Archives par mot-clé : Asie

A télécharger : Architects of Buddhist Leisure

A télécharger : Justin Thomas McDaniel, Architects of Buddhist Leisure : Socially Disengaged Buddhism in Asia’s Museums, Monuments, and Amusement Parks, University of Hawaii Press, 2016

Buddhism, often described as an austere religion that condemns desire, promotes denial, and idealizes the contemplative life, actually has a thriving leisure culture in Asia. Creative religious improvisations designed by Buddhists have been produced both within and outside of monasteries across the region—in Nepal, Japan, Korea, Macau, Hong Kong, Singapore, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Justin McDaniel looks at the growth of Asia’s culture of Buddhist leisure—what he calls “socially disengaged Buddhism”—through a study of architects responsible for monuments, museums, amusement parks, and other sites. In conversation with noted theorists of material and visual culture and anthropologists of art, McDaniel argues that such sites highlight the importance of public, leisure, and spectacle culture from a Buddhist perspective and illustrate how “secular” and “religious,” “public” and “private,” are in many ways false binaries. Moreover, places like Lek Wiriyaphan’s Sanctuary of Truth in Thailand, Suối Tiên Amusement Park in Saigon, and Shi Fa Zhao’s multilevel museum/ritual space/tea house in Singapore reflect a growing Buddhist ecumenism built through repetitive affective encounters instead of didactic sermons and sectarian developments. They present different Buddhist traditions, images, and aesthetic expressions as united but not uniform, collected but not concise: together they form a gathering, not a movement.

Despite the ingenuity of lay and ordained visionaries like Wiriyaphan and Zhao and their colleagues Kenzo Tange, Chan-soo Park, Tadao Ando, and others discussed in this book, creators of Buddhist leisure sites often face problems along the way. Parks and museums are complex adaptive systems that are changed and influenced by budgets, available materials, local and global economic conditions, and visitors. Architects must often compromise and settle at local optima, and no matter what they intend, their buildings will develop lives of their own. Provocative and theoretically innovative, Architects of Buddhist Leisure asks readers to question the very category of “religious” architecture. It challenges current methodological approaches in religious studies and speaks to a broad audience interested in modern art, architecture, religion, anthropology, and material culture.

A télécharger sur : http://oapen.org/search?identifier=626388

Call for papers : International Federation for Theater Research-Asia 2018

Call for papers : International Federation for Theater Research-Asia 2018 : Bodies in/and Asian Theaters, 20-23 February 2018,  University of the Philippines Diliman

IFTR-Asia 2018 is now accepting abstract submissions.

Please remember: abstract submission closes on 15 September 2017

IFTR-Asia 2018’s website is: http://iftr-asia2018.upd.edu.ph

The conference attempts to answer these general questions: What do we mean when we talk about bodies in Asian theatres and performances? What do we mean when we talk about Asian bodies in different performances outside the region? How does theatre affect the way we think about the bodies of Asians?

Possible sub-themes include but not limited to the following:

The Spectacularization of the Body in Asia
Performing Queer Asian Bodies
Performing Displaced Bodies
Gendered Bodies
Asian Bodies Recuperated
Disembodiments
The Body as Medium
Asian Corporeality and/in Choreography
The Asian Body as Method

For details of these sub-themes, please visit: http://iftr-asia2018.upd.edu.ph/call-for-papers.html

IFTR-Asia 2018 is now accepting abstract submissions. As you prepare your abstract, please note the following:

1. Please make sure your abstract is related to the major theme Bodies in/and Asian Theatres or one of the sub-themes of the joint ATWG International Colloquium and IFTR Regional Conference.

2. Please limit your abstract to not more than 300 words. Otherwise, the system will not accept your submission.

3. Please submit a short bionote of not more than 150 words.

4. You will receive a confirmation email from the conference conveners as soon as your submission is received.

5. Announcement of successful submissions shall start on 2 October 2017.

To submit your abstract, please go to this link: https://docs.google.com/…/1FAIpQLSeyCdzDSdpPugz6wK…/viewform

CALL FOR workshop PAPERS: Populism in Asia: Contours, Causes, Consequences

Call for workshop papers : Populism in Asia: Contours, Causes, Consequences, 15-16 November 2017, Monash University Malaysia

During the last few years, populism has gained widespread attention in the Western world. Populist tendencies in Asia, however, have been largely ignored. Apart from the volume by Mizuno/Pasuk (2009), the phenomenon has slipped academic attention so far. Yet in recent years, the success of a new « Islamic populism » in Indonesia and Turkey, the rise of populist-authoritarian strongmen such as Duterte in the Philippines and Prabowo in Indonesia illustrate the salience of the phenomenon in Asia. A two-day-workshop organized by Monash Malaysia’s School of Arts and Social Science and the German Institute of Global and Area Studies in Hamburg (GIGA) is exploring the issue of populist mobilization in Asia, its causes and consequences.

Altough the concept itself is fuzzy, recent scholarship has made some significant contributions to the understanding of populism. We follow a narrow definition of the concept and understand it as a mobilization strategy, which uses ideas that divide society into two homogenous and antagonistic camps : the « pure people » and the « corrupt elite » (Mudde 2004 ; Müller 2016). We can distinguish between classical, right-wing (ethno-nationalist), neoliberal and left-wing populism. Often, populism as a « thin ideology » is combined with elements of nationalism or socialism. The causes and effects of the rise of populist movements and parties are subject to intense debate : structuralist explanation such as economic insecurity, delayed modernization or uneven globalization stand next to culturalist assumptions, e. g. the cultural backlash thesis that is the « retro reaction by once-predominant sectors of the population to progressive value change (Inglehart/Norris  2016).

The workshop explores the following questions :

  1. How can we caracterize Asia’s emerging populism ?
  2. What are the root causes for the rise (or failure) of populists leaders/movements/parties ?
  3. How do populists mobilize their followers ?
  4. What are the effects of the rise of populists on foreign policy and domestic politics ?

Organizers :

Marco Bünte, Monash University Malaysia : marco.buente@monas.edu

Andreas Ufen, GIGA, Hamburg : andreas.ufen@giga-hamburg.d

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/APSASEAsia/?hc_ref=ARRAVdrGiHU3fIEFccDe-QWg88aT9_vJ_ShhFkjThep1iMPHm5nEZCT2A7_NaXR4C2g&fref=nf

 

Nang Magazine, n° 2 : Scars and Death

NANG Magazine, n° 2 : Scars and Death

Guest-editors  : Yoo Un-Seong & John Torres

NANG is an English-language 10-issue magazine which covers cinema and cinema cultures in the Asian world with passion and insight.

Issue 2 is dedicated to Scars and Death. We asked writers, filmmakers, scholars, bloggers, and artists from Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, the USA, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, India, and Kazakhstan to pitch in without feeling the need to conform to a particular form or tone of writing. Write about scars and death. Die for the piece and swear by it. For the scarred workers, the dedicated, the desperate enough, for those dying to be offered another chance. For the films we have lost, the scenes that are scarred by time, those missing frames, abrupt endings and low resolutions. For the ones who died on- and off-screen, for deaths we haven’t seen. For those who risk life savings for a fictional piece. For all others who toil away, INT/EXT, their bodies taking it, DAY/NIGHT.

Yoo Un-Seong is a film critic, co-publisher of OKULO (a quarterly magazine on cinema and the moving image), and Lecturer at the Korea National University of Arts (K’ARTS). He worked as a programmer of the Jeonju International Film Festival from 2004 to 2012.

John Torres is a filmmaker, writer, musician. Does filmmaking workshops and hosts talks for independently run film and artist space “Los Otros” (with Shireen Seno). Feature films include Todo Todo Teros (2006) and Lukas the Strange (2013). Singer for Taggu nDios, working on their debut EP.

Vous pouvez suivre NANG sur son blog ou vous abonner à sa Newsletter, excellente source sur les ressources et les événements concernant le cinéma d’Asie.

Vous pouvez également aller feuilleter la revue à Paris, à la Librairie du Cinéma du Panthéon.

Site : https://www.nangmagazine.com/

Framing Asia

Framing Asia is a monthly film screening and discussion on Asia during the Leiden Asia Year.

Framing Asia is organised by by the KITLV (Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean), the IIAS (International Institute for Asian Studies), the department CA-DS (Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology) and Studium Generale of University Leiden.

You are welcome to join us on Tuesday 11 April at 19.30 h at Lipsius 028. This edition will screen two films on Popcultures and subcultures.

The first film is titled That’s Wicked (11 min) and directed by Joycelyn Lee. It follows the 15 year old Martin who introduces us to the world of beatboxing in Singapore.

The second film, The Silk Road of Pop (53 min), produced by Sameer Farooq, Ursula Engel and Stijn Deklerck shows us the vibrant music scene of the Uyghur youth in Xinjiang, China.

Afterwards, Ursula Engel (co-director of The Silk Road of Pop) will join our discussion with Bart Barendregt. Bart Barendregt is an associate professor at the Leiden Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology. He has an interest in popular and digital culture, and has published on Southeast Asian performance, new and mobile media, and (Islamic) pop music.

Voir les séances précédentes, Transgender issues in Indonesia, Disaster and the failing state sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/framing-asia

What’s (written) history for? On James C. Scott’s Zomia, especially Chapter 6½

Jean Michaud, « What’s (written) history for? On James C. Scott’s Zomia, especially Chapter 6½, » Anthropology Today, vol. 33, no. 1 (february 2017)

« Zomia. It sounds like a skin disease or some alarming bacteria. As it turns out, Zomia is a recently named space in Asia. As referred to in this article, Zomia encompasses the highlands of northeast India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and southwest China. Within these countries resides a combined population of over 100 million1 individuals officially registered as ‘national minorities’ by each respective government. For anthropologists who might have spent the last few years on a solitary digging trip to North Korea or foraging for tasty ontologies in Amazonia, let me start by teasing apart the term Zomia a little more, before I weigh in further on the Zomia debate. »

PDF à télécharger sur :  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-8322.12322/full

CFP : 9th Annual International Asian Dynamics Initiative Conference

Inside or outside?

CFP : 9th Annual International Asian Dynamics Initiative Conference, 26-28 June 2017, Asian Dynamics Initiative, University of Copenhagen : Asia in circulations

Deadline for submitting abstracts : 1 March 2017

The conference attends to the ways in which connected histories, flows and connections both within and beyond territoriality are taking shape. What kind of circulatory worlds are produced through these multiple connections forged across temporalities via commodity trade, investments, human migration, technology, tourism, religion, art, literature and other forms of cultural consumption? How has Asia historically circulated beyond its territorial boundaries? And how do these circulations shape the contemporary world?

We invite abstracts for paper presentations addressing Asian circulations and dynamics in a global context, but especially welcome perspectives relating to one of the panels listed below.

Arms Race in Asia? The Role of China’s Military Rise for the Powers in Asia
Conveners: Bertel Heurlin, University of Copenhagen; You Ji, University of Macau 

Asian Accelerations
Conveners: Lars Højer and Stine Simonsen Puri, University of Copenhagen

Branded Nation: Image, Commodity, Surplus
Convener: Ravinder Kaur, University of Copenhagen

China’s Borderlands in the Making of the Nation
Conveners: Ildikó Bellér-Hann and Edyta Roszko, University of Copenhagen

(En)countering Sexual Violence in the South Asian City
Conveners: Atreyee Sen and Emilija Zabiliute, University of Copenhagen; Raminder Kaur, University of Sussex

Exhibiting Asian Modernities
Conveners: Jens Sejrup and Oscar Salemink, University of Copenhagen

Globalization, International Trade and Economic Policy
Convener: Jakob Roland Munch, University of Copenhagen

« Going Comparative » in Asia
Convener: Jun Liu, University of Copenhagen

Research for Change: Reconfiguring Society and Politics through Theory and Engagement
Convener: Dan V. Hirslund, University of Copenhagen

The Politics of Local Food Movements in Scandinavia and East Asia
Conveners: Anders Riel Müller, NIAS; Erik Mobrand, Seoul National University; Hyejin Kim, Singapore National University; Niels Heine, Aalborg University

Trade and Translation of Buddhist Material Culture across Asia
Conveners: Trine Brox, University of Copenhagen; 
Emma Martin, University of Manchester

Urban Struggles, Digital Obstruction
Convener: Mark Philip Stadler, University of Copenhagen

Plus d’informations sur : http://asiandynamics.ku.dk/english/adi-conference-2017/call-for-papers/