Archives par mot-clé : Indonésie

Why is Ahok in prison? A legal analysis of the decision

On 9 May, the North Jakarta District Court found that Basuki ‘Ahok’ Tjahaja Purnama had violated Article 156a of the Criminal Code (KUHP) and sentenced him to two years in prison. Photo by Dharma Wijayanto.
Gubernur nonaktif DKI Jakarta Basuki Tjahaja Purnama atau Ahok bersiap menjalani persidangan lanjutan kasus dugaan penistaan agama di auditorium Kementerian Pertanian, Jakarta, Selasa (3/1). Ahok menjalani sidang lanjutan dengan agenda pemeriksaan saksi. ANTARA FOTO/POOL/Dharma Wijayanto/kye/16.

Why is Ahok in prison? A legal analysis of the decision by Simon Butt, 06/06/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama has had a rough few months. Until recently, the Christian and ethnic Chinese Ahok was the governor of Jakarta – and one of the most committed reformers and effective administrators to ever lead the capital. In April, he lost a run-off election for governor, for a second term that would have begun in October. Then, on 9 May, he was convicted for blasphemy, in what was the most significant use of Indonesia’s blasphemy laws for political ends in the country’s history. The election loss and his trial were undeniably linked.

The blasphemy charges were clearly brought against him to undermine his chances of election. Worse, they related to his alleged misuse of a Qur’anic verse that the Indonesian Council of Ulama (MUI) and Islamist groups say prohibits Muslims from electing a non-Muslim as a leader. So every mention of his blasphemy case reinforced the message of his unelectability.

Many commentators have looked at the broader implications of Ahok’s loss and his conviction for blasphemy. In this article, I instead offer a legal analysis of the decision itself. What arguments did the court hear and what did it accept?

Lire la suite sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/why-is-ahok-in-prison-a-legal-analysis-of-the-decision/

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: online feminism

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: online feminism by Devi Asmarani, 08/06/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

In Talking Indonesia this week, we continue our recent conversation on the state of women’s activism amid growing religious conservatism, and explore the ways in which issues important to women, including sexuality and religion, are being shared and communicated beyond the conventional media. What is the state of the mediascape in Indonesia today? How has digital media created spaces for a diversity of views written by and for Indonesians? What does an Indonesian ‘feminist’ publication look like?

Host Dr Jemma Purdey spoke to Devi Asmarani, chief editor of online magazine Magdalene, which publishes under the tagline “a slanted guide to women’s issues” and also calls itself a feminist publication. Magdalene publishes in both English and Indonesian and has a growing readership in and outside of Indonesia.

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/talking-indonesia

« There Are No Straight Lines in Nature » : Making Living Maps in West Papua

Droning destruction — aerial view of deforestation in Merauke. Source: Sophie Chao.

« There Are No Straight Lines in Nature » : Making Living Maps in West Papua by Sophie Chao, 17/05/2017, Anthropology Now

With land growing scarce in Sumatra and Borneo, the oil palm frontier is rapidly moving eastward into West Papua, where rainforest and savannah are being razed at an unprecedented rate [2]. In particular, oil palm expansion in the Papuan regency of Merauke, a remote region of swamplands and savannah on the border with Papua New Guinea, has been the subject of growing campaigns led by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), including advocacy at the level of the United Nations [3]. Largely implemented without the free, prior and informed consent of the indigenous Marind-Anim people (hereafter the Marind), oil palm expansion has been facilitated by widespread collusion among corporate, state and military interests.

Along the banks of the Bian River in northern Merauke, I carried out fieldwork among several Marind communities whose lands and settlements are encircled by large-scale oil palm plantations established in the last decade. Participatory mapping with local communities is one of the key tools being used in the area to protect remaining forest areas in indigenous territories from oil palm incursion. This article explores maps as objects and mapping as practice, both of which are part ethnographic method, part advocacy tool.

As ethnographic tools, maps and mapping can provide important insight about how our research participants conceptualize place within their particular cultural value systems and cosmologies. Among the Marind, for example, mapmaking reveals that place is a dynamic entity shaped by the lives and doings of multiple actors, both human and nonhuman. In producing their own maps, the Marind convey this sense of place as a multispecies endeavor by emphasizing the role of different organisms in shaping it and giving it meaning. In this respect, places and the maps that represent them are lively entities, characterized by constant movement and transformation. The consequence of this is that Marind maps themselves keep morphing and never sit still, in the image of the multispecies world itself.

Lire la suite sur : http://anthronow.com/feature-preview/there-are-no-straight-lines-in-nature?platform=hootsuite

Wacana, vol. 18, n° 2 (2017) : Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II

Wacana, vol. 18, n° 2 (2017) : Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective II

Table of contents

Articles

  • The Chinese-Indonesian collections in the National Museum of World Cultures, the Netherlands by Francine Brinkgreve, Johanna Leijfeldt
  • Chinese photographers and their clientele in the Netherlands Indies, 1890-1940 by Liesbeth Ouwehand
  • Chinese correspondence in Dutch East Indies (1865-1949) by Tjong Han Siem
  • The Kai Ba Lidai Shiji 开吧历代史记: An autonomous history of the Chinese community of Batavia/ Jakarta in the VOC period by Leonard Blussé
  • Sajarah Cina: A nineteenth-century apology in Javanese by Willem van der Molen
  • Bangsawan prampoewan: Enlightened Peranakan Chinese women from early twentieth century Java by Didi Kwartanada
  • Dr Oen Boen Ing:  Patriot doctor, social activist, and doctor of the poor by Ravando Lie
  • Culture, power and identity: The case of Ang Hien Hoo, Malang by Melani Budianta
  • Chinese taukeh, labourer, and state control: Case study of panglong in eastern region of Sumatra (1890-1930) by Erwiza Erman
  • An early story of Kho Ping Hoo by C. W. Watson
  • Pecinan as an inspiration: The contribution of Chinese Indonesian architecture to an urban environment by Wiwi Tjiook

Articles à télécharger sur : http://wacana.ui.ac.id/index.php/wjhi/issue/view/42/showToc

Wacana, vol. 18, n° 1 (2017) : Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I

Wacana, vol. 18, n° 1 (2017) : Chinese Indonesians in historical perspective I

Table of Contents

Articles

  • The Chinese from Indonesia in the Netherlands and their heritage: Chinese Indonesian Heritage Center (CIHC) by Patricia Tjiook Liem
  • Long way home: The life history of Chinese-Indonesian migrants in the Netherlands by Yumi Kitamura
  • Indonesian Chinese in the Netherlands and the legacies of violence in colonial and post-colonial Indonesia by Alexander van der Meer, Martijn Eickhoff
  • Between ideology and experience: Siauw Giok Tjhan’s legacy to his daughter Siauw May Lie by Maya H.T. Liem, Ing Lwan Taga-Tan
  • Violent, political, and administrative repression of the Chinese minority in Indonesia, 1945-1998 by Mary Somers Heidhues
  • Chinese Indonesians after May 1998: How they fit in the big picture by Dewi Anggraeni
  • The strategic adaptation of Chinese-Manadonese in the Reform Era by Adrianus L.G. Waworuntu, Zeffry Alkatiri, Fuad Gani
  • Confucius Institute at Universitas Al Azhar, Jakarta: The unseen power of China by Thung Ju Lan
  • Moral is political: Notions of ideal citizenship in Lie Kim Hok’s Hikajat Khonghoetjoe by Evi Sutrisno
  • Chinese officers in Cirebon by Steve Haryono
  • The house of Kwee Sik Poo: An Indonesian-Chinese merchant from Pasuruan by Kwee Hong Sien

PhD Thesis Summaries

  • Chinese society as depicted in early twentieth century Chinese-Malay literature by Dwi Susanto

Book reviews

  • Book review; Petualangan Unjung dan Mbui Kuvong: Sastra lisan dan kamus Punan Tuvu’ dari Kalimantan by Bernard Sellato
  • Book review; Islamic Populism in Indonesia and the Middle East by C.W. Watson
  • Book review; Tesamoko: Tesaurus Bahasa Indonesia by Hein Steinhauer

Articles à télécharger sur : http://wacana.ui.ac.id/index.php/wjhi/issue/view/41/showToc

 

 

Review: Beyond decent work

A factory visited by the ILO during ‘Better Work Indonesia’, one of the two major campaigns analysed in Hauf’s book. (ILO Asia-Pacific)

Review: Beyond decent work by Antje Missbach, 02/06/2017, Inside Indonesia

A new book examines Indonesian labour struggles through the lens of international political economy theory

Indonesian wages continue to be among the lowest in the region. The term ‘decent work’ is generally defined as fair globalisation and poverty reduction through the promotion of competitiveness. This is achieved by improving compliance with existing labour regulations. But more radical unions in Indonesia have decided not to be part of ‘decent work’ schemes at all.  In his book Beyond decent work: The cultural political economy of labour struggles in Indonesia, Felix Hauf argues that it remains questionable whether low-cost production can ever be compatible with ethical labour standards given that the Indonesian minimum wage (which is not even paid by many employers) is seldom above subsidence levels.

In order to evaluate the impacts of ‘decent work’ schemes in Indonesia, Hauf examines three case studies in the garment and textile industries, which are among the most globalised sectors in Indonesia. Before revealing his findings Hauf offers a detailed examination of his theoretical framing, cultural political economy, and his methodological approach, referred to as critical grounded theory. He engages with the prominent writers of post-Marxist thought, such as Gramsci and Poulantzas and the usual big names from French poststructuralist philosophy. The works of Bob Jessop and Ngai-Ling Sum, who have thoughtfully dissected the flaws of late capitalism and neoliberal globalisation, are Hauf’s key references.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/review-beyond-decent-work?

Female Ulama voice : a vision for Indonesia’s future

Female Ulama voice : a vision for Indonesia’s future by Kathryn Robinson, 30 May 2017, New Mandala

In April, Indonesian religious scholars and activists hosted a world first: a convention of female religious authorities (ulama). The conference title, KUPI (Kongres Ulama Perempuan Indonesia), played with a dual meaning: female religious authorities, and scholars (male and female) whose interpretations of the Qur’an and Hadith proclaim gender equity (kesetaraan jender) as a fundamental principle of Islam. Over three days, speakers and delegates discussed the history of female religious authority in Indonesia—a claim that is highly contentious to hard line groups who argue that male authority, as prayer leaders and hence as political leaders, is a fundamental Islamic principle. They also discussed the more abstract concepts of social justice and human rights, as fundamental Islamic values focusing on issues like sexual and domestic violence and child marriage.

The congress ended with a declaration of three fatwa, reinforcing the value of female religious authority. The first fatwa argued for a minimum age of marriage of 18; the second, that sexual violence against women, including within marriage, is haram (forbidden). The third fatwa picked up the theme of environmental protection: environmental destruction is haram as it can trigger social and economic imbalances and place burdens on women. The congress called on the government to stop allowing the destruction of natural resources for ‘development’. Congress attendees have strong links into the community, and the organisers hold significant institutional positions, respect and support from government. This movement has been slowly building for a long time and is a significant voice in defining the future of Indonesia.

Lire l’article sur : http://www.newmandala.org/female-ulama-voice-vision-indonesias-future/

Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641−1699

Sher Banu A.L. Khan, Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641−1699, NUS Press, 2017

The Islamic kingdom of Aceh was ruled by queens for half of the 17th century. Was female rule an aberration? Unnatural? A violation of nature, comparable to hens instead of roosters crowing at dawn? Indigenous texts and European sources offer different evaluations. Drawing on both sets of sources, this book shows that female rule was legitimised both by Islam and adat (indigenous customary laws), and provides original insights on the Sultanah’s leadership, their relations with male elites, and their encounters with European envoys who visited their court. The book challenges received views on kingship in the Malay world and the response of indigenous polities to east-west encounters in Southeast Asia’s Age of Commerce.

« We have waited too long for a book such as this. It explores the extraordinary phenomenon of a preference for queens in the golden age of Islamic Aceh. Countering the dominant nationalist, feminist and Islamic scholarship, all of which find uncongenial the striking phenomenon of a preference for queens in early modern Asian Islam, Banu has utilized rich primary sources to reveal a queenship that was truly Islamic, effective and benign. This book is a revelation. Read it. »
Anthony Reid, The Australian National University

« Sher Banu’s superb study based on a host of newly discovered contemporary source materials throws new light on a hotly discussed topic among historians of Southeast Asian statecraft in Early Modern time. »
Leonard Blusse, Leiden University

« The author is to be congratulated on a book that makes a significant contribution both to the history of Southeast Asia and to comparative studies on women in early modern Asia. »
Barbara Watson Andaya and Leonard Y. Andaya, University of Hawai‘i 

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/products/sovereign-women-in-a-muslim-kingdom-the-sultanahs-of-aceh-1641-1699

Inside Indonesia 128, apr – jun 2017

Inside Indonesia 128 : april – june 2017 : New law, new villages ? Written by Ward Berenschot and Jacqueline Vel

The new Village Law could substantially change Indonesia’s villages. Not necessarily for the better.

Table of contents

  • Creating Indonesia’s Village Law by Jacqueline Vel, Yando Zakaria and Adriaan Bedner
  • The myth of the harmonious village by Ben White
  • New law, old bureaucracy by Yando Zakaria and Jacqueline Vel
  • The village head as patron by Ward Berenschot and Prio Sambodho
  • Participation in Ngada by Lily Hoo
  • When village development fails by Yulia Indri Sari
  • Traditional village institutions and the Village Law by Agung Wardana and Darmanto

A lire sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/

Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia

Arahmaiani Feisal (1961- ), No More Shadow Play ;Courtesy of the artist.

Thomas J. Berghuis, Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia, 25/05/2017, SOAS

Description

This seminar introduces the development of performance art in Indonesia, from the 1980s until the present day. It considers ways in which performance art in Indonesia has its art historical origins in the conceptual art movement of the 1970s, when artists across Southeast Asia began to consider new social and artistic realities in their artworks. But the the seminar will also draw on the multiple interwoven strands of performance practices and performance traditions that connect the development of contemporary performance art in Indonesia.

The seminar will examine the role of performance art in Indonesia in relation to place, time and media. Artists whose works will be examined include Arahmaiani, Heri Dono, FX Harsono, Mella Jaarsma, Tisna Sanjaya, Melati, Iwan Wijono, W. Christiawan, Mimi Fadmi, Redza Afisina, and Performance Club 69 — a recently established platform for study and practices of performance art initiated by Forum Lenteng in Jakarta, starting in 2016.

About the speaker

Dr. Thomas J. Berghuis is currently a Visiting Fellow at Tate Research Centre: Asia. He is Principal Fellow (Honorary) with the School of Culture and Communication at The University of Melbourne in Australia and is currently based in Leiden, the Netherlands. An art historian and curator of contemporary Asian art, with focus on contemporary art in China and Indonesia, Berghuis previously worked as Lecturer in Asian Art History at the University of Sydney (2008-2013); The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Curator of Chinese Art (2013-2015) at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York; and Director of the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara (Museum MACAN) in Jakarta, Indonesia (2015-2016). Berghuis’ writings have been published in prominent journals and art magazines. He is the author of Performance Art in China (Hong Kong: Timezone 8, 2006).

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/art/events/contemporary-arts-research-seminar/25may2017-place-time-and-media-in-performance-art-in-indonesia.html

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence by Maggie Lee, 21/05/2017, Variety

Something invigorating and full-bodied is brewing in Indonesia, and it’s not a cup of mocha java. It’s a cinematic resurgence, the biggest since the early 2000s, when Rudy Soedjarwo’s 2002 teen romance Apa ada dengan cinta? (What’s With Love?) rocked the Southeast Asia market while in the same year Riri Riza’s Eliana Eliana stunned the festival circuit with femme-centric social realism.

In September 2016, Warkop DKI Reborn: Jangkrik Boss Part 1, a reboot of a police slapstick comedy by 1980s comic trio Dono, Kasino and Indro (DKI), became the most-viewed Indonesian film in history, with 6.8 million tickets sold. For the first time, the top 10 domestic films enjoyed more than 1 million admissions, with horror Danur taking the top spot in 2017. According to Korean industry giant CJ CGV, exhibition of local films at its theatrical chain in Indonesia rose from 5% to 23% last year.

The arthouse scene is also flourishing, with second-generation directors Edwin, Joko Anwar, Lucky Kuswandi and Teddy Soeriaatmadja turning up at top festivals alongside relative newcomers including Eddie Cahyono (Siti) and Yosep Anggi Noen (Solo Solitude). In fact, there is talk of a new wave, or neo-neorealism, that explores gritty contemporary subjects about politics or gender with stylized, poetic film language.

A new height has been scored by the selection of Marlina, the Murderer in Four Acts in this year’s Directors’ Fortnight, the third Indonesian feature to bow in Cannes. It is also the third feature by Mouly Surya, whose sophomore feature, What They Don’t Talk About When They Talk About Love, premiered at Sundance 2013.

Australia-educated Surya, whose auteur influences are Stanley Kubrick, Michael Haneke and Abbas Kiarostami, cites Garin Nugroho’s Of Love and Eggs and Sjumandjaja’s biopic of women’s rights champion R.A. Kartini as her entry point to national cinema. It was Nugroho, the country’s most distinguished filmmaker, who proposed her to direct Marlina, based on a treatment developed from his visit to Sumba Island, an isolated, arid territory that resembles Texas.

Taking cues from Japanese samurai and Chinese martial arts that fused Western elements, she refashioned the Italo-American genre into a vehicle to examine male violence and patriarchal dominance in Southeast Asian backwaters such as Sumba, while highlighting the indigenous women’s unique air of mystery, sensuality and reliance. The women in Surya’s films bleed in key moments and there will be blood in Marlina, too.

“In my debut Fiksi [written by Joko Anwar], the heroine lost her virginity; in my second film, the blind protagonist had her first period,” Surya says. “Marlina doesn’t spill her own blood, but that of others, symbolizing the strength of women from Sumba. My female characters have grown up. Marlina is a full-grown woman, a widow who finds strength in grief.”

Voir : http://variety.com/2017/film/asia/indonesia-film-industry-recognized-at-cannes-1202437479/

 

Locating the historical Kartini

Locating the historical Kartini by Joost Coté, 22/05/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

A new feature film has prompted a renewed interest in the life of national hero Kartini.

Dr Joost Coté will speak tomorrow at a panel discussion on “The film ‘Kartini’ and Kartini as a source of historical and contemporary inspiration in Indonesia”, sponsored by the University’s Indonesia Forum. Coté was a researcher and adviser for the film, which was released inIndonesia earlier this year.

Joost Coté is also the editor and translator of Kartini: The Complete Writings 1898-1904.

Like so many iconic figures of history, over the last century, Raden Adjeng Kartini (21 April 1897-17 September 1904) has been much mythologised, misused and misread – or should that be not read?

The creation of Kartini as a national feminist icon all began with a Jacques Abendanon, the former director of colonial education, who selected and published letters Kartini had written to prominent Dutch progressive figures to support his campaign for colonial education reform. The result was Door Duisternis tot Licht (1911). An American feminist, Agnes Louise Symmers, on hearing about this remarkable Javanese woman, produced a (rather loose) English translation. The result was an international “feminist text” in 1920, ever since known by the inappropriate title, Letters of a Javanese Princess.

Two years later, the erudite North Sumatran author Armijn Pane produced the first Indonesian translation, Habis Gelap, Terbitlah Terang, for the colonial government’s “good literature” program, Balai Pustaka, and 16 years on, a definitive version for Indonesian readers. In 1939, the first Javanese translation appeared – which has since effectively disappeared –in 1940, a Japanese translation, later a French translation, followed by others.

Lire la suite sur :

Ahok’s defeats and public debate in Indonesia

Ward Berenschot, Ahok’s defeats and public debate in Indonesia, 18/05/2017, New Mandala

Basuki Thahaja Purnama’s (‘Ahok’) electoral defeat in Jakarta’s gubernatorial election on 19 April was stunning in itself. And then Jakarta’s sitting governor was dealt a further blow on 9 May when he was convicted to a two year jail sentence for blasphemy. Both events are a setback for those campaigning for a tolerant and pluralist Indonesia. As the election campaign focused on Ahok’s Chinese-Christian background and the purported threat he posed to Islam, the election results and the subsequent court ruling suggest that the appeal and the power of hardliner Islamic organisations is growing.

So far the interpretations of these events have focused on the considerations of Indonesian voters. Some attributed Ahok’s electoral defeat to a growing concern about social inequality, pointing to his low vote-share among poor Jakartans. Others focused on the impact that religious identity has on voting behaviour. Compared to other groups, Muslims were much less likely to vote for Ahok. These views suggest that a complex interplay of class and religion brought about Ahok’s defeat.

These analyses all focus on the considerations that individual voters may have. But at least as significant is what Ahok’s defeat says about the character of public debate in Indonesia. The Jakarta elections and Ahok’s conviction throw up a number of puzzles that suggest that we need to take a closer look at how public opinion is shaped, and by whom. The nature of Ahok’s defeat raises concerns about the increasingly closed character of Indonesia’s public sphere, and points to the importance of informal, personal networks in spreading and legitimising ideas.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/ahoks-defeats-say-public-debate-indonesia/

Indonésie, les fermiers du miel

Exposition : Indonésie, les fermiers du miel, du 20/05/2017 au 27/11/2017, Musée de l’Homme, Balcon des Sciences

Par Nicolas Césard, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle

Au détour de la forêt indonésienne, à Bornéo, découvrez comment des hommes se rendent en haut des arbres, en pleine nuit, pour récolter le miel produit par la plus grande des abeilles mellifères, Apis dorsata.

Cette apicollecte évolue vers une apiculture par l’aménagement d’emplacements favorables à l’installation des essaims sauvages. Ainsi, la destruction des abeilles est limitée et la récolte du miel est rendue plus aisée. Ces nouvelles pratiques permettent une gestion plus durable des ressources mellifères.

À travers des objets, des spécimens et des reconstitutions, et grâce à plusieurs dispositifs multimédias – jeux interactifs et vidéos de terrain -, cette exposition présente les diverses techniques et outils utilisé par ces fermiers du miel, et explore les relations entre les sociétés et les abeilles en Indonésie.

Voir : http://www.museedelhomme.fr/fr/visitez/agenda/exposition/indonesie-fermiers-miel

Balthazar, Prince Noir de Timor et de Solor en Chine, en Amérique et en Europe au XVIIIe siècle

 

Exposition : Balthazar, Prince Noir de Timor et de Solor en Chine, en Amérique et en Europe au XVIIIe siècle, du 22/05/2017 au 02/06/2017, INALCO

Par Frédéric Durand, Professeur, Université Toulouse II – Jean Jaurès

Originaire des îles de la Sonde (Indonésie et Timor-Oriental) où il est né en 1737, dans la communauté de métis Timorais/Portugais des Topasses-Larentuqueiros, Balthazar est selon toute vraisemblance le fils de Gaspar da Costa, le chef des métis portugais qui vivaient entre Flores, Solor et Timor-ouest, et avait le statut de « roi ».
Gaspar da Costa est mort en 1749, lors de la bataille de Penfui contre les Hollandais, à la tête d’une armée de 50 000 hommes. Il est considéré comme un des pionniers de la lutte anti-coloniale aux Indes néerlandaises et sa mémoire est commémorée par un monument à Timor-ouest.

Le Prince Balthazar, se rend à Batavia, à Macao et à Canton, avant de prendre un bateau pour la France, où il est abandonné à l’âge de treize ans par son précepteur, un prêtre portugais. Pour survivre, le jeune Prince embarque sur des bateaux, dont des navires corsaires, qui l’emmène notamment aux Pays-Bas, en Angleterre, en Ecosse et au Québec. Il revient ensuite en France, où il écrit à de nombreuses personnalités dont les rois Louis XV et Louis XVI et le philosophe Voltaire. Il n’est alors pas évident pour lui de se faire reconnaître en France, car en concurrence avec d’autres étrangers se disant « princes », dont ceux d’Angola et de Macao. Au cours des années 1760/70, la presse internationale parle de lui, de l’Italie à l’Angleterre et de Paris à Bratislava. Balthazar fréquente de nombreux milieux intellectuels où religieux, dont des académiciens, des alchimistes, des encyclopédistes et des francs-maçons. Il est également l’ami de la communauté des Noirs et des Asiatiques de Paris. Dans les années 1780, Balthazar devient conteur et poète dans la grande société parisienne, mais en 1789, la Révolution française fait s’effondrer le monde dans lequel il s’était intégré. Il est mort en 1791 à l’Hôtel Dieu de Paris.

Oublié au XXe siècle, plusieurs articles à son sujet on été publiés dans des revues scientifiques, et notamment dans Archipel, à propos de mémoires qu’il avait fait publier dans les années 1760. Les historiens qui avaient travaillé sur lui n’avaient cependant pas perçu sa notoriété et pensaient qu’il était mort pauvre et inconnu.

Les vingt-quatre panneaux de l’exposition reproduisent chronologiquement les étapes importantes de la vie du Prince de Timor et de Solor.

Voir : http://www.inalco.fr/evenement/exposition-balthazar-prince-noir-timor-solor-chine-amerique-europe-xviiie-siecle