 

Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago

Leiden Asia Year : Symposium Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago, 13 May 2017, Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden

KITLV in collaboration with Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Universitas Indonesia, will organize a symposium on the importance of storytelling in Indonesia on 13 May 2017 in Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden, 10.30 – 17.00 hrs.

Indonesia’s oft-overlooked repertoire of storytelling traditions continues to inspire the nation’s arts, cultures and social practices. Inspired by a special edition of the journal Wacana, we investigate some of the archipelago’s diverse story-texts and performance practices.

This broad-scope symposium centers on the characteristics of Indonesian stories, their embedding in storytelling traditions, and the (ritual) contexts in which these are performed. Several presentations explore how stories were – and are – composed and disseminated. Other participants bring to the fore Indonesian perspectives on storytelling beyond the boundaries of the written word, including solo- and group-performances accompanied by music, singing and dance.

We hope that this event will contribute to a renewed attention to the storytelling practices of Indonesia, fostering a more nuanced understanding of “text” in all its forms, the relevance of traditional stories in a rapidly changing society, and ongoing developments in Indonesian literature and popular culture.

Among the presenters are Aone van Engelenhove and Nazarudin (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) who will analyze [hi]stories and storytelling on the island of Kisar, Southwest Maluku, Els Bogaerts (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) with a fresh view on the well-known historical figure of Arya Penangsang in a recent theatre-play from Yogyakarta, Joachim Niess (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Südostasienwissenschaften) with a discussion of fiction in early Indonesian newspapers, and Clara Brakel-Papenhuyzen presenting recordings of Malay storytellers in North Sumatra that reflect the relationship between the interior and the coastal areas on that island. The programme also features performances of music and dance by Sundanese ensemble Dangiang Parahiangan and West Sumatran ensemble Archipelago.

Please register if you wish to attend: ln.vltik@vltik

Voir le programme complet sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/symposium-stories-storytelling-indonesian-archipelago-leiden-asia-year/

 

Historicizing fiction, fictionalizing history

Historicizing fiction, fictionalizing history by Taufiq Hanafi, 31/03/2017, KITLV Blog

Sometimes fiction tells the truth and history perpetuates a fiction. This blog tells us about how history has been used to serve the creation of a national mythology, while fiction has allowed a space for more difficult histories to be worked out.

Similarly, the bleakest moment in Indonesian history is ignored and silenced. Almost all Indonesian written history skips over the mass killings of the communists and left-wing sympathizers after the aborted coup blamed on the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) in 1965.

Take the obligatory read for elementary students in the 1990s, Pendidikan Sejarah Perjuangan Bangsa (The History of the National Struggle). We Indonesians were so accustomed to this that we thought the historical events presented in the book were all objectively true. The book instructed students to show admiration for the Indonesian Army for their outstanding success in crushing the September movement of the PKI. It also wanted us to believe that the anti-communist purge was the right thing to do in order to support the national struggle for the just and prosperous society under Pancasila. Furthermore, it created a make-believe world in which Soeharto was a hero who had so much love and respect for his people and his country. As for the massacre, the book remained silent.

In fiction, however, the killings were made (more) clear. Ahmad Tohari in the Ronggeng Dukuh Paruk (Dancer of Paruk Hamlet) trilogy narrates the mass killings in Central Java, and describes the close cooperation between the army and paramilitary groups. Mencoba Tidak Menyerah (Trying not to Surrender) by Yudhistira ANM Masardi vividly portrays the systematic massacre and politics of fear through the eyes of a small boy who is searching for his father after he was made to disappear due to his affiliation with the communists. Ashadi Siregar centers his novel, Jentera Lepas, on students who were massacred by the army after the aborted coup, while Umar Kayam in Bawuk questions how society has been dehumanized for not having the courage to address the issue.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/blog-historicizing-fiction-fictionalizing-history/

Sin Cities: Unlock Bangkok with Prabda Yoon

Sin Cities: Unlock Bangkok with Prabda Yoon, 13/03/2017, Asia House, London

Sponsored by Cockayne Grants for the Arts, a donor advised fund of the London Community Foundation, Asia House introduces its brand new series, Sin Cities: Vice & Virtue Across Asia’s Urban Landscapes, with Unlock Bangkok with Prabda Yoon.

Translated from the Thai by Mui Poopoksakul and published in English for the first time by Tilted Axis Press, Prabda Yoon’s new collection of postmodern short-stories titled The Sad Part Was will be launched at this entertaining talk chaired by Rachel Harrison, Professor of Thai Cultural Studies at SOAS.

Winner of a PEN Translates grant and selected as a “a book to look for in 2017” by The Guardian and BuzzFeed Books, The Sad Part Was comprises twelve highly literary and entrancing short-stories which deliver narratives that offer an oblique reflection of contemporary Bangkok life, exploring the bewildering contradictions of a modernity that is mismatched with many traditional Thai ideas on relationships, family, school and work.

They dip into pop culture, push the boundaries of punctuation, dally with sci-fi and, in a metafictional twist, mock Yoon’s own position as omnipotent author. Don’t be fooled by the title, you’re guaranteed to crack a smile!

Voir : http://asiahouse.org/events/sin-cities-unlock-bangkok-prabda-yoon/

Page chez l’éditeur : http://www.tiltedaxispress.com/the-sad-part-was/