Archives par mot-clé : Art contemporain

Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia

Arahmaiani Feisal (1961- ), No More Shadow Play ;Courtesy of the artist.

Thomas J. Berghuis, Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia, 25/05/2017, SOAS

Description

This seminar introduces the development of performance art in Indonesia, from the 1980s until the present day. It considers ways in which performance art in Indonesia has its art historical origins in the conceptual art movement of the 1970s, when artists across Southeast Asia began to consider new social and artistic realities in their artworks. But the the seminar will also draw on the multiple interwoven strands of performance practices and performance traditions that connect the development of contemporary performance art in Indonesia.

The seminar will examine the role of performance art in Indonesia in relation to place, time and media. Artists whose works will be examined include Arahmaiani, Heri Dono, FX Harsono, Mella Jaarsma, Tisna Sanjaya, Melati, Iwan Wijono, W. Christiawan, Mimi Fadmi, Redza Afisina, and Performance Club 69 — a recently established platform for study and practices of performance art initiated by Forum Lenteng in Jakarta, starting in 2016.

About the speaker

Dr. Thomas J. Berghuis is currently a Visiting Fellow at Tate Research Centre: Asia. He is Principal Fellow (Honorary) with the School of Culture and Communication at The University of Melbourne in Australia and is currently based in Leiden, the Netherlands. An art historian and curator of contemporary Asian art, with focus on contemporary art in China and Indonesia, Berghuis previously worked as Lecturer in Asian Art History at the University of Sydney (2008-2013); The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Curator of Chinese Art (2013-2015) at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York; and Director of the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara (Museum MACAN) in Jakarta, Indonesia (2015-2016). Berghuis’ writings have been published in prominent journals and art magazines. He is the author of Performance Art in China (Hong Kong: Timezone 8, 2006).

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/art/events/contemporary-arts-research-seminar/25may2017-place-time-and-media-in-performance-art-in-indonesia.html

Feminisms and Contemporary Art in Indonesia : defining experiences

Wulan Dirgantoro, Feminisms and Contemporary Art in Indonesia : defining experiences, Amsterdam University Press, 2017

While Indonesian contemporary art is currently on the rise on the international art scene, there hasn’t yet been an in-depth study of the works of Indonesian women artists and the feminist strategies they employ within the art world. This book fills that gap, presenting the first comprehensive study of feminisms and contemporary arts in Indonesia, using feminist readings to analyze the works of Indonesian women artists historically and today, illuminating the sociocultural contexts in which they have worked and offering a nuanced understanding of local feminisms in the nation.

Table des matières sur : http://en.aup.nl/books/9789089648457-feminisms-and-contemporary-art-in-indonesia.html

New photo exhibition takes on Cambodian gender double standards

An image from Neak Sophal’s Flower series. Photo supplied

New photo exhibition takes on Cambodian gender double standards by Anna Koo, 05/05/2017, The Phnom Penh Post

Neak Sophal’s Flower opens at Java Café and Gallery at 6:30pm on Tuesday, May 9. The exhibition, which will be displayed on the second floor of the café, runs through June 25.

The series, which was the product of six months work, is based on a Khmer saying that compares women to white paper and men to gold. If gold were dropped in the mud, the saying goes, it could be polished and cleaned and will never tarnish.

White paper, meanwhile, gets permanently stained and, once considered dirty, no longer has value. The proverb is a not-so-subtle reminder of the need for women to behave themselves sexually, or else they “lose their value”.

“If you are virginal, you are a valued woman. If you don’t have it, you are not a good woman . . . For me, it is an unacceptable comparison, because women and men are human and we live together,” she says.

Gender studies has long been a subject of interest for the 28-year-old Royal University of Fine Arts graphic design graduate. Her distinctive conceptual style results in work that often serves as social commentary, highlighting what she sees as invisible social issues in Cambodian culture.

She won the Photo Prize at the Angkor Photo Festival in 2013 with her exhibition The Hang On, featuring subjects from all walks of life in Cambodia with their faces obscured by objects, usually related to their jobs, which have overtaken their identity.

In Sophal’s images, the subjects are framed by flowers a motif inspired by the frequent comparisons in songs, movies and stories of women to flowers. She then drops paint on the photograph to produce her final product, to prove that stains do not always have to be dirty and can be an element of beauty itself…

Lire la suite sur : http://www.phnompenhpost.com/post-weekend/new-photo-exhibition-takes-cambodian-gender-double-standards

TRANSNATIONALISM AND ITS LIMITS: MOBILITY AND CONTEMPORANEITY IN THAI ART

Tate Modern Talk : Transnationalism and its limits : mobility and contemporaneity in Thai art, 22 June 2017, Tate Modern

Hear David Teh, author of Thai Art: Currencies of the Contemporary​, discuss the possibilities and constraints of transnationalism.

In this seminar, David Teh gives artistic mobility a discrete history with reference to the contemporary art of Thailand, a nation on edge after decades of sovereign insecurity, economic boom and bust, and constitutional meltdown. While Thai artists reflect these tribulations in their work, since the 1990s many have downplayed their identity and become conspicuously mobile. What can their excursions tell us about the transnationalism of contemporary art? Their mobility allows them to dodge local limitations, but it also recalls a much older spatial imaginary, a worldliness that is no symptom of art’s globalisation but a condition of its possibility.

Teh’s paper is followed by a response from May Adadol Ingawanij. The subsequent panel discussion is chaired by Lucy Steeds.

Biographies

May Adadol Ingawanij is a moving image theorist and curator. She is currently writing a book titled Animistic Cinema: Moving Image Performance and Ritual in Thailand. Her publications include Long Walk to Life: the Films of Lav Diaz (2015); Animism and the Performative Realist Cinema of Apichatpong Weerasethakul, (2013). May’s curatorial projects include Lav Diaz Journeys (London, 2017), and Attachments and Unknowns (Phnom Penh, 2017). She teaches at CREAM, University of Westminster.

Lucy Steeds is Reader in Art Theory and Exhibition Histories at Central Saint Martins (CSM), University of the Arts London (UAL). She is Senior Research Fellow for Afterall at CSM – leading on the Exhibition Histories strand – and she teaches on the MRes Art: Exhibition Studies course. Her recent books include The Curatorial Conundrum (co-edited with Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson), MIT Press, 2016; and Exhibition (for the Documents of Contemporary Art series), Whitechapel Gallery and MIT Press, 2014.

David Teh is a curator and researcher based at the National University of Singapore. His essays have appeared in Afterall Journal, Third Text, ARTMargins and Theory, Culture and Society, and his book Thai Art: Currencies of the Contemporary was published this year by MIT Press. His most recent curatorial project, Misfits: Pages from a loose-leaf modernity, is showing at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin until 3 July.

Voir : http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/talk/transnationalism-limits

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank by Denis D. Gray, 16/04/2017, Nikkei Asian Review

Evolution of Thai northern city into creative hub fuels hopes of gaining UNESCO status.

The millions of tourists who flock to the ancient, mountain-ringed city of Chiang Mai in northern Thailand might not immediately notice, but the alleys, riversides and Bohemian cafes here are percolating with striking imagery, innovative design and digital wizardry. It is a heady brew that has prompted some to predict a real explosion — a creative one, that is.

The city is already home to more than 40 art galleries and a world-class contemporary arts museum, with others planned. It hosts design and arts festivals and was listed on a widely consulted digital nomad website as No. 1 of 991 places in the world for roving techies to plug in their computers. A creative resource guide to the city runs to 199 pages, focusing on venues ranging from the Wandering Moon Theater to Chiang Mai University’s College of Arts, Media and Technology.

Among a growing base of arts enthusiasts, Chiang Mai has become Thailand’s Left Bank, a part of Paris long known for its artistic and intellectual community.

Lire la suite sur : http://asia.nikkei.com/Life-Arts/Arts/Chiang-Mai-Thailand-s-modern-day-Left-Bank?page=1

Recalling a forgotten kingdom in Venice Biennale

Recalling a forgotten kingdom in Venice Biennale by Helmi Yusof, 14/04/2017, The Business Times

Zai Kuning will be showcasing Dapunta Hyang: Transmission of Knowledge at the Singapore Pavilion of the 57th Venice Biennale from May 13 to Nov 26, 2017.

After18 years criss-crossing South-east Asia, Zai Kuning’s artistic journey is now going beyond the region to make a stop at the most important art event in the world: the Venice Biennale.

There, at the Singapore Pavilion in Arsenale, Zai is constructing a massive Phinisi ship out of rattan, string and beeswax. It will be 17 metres long – a metre perhaps for each year he’s spent exploring the history of Malays in South-east Asia – and it will be surrounded by 100 books that have been dipped in wax, never to be opened and read again, a metaphor for lost histories.

Since 1999, the artist has been obsessed with the meta-historical questions of: « Who am I? Where do I come from? Whom do I belong to? Whom do I answer to? » He’s less interested in issues of national identity and family genealogy than the broader field of the ethnogenesis and migration of Malays. The central figure in his research is Dapunta Hyang, the first ruler of the Srivijaya kingdom that dominated the Malay Archipelago from the 8th to the 12th century. As a Malay Buddhist, Dapunta Hyang also helped spread Buddhism throughout his kingdom.

At the Venice showcase, Zai will be putting up 30 photographic portraits of living mak yong performers on a facing wall running parallel to the ship. An audio recording of a mak yong master speaking in an ancient Malay dialect will also be played on loop.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/lifestyle/arts/recalling-a-forgotten-kingdom-in-venice-biennale

Contemporary Indonesian Art: Artists, Art Spaces, and Collectors

Yvonne Spielmann, Contemporary Indonesian Art: Artists, Art Spaces, and Collectors, NUS Press, 2017

Indonesian art entered the global contemporary art world of independent curators, art fairs, and biennales in the 1990s. By the mid-2000s, Indonesian works were well-established on the Asian secondary art market, achieving record-breaking prices at auction houses in Singapore and Hong Kong. This comprehensive overview introduces Indonesian contemporary art in a fresh and stimulating manner, demonstrating how contemporary art breaks from colonial and post-colonial power structures, and grapples with issues of identity and nation-building in Indonesia. Across different media, in performance and installation, it amalgamates ethnic, cultural, and religious references in its visuals, and confidently brings together the traditional (batik, woodcut, dance, Javanese shadow puppet theater) with the contemporary (comics and manga, graffiti, advertising, pop culture).

Spielmann’s Contemporary Indonesian Art surveys the key artists, curators, institutions, and collectors in the local art scene and looks at the significance of Indonesian art in the Asian context. Through this book, originally published in German, Spielmann stakes a claim for the global relevance of Indonesian art.

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/collections/frontpage/products/contemporary-indonesian-art-artists-art-spaces-and-collectors

Transformative traditions: Dana Langlois and Reaksmey Yean of Cambodia’s JavaArts – in conversation

Transformative traditions: Dana Langlois and Reaksmey Yean of Cambodia’s JavaArts – in conversation, 04/04/2017, Art Radar

Prominent Phnom Penh gallery seeks to make contemporary art accessible through initiatives. 

Based in Phnom Penh since 1998, Dana Langlois founded JavaArts in 2000. In addition to the café and gallery that makes up JavaArts, Langlois also founded experimental gallery Sala Artspace and Our City Festival.

Java Gallery’s current Curator for Creative Programmes, Reaksmey Yean worked for art organization Phare Ponleu Selpak as an Assistant to the Department of Performing Arts and Administrator of Artist Residency Programmes (EU) and Cambodian Living Arts as a Communication and Advertising Officer and Production and Logistic Officer. Yean is also the founder of Trotchaek Pneik.

Langlois and Yean talked with Art Radar about the rapid changes engulfing Cambodia’s urban capital and the echo of the country’s brutal genocide under Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, where an estimated 1.7 to 2.5 million people perished between 1975 and 1979.

Lire la suite sur : http://artradarjournal.com/2017/04/04/transformative-traditions-dana-langlois-and-reaksmey-yean-of-cambodias-javaarts-in-conversation/

Southeast of now : Directions in Contemporary and Modern Art in Asia

Southeast of Now : Directions in Contemporary and Modern Art in Asia, vol. 1, no. 1, March 2017

This new journal is published by NUS Press, Singapore

Site : https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/35721

Southeast of Now aims to look and listen closely to the discursive spaces of art in, from, and around the region that is referred to as Southeast Asia, from a historical perspective. The journal presents a necessarily diverse range of perspectives not only on the contemporary and modern art of Southeast Asia, but indeed of the region itself: its borders, its identity, its efficacy, and its limitations as a geographical marker and a conceptual category. As such, the journal is defined by a commitment to the need for and importance of rigorous discussion, of the contemporary and modern art of the domain that lies south of China, east of India, and north of Australia.

Vous pouvez lire des extraits des articles à l’adresse indiquée ci-dessus et l’ensemble du numéro sera accessible à tous dès la semaine prochaine.

Table of contents

Editorial

  • Editorial : Discomfort

Articles

  • “Total Community Response”: Performing the Avant-garde as a Democratic Gesture in Manila by Patrick D. Flores
  • An exceptional inclusion : On MoMA’s Exhibition Recent American Prints in Color and the First Exhibition of Southeast Asian Art by Kathleen Ditzig
  • Endurance and Overcoming in the Art of Amron Omar and Melati Suryodarmo: Invoking Uncommon Alignments for Contemporary Southeast Asian Art History by Michelle Antoinette
  • A Dark Spot on a Royal Space: The Art of the People’s Party and the Politics of Thai (Art) History by Thanavi Chotpradit

Interview

  • Of Poems in a Recalcitrant Landscape: An Interview with Stanley J. O’Connorn by Pamela N. Corey, Stanley J. O’Connor

Archives

  • Searching for Discomfort by Sharmini Pereira, P. Kirubalini

Review

  • Hol Pidan: Cambodian Traditional Pictorial Silk Textile Preservation and Development, at the National Museum of Cambodia, 2016 by Joanna Wolfarth

Artists’ Projects

  • Introduction by Vera Mey
  • Towards Figures of Dedication, and a Flood (2015) by Tom Nicholson, Grace Samboh and Edhi Sunarso
  • Getah Bening by Shooshie Sulaiman