Archives par mot-clé : Femmes

Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories

Phaptawan Suwannakudt, Wat Tha Suthawat Angthong (detail), 1994. Photograph by: Aroon Permpoonsophon

Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories Symposium, 11–13 October 2017, Power Institute, University of Sydney

Studies focused on gender in Southeast Asian societies have emerged, in recent decades, in approximate concurrence with the development of regionally focused Southeast Asian art histories. The founding premise of this international symposium is that there has to date been insufficient intersection between these two fields.

As the first symposium of its kind, Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories aims to establish the parameters of current research, and to develop inter-disciplinary and transnational frameworks for future studies in the field. Bringing together a range of scholars working on the pre-modern, modern, and contemporary, we seek to consider new perspectives and methodological approaches brought to the fore in art history through studies that are attentive to gender, or how we might reassess art historical narratives through the lens of gender.

The symposium will be launched by a keynote address from Professor Ashley Thompson, the Hiram W. Woodward Chair in Southeast Asian Art at SOAS, University of London. Symposium participants and up to twelve additional attendees, on a competitive basis, will also be invited to participate in a half-day masterclass led by Professor Thompson, and a professional development workshop.

Masterclass and workshop

Introduction to the Masterclass, by Professor Ashley Thompson, with a list of readings.

Speakers

The symposium will be launched by a keynote address from Professor Ashley Thompson, the Hiram W. Woodward Chair in Southeast Asian Art at SOAS, University of London : Figuring the Buddha.

Chanon Kenji Praepipatmongkol | Ph.D. candidate, University of Michigan
Chang Saetang’s Self-Portraits and the Inversion of ‘Barami’

Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez | Assistant Professor, Department of Art Studies, University of the Philippine
Art on the Back Burner: Gender as the Elephant in the Room of SEA Art Histories

Eksuda Singhalampong | Lecturer in Art History, Silpakorn University
Picturing Femininity: Portraits of the Early Modern Siamese Women

May Adadol Ingawanij | Reader and Co-director, Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media, University of Westminster
The Essay Film as Feminist Cinema in Southeast Asia: Nguyen Trinh Thi and Anocha Suwichakornpong

Qui Ha Nguyen | PhD candidate, University of Southern California
Womanhood and Modernity: Revisiting Cinematic Representation of Women’s Social Transformation in Vietnamese Revolutionary Cinema during the Wartime (1945-1975)

Roger Nelson | Postdoctoral Fellow, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Women as Passengers, Men as Drivers? On Urban Movement in Post-Independence ‘Cambodian Arts’

Soumya James | Independent Scholar, New Haven, CT
Exploring the Feminine in Angkor’s Visual Imagery

Tina Le | PhD candidate, University of Michigan
Crafting the Indigenous: Paz Abad Santos and the Feminine Arts

Wulan Dirgantoro | Postdoctoral Fellow, Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices 2016/2017 program, Forum Transregionale Studien, Berlin, Germany
Correcting, Interrogating: A proposal for feminist framework for Indonesian visual arts

Yvonne Low | Sessional Lecturer in Asian Art, Department of Art History, University of Sydney
Recovering the Nation’s Woman (Artists): Mia Bustam and Lai Foong Moi

Programme complet et abstracts sur : http://www.powerpublications.com.au/gender-in-southeast-asian-art-histories/

 

 

East Timor’s “Red Rosa”

« East Timor’s “Red Rosa” » by David Hutt, 18/08/2017, New Mandala

When East Timor gained its independence in May 2002, after a 24-year struggle against Indonesian occupation, how to compensate those who fought was one of the first decisions the new government had to make. By September of that year, two commissions had been established to register veterans of the armed struggle. Almost 40,000 people registered at the time, and a further 76,000 registered when another commission was established two years later. Veterans’ benefits are a sensitive issue in East Timor. Misgivings about favouritism were partly behind the 2006 violence that spread throughout the nation, while a significant chunk of the state budget is still today handed over for pensions, not without politically-motivated reasons.

But more aggrieved than most were the women of East Timor. In the first two commissions, out of 36,959 registered individuals only 13 were women. At the 2004 commission, which was intended for those who had fought in the clandestine resistance, 10,337 of the 76,061 registered were women—roughly 13%. This is despite some estimates that as many as 60% of the clandestinos (as they are known) were female…

When I visited Dili in 2015, an idle afternoon provided me the time to wander the city. Under a sedulous sun, I stopped to rest in a small, unassuming park that I later discovered is dedicated to Rosa “Muki” Bonaparte Soares, a little known but important figure of the early nationalist movement. Back home, I consulted the books I own on East Timorese history: Bonaparte’s name arose only in either a long list of other names from the period or as a passing reference to her stewardship of the OPMT. Academic essays bore more fruit. Perhaps the finest exploration of Bonaparte’s life, and of the East Timorese women’s movement during the 1970s, is Hannah Loney’s essay, “The Target of a Double Exploitation: Gender and Nationalism in Portuguese Timor, 1974–75”, published in 2015.

Bonaparte was one of only three women—along with Maria do Céu Pereira and Guilhermina Araújo—to be part of FRETILIN’s original 50-strong central committee. And, on 28 August 1975, she was named Secretary General of the first East Timorese women’s organisation, the OPMT. It wasn’t long before organisation chapters spread across the half-island nation, with 7,000 members within weeks. Free classes were provided to illiterate women and, for the first time, taught in the Timorese language, Tetum, and crèches were established for child-care.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/rosa-bonaparte-east-timors-red-rosa/

Angkor Wat Apsara and Devata : Khmer women in divine context

« Angkor Wat Apsara and Devata : Khmer women in divine context» by Jana Igunma, 05/07/2017, Southeast Asia Library Group (SEALG)

Angkor Wat Apsara and Devata : Khmer women in divine context is a rich and well researched online resource dedicated to the women of the Khmer Empire (9th-15th century). Being great builders, the Khmer filled the landscape with monumental temples, huge reservoirs and canals, and laid an extensive network of roads with bridges. Angkor Wat is the best known and most stunning temple. It is, in fact, a microcosm of the Hindu universe. Covering 200 hectares it is the world’s largest religious complex. Its construction was started by the Khmer king Suryavarman II around 1122 CE and took some 30 years to complete. The walls of Angkor Wat house a royal portrait gallery with 1,795 women realistically rendered in stone. Although the temple complex has been researched extensively in terms of architecture, art and archaeology, not much is known about these women.

Devata.org aims to provide answers to questions like:

  •  Who were the women of Angkor Wat?
  • Why are images of women immortalized with the most prominent placement in the largest temples the Khmer civilization ever built?
  • What did these women mean to the Khmer rulers, priests and people?
  • How does the Cambodian dance tradition relate to the women of Angkor Wat?
  • Do the women of Angkor Wat embody information important to us in modern times?

This online resource gives access to articles about books and authors relating to Khmer history, Cambodian dance, children of Angkor, women’s history and heritage preservation. The focus, however, is on the women of Angkor Wat and other Khmer temples. Features like an Angkor Wat Devata Inventory, the Devata Database Project, Facial Pattern Recognition of the Angkor Wat portraits, photo galleries and a range of research articles provide insight into the rich culture of the Khmer people.

Voir : https://southeastasianlibrarygroup.wordpress.com/2017/07/05/khmer-women-in-divine-context/

Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641−1699

Sher Banu A.L. Khan, Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641−1699, NUS Press, 2017

The Islamic kingdom of Aceh was ruled by queens for half of the 17th century. Was female rule an aberration? Unnatural? A violation of nature, comparable to hens instead of roosters crowing at dawn? Indigenous texts and European sources offer different evaluations. Drawing on both sets of sources, this book shows that female rule was legitimised both by Islam and adat (indigenous customary laws), and provides original insights on the Sultanah’s leadership, their relations with male elites, and their encounters with European envoys who visited their court. The book challenges received views on kingship in the Malay world and the response of indigenous polities to east-west encounters in Southeast Asia’s Age of Commerce.

« We have waited too long for a book such as this. It explores the extraordinary phenomenon of a preference for queens in the golden age of Islamic Aceh. Countering the dominant nationalist, feminist and Islamic scholarship, all of which find uncongenial the striking phenomenon of a preference for queens in early modern Asian Islam, Banu has utilized rich primary sources to reveal a queenship that was truly Islamic, effective and benign. This book is a revelation. Read it. »
Anthony Reid, The Australian National University

« Sher Banu’s superb study based on a host of newly discovered contemporary source materials throws new light on a hotly discussed topic among historians of Southeast Asian statecraft in Early Modern time. »
Leonard Blusse, Leiden University

« The author is to be congratulated on a book that makes a significant contribution both to the history of Southeast Asia and to comparative studies on women in early modern Asia. »
Barbara Watson Andaya and Leonard Y. Andaya, University of Hawai‘i 

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/products/sovereign-women-in-a-muslim-kingdom-the-sultanahs-of-aceh-1641-1699