Archives par mot-clé : Indonésie

Early Views of Indonesia: Drawings from the British Library

Annabel Teh Gallop, Early Views of Indonesia: Drawings from the British Library, London : The British Library, Jakarta : Yayasan Lontar, 1995, p. 132.

Annabel Gallop’s bilingual book, Early Views of Indonesia: Drawings from the British Library, is now available free online. This book is the catalogue of an exhibition held in Jakarta in 1995 to mark the presentation to the National Library of Indonesia of a complete set of facsimile reproductions of 510 archaeological drawings of Indonesia in the British Library. The presentation was a gift from the British government to the people of the Republic of Indonesia to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Indonesian independence.

A lire sur : http://library.lontar.org/flipbooks/Early Views Of Indonesia/Early Views Of Indonesia.html#/1/

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java in ResearchWorks Archive of the University of Washington Libraries

The University of Washington Libraries collaborated with Anthropology Ph.D. student, Evi Sutrisno, who was conducting her dissertation field research on Chinese Indonesian Confucianism, to digitize the rare and fragile Sino-Malay literature owned by two temple libraries in Java. The first project was conducted in Boen Bio (Wen Miao) – a Confucian temple of Surabaya, East Java – in 2010-2011. The temple was founded in 1907 and had a collection of religious books and magazines in Chinese and Malay languages in its abandoned library. The second project was conducted in the Hok An Kiong temple, Muntilan, Central Java in 2014-2016. The temple was founded in 1898 and had became the religious, social and learning space for the Chinese in the area. As in the case of Boen Bio, the Hok An Kiong also has an abandoned library, where popular Sino-Malay novels and magazines were collected.

Between 1967 and1998 Confucian practices and Chinese identity were severely repressed under the Indonesian New Order regime, so these materials were hidden away in the corners of dark and humid storage rooms to avoid state confiscation. Due to climate conditions, biological pests, and lack of appropriate storage facilities, the collection was in great danger and in urgent need of preservation. These projects are parts of a larger effort to identify materials in all known collections belonging to temples and private collections in four cities: Jakarta/Tangerang, Bandung, Solo, and Pontianak, where the Confucian communities during the period of 1900s to 1940s were vibrant. The first project consists of about 5,000 pages scanned from the collections of the Boen Bio temple and three other private collections in Surabaya. The second digitizes about 12,500 pages from the collection of the Hok An Kiong temple in Muntilan. Each project has been done in collaboration with other scholars and the temple communities who are interested in preserving the precious documents and history of the Chinese-Indonesians. For the second project, Evi Sutrisno would like to thank Sutrisno Murtiyoso of Tarumanegara University, Jakarta, Endy Saputro of State College for Islamic Studies, Surakarta and Elizabeth Chandra of Keio University, Tokyo for their supports and collaborations. Thanks also to Laurie Sears for her decision to provide funding. For further description of the project and the importance of the materials preserved, see: Evi Sutrisno. Forgotten Confucian Periodicals in Indonesia, CORMOSEA Bulletin, no 34 (Summer 2016): 8-14.

Vous pouvez faire des recherches dans la collection et consulter la liste des deniers documents mis en ligne sur : https://digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/21474

Iswadi Pratama, an auteur of Indonesian theatre

Iswadi Pratama, an auteur of Indonesian theatre by Caranissa Djatmiko, 12/04/2017, Inside Indonesia

Indonesia’s foremost theatre director, the internationally acclaimed Iswadi Pratama, staged an extraordinary eight productions in 2016.

There is no simple way of describing Iswadi Pratama. He claims to be a self-taught artist, yet his exceptional talents seem to suggest otherwise. Having spent most of his life bringing realities to the stage he insists that he only has the books he reads (stacked quite untidily at his private library) and the mentors who have guided him in the past to thank. Yet, after staging eight ambitious productions in 2016, it would be hard to dispute the fact that he has revolutionised Indonesian theatre.

The 45-year old poet and theatre director always knew that art was his true calling. He considers it to be the only space where he can express himself unapologetically, while also being a vehicle for helping others. ‘Everything that I do is motivated by an awareness that art must make people find their turning points in life,’ he says. ‘So I always choose projects based on [various] priorities: to what extent do the people involved in a certain program require my ability and capacity, and the relevance of it to my creative work and my vision regarding social transformation.’

Pratama’s plays have been showcased around the globe. His play Nostalgia di Sebuah Kota (Nostalgia in a City) was translated and performed in Germany in 2010. He has worked with some of the best artists in the world including American director Julie Taymor (Frida, The Lion King stage musical) who mentored Pratama when he became the first Indonesian to be a part of the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/iswadi-pratama-an-auteur-of-indonesian-theatre

Contemporary Indonesian Art: Artists, Art Spaces, and Collectors

Yvonne Spielmann, Contemporary Indonesian Art: Artists, Art Spaces, and Collectors, NUS Press, 2017

Indonesian art entered the global contemporary art world of independent curators, art fairs, and biennales in the 1990s. By the mid-2000s, Indonesian works were well-established on the Asian secondary art market, achieving record-breaking prices at auction houses in Singapore and Hong Kong. This comprehensive overview introduces Indonesian contemporary art in a fresh and stimulating manner, demonstrating how contemporary art breaks from colonial and post-colonial power structures, and grapples with issues of identity and nation-building in Indonesia. Across different media, in performance and installation, it amalgamates ethnic, cultural, and religious references in its visuals, and confidently brings together the traditional (batik, woodcut, dance, Javanese shadow puppet theater) with the contemporary (comics and manga, graffiti, advertising, pop culture).

Spielmann’s Contemporary Indonesian Art surveys the key artists, curators, institutions, and collectors in the local art scene and looks at the significance of Indonesian art in the Asian context. Through this book, originally published in German, Spielmann stakes a claim for the global relevance of Indonesian art.

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/collections/frontpage/products/contemporary-indonesian-art-artists-art-spaces-and-collectors

Sinitic Trends in Early Islamic Java (15th to 17th century)

Seated feline figures. Truc Phuong commune, Truc Ninh district. c. L 8 x H 15 cm, Nam Dinh museum, Nam Dinh Province. Late Lê dynasty. (Credit: H. Njoto)

Sinitic Trends in Early Islamic Java (15th to 17th century) by Hélène Njoto (Nalanda-Sriwijaya Center)

Note: This article is reproduced from the latest issue of NSC Highlights. For more, please see : https://goo.gl/XoyXfM

Java’s north coast is known to have had cosmopolitan and multi-religious towns where Muslim travellers and traders settled since the early 15th century. While there is scarce evidence of the presence of Muslims and foreigners in the early Islamic period, the accounts of past Muslim ruling figures, revered as holy men (wali), have persisted. These accounts have survived thanks to the fairly good conservation of the mausolea of these holy men, many of which are five to six centuries old. These mausolea, considered sacred (kramat), are visited every year by thousands of pilgrims from Java and other parts of the Malay world.

 These mausolea contain elements of a Sinitic (relating to Chinese culture) trend in early Islamic Java. Historical sources note the presence of ‘Chinese’ among the Muslims present on Java’s north coast in the 15th and 16th centuries. Local Javanese traditions and hagiographies also suggest that some of the most prominent holy men were of Chinese descent. Some are said to have come from Champa, the former Hindu-Buddhist kingdom of present-day coastal Vietnam (Manguin 2001).

 Nevertheless, the ‘sinitic’ origin of some of these holy men on the Javanese coast remains enigmatic since there is little material evidence apart from these mausolea remains. The richly decorated wooden panels that enclose these tombs on four sides, delicately sculpted, some in openwork or painted in red, are indeed vaguely reminiscent of a Sinitic culture. However, most motifs and stylisation, such as the lotus leaves in a pond, represented in a naturalistic way, had in fact already appeared during the Hindu-Buddhist period, possibly as the consequence of earlier Sinitic borrowings.

 However, the motif of the seated feline figure stands out. These feline figures, sculpted in wood or stone, were found in four religious sanctuaries such as in the mausolea of Sunan Drajat and Sunan Sendang Duwur. In these mausolea, they are represented in-the-round, in a seated hieratic position, bearded, with their maw wide open and their tongues pulled out (in Sunan Drajat). They have volutes motifs on the legs and a necklace or winged-like motif spreading from the scapula backwards. These feline figures suggest that these holy men had developed a taste for decorative features found in China and the Indo-Chinese peninsula of the same period.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.facebook.com/notes/nalanda-sriwijaya-centre/sinitic-trends-in-early-islamic-java-15th-to-17th-century-by-hélène-njoto/1368801939864852

Pacific Affairs : 2016 winner of the Holland Prize

2016 winner of the Holland Prize :

Perilous Waters: People Smuggling, Fishermen, and Hyper-precarious Livelihoods on Rote Island, Eastern Indonesia by Antje Missbach, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Pacific Affairs is pleased to announce that the fifteenth William L. Holland Prize for the best article published in Volume 89 (2016) of Pacific Affairs  has been awarded to Antje Missbach for her article published in Volume 89, No. 4 (December 2016).

An epitome of in-depth fieldwork, thorough contextual research, and clear writing, this year’s Holland Prize winning article by Antje Missbach addresses issues of trafficking, asylum-seeking, and migration through the question of why a disproportionate number of Indonesian offenders sentenced to jail for people smuggling, both in Indonesia and Australia, are fishermen from Eastern Indonesia, the poorest part of the country. Her answers guide readers from specific shores of local sites and practices via extended fieldwork on Rote Island (a frequent departure point for asylum seekers to Australia) and prisons, into broader streams of transnational people-smuggling networks and the effects of Australia’s policies, eventually navigating the broad and salient oceans of pollution and overfishing. In lieu of the superficial resort to moralistic labeling of smugglers as ‘bad’ people, Missbach’s article shows how complex imbrications of climatic, international, institutional, and social conditions render individual smugglers themselves captive in nets of hyper-precarity.

A télécharger sur : http://www.pacificaffairs.ubc.ca/announcements/holland-prize/

 

« Still in the Game »: The State of Indonesian Art History in the 21st Century

« Still in the Game »: The State of Indonesian Art History in the 21st Century : 3rd Cornell Modern Indonesia Project (CMIP) Conference

Cornell Southeast Asia Program with Cornell Modern Indonesia Project and the Herbert F Johnson Museum present the 3rd Cornell Modern Indonesia Project (CMIP) Conference.

18 renowned scholars from Indonesia, Australia, Europe, and America will gather in honor of the 50th anniversary of Claire Holt’s magnum opus, Art in Indonesia: Continuities and Change (Cornell University Press, 1967). The conference will be organized around the chapters of her classic text, as follows:

Friday, April 21, 2017 | Kahin Center

4:30pm  Opening Remarks by Professor Kaja McGowan, Director of Southeast Asia Program, Professor of History of Art, Cornell University

5:00 pm  The Great Debate Revisited

Saturday, April 22, 2017 | Kahin Center

10:00 am  Exploring Some Prehistoric Roots

2:00 pm  Impact of Indian Influences & Emergence of New Styles 4:00 pm  The Dance & Dance Drama

Sunday, April 23, 2017 | Johnson Museum

9:00 am  The Wayang World
11:00 am  Photography & New Media

2:00 pm  Wayang Performance of Dewaruci/ Bimasuci

A traveling exhibition of contemporary Indonesian photography at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum, curated by Brian Arnold, will further enhance the programming. Also, in honor of Benedict Anderson, an exhibition of his gifts to the museum, particularly his masks, will be on display on the 5th floor.

Details of speakers, titles of talks to follow.

Voir : https://seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/still-game-state-indonesian-art-history-21st-century

Ramayana : the divine poem as revealed by the Rajbansi masks (India, Nepal, Indonesia)

Exposition : Ramayana : the divine poem as revealed by the Rajbansi masks (India, Nepal, Indonesia), 08/04/2017 – 10/09/2017, Museo Arte Orientale di Venezia

Il Museo d’Arte Orientale di Venezia, presenta la mostra Rāmāyaa. The divine poem as revealed by the Rājbanśī masks, Museo d’Arte Orientale di Venezia, 8 aprile – 10 settembre 2017, prodotta da ICI Venice – Istituto Culturale Internazionale e dall’Association pour le Rayonnement des Cultures Himalayennes, a cura di Marta Boscolo Marchi e François Pannier, con il contributo scientifico di Stefano Beggiora.

La mostra, patrocinata dall’UNESCO, dall’Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia e dall’ICOO, Istituto di Cultura per l’Oriente e l’Occidente, offre un suggestivo percorso tra Nepal, India e Indonesia, seguendo la diffusione del Rāmāyana, testo sacro dell’induismo.

Tradizionalmente attribuito al saggio Vālmīki (fine II – inizio I sec. a.C.), il nucleo originario del grande poema venne composto in realtà tra il VI e il III secolo a.C. e trovò la sua definizione nei primi secoli della nostra era. Analogamente ai poemi omerici, il Rāmāyana è un insieme organico delle conoscenze e dei modelli culturali di un’intera civiltà.

In esposizione alcune splendide maschere in legno dipinto della collezione di Alain Rouveure, che rappresentano alcuni dei numerosi personaggi della saga di Rāma, avatāra (discesa) di Viṣṇu e furono realizzate per le sacre rappresentazioni che si tenevano nei villaggi, testimoniano il radicamento di questa tradizione presso l’etnia Rājbanśī, tra il sud del Nepal, il Bihar e il Bengala indiano.

Come si potrà vedere nel docu-film girato da Anne e Ludovic Segarra nel 1975, nel Mithila le donne continuano a dipingere le loro case con scene sacre, e nei villaggi di quella regione gli attori mettono in scena il Rāmāyana col volto semplicemente dipinto.

Dall’India il Rāmāyana si diffuse anche in Indonesia: la sua messa in scena nel teatro di figura indonesiano e in particolare nel wayang kulit, il teatro delle ombre, lo ha reso una delle storie più popolari e note del paese. Nell’ultima sala del percorso espositivo, le marionette della collezione del Museo d’Arte Orientale raffigurano molti degli stessi personaggi delle maschere Rājbanśī, creando un suggestivo legame culturale tra India e Indonesia.

Pour plus d’informations : https://icivenice.wordpress.com/2017/03/14/ramayana-the-divine-poem-as-revealed-by-the-rajbansi-masks-exhibition-museo-arte-orientale-di-venezia-exhibition-08-04-2017-10-09-2017/

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem de Linus Suryadi A. G., vendredi 28 avril 2017 à 13h, Salon Peillot, Musée Guimet

Au programme, un long poème narratif en prose : « Confidences de Pariyem. L’univers d’une femme de Java » de l’indonésien Linus Suryadi AG (1951-1999).

« Confidences de Pariyem » a paru en 1981 à Jakarta. A travers les confidences de l’héroïne au jeune Païman, c’est une description rare et puissante de la vie quotidienne et des états d’âme d’une jeune fille de la fin des années 60 qui transparaît.
Embauchée dans une vieille famille noble de Yogyakarta, dernier bastion de l’héritage culturel des cours javanaises, Pariyem nous offre avec candeur, fierté et humour un saisissant voyage.

La lecture sera ensuite prolongée par une rencontre littéraire animée par Etienne Naveau, qui donnera quelques clefs sur Java, les femmes, l’Islam et la place proéminente des écrivaines sur la scène littéraire de l’archipel.
Etienne Naveau est professeur de langue et de littérature indonésienne à l’INALCO.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/1730539373639915/

 

 

Blocking Papua from the Truth

Blocking Papua from the Truth by Andre Barahamin, 28/03/2017, New Mandala

Why have Jokowi’s promises to open up Indonesia’s “forbidden island” to journalists and rights monitors flunked?

On 20 December 2016, the Legal Aid Foundation for Indonesia Press (LBH Pers) staged a press conference. It highlighted censorship by The Indonesia Ministry of Information and Communication (Kominfo) towards Suara Papua, a local news outlet based in Abepura, Papua. With no prior notification, Suara Papua was silently listed alongside 11 websites blocked by the government. Those websites allegedly violated principles of journalism by promoting hoaxes and hate.

Later that evening, Rudiantara, the Minister of Information and Communication called Asep Komarudin from LBH Pers, promising that the ban would be lifted  the next day.

On  21 December, Suara Papua could  be accessed again, but not for those using Telkomsel – the largest telecommunications service provider in Indonesia. In Papua, Telkomsel is the main player and controls more than 65 per cent of the market for mobile phone services users. When I recently published an article with Suara Papua, dozens of people told me that they could not read it due to the Kominfo block.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/blocking-papua-truth/

Andre Barahamin is researcher of PUSAKA Foundation, and member of Papua Itu Kita (Jakarta-based solidarity campaign for Papua). He is also serving as editor for IndoPROGRESS, an online platform connecting progressive scholars and activists.

Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago

Leiden Asia Year : Symposium Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago, 13 May 2017, Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden

KITLV in collaboration with Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Universitas Indonesia, will organize a symposium on the importance of storytelling in Indonesia on 13 May 2017 in Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden, 10.30 – 17.00 hrs.

Indonesia’s oft-overlooked repertoire of storytelling traditions continues to inspire the nation’s arts, cultures and social practices. Inspired by a special edition of the journal Wacana, we investigate some of the archipelago’s diverse story-texts and performance practices.

This broad-scope symposium centers on the characteristics of Indonesian stories, their embedding in storytelling traditions, and the (ritual) contexts in which these are performed. Several presentations explore how stories were – and are – composed and disseminated. Other participants bring to the fore Indonesian perspectives on storytelling beyond the boundaries of the written word, including solo- and group-performances accompanied by music, singing and dance.

We hope that this event will contribute to a renewed attention to the storytelling practices of Indonesia, fostering a more nuanced understanding of “text” in all its forms, the relevance of traditional stories in a rapidly changing society, and ongoing developments in Indonesian literature and popular culture.

Among the presenters are Aone van Engelenhove and Nazarudin (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) who will analyze [hi]stories and storytelling on the island of Kisar, Southwest Maluku, Els Bogaerts (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) with a fresh view on the well-known historical figure of Arya Penangsang in a recent theatre-play from Yogyakarta, Joachim Niess (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Südostasienwissenschaften) with a discussion of fiction in early Indonesian newspapers, and Clara Brakel-Papenhuyzen presenting recordings of Malay storytellers in North Sumatra that reflect the relationship between the interior and the coastal areas on that island. The programme also features performances of music and dance by Sundanese ensemble Dangiang Parahiangan and West Sumatran ensemble Archipelago.

Please register if you wish to attend: ln.vltik@vltik

Voir le programme complet sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/symposium-stories-storytelling-indonesian-archipelago-leiden-asia-year/

 

Historicizing fiction, fictionalizing history

Historicizing fiction, fictionalizing history by Taufiq Hanafi, 31/03/2017, KITLV Blog

Sometimes fiction tells the truth and history perpetuates a fiction. This blog tells us about how history has been used to serve the creation of a national mythology, while fiction has allowed a space for more difficult histories to be worked out.

Similarly, the bleakest moment in Indonesian history is ignored and silenced. Almost all Indonesian written history skips over the mass killings of the communists and left-wing sympathizers after the aborted coup blamed on the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) in 1965.

Take the obligatory read for elementary students in the 1990s, Pendidikan Sejarah Perjuangan Bangsa (The History of the National Struggle). We Indonesians were so accustomed to this that we thought the historical events presented in the book were all objectively true. The book instructed students to show admiration for the Indonesian Army for their outstanding success in crushing the September movement of the PKI. It also wanted us to believe that the anti-communist purge was the right thing to do in order to support the national struggle for the just and prosperous society under Pancasila. Furthermore, it created a make-believe world in which Soeharto was a hero who had so much love and respect for his people and his country. As for the massacre, the book remained silent.

In fiction, however, the killings were made (more) clear. Ahmad Tohari in the Ronggeng Dukuh Paruk (Dancer of Paruk Hamlet) trilogy narrates the mass killings in Central Java, and describes the close cooperation between the army and paramilitary groups. Mencoba Tidak Menyerah (Trying not to Surrender) by Yudhistira ANM Masardi vividly portrays the systematic massacre and politics of fear through the eyes of a small boy who is searching for his father after he was made to disappear due to his affiliation with the communists. Ashadi Siregar centers his novel, Jentera Lepas, on students who were massacred by the army after the aborted coup, while Umar Kayam in Bawuk questions how society has been dehumanized for not having the courage to address the issue.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/blog-historicizing-fiction-fictionalizing-history/

REVIEW : Keyakinan dan Kekuatan: Seni Bela Diri Silat Banten

Gabriel Facal, Keyakinan dan Kekuatan: Seni Bela Diri Silat Banten (Faith and Force: The Silat Martial Arts of Banten), Yayasan Pustaka Obor Indonesia and O’ong Maryono Pencak Silat Award, 2016

Reviewed by Abdul Hamid in Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, no. 21

Keyakinan dan Kekuatan is developed from a Ph.D. dissertation, originally entitled (in French) “La foi et la force: L’art Silat martial de Banten en Indonésie,” written by Gabriel Facal. Facal is an ethnographer and a martial artist who has been practicing in various silat (traditional martial art) schools (paguron) in Banten, Indonesia. Nicely translated by Arya Seta, it was first published in Indonesian to target Indonesian readers.

As its title suggests, there are two unique aspects of the Bantenese Martial Arts: faith (“keyakinan”) and force (“kekuatan”). Facal argues that the interweaving of these two aspects has differentiated Bantenese Silat from other kind of martial arts, even within Indonesia’s regional martial arts traditions.

Strengthening faith is considered the first step to learn silat rituals. After this first step, faith is instrumental to be integrated in the fighting techniques/the forces of the silat. Faith and fighting techniques complement each other in order to gain physical, mental, and moral power, at the same time. Thus, in Bantenese martial arts, both religion and ritual practice are blended and in turn strengthen each other to perfection…

Lire la suite sur : https://kyotoreview.org/book-review/keyakinan-dan-kekuatan/

 

BIES: Read our latest free-access collection

BIES: Read our latest free-access collection

Each year, the editors of the Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies (BIES) make six recently published articles free to access online. Their selections for 2017 are below.

Jokowi and the New Developmentalism by Eve Warburton
December 2016 (52.3)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1249262

Authoritarian Legacies in Post–New Order Indonesia: Evidence from a New Dataset by Sharon Poczter and Thomas B. Pepinsky April 2016 (52.1)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2015.1129051

 Village Governance, Community Life, and the 2014 Village Law in Indonesia by Hans Antlöv, Anna Wetterberg, and Leni Dharmawan
August 2016 (52.2)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00074918.2015.1129047

Consistency between Sakernas and the IFLS for Analyses of Indonesia’s Labour Market: A Cross-Validation Exercise by Sarah Xue Dong
December 2016 (52.3)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1228828

Could a Resource Export Boom Reduce Workers’ Earnings? The Labour-Market Channel in Indonesia by Ian Coxhead and Rashesh Shrestha
August 2016 (52.2)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1184745

How Robust Is Indonesia’s Poverty Profile? Adjusting for Differences in Needs by Jan Priebe
August 2016 (52.2)

 

Talking Indonesia podcast : Volunteers and Indonesian elections

Talking Indonesia: Volunteers and Indonesian elections by Dirk Tomsa

The last five years have seen the emergence of volunteer organisations as new actors in the campaigns of some of Indonesia’s most important elections. Who are these volunteers, what motivates them and what role do they play in elections? Have volunteer organisations changed the role of political parties, or opened new access for the citizens mobilising as part of them? How will they influence the 2019 presidential elections?

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae explore these issues with Dr Dirk Tomsa, senior lecturer in the Department of Politics and Philosophy at La Trobe University and a new co-host in 2017 of Talking Indonesia.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-volunteers-and-elections/