Archives par mot-clé : Bouddhisme

Imagination and Narrative: Lexical and Cultural Translation in Buddhist Asia

Peter Skilling and Justin Thomas McDaniel (eds), Imagination and Narrative: Lexical and Cultural Translation in Buddhist Asia, Silkworm Books, 2017

The essays in this volume highlight the movement of Buddhist ideas and practices across Asia and how the encounter of far-flung cultures and personalities encouraged adaptation and transformation. At times this meant textual translation and transmission, as seen in the chapters about Chinese and Japanese Buddhist texts and their authors, or the analysis of Buddhist manuscripts in northern Thailand. Other cases entailed cultural translation—local adaptations of jataka tales, the evolution of legal notions within the framework of Theravada Buddhist teachings, localizations embedded in material culture seen through inscriptions and archaeological traces. Some themes go beyond Buddhism writ small to explore the broad canvas of engagement: the East-West encounter in the British geographical and anthropological exploration of Burma, and the place of Brahmanism in early Buddhist thought as expressed through the jatakas.

This expertly curated selection of scholarship shows that the diffusion of ideas and religious thought is much more than a tale of decline and loss or cultural appropriation and impoverishment. The fresh perspectives presented here—all drawn on primary sources—give an overall impression of a singular diversity that somehow participates in an unacknowledged unity. Beyond the fragmentations of sectarian and cultural divides, disparate Buddhist and non-Buddhist traditions have gone beyond arbitrary boundaries and flourished through their simultaneity.

Contributors: Olivier de Bernon, Frédéric Girard, Iyanaga Nobumi, François Lagirarde, Jacques Leider, Michel Lorrillard, Justin McDaniel, Kumkum Roy, Peter Skilling, Warangkana Srikamnerd.

Voir : https://silkwormbooks.com/products/imagination-and-narrative

 

Birmanie, le pouvoir des moines

Birmanie, le pouvoir des moines
un film de Joël Curtz et Benoît Grimont
 
Myanmar, die Macht der Mönche
ein film von Joël Curtz und Benoît Grimont
sera diffusé sur ARTE
auf ARTE ausgestrahlt wird
le mardi 20 JUIN à 23h20
en France et en Belgique
und
am Dienstag 20. Juni um 23h20Uhr
in Deutschland und Österreich
 
 

The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand

Angela S. Chiu, The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand, University of Hawaii Press, 2017

For centuries, wherever Thai Buddhists have made their homes, statues of the Buddha have provided striking testament to the role of Buddhism in the lives of the people. The Buddha in Lanna offers the first in-depth historical study of the Thai tradition of donation of Buddha statues. Drawing on palm-leaf manuscripts and inscriptions, many never previously translated into English, the book reveals the key roles that Thai Buddha images have played in the social and economic worlds of their makers and devotees from the fifteenth to twentieth centuries.

Author Angela Chiu introduces stories from chronicles, histories, and legends written by monks in Lanna, a region centered in today’s northern Thailand. By examining the stories’ themes, structures, and motifs, she illuminates the complex conceptual and material aspects of Buddha images that influenced their functions in Lanna society. Buddha images were depicted as social agents and mediators, the focal points of pan-regional political-religious lineages and rivalries, indeed, as the very generators of history itself. In the chronicles, Buddha images also unified the Buddha with the northern Thai landscape, thereby integrating Buddhist and local conceptions of place. By comparing Thai Buddha statues with other representations of the Buddha, the author underscores the contribution of the Thai evidence to a broader understanding of how different types of Buddha representations were understood to mediate the “presence” of the Buddha.

The Buddha in Lanna focuses on the Thai Buddha image as a part of the wider society and history of its creators and worshippers beyond monastery walls, shedding much needed light on the Buddha image in history. With its impressive range of primary sources, this book will appeal to students and scholars of Buddhism and Buddhist art history, Thai studies, and Southeast Asian religious studies.

Voir : http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9745-9780824858742.aspx

Buddhist Sectarianism in Burma’s Last Kingdom

Buddhist Sectarianism in Burma’s Last Kingdom by Alexandra Kolayanides (Stanford), 02/05/2017, UC Berkeley Centre for Southeast Asia Studies

The collapse of Burma’s final kingdom was devastating for the Buddhist organizations that depended on its royal sponsorship. The nineteenth-century encroachment of the British Raj crippled both the Konbaung Dynasty and its once-powerful monastic establishment, but it also created opportunities for opposition parties. One adversarial Buddhist sect, the Paramats, was particularly active between the Second Anglo-Burmese War in 1852 and the total colonization of the country in 1886. This reformist sect has been something of a mystery in the study of Burmese Buddhism because of minimal references to them in official Burmese materials. This paper examines a previously unstudied collection of documents dating from 1830–1880 found in an American missionary archive to argue that the Paramats were not a kind of Mahayanist group dedicated to propounding emptiness teachings, as scholars have argued, but rather, they were a Burmese Buddhist organization concerned with protesting laxity within mainstream monasteries and excess at royally-sponsored shrines. These archival documents suggest that scholars should attend to politics, as well as philosophy, to understand this particular sectarian development and similar religious reform movements at the end of the Konbaung Dynasty.

Alexandra Kaloyanides is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford University. She researches Burmese religions and American religious history. Her book manuscript, “Objects of Conversion, Relics of Resistance,” examines the religious contestations, conversions, and transformations during the nineteenth-century American Baptist mission to Burma.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/1771316929755778/

Buddhist Salvation Armies as Vanguards of the Sāsana: Sorcerer Societies in Twentieth-Century Burma

Thomas Patton, « Buddhist Salvation Armies as Vanguards of the Sāsana: Sorcerer Societies in Twentieth-Century Burma » in The Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 75, no. 4 (nov. 2016)

Since the early twentieth century, groups of Burmese Buddhist sorcerers and their followers have taken on the duty of guarding the Buddha’s sāsana from colonial, ideological, and Islamic threats. Sāsana (broadly, the teachings of the Buddha and the institutions and practices that support them) and how it should be sustained in the face of its inevitable demise have been central concerns of these societies, expressed in both their textual and oral representations. To illustrate this tension between endurance and change, this article explores ideas of the life cycle of the sāsana and how ideas about its responsibility to wider communities of Burmese Buddhists became expressed through the intersection of sāsana and sorcery. Examining the ways these associations understood themselves to be protecting and propagating the sāsana through various means demonstrates how sāsana vitality gave their beliefs and actions a distinct collective and collectively ethical tone.

A télécharger sur : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-asian-studies/article/div-classtitlebuddhist-salvation-armies-as-vanguards-of-the-span-classitalicssanaspan-sorcerer-societies-in-twentieth-century-burmadiv/C95DEB4DF28679334ED28078F97ED98A

 

The 2nd Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History with a focus on Hindu and Buddhist art and archaeology of central Java (8-9th Century CE)

Pour en savoir plus

The 2nd Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History with a focus on Hindu and Buddhist art and archaeology of central Java (8-9th Century CE) will be taking place in Yogyakarta, Central Java, July 27–2 August 2017. It is jointly run by SOAS University of London and Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM).

Programme Overview

In 2016, a pioneering Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History and Conservation focusing on premodern Javanese Art was held in Trawas (East Java). In 2017, the second edition of the Programme will be held in Yogyakarta, the iconic royal city of Central Java. It will focus on Central Javanese Hindu and Buddhist Art History in both its local and translocal dimensions. The period covered is from the early 8th to the late 9th century—the heyday of the Central Javanese civilisation.

Continuer la lecture de The 2nd Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History with a focus on Hindu and Buddhist art and archaeology of central Java (8-9th Century CE)