Archives par mot-clé : Indonésie

Talking Indonesia : Higher education

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: higher education by Andrew Rosser, 14/09/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

Indonesia’s tertiary education institutions have long performed poorly in global university rankings. Among the various deficits that are routinely recorded are low teaching and research quality, inadequate levels of knowledge transfer and a lack of an international outlook. The Indonesian government has repeatedly expressed concern about the dismal results in the rankings, but despite a number of initiatives to transform the country’s leading universities into world class institutions, the higher education sector remains riddled with problems. Why do Indonesian universities struggle to deliver better academic programs? What reforms have been attempted and why have they failed? Who are the actors and organisations involved in the politics of higher education in Indonesia?

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these issues with Andrew Rosser, Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute.

Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

A écouter : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-higher-education/

 

« Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash » by Eka Kurniawan

Eka Kurniawan, Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash by Tim Hannigan, 14/09/2017, Asian Review of Books

Eka Kurniawan is the Quentin Tarantino of Indonesian literature: a brash wunderkind, delivering gleeful references to pulp fiction, lashings of stylized violence, and an array of characters and scenarios that far surpass the tropes and clichés which inspire them. But as with Quentin Tarantino, one might occasionally wonder just how much substance lies beneath the indisputably stylish surface.

Vengeance is Mine, All Others Pay Cash (a peculiar rendering of the Indonesian title, Seperti Dendam, Rindu Harus Dibayar Tuntas, which might be better translated as “like revenge, longing must be paid in full”) is Kurniawan’s third novel to be translated into English. It follows his acclaimed debut, the surreal historical epic, Beauty is a Wound, and the short, sharp Man Tiger. As with the previous books there is plenty of sex, brutality and outrageous humor. But this time around there is no direct engagement with Indonesian history and few overtly supernatural elements. What we have instead is the violently quixotic odyssey of a man who can’t get an erection.

The book begins with the protagonist—street thug and sometime assassin Ajo Kawir—sitting on the edge of his bed, staring forlornly at his flaccid penis, “nestling like a newly hatched baby bird—curled into itself, looking hungry and cold”. And the opening dialogue is the first of Ajo Kawir’s many one-sided conversations with his unresponsive member:

He whispered to it, get up, Bird. Get up, you Wretch. You can’t just sleep forever. You have to get up. But that damn little bird didn’t want to get up.

Lire la suite sur : http://asianreviewofbooks.com/content/vengeance-is-mine-all-others-pay-cash-by-eka-kurniawan/

Hearing Allah’s call : preaching and performance in Indonesian islam

Parution : Julian Millie, Hearing Allah’s call : preaching and performance in Indonesian Islam, Cornell University Press, 2017

Hearing Allah’s Call changes the way we think about Islamic communication. In the city of Bandung in Indonesia, sermons are not reserved for mosques and sites for Friday prayers. Muslim speakers are in demand for all kinds of events, from rites of passage to motivational speeches for companies and other organizations. Julian Millie spent fourteen months sitting among listeners at such events, and he provides detailed contextual description of the everyday realities of Muslim listening as well as preaching. In describing the venues, the audience, and preachers—many of whom are women—he reveals tensions between entertainment and traditional expressions of faith and moral rectitude.

The sermonizers use in-jokes, double entendres, and mimicry in their expositions, playing on their audiences’ emotions, triggering reactions from critics who accuse them of neglecting listeners’ intellects. Millie focused specifically on the listening routines that enliven everyday life for Muslims in all social spaces—imagine the hardworking preachers who make Sunday worship enjoyable for rural as well as urban Americans—and who captivate audiences with skills that attract criticism from more formal interpreters of Islam. The ethnography is rich and full of insightful observations and details. Hearing Allah’s Call will appeal to students of the practice of anthropology as well as all those intrigued by contemporary Islam.

Plus d’informations sur :  http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100973660

 

Indonesia in the new world: globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty

Indonesia Update 2017 : Indonesia in the new world: globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty, 15-16 /09/ 2017, Australian National University

Today, globalisation is more complex than ever. The effects of the global financial crisis and increased inequality have in many countries spurred anti-global sentiment, and encouraged the adoption of populist and inward-looking policies. Discontent has manifested in some surprising results: Brexit, Trump, and possibly more to come. In Indonesia it has led to rising protectionism, a rejection of foreign interference in the name of nationalism, and economic policies dominated by calls for self-sufficiency. Meanwhile, human trafficking and the abuse of migrant workers have shown the other side of globalisation.

At the 2017 Indonesia Update conference, leading experts will explore key issues around globalisation, nationalism, and sovereignty in modern Indonesia. Topics will include the historical dynamics of Indonesia’s engagement with the global world, its stance in the South China Sea, and the emergence of new nationalism. Speakers will also examine nationalism in practice (for example, food sovereignty and resource nationalism) and the impact of and response to globalisation, as well as poverty, inequality, and gender issues.

LIVE STREAMING

The Political Update and Economic Update sessions will be live streamed at the ANU Indonesia Project Facebook page from 09:00AEST/06:00WIB on Friday 15 September. Other sessions will be video recorded and uploaded to the Indonesia Project YouTube channel in the weeks after the conference.

Voir le programme complet sur : http://www.newmandala.org/home/indonesia-new-world-globalisation-nationalism-sovereignty/

Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands

Nouvelle parution : Reimar Schefold, Toys for the souls : life and art on the Mentawai Islands, PRIMEDIA Editions, 2017

This book presents a detailed and inspiring picture of the traditional ways of life and the impressive art of the Mentawai archipelago located off the west coast of Sumatra in Indonesia. This shamanistic culture, most notably found on the northernmost island of Siberut, maintains an ancient relationship between man and the spiritual world. Within this worldview, everything is animated. Not only do humans have souls, but so do animals, plants and objects. To please these souls and to create harmony, alluring artifacts have been created for generations. In this way life, art, ritual and esthetics are intertwined: a notion reflected in the field photographs and in the beautiful and rare objects that are described and illustrated here. Toys for the Souls reveals for the first time the richness and creative power of an artistic imagination, deeply rooted in Southeast Asian prehistory.

Voir : http://www.tribalartmagazine.com/fischbacher/art-books/?a=view&id=382&lang=en

Inside Indonesia, n° 129 (Jul. – Sep. 2017) : Citizenship

Inside Indonesia n° 129 (Jul. – Sep. 2017) : Citizenship

« I am an Indonesian citizen! » by Ward Berenschot and Gerry van Klinken

What does exercising citizenship in Indonesia’s democracy look like?

 Digital citizenship by M. Zamzam Fauzanafi

Online corruption talk in Banten can be vitriolic

Labour takes a citizenship approach by Hari Nugroho

Despite the impressive activism of Pekalongan’s labour union, its political clout remains limited

Indonesia’s diaspora citizens by Yearry Panji Setianto

After decades of neglect, Indonesia’s diaspora demands more rights

From mother to citizen by Vita Febriany

The New Order actively promoted citizenship of a particular kind for women

 « We are natural-born children, you are adopted » by Safrudin Amin   

Locals contest national citizenship rights in North Maluku

When « home » is not home by Laila Kholid Alfirdaus

Locals react coolly to ex-transmigrants who return to Java after fleeing violence elsewhere

 Islam and citizenship by Chris Chaplin

Organisations like Wahdah Islamiyah envision an ‘Islamic’ citizenship for Indonesia

A lire sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/edition-129-jul-sep-2017-2

 

 

 

 

 

La Galigo manuscript – UNESCO heritage – digitally available

La Galigo manuscript – UNESCO heritage – digitally available, 27/07/2017, Leiden University

The La Galigo manuscript at Leiden University Libraries (UBL) has been digitized. The manuscript, which was inscribed in 2011 on UNESCO’s ‘Memory of the World’ Register, is now freely available online and can be used for teaching and research. La Galigo is the world’s longest epic, written in the Buginese language and script. The UBL holds one of the most extensive and valuable La Galigo manuscripts. The digitization of the Leiden La Galigo manuscript was made possible with support from Yayasan La Galigo.

Leiden manuscript
The Leiden manuscript (NBG-Boeg 188) consists of twelve parts and includes the first part of the Buginese epic poem. It tells the story about the origins of mankind according to South Sulawesi tradition. It is the longest fragment of the manuscript in existence. It was transcribed in Makassar, approximately in 1852-1858, by order of Colliq Pujie (Arung Pancana Toa), Queen Mother of Tanete, a small kingdom in South Sulawesi (Indonesia). The manuscript is part of the Makassarese Buginese manuscript collection of the Nederlands Bijbelgenootschap (Dutch Bible Society) and has been on permanent loan since 1905.

World Heritage
The majority of La Galigo manuscripts that have been preserved are located in Indonesia and the Netherlands. Along with one other La Galigo manuscript, which is kept at the La Galigo Museum in Makassar, the Leiden manuscript was inscribed in 2011 on the UNESCO’s ‘Memory of the World’ Register. This entry underlines the global significance and importance of the La Galigo manuscript.

Accessibility
The digitized La Galigo manuscript can be found in Leiden’s digital collections: https://digitalcollections.universiteitleiden.nl/LaGaligo. In addition, transcripts of the Buginese text in Dutch are available, as are relevant documents, maps and images taken from Leiden’s special collections. The digitized text can also be downloaded.

Inspiration
La Galigo is also known as a musical work by the American avant-garde theatre director and artist Robert Wilson. His La Galigo-based performance premiered in Singapore in 2004 and has been performed in many cities worldwide. In the UBL’s online video series World Treasures, Gert Oostindie, director of the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV) and Professor of History at Leiden University, gives more background and discusses the importance of the Leiden manuscript.

Festive meeting in Makassar
On Saturday 19 August, the digital La Galigo manuscript was officially made available online at the Hasanuddin University in Makassar. This event was combined with the launch of the reprints of Volume 1 and 2 and the new print of Volume 3.  The seminar was attended by more than 250 interested participants and representatives of local Indonesian governmental institutions, Hasanuddin University and Leiden University.

Voir : https://www.library.universiteitleiden.nl/news/2017/08/la-galigo-manuscript—unesco-heritage-%E2%80%93-digitally-available

In Indonesia, Chinese Deity Is Covered in Sheet After Muslims Protest

« In Indonesia, Chinese Deity Is Covered in Sheet After Muslims Protest » by Russell Goldman, 10/08/2017, The New York Times

A 100-foot statue depicting a Chinese deity was covered with an enormous sheet this past weekend in East Java Province, Indonesia, after Muslims threatened to tear the colossus down amid mounting ethnic and religious tensions across the country.

The Islamist campaign against the statue, a depiction of the third-century general Guan Yu, who is worshiped as a god in several Chinese religions, began online and soon spread to the gates of a Chinese Confucian temple in Tuban, near the Java Sea coast, where the figure was erected last month.

On social media, Muslims assailed the statue as an “uncivilized” affront to Islam and the island’s “home people,” and a mob gathered this week outside the East Java legislature in the city of Surabaya to demand its destruction.

Statues deemed un-Islamic have been destroyed or vandalized around Indonesia in recent years, and several Chinese temples have been set on fire. Covering the statue with a large white tarp was a stopgap measure proposed by the temple’s officials after a governmental religious body pushed them to find a solution…

Colossal statues of Guan Yu have been erected around the world. The Tuban statue, which took more than a year to build at a cost of about $188,000, is the largest of its type in Southeast Asia, according to Indonesia’s Museum of World Records.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/10/world/asia/indonesia-chinese-statue-islam-muslims-protest-guan-yu.html

‘Land of Freedom’: Heri Dono’s First Solo Exhibition in Hong Kong

« Joko Tarub Bathe in the Lake, Attacked by Terrorists, Protected by 7 Bidadari » (2016) by Heri Dono. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Contemporary Art

« Land of Freedom » : Heri Dono’s First Solo Exhibition in Hong Kong by Valencia Tong, 07/07/2017, the Artling

As one of Indonesia’s most celebrated contemporary artists, Heri Dono is known for his satirical political commentary in his paintings and installations. Earlier on, The Artling interviewed the Yogyakarta-based artist back in 2015 during his residency at STPI in Singapore, before his solo installation at the Indonesian Pavillion for the Venice Biennale. Fast-forward to 2017, Heri Dono is showing his works at Tang Contemporary Art in his first solo gallery exhibition in Hong Kong.

The artworks on view seem humorous at first glance, yet they deal with serious sociopolitical issues, such as those in the Brexit and Trump era. To illustrate the complexities of the global political scene, strange-looking mythological creatures are juxtaposed against political caricatures. In Super Trump – Land, US president Donald Trump is depicted as a superhero-like figure with three eyes.

The artist, born in 1960 in Jakarta, Indonesia, is inspired by wayang kulit, a form of traditional shadow puppet play in Indonesia. Symbols of animals, mythological beasts, machines, spaceships and parodies of world leaders are commonly found in his work.

Lire la suite sur : https://theartling.com/en/artzine/2017/07/07/land-of-freedom-heri-donos-first-solo-exhibition-in-hong-kong/

Aural archipelago : field recordings from around Indonesia

Aural archipelago : field recordings from around Indonesia

Aural Archipelago is the lovechild of Palmer Keen, an American DIY ethnomusicologist wandering the vast archipelago of Indonesia to find, document, expose and promote little-known traditional musics around the country. Within a few years, Palmer has travelled from vast islands like Sumatra, Java, and Borneo to small dots in the ocean like Rote and Selayar in search of the diverse and beautiful music that fascinates him. With this project, his hope is to allow unprecedented audiences (local and foreign) free access to music that is often difficult or impossible to hear otherwise.

Palmer can be contacted at auralarchipelago@gmail.com

Enregistrements à écouter sur : http://www.auralarchipelago.com/

 

Banda : Heritage for Indonesia

« Banda : Heritage for Indonesia : a seminar and an exhibition about Banda, nutmeg and the treaty of Breda 1667-2017 », 31/07/2017 – 31/08/2017, Erasmus Huis, Jakarta

2017 marks the 350th anniversary of the Treaty of Breda. This Treaty, named after the Dutch city where it was signed on 31 July 1667, ended the Second Anglo-Dutch war (1665–1667) during which England and the Netherlands had fought over maritime hegemony and world trade. Through signing the Treaty of Breda, the Dutch accepted English rule over what is now New York (New Amsterdam), while the British accepted Dutch rule over Suriname and Run, the remotest of the Banda islands. However, the Banda islands had been an international trade centre long before the Portuguese were the first Europeans to visit Banda. It was after their arrival to the islands that various European powers attempted to monopolize the worldwide trade in nutmeg. These disputes turned the Banda islands into a lively, yet often violent stage for world politics. After the Dutch, led by J.P. Coen, unleashed a lethal expedition against the Bandanese in 1621, a Dutch monopoly on the spice was secured even though the British maintained their claim on Run until 1667.

This exhibition traces this fascinating history behind the Treaty of Breda. Through the presentation of historical maps, images and objects, Banda’s multi-faceted history will be highlighted. The visitor gets acquainted with nutmeg and its characteristics, Banda as a centre of international trade and world politics.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/bartelegallery/photos/a.157149674310864.41895.111961525496346/2010751102284036/?type=3&theater

Book-hunting in the City of Heroes

« Book-hunting in the City of Heroes » by Tom Hoogervorst, 20/07/2017, KITLV blog

Situated in an inconspicuous residential area in the south of Surabaya, one could easily overlook one of Indonesia’s most intriguing libraries and its equally fascinating owner. Tom Hoogervorst looks back on a fruitful week of research spent at Medayu Agung.

“Some of the books are a bit sticky”, says Mr. Oei Hiem Hwie, as he deftly separates the pages of a 1919 book on traditional medicine. “I had to hide my collection above the ceiling of my old house. They burnt many of my possessions. In the end, everything was buried under a 15 cm coat of dust.”

Known to his friends as Pak Wie, the Malang-born septuagenarian and life-long book collector heads a unique library open to Indonesian and international visitors: Medayu Agung. Every day, students, journalists, intellectuals, and cultural activists can be spotted browsing through its books and newspapers. The library contains material in Indonesian, Chinese, Javanese, Dutch, English and German – among others – ranging from colonial to recent times. In addition to this wealth of printed sources, innumerable beautiful black-and-white photos of old Surabaya and other historical paraphernalia make it a living museum. Even an original edition of Mein Kampf signed by Adolf Hitler himself has found its way into the library.

The history of Medayu Agung is closely connected with the history of Indonesia. In 1965, at the peak of his journalistic career, Pak Wie was imprisoned without a trial on the unfounded suspicion of involvement with Indonesia’s communist party. As a result, he was detained for 13 years in some of the country’s most notorious prisons, including the gulag-style internment camps of Nusakembangan and Buru. While incarcerated, he developed a close friendship with fellow convict Pramoedya Ananta Toer, who later became Indonesia’s most famous writer. His ground-breaking “This Earth of Mankind” (Bumi Manusia) was first written down on pieces of paper smuggled in by Pak Wie. They are still kept in the library.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/book-hunting-city-heroes/

Indonesian Textiles at The Tropen Museum

Book Launch : Indonesian Textiles at The Tropen Museum, 13/10/2017, Tropenmuseum Studio

The Tropenmuseum Amsterdam cares for an internationally renowned collection of textiles from Indonesia. Numbering approximately 12,000 objects the majority of these textiles were acquired during the period that Indonesia was a Dutch colony, the former Netherlands East Indies. These textiles originate from all over the archipelago, from Aceh on Sumatra, to Tanimbar in the east. A small part of the collection was even made in the Netherlands for artistic or commercial reasons.

Indonesian Textiles at the Tropenmuseum explores this collection within a broader framework of Dutch colonial and scientific history. It examines the stories of those who made and used them, those who collected and brought them to the Netherlands, as well as those who have studied and exhibited them.

About the author
Itie van Hout is former Curator of Textiles of the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam, and is now retired. She is the author of Batik Drawn in Wax: 200 Years of Batik Art from Indonesia in the Tropenmuseum Collection (2001) and Beloved Burden: Baby Carriers in Different Countries (2011).

Co-author is Sonja Wijs, anthropologist and researcher. She also is the co-author of Africa at the Tropenmuseum (2011).

Voir : http://materialculture.nl/en/events/indonesian-textiles-at-the-tropenmuseum

Reviving Panji tales in arts and culture

A ‘wayang beber’ performance around 1902 in the house of Wahidin Soedirohoesoedo in Yogyakarta. (Leiden University Library/Kassian Cephas)

« Reviving Panji tales in arts and culture » by Wardiman Djojonegoro, 19/07/2017, The Jakarta Post

Massively popular for centuries in Java, Bali, Sumatra, and even in other Southeast Asian countries, Panji tales have become the sources of inspiration of other forms of local culture.

Indonesian people have enjoyed Panji tales for generations. Children cherish childhood stories that include the legends of Keong Emas and Ande Ande Lumut, both derived from Panji tales. Yet with the influx of information and foreign culture, Panji tales and other indigenous forms of culture are being pushed further aside and find it hard to compete with modern publishing and communication technologies.

The influence of Panji tales can be found in dances, theatrical performances, traditional wayang (wayang beber, wayang kelir, wayang krucil) shows and a variety of Panji masks. Panji tales are found engraved on temple reliefs with Panji featured as a character with a distinctive cap on his head …

Lire la suite sur :