Archives par mot-clé : Indonésie

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive, Sejarah Nusantara, Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia

The paper archives created by the Dutch East India Company (VOC, 1602-1799) and dealing with its commercial operations in Asian waters are preserved in the national archives of Indonesia, the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, South Africa and India. In particular, the archives in Jakarta contain thousands of documents originating from Asian persons, including many local rulers from around the Indonesian archipelago. The most voluminous collections spanning 2,000 metres are in the Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia (ANRI). On 9 March 2004, the archives of the VOC were included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.

The 2.000 metres of archives in ANRI can be roughly divided into two sections:
1) The archives created in and formerly kept at Batavia Castle, the former headquarters of the VOC in Asia. This is the archive of the Supreme Government (the Governor-General and the ordinary Councillors of Dutch Asia).
2) The archives of local private and public institutions in Batavia.

For this digitalization and public access project, a selection had to be made. The Daily Journals of Batavia Castle which can be found in the archives of the Supreme Government were digitalized and published first. This series reflects the principle concerns of the Supreme Government.  Prominent here were internal Company affairs in matters as diverse as the general management of trade, personnel and financial affairs, shipping and logistics. The Supreme Government also dealt with all political and diplomatic affairs, the administration of justice and correspondence with other VOC factories in Asia as well as the VOC Chambers and their Governing Board, theso-called Gentlemen Seventeen (Heren XVII) or Directors of the VOC  in the Dutch Republic. The Daily Journals were created to maintain an ongoing overview of such activities.

During the course of the eighteenth century, the Resolution Books of the Supreme Government became more and more important and voluminous while the registration of correspondence in the Daily Journals gradually declined. In particular, the handling of all matters to do with the regional establishments of the Company were included in the General Resolution Books. In 1743, such matters were recorded in a separate yearbook, giving birth to a separate series: the General (Foreign) Affairs Books (Net-Generale Besogneboeken).

Another, hitherto unresearched and historically unique series are the Appendices to the General Resolution Books. These total together some 742 volumes numbering some 550,000 folio pages. This series contain a variety of documents which may gradually become accessible via a special database. The first document descriptions for this database were started in 2013 by ANRI’s Content Team (see organisation).

Liste des archives consultables moyennant une inscription sur le site:

  • General Resolutions of Batavia Castle 1613-1810
  • Realia 1610-1808
  • Appendices to General Resolutions 1686-1811
  • The Placards of Batavia Castle 1602-1808
  • Daily Journals of Batavia Castle 1624-1806
  • Marginalia to the Daily Journals 1659-1807
  • Diplomatic Letters 1625-1812
  • Corpus Diplomaticum 1595-1799

Plus d’informations sur : https://sejarah-nusantara.anri.go.id/archive/

 

Becoming Better Muslims

David Kloos, Becoming Better Muslims : Religious Authority and Ethical Improvement in Aceh, Indonesia, Princeton University Press, 2017

How do ordinary Muslims deal with and influence the increasingly pervasive Islamic norms set by institutions of the state and religion? Becoming Better Muslims offers an innovative account of the dynamic interactions between individual Muslims, religious authorities, and the state in Aceh, Indonesia. Relying on extensive historical and ethnographic research, David Kloos offers a detailed analysis of religious life in Aceh and an investigation into today’s personal processes of ethical formation.

Aceh is known for its history of rebellion and its recent implementation of Islamic law. Debunking the stereotypical image of the Acehnese as inherently pious or fanatical, Kloos shows how Acehnese Muslims reflect consciously on their faith and often frame their religious lives in terms of gradual ethical improvement. Revealing that most Muslims view their lives through the prism of uncertainty, doubt, and imperfection, he argues that these senses of failure contribute strongly to how individuals try to become better Muslims. He also demonstrates that while religious authorities have encroached on believers and local communities, constraining them in their beliefs and practices, the same process has enabled ordinary Muslims to reflect on moral choices and dilemmas, and to shape the ways religious norms are enforced.

Arguing that Islamic norms are carried out through daily negotiations and contestations rather than blind conformity, Becoming Better Muslims examines how ordinary people develop and exercise their religious agency.

Plus d’informations sur : https://press.princeton.edu/titles/11204.html

 

Behind Indonesia’s illiberal turn

Behind Indonesia’s illiberal turn by Vedi Hadiz, 20/10/2017, New Mandala

The past year or so has seen conspicuous setbacks to Indonesian democracy’s capacity to protect many social rights, including of some of the more vulnerable members of society—most notably women, religious and sexual minorities, and victims of the 1965–66 mass killings. Ironically, this has occurred under a government whose declared agenda of extending access to social services has been a celebrated and defining characteristic, not to mention the presumption that its establishment had deflected a prior possible reassertion of authoritarian-like politics.

By 2015, a wide-ranging survey had offered the proposition that Indonesia’s hard-won democracy had stagnated. However, many of the more sombre assessments of this condition were to come in the wake of the second round of the Jakarta gubernatorial election in April 2017, and the farcical blasphemy case that saw the defeated Basuki Tjahaja Purnama (“Ahok”) sentenced to jail. The mood of these analyses could not be more different from the upbeat tone that characterised those that immediately followed the victory of Ahok’s close ally Jokowi over Prabowo Subianto in the 2014 election. That result had spared most Australia-based analysts—and many of the people of Indonesia—from the pain of having to contend with what might have been an overwhelmingly clear signal of democratic regression.

But the manner of Ahok’s downfall is merely symptomatic of much deeper problems within Indonesia democracy, which have never been resolved since the fall of Soeharto. These problems are intertwined with continuing oligarchic dominance and the manner in which intra-oligarchic conflict now occurs. The mobilisation of identity politics has become a more salient feature of conflicts over power and resources. In fact, we may be entering a new phase in which conservative takes on Islamic morality, and the hyper-nationalism which is being positioned against them, become the most important cultural resource pools from which the ideational aspects of intra-oligarchic struggles are forged—thus accentuating the illiberalism of Indonesian democracy. Indeed, the relative absence of organised social forces that would drive an agenda of liberal political reform is more palpable than ever before.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/indonesia-illiberal/

Indonesia Update 2017 : GLOBALISATION, NATIONALISM AND SOVEREIGNTY

ANU Indonesia Project Blog : Indonesia Update 2017 : Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty, 15-16/09/2017, The Australian National University

Today, globalisation is more complex than ever. The effects of the global financial crisis and increased inequality have, in many countries, spurred anti-global sentiment and encouraged the adoption of populist and inward-looking policies. Discontent has manifested in some surprising results: Brexit, Trump, and possibly more to come. In Indonesia, it has led to rising protectionism, a rejection of foreign interference in the name of nationalism, and economic policies dominated by calls for self-sufficiency. Meanwhile, human trafficking and the abuse of migrant workers have shown the other side of globalisation.

Againts this background the ANU Indonesia Project held its 35th Indonesia Update conference on 15 and 16 September in Canberra. As usual, the coference kicked off with the updates on politic and economic development. Then centered on the theme “Indonesia in the New World: Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty”, fourteen papers were presented to the audience of more than 500 during the one-and-half-day event. The topics included the historical dynamics of Indonesia’s engagement with the global world, its stance in the South China Sea, and the emergence of new nationalism. Speakers also examined nationalism in practice (for example, food sovereignty and resource nationalism) and the impact of and response to globalisation, as well as poverty, inequality, and gender issues.

Following the Canberra conference, we held two “Mini Indonesia Updates” on 18 September, in Sydney (in collaboration with the Lowy Institute) and in Adelaide (in collaboration with the University of Adelaide’s Institute for International Trade).

The papers presented in the conference will be published in the Indonesia Update book series and will be launched next year, in collaboration with the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS)/ Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore.

Vous trouverez sur cette page les vidéos des conférences suivantes :

Political Update : Indonesia’s year of democratic setback: toward a new era of deepening illiberalism? by Vedi Hadiz (University of Melbourne)

Economic Update : Effectivity of policy reform in democracy and regional autonomy regime by Raden Pardede (CReco Consulting)

Globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty: the Indonesian experience by Anthony Reid (ANU), Edward Aspinall (ANU), Shafiah Muhibat (Nanyang Technological University) with an Overview by Mari Pangestu (Universitas Indonesia)

Nationalism in practice by Jeffrey Neilson (The University of Sydney), Eve Warburton (ANU), Yose Rizal Damuri (Centre for Strategic and International Studies)

Poverty, inequality and gender issues by Arief Anshory Yusuf (Padjadjaran University), Peter Warr (ANU), Janneke Pieters (Wageningen University), Robert Sparrow (Wageningen University)

The human face of globalisation by Anis Hidayah (Migrant CARE), Dominggus Elcid Li (Institute of Resource Governance and Social Change)

Response to globalisation by Manggi Habir (Bank Danamon Indonesia), Titik Anas (Presisi Indonesia)

Concluding remarks: navigating the new globalisation by Hal Hill (ANU), Deasy Pane (ANU), Danny Quah (National University of Singapore)

A voir sur : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/blogs/indonesiaproject/?page_id=8559

Indonesia for Sale

Indonesia for Sale: in-depth series on corruption, palm oil and rainforests launches, by Mongabay

  • The investigative series Indonesia for Sale, launching this week, shines new light on the corruption behind Indonesia’s deforestation and land rights crisis.
  • In-depth stories, to be released over the coming months, will expose the role of collusion between palm oil firms and politicians in subverting Indonesia’s democracy. They will be published in English and Indonesian.
  • The series is the product of nine months’ reporting across the country, interviewing fixers, middlemen, lawyers and companies involved in land deals, and those most affected by them.
  • Indonesia for Sale is a collaboration between Mongabay and The Gecko Project, an investigative reporting initiative established by UK-based nonprofit Earthsight. 

Lire la suite sur : https://news.mongabay.com/2017/10/indonesia-for-sale-in-depth-series-on-corruption-palm-oil-and-rainforests-starts-tomorrow/

Premier épisode de la série : The palm oil fiefdom

A politician in Borneo turned his district into a sea of oil palm. Did it benefit the people who elected him, or the members of his family?

A lire sur : https://news.mongabay.com/2017/10/the-palm-oil-fiefdom/

 

 

Ancestors & Rituals, EUROPALIA INDONESIA

Ancestors & Rituals, Europalia Indonesia, 11/10/2017 – 14/01/2018, BOZAR/Palais des Beaux-Arts, Bruxelles

Commissaire: Daud Tanudirjo
Conseillers: Pieter ter Keurs & Francine Brinkgreve

Immense archipel de plus de 13 000 îles s’étalant sur pas  moins de 5 000 kilomètres d’est en ouest, l’Indonésie compte près de 255 millions d’habitants, 300 groupes ethniques et plus de 700 langues. Ces quelques chiffres donnent une idée de la diversité de ce pays et de la variété des cultures qui le composent.

Un point commun relie cependant une  grande majorité de ces cultures : l’importance accordée aux ancêtres. De Sumatra à la Papouasie, en passant par Java, Bornéo, Sulawesi, les petites îles de la Sonde et les Moluques : les ancêtres ont joué et jouent souvent encore un rôle de premier plan en Indonésie.

Qu’ils soient généalogiques ou mythiques, les ancêtres remplissent trois fonctions cruciales ayant trait au passé, au présent et au futur. Ils relient les vivants à leur passé, leur permettant de revendiquer une place au sein d’une lignée et de définir ainsi leur statut et position sociale. Ils sont ensuite garants de l’équilibre de la société et assurent par leur soutien et protection un présent harmonieux. Ils sont enfin source de fertilité et préservent ainsi le futur des peuples et cultures.

Les échanges avec d’autres cultures et religions ont, au fil des millénaires, influencé les arts, les identités et la manière  même d’envisager le monde des peuples indonésiens. La majeure partie des cultures de l’archipel trouvent leurs racines dans la culture austronésienne, apportée par des peuples migrateurs qui partirent de Taiwan il y a plus de 5 000 ans. La splendide culture Dong Son du nord du Vietnam, connue pour sa grande maîtrise du bronze, n’est pas non plus restée sans influence.

Enfin, un important volet de l’exposition est consacré aux surprenants rituels funéraires. Accomplis en différentes phases, parfois étalées sur plusieurs années, c’est ceux-ci qui permettent aux défunts d’accéder au statut d’ancêtres. Ceux qui leur survivent ne ménagent ni leurs efforts ni leurs finances pour les accompagner vers les mondes supérieurs et préserver ainsi l’équilibre et l’harmonie de la communauté.

La plupart des 160 trésors archéologiques et ethnographiques ont été prêtés par le Musée national d’Indonésie et sont exposés pour la première fois en Europe. Une trentaine de ceux-ci proviennent quant à eux de musées et de collections privées européennes. L’ensemble est mis en contexte à partir de photographies d’époque, de vidéos, de dessins et de peintures.

Voir : https://europalia.eu/fr/article/ancestors-rituals_1041.html

Muslim NGOs and civil society in Indonesia

Podcast: Muslim NGOs and civil society in Indonesia
Religion and NGOs

Produced by R. Michael Feener

While the service provision activities of some religious NGOs complement and enhance systems of low state capacity, in others they compete with state services and in still others service delivery by religious NGOs is associated with political parties and forms part of their electoral strategies. Across diverse engagements, then, religious NGOs depend on their ability to elude, enrol, and subvert the state institutions – while states themselves adjust to the impact of these new actors in turn. In this interview with Robert Hefner about his research on Muslim NGOs in the Javanese city of Yogyakarta, and what his findings can show us about Islam and civil society in contemporary Southeast Asia.

Since the turn of the twenty-first century, there has been a remarkable surge of interest among both academics and policy makers in the effects that religion has on international aid and development. Within this broad field, the work of ‘religious NGOs’ or ‘Faith-Based Organisations’ (FBOs) has garnered considerable attention. This series of podcasts for The Religious Studies Project seeks to explore how the discourses, practices, and institutional forms of both religious actors and purportedly secular NGOs intersect, and how these engagements result in changes in our understanding of both ‘religion’ and ‘development’. These interviews with leading scholars working on the topic across diverse contexts in Asia (and beyond) have been conducted by Dr. Catherine Scheer & Dr. Giuseppe Bolotta of the National University of Singapore’s Asia Research Institute. Our work on this has been generously supported by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

Podcast et transcription de l’interview de Robert W. Hefner sur : http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/podcast/muslim-ngos-and-civil-society-in-indonesia/?

U.S. Embassy Tracked Indonesia Mass Murder 1965

General Suharto in the days after the September 30th Movement

Newly Declassified U.S. Embassy Jakarta Files Detail Army Killings, U.S. support for Quashing Leftist Labor Movemen, Briefing Book # 607, edited by Brad Simpson, National Security Archive, The George Washington University

Washington, D.C., October 17, 2017 – The U.S. government had detailed knowledge that the Indonesian Army was conducting a campaign of mass murder against the country’s Communist Party (PKI) starting in 1965, according to newly declassified documents posted today by the National Security Archive at The George Washington University.  The new materials further show that diplomats in the Jakarta Embassy kept a record of which PKI leaders were being executed, and that U.S. officials actively supported Indonesian Army efforts to destroy the country’s left-leaning labor movement.

The 39 documents made available today come from a collection of nearly 30,000 pages of files constituting much of the daily record of the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, from 1964-1968. The collection, much of it formerly classified, was processed by the National Declassification Center in response to growing public interest in the remaining U.S. documents concerning the mass killings of 1965-1966.  American and Indonesian human rights and freedom of information activists, filmmakers, as well as a group of U.S. Senators led by Tom Udall (D-NM), had called for the materials to be made public.

The documents concern one of the most important and turbulent chapters in Indonesian history and U.S.-Indonesian relations, which witnessed the gradual collapse of ties between Jakarta and Washington, a low-level war with Britain over the formation of Malaysia, rising tension between the Indonesian Army and the Indonesian Communist Party, the growing radicalization of Indonesian President Sukarno, and the expansion of U.S. covert operations aimed at provoking a clash between the Army and PKI. These tensions erupted in the aftermath of an attempted purge of the Army by the September 30th Movement – a group of military officers with the collaboration of a handful of PKI leaders.  After crushing the Movement, which had kidnapped and killed six high-ranking Army generals, the Indonesian Army and its paramilitary allies launched a campaign of annihilation against the PKI and its affiliated organizations, killing up to 500,000 alleged PKI supporters between October 1965 and March 1966, imprisoning up to a million more, and eventually ousting Sukarno and replacing him with General Suharto, who ruled Indonesia for the next 32 years before he himself was overthrown in May 1998.

In an unprecedented collaboration, the National Security Archive worked with the National Declassification Center (NDC) to make the entirety of this collection available to the public by scanning and digitizing the collection, which will be incorporated into the National Archives and Records Administration’s (NARA) digital finding aids. When completed, scholars, journalists, and researchers will be able to search the documents by date, keyword, or name, providing unparalleled access, in particular for the Indonesian public, to a unique collection of records concerning one of the most important periods of Indonesian history.

Of the 30,000 pages processed by the NDC, several hundred documents remain classified and are undergoing further review before their scheduled release in early 2018. While some of the documents in this collection were declassified and deposited at NARA or the Lyndon Johnson Presidential Library in the late 1990s, many thousands of pages are being made available for the first time in more than 50 years.

Le texte des documents déclassifiés et leurs fac-similés sont sur la page ainsi que des liens, des ouvrages et une liste d’articles de presse : http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/briefing-book/indonesia/2017-10-15/indonesia-mass-murder-1965-us-embassy-files

Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Management

Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Management, 23/10/2017, Ethnological Museum, Leiden

An international symposium in honour of the work of Prof. Dr. Gerard Persoon on the occasion of his retirement from Leiden University. 

The international symposium in honour of the work of retiring Professor Dr. Gerard Persoon, who held the IIAS Chair Environment and Development at the Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, will take place on October 23, 2017, at the Ethnological Museum in Leiden.

The symposium will consist of a series of presentations on the interdisciplinary theme of Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Management by scholars from the Philippines, Indonesia, Taiwan, Cameroon and the Netherlands, and will be closed by a lecture by Prof. Gerard Persoon himself (see the tentative program below).

Please register for the symposium by sending an email to the secretariat of the Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology (secrcaos@fsw.leidenuniv.nl) specifying your name and affiliation. As seats are limited, be advised to register early.

Tentative Program

Opening remarks by Prof. Dr. Cristina Grasseni (Scientific Director of the Insitute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, Leiden University)

Keynote address and Fifth Louwes Lecture by Mr. Dave de Vera (Executive Director Philippine Assoc. For Intercultural Development, Inc. (PAFID))

Title: Indigenous Community Conservation in the Philippines

Presentation by Dr. Dante Aquino (Professor/University Director, Research and Development)

Title: Promoting Indigenous Peoples Rights in the Philippines: Policy implementation and onsite field realities

Presentation by Dr. Tessa Minter (Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, Leiden University)

Title: Does ownership matter? Resource rights in the Philippines and Solomon Islands.  

Presentation by Dr. Louis Defo (World Wildlife Fund Cameroon)

Title: Hunters-gatherers and best practices in forestry industry. The case of the Baka of South East Cameroon

Presentation by Dr. Haman Unusa (Ministry of Environment; Protection of Nature and Sustainable Development; Visiting lecturer University of Dschang)

Title: Nomadic Pastoralism in Far North Cameroon: A response to environmental pressures rather than a cultural trait 

Presentation by Dr. Huei-Min Tsai (Associate Professor, Graduate Institute of Environmental Education, National Taiwan Normal University; Executive Secretary, International Geographic Union (IGU) Commission on Islands)

Title: A new hope for nature conservation: Indigenous movements in natural resource management and participatory approaches to biodiversity conservation on the Mentawai Islands of Indonesia 

Presentation by Prof. Dr. Gerard Persoon

Title: Indigenous Peoples: Local impact of international rights 

Voir : https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/en/events/2017/10/symposium-indigenous-peoples-and-natural-resource-management

Between worlds : Raden Saleh & Juan Luna

Exposition : Between worlds : Raden Saleh & Juan Luna, 16/11/2017 – 11/03/2018, Singtel Special Exhibition Gallery C, National Gallery Singapore

Explore the extraordinary life stories of two artists who are considered national heroes in their home countries––Indonesian painter Raden Saleh (c.1811–1880) and Filipino painter Juan Luna (1857–1899). Drawing from important collections around the world, this landmark exhibition brings together more than 80 of their works for the first time.

Between Worlds takes you through significant chapters of each artist’s journey, uncovering parallels and differences in their experiences, from their emergence as artists in Java and the Philippines; to their subsequent training and participation in artistic and social circles in Europe; and their later return to Southeast Asia.

Between Worlds is part of the showcase Century of Light, which features two exciting exhibitions on art from the 19th century, a post-Enlightenment era of innovation and change. Together with Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay, the show demonstrates the range of painting styles and art movements that emerged in Europe during this formative period, which has been and continues to be influential to the development of art in Southeast Asia and around the world.

Voir : https://www.nationalgallery.sg/see-do/programme-detail/619/between-worlds-raden-saleh-and-juan-luna

Exposition : Les Mentawai d’Indonésie : Trésors de la réserve

Exposition : Les Mentawai d’Indonésie : trésors de la réserve, 21/10/2017 – 28/05/2018, Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden

Dans cette exposition, des objets uniques nous racontent l’histoire des traditions séculaires et de la culture d’aujourd’hui des Mentawai (Indonésie). Dans quelle mesure des traditions comme celles des Mentawai continuent-elles à être observées à une époque où la modernité s’est frayé un chemin jusque dans leur île ? Dans quelle mesure les Mentawai sont-ils prêts à faire partie d’un monde globalisé ? Les anciennes traditions sont-elles compatibles avec la vie au 21e siècle ?

C’est grâce au don de Reimar Schefold, ancien professeur d’anthropologie de l’Indonésie à l’Université de Leyde, que le Museum Volkenkunde peut disposer d’une collection d’art et d’objets Mentawai.

Lire la suite : https://volkenkunde.nl/nl/tentoonstelling-schatten-depot-mentawai-uit-indonesie

 

Is Indonesia sliding towards a ‘Neo-New Order’?

Joko Widodo watches Soeharto-era anti-communist film Pengkhianatan G30S/PKI with senior military and police figures on 29 September. Photo by Laily Rachev for Antara.

« Is Indonesia sliding towards a ‘Neo-New Order’? » by Tim Lindsey, 04/10/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

On 16 September, police broke up an academic discussion at the offices of renowned activist NGO the Jakarta Legal Aid Foundation (LBH). The topic was the killings of alleged leftists in 1965 and 1966 in the wake of the failed coup that brought former president Soeharto to power, public discussion of which has often raised the ire of anti-communist mobs.

This event was more significant than it seems at first glance. LBH has always been critical of government and unafraid to address highly controversial issues. Despite this, security forces have never before broken up a meeting at its offices – not even under Soeharto’s authoritarian New Order, when LBH was often the most vocal opposition voice in the country.

The trouble started when protesters gathered outside LBH, claiming the meeting supported communism. They included prominent Islamist ginger groups like the Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) and others involved in recent mass rallies against former Jakarta governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama. As is so often the case, the police gave in to the mob. They surrounded LBH, forced their way in and closed the event down.

Discussion of the mass killing or imprisonment in 1965 and 1966 of Indonesians supposedly associated with the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) may still be controversial in Indonesia but it is hardly novel. There have been many similar events in recent years (including at LBH) and even public conferences, some endorsed by the government. Likewise, Joshua Oppenheimer’s dramatic documentary about the killings, “The Act of Killing” has been screened in Indonesia and covered widely in the media. Every Thursday, survivors and supporters protest outside the palace to remind President Joko Widodo (Jokowi) of his broken election promise to resolve past violations of human rights, including the massacres of 1965/6.

In this context, having police break into LBH to halt a private meeting seemed extreme and heavy-handed, so LBH organised an artistic event the next day to protest. The mob gathered again, using social media to spread rumours it was a secret congress of the PKI, and pelted those trying to enter with stones. This time, police held protesters off but activists were trapped inside LBH for hours before being evacuated to the National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas HAM).

The idea that communism might be resurgent is ridiculous in a country that doesn’t even have a leftist political party. Although the PKI was violently obliterated in the mid-sixties, and communism is a dead letter globally with has no popular support in Indonesia, it is alive and well as Indonesia’s No. 1 bogeyman. Jokowi helped legitimise this in May, responding to claims that he is from a former PKI family by calling for communism to be “crushed” if it rose again. Communism remains the label of choice to smear progressive opponents, as Islamist groups showed in their highly effective attack on LBH.

Civil society leaders like those at LBH are, in fact, the intellectual engine of the reform movement that delivered democratisation in the years immediately following Soeharto’s fall in 1998. For them, the attacks on LBH are another marker of what they see as Indonesia’s slow slide away from liberal democratic reform, towards what they are now calling the “Neo-New Order”.

Lire la suite sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/is-indonesia-sliding-towards-a-neo-new-order/

If Indonesia wants to combat hoaxes it must fix its public broadcasters

If Indonesia wants to combat hoaxes it must fix its public broadcasters by Ross Tapsell, 25/09/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

On election night in 2014, Indonesians tuned in to two 24-hour news stations to see who won. On TVOne, Prabowo Subianto was touted as the winner. Over on MetroTV, Joko “Jokowi” Widodo was declared the winner. Given the partisan coverage of both stations throughout the election, it was not surprising that many viewers had no idea who actually won. Few bothered to check TVRI, Indonesia’s state-run television station.

Since then, citizens have become increasingly wary of partisan mainstream news sites, and are turning to a swathe of alternative online sources of information, some of which are deliberately produced to encourage sectarianism.

One solution to this problem is an independent, fearless, public media that could provide a serious alternative to privately owned conglomerates and the increasing spread of hoax news and disinformation online. Indonesia is in dire need of a robust publicly owned media in the digital era. Unfortunately, public broadcasting in Indonesia is ‘dying’ and needing ‘revitalisation’.

 In countries such as the United Kingdom (BBC), Australia (ABC), and Japan (NHK), nation-wide public broadcasters produce news and information across a variety of platforms, including the internet. In Australia, for example, the ABC has three digital television stations, a 24-hour news station that can be live-streamed online, and hundreds of local radio stations (which are also available online), as well as a growing online news and information presence through abc.net.au.

Indonesia’s public media looks more like the United States model, where television station PBS is underfunded and ignored by viewers, overpowered by privately owned cable news stations like Fox and CNN.

Lire la suite : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/if-indonesia-wants-to-combat-hoaxes-it-must-fix-its-public-broadcasters/

 

Talking Indonesia : Higher education

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: higher education by Andrew Rosser, 14/09/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

Indonesia’s tertiary education institutions have long performed poorly in global university rankings. Among the various deficits that are routinely recorded are low teaching and research quality, inadequate levels of knowledge transfer and a lack of an international outlook. The Indonesian government has repeatedly expressed concern about the dismal results in the rankings, but despite a number of initiatives to transform the country’s leading universities into world class institutions, the higher education sector remains riddled with problems. Why do Indonesian universities struggle to deliver better academic programs? What reforms have been attempted and why have they failed? Who are the actors and organisations involved in the politics of higher education in Indonesia?

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these issues with Andrew Rosser, Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute.

Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

A écouter : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-higher-education/

 

« Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash » by Eka Kurniawan

Eka Kurniawan, Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash by Tim Hannigan, 14/09/2017, Asian Review of Books

Eka Kurniawan is the Quentin Tarantino of Indonesian literature: a brash wunderkind, delivering gleeful references to pulp fiction, lashings of stylized violence, and an array of characters and scenarios that far surpass the tropes and clichés which inspire them. But as with Quentin Tarantino, one might occasionally wonder just how much substance lies beneath the indisputably stylish surface.

Vengeance is Mine, All Others Pay Cash (a peculiar rendering of the Indonesian title, Seperti Dendam, Rindu Harus Dibayar Tuntas, which might be better translated as “like revenge, longing must be paid in full”) is Kurniawan’s third novel to be translated into English. It follows his acclaimed debut, the surreal historical epic, Beauty is a Wound, and the short, sharp Man Tiger. As with the previous books there is plenty of sex, brutality and outrageous humor. But this time around there is no direct engagement with Indonesian history and few overtly supernatural elements. What we have instead is the violently quixotic odyssey of a man who can’t get an erection.

The book begins with the protagonist—street thug and sometime assassin Ajo Kawir—sitting on the edge of his bed, staring forlornly at his flaccid penis, “nestling like a newly hatched baby bird—curled into itself, looking hungry and cold”. And the opening dialogue is the first of Ajo Kawir’s many one-sided conversations with his unresponsive member:

He whispered to it, get up, Bird. Get up, you Wretch. You can’t just sleep forever. You have to get up. But that damn little bird didn’t want to get up.

Lire la suite sur : http://asianreviewofbooks.com/content/vengeance-is-mine-all-others-pay-cash-by-eka-kurniawan/