Archives par mot-clé : Féminisme

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: online feminism

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: online feminism by Devi Asmarani, 08/06/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

In Talking Indonesia this week, we continue our recent conversation on the state of women’s activism amid growing religious conservatism, and explore the ways in which issues important to women, including sexuality and religion, are being shared and communicated beyond the conventional media. What is the state of the mediascape in Indonesia today? How has digital media created spaces for a diversity of views written by and for Indonesians? What does an Indonesian ‘feminist’ publication look like?

Host Dr Jemma Purdey spoke to Devi Asmarani, chief editor of online magazine Magdalene, which publishes under the tagline “a slanted guide to women’s issues” and also calls itself a feminist publication. Magdalene publishes in both English and Indonesian and has a growing readership in and outside of Indonesia.

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/talking-indonesia

Locating the historical Kartini

Locating the historical Kartini by Joost Coté, 22/05/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

A new feature film has prompted a renewed interest in the life of national hero Kartini.

Dr Joost Coté will speak tomorrow at a panel discussion on “The film ‘Kartini’ and Kartini as a source of historical and contemporary inspiration in Indonesia”, sponsored by the University’s Indonesia Forum. Coté was a researcher and adviser for the film, which was released inIndonesia earlier this year.

Joost Coté is also the editor and translator of Kartini: The Complete Writings 1898-1904.

Like so many iconic figures of history, over the last century, Raden Adjeng Kartini (21 April 1897-17 September 1904) has been much mythologised, misused and misread – or should that be not read?

The creation of Kartini as a national feminist icon all began with a Jacques Abendanon, the former director of colonial education, who selected and published letters Kartini had written to prominent Dutch progressive figures to support his campaign for colonial education reform. The result was Door Duisternis tot Licht (1911). An American feminist, Agnes Louise Symmers, on hearing about this remarkable Javanese woman, produced a (rather loose) English translation. The result was an international “feminist text” in 1920, ever since known by the inappropriate title, Letters of a Javanese Princess.

Two years later, the erudite North Sumatran author Armijn Pane produced the first Indonesian translation, Habis Gelap, Terbitlah Terang, for the colonial government’s “good literature” program, Balai Pustaka, and 16 years on, a definitive version for Indonesian readers. In 1939, the first Javanese translation appeared – which has since effectively disappeared –in 1940, a Japanese translation, later a French translation, followed by others.

Lire la suite sur :

Feminisms and Contemporary Art in Indonesia : defining experiences

Wulan Dirgantoro, Feminisms and Contemporary Art in Indonesia : defining experiences, Amsterdam University Press, 2017

While Indonesian contemporary art is currently on the rise on the international art scene, there hasn’t yet been an in-depth study of the works of Indonesian women artists and the feminist strategies they employ within the art world. This book fills that gap, presenting the first comprehensive study of feminisms and contemporary arts in Indonesia, using feminist readings to analyze the works of Indonesian women artists historically and today, illuminating the sociocultural contexts in which they have worked and offering a nuanced understanding of local feminisms in the nation.

Table des matières sur : http://en.aup.nl/books/9789089648457-feminisms-and-contemporary-art-in-indonesia.html