412 Historic Artefacts to Return Home to Sarawak, Malaysia

412 Historic Artefacts to Return Home to Sarawak, Malaysia

 

On 22 November, in the historic surroundings of Museum Prinsenhof in Delft, the Netherlands, YB Datuk Haji Abdul Karim Rahman Hamzah, Minister of Tourism, Arts, Culture, Youth and Sports of the Sarawak State Government, Malaysia, received one of the 412 historic artefacts which have been donated by the City of Delft to the Sarawak Museum to be displayed in the exhibition galleries of the new Sarawak Museum Campus.

A delegation from Sarawak, led by YB Datuk Karim, brought an appreciation visit to the city of Delft to convey the gratitude of the Sarawak State Government. The Deputy Mayor of Delft, Mr. Ferrie Forster, and the Director of Heritage Delft, Mrs. Janelle Moerman, ceremonially handed over the collection to the Minister and Mr. Ipoi Datan, director of the Sarawak Museum.

In his speech, YB Datuk Karim conveyed the gratitude of the Sarawak State Government on the generous donation of the highly unique 412 Bornean ethnographic items to the Sarawak Museum. He added that: ‘The donation greatly complements the Sarawak Museum’s own collection and augurs well to assist in achieving its Vision of becoming the “Global Centre for Bornean Heritage by 2030.” The Sarawak government is ever keen to ensure that such artefacts that originated from Borneo, the world’s third largest island, would be returned to its original abode.’ Datuk Karim, in his speech, acknowledged the role that Mr. Hans van de Bunte, the Senior Project Director of the Sarawak Museum Campus, had played in this matter.

In early 2018, after the artefacts have arrived in Sarawak, an exhibition will be set up at the Textile Museum in Kuching to show a selection of the Nusantara artefacts to the public. A special edition of the booklets on the Sarawak Museum’s collections will be published alongside the exhibition. For both the exhibition and booklet YB Datuk Karim extended his gratitude to the Dutch Embassy in Malaysia for their kind support and very helpful sponsorship.

Museum Nusantara, in the city of Delft, The Netherlands, closed its doors to the public in 2013 and the city government with Heritage Delft started a project to find new museum owners for the collection of artefacts. The possibility to acquire a selection of historic artefacts from Borneo came under the attention of the Sarawak Museum Campus’ Senior Project Leader. The Sarawak Museum, a member of ASEMUS, was seen as the appropriate location for this collection. A formal request was prepared and initiated the successful donation by the Dutch institute to the Sarawak Museum.

YB Datuk Karim extended an invitation to the city of Delft to attend the opening of the exhibition in Sarawak in early 2018. He offered the city of Delft the opportunity to collaborate with the Sarawak Museum to co-organise any events or activities, like seminars or exhibitions, for their mutual benefit, to be held in Sarawak in 2019, which happens to be Visit Sarawak Year.

The Sarawak Museum Campus and Heritage Trail

The Sarawak Museum Campus is a State-funded project to revive the international status of the Sarawak Museum and to build a new museum to showcase Sarawak’s rich cultural and historical heritage which will incorporate education and public outreach programmes. Its main goal is to establish a world-class museum campus and become one of the best museums in the region.

The objectives of the Sarawak Museum Campus include:

  • Establishing a world-class museum campus and restoring its status as one of the best museums in the region
  • Developing a new main museum building to showcase Sarawak’s rich cultural and historical heritage and provide visitor facilities for all.
  • Setting up an internationally recognized Sarawak Heritage Conservation Centre for research into Sarawak’s Heritage with conservation laboratories, collection storage facilities, research and museum staff offices, a library and the museum archive.
  • Ensuring conservation of the historic Sarawak Museum building and exhibitions to its former glory in an early 20th-century style museology and conservation of the ancillary buildings and gardens.
  • Harnessing the potential for education and public outreach through educational programmes for all, especially to younger generations.
  • Strengthening cultural tourism to Kuching and Sarawak.

The permanent exhibition galleries at the new museum span 6,000 sq. meters and research on the collections is being done by academic specialists to give depth to the exhibition storyline and provide new academic insights. The exhibition storyline is developed with a strong research background, and will be presented in an accessible format so that it engages with a local and broad audience. Especially as it will be presenting exciting knowledge about the local communities, culture, history and archeology of Sarawak and Borneo at large.

For  about the activities of the Sarawak Museum Department, please visit http://www.museum.sarawak.gov.my/

 

Pictured above: delegations of Sarawak and Delft, 22 November 2017; box, bamboo, early 20th century; jacket, bark, early 20th century

New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts

Subi Reef, Spratly Islands

New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts

A two-day workshop on ‘New Approaches to the South China Sea Conflicts’, organised by Drs Nagamuttu Ravindranathan and Matthew J. Walton was held at St Antony’s College and the University of Oxford China Centre on 19th and 20th October 2017.

A list of papers given is provided below; please see the links for a number of powerpoint slides and audio recordings. 

  • Concrete proposals for the resolution of conflicts between the Philippines and China
    Jay Batongbacal (University of the Philippines)
    Full Paper / Slides / Audio Podcast 
  • ASEAN and Regional Cooperation in the South China Sea
    Robert Beckman (National University of Singapore)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Philippines-China arbitration: How would any lessons learnt shape the future peaceful resolution of conflicts?
    Antonio Carpio (Supreme Court of the Republic of Philippines)
    Talk Outline
  • A neglected resolution for the conflicts in the South China Sea arising from the original claims of the Republic of China in 1947
    Charles I-hsin Chen (University of Cambridge)
  • South China Sea Conflicts or Cooperation: UNCLOS design and reality
    Fu Kuen-Chen (Xiamen University)
  • Base points and equity applicable to the resolution of conflicts
    Robin Cleverly (Marbdy Consulting)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Thinking of the unthinkable
    Jerome Cohen (New York University)
    Audio Podcast
  • What role will international law play in the resolution of South China Sea disputes?
    Stephen Fietta (Fietta LLP)
  • Functional cooperative management in the South China Sea
    Vivian Forbes (National Institute for South China Sea Studies)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Peace in our time – considering Helsinki accords and Alpha in East Asia
    Kimie Hara (University of Waterloo)
  • ​What’s wrong with the status quo?
    Bill Hayton (British Broadcasting Corporation)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • UNCLOS and the South China Sea Conflicts
    Nong Hong (Institute for China America Studies)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • A Practical Solution in Resolving Conflicts in the South China Sea Between Malaysia and China as a Feasible Solution: Perspectives from Malaysia
    Jalila Abdul Jalil (Maritime Institute of Malaysia)
  • Philippines-China arbitration: What lessons are there in other East Asian conflicts?
    Zou Keyuan (University of Central Lancashire)
  • South China Sea – Vietnam’s view after the July 2016 Award
    Nguyễn Hồng Thao (National University of Hanoi)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Will naval power close the South China Sea chapter?
    Alessio Patalano (King’s College London)
    Slides / Audio Podcast
  • Does there have to be an escalation of conflict in the South China Sea?
    John Ross (Chongyang Institute, Renmin University)
    Slides
  • China’s Maritime Policies
    Alexandre Sheldon-Duplaix (French Defence Historical Service)
    Slides / Audio Podcast – to come
  • Concrete proposals for conflict settlements of the South China Sea disputes: Review and assessment
    Zheng Wang (Seton Hall University)
    Audio Podcast
  • Current conflicts and the future
    Wu Shicun (National Institute for South China Sea Studies)

CALL FOR PAPERS  for a joint meeting of The Asian Society of the History of Médicine (9th meeting) and HOMSEA (History of Medicine in Southeast Asia) to be held in Jakarta, Indonesia, June 27-30, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS 

for a joint meeting of The Asian Society of the History of Médicine (9th meeting) and HOMSEA (History of Medicine in Southeast Asia)

to be held in Jakarta, Indonesia, June 27-30, 2018

Theme: Colonial Medicine after Decolonisation: Continuity, Transition, and Change

Deadline for submission: 1 February 2018

Notification of acceptance will be given by 1 March 2018.

 Guidelines for Submission: Submissions on all topics related to the history of medicine in Asia are welcome; submissions related to the conference theme are especially encouraged. Participants can submit full panels (2, 3, or 4 papers) as well as individual papers. Paper proposals (title, author, and an abstract in English of no more than 200 words) and a1-page curriculum vitae or panel proposals (a panel proposing of no more than 200 words with abstracts and 1-page CVs of all participants) should be sent by electronic mail to James Dunk (james.dunk@sydney.edu.au). The program committee reserves the right to suggest changes and revisions to abstracts and panel proposals.

 

Program committee: Dr Harry Yi-Jui Wu (Hong Kong); Dr. Ning Jennifer Chang (Taipei); Prof Laurence Monnais (Montreal); A/Prof Hans Pols (Sydney); Dr. Yu-Chuan Wu (Taipei); Dr. Por Heong Hong (Kuala Lumpur); and members of the Local Arrangements Committee.

 

Unfortunately, the ASHM cannot offer funds to defray travel expenses due to budget constraints. There is a range of affordable accommodation available near the conference venue. Participants are encouraged to apply for support from their home departments or institutions.

The conference will be hosted by the Indonesian Academy of Sciences, which is located in the new buildings of the Indonesian National Library in the centre of Jakarta.

Laurence Monnais

Professeur titulaire – Département d’histoire

Directrice – Centre d’Etudes de l’Asie de l’Est (CETASE)

Directrice scientifique – Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal (PUM) http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/

Chercheur – Equipe MEOS http://www.meos.qc.ca/ – Institut de recherche en santé publique de l’Université de Montréal (IRSPUM) http://www.irspum.umontreal.ca/

Call for papers ASHM HOMSEAUniversité de Montréal

C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville

MONTREAL, QC, CANADA H3C 3J7

Tél : 514-343-6544

Adat Aceh: royal Malay statecraft in the 17th century

Adat Aceh: royal Malay statecraft in the 17th century by Annabel Gallop, 13/11/2017, Asian and African Studies blog

When I am asked which is the most important Malay manuscript in the British Library, there is no simple answer. Should I cite the two copies we hold of the Sejarah Melayu, ‘Malay Annals’(Or 14734 and Or 16214), recounting the founding of the 15th-century kingdom of Melaka, and arguably the single most famous Malay text? Or the oldest known manuscript of the earliest historical chronicle in Malay, the Hikayat Raja Pasai, ‘Chronicle of the Kings of Pasai’ (Or 14350)? Or one of the finest illuminated Malay manuscripts known, a copy of the Taj al-Salatin, ‘The Crown of Kings’, written in Penang in 1824 (Or 13295)? Unmissable from this list of the great and the good of Malay writing is the Adat Aceh, ‘The Statecraft of Aceh’ (MSS Malay B.11), a compendium of court customs, regulations and practice from the greatest Muslim sultanate in Southeast Asia in the 17th century.

Lire la suite sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2017/11/adat-aceh-royal-malay-statecraft-in-the-17th-century.html

Panji tales awarded the status of world heritage by UNESCO

Panji tales awarded the status of world heritage by UNESCO

31 October 2017

The unique collection of more than 250 ancient tales revolving around the mythical Javanese Prince Panji, which is curated by Leiden University Libraries (UBL), has been acknowledged as world heritage by UNESCO. The UBL is grateful to UNESCO for this exceptionally prestigious award.

The Leiden collection of Panji tales is included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register, together with similar collections held by the national libraries of Indonesia, Malaysia and Cambodia. The Register contains documentary heritage of outstanding value to the world. UBL already holds two documents included in the UNESCO Register: La Galigo (2011) and Babad Diponegoro (2013). By digitising the Panji tales, they can be made available worldwide via free via open access for research and education. UBL has started a crowdfunding campaign to help digitise the Panji tales.

Mythical prince

Prince Panji is the title character in the popular Panji tales from Java. These stories arem always about a prince and a princess, about love and adventure. They can be rather complex, featuring name changes, masquerades, incarnations and transformations, and may take the form of text or theatre. There are dozens of known Panji tales, written in different languages, such as Javanese-Balinese, Javanese, Malaysian, Balinese, Sasak, Sundanese, Acehnese and Buginese. They originate from Eastern Java and have spread across a large area from Indonesia to Malaysia and from Cambodia to Thailand. They owe their popularity to the flexibility of the story which can be easily adjusted to fit local traditions.

From reading room to online at home

The unique manuscripts come in many different shapes and sizes and are handwritten in several different languages. At the moment, they can only be consulted in the library’s Special Collections reading room. By digitising the Panji tales, we will be able to provide worldwide open access for research and educational purposes. The study of these texts has led to many new insights about Southeast Asian history, literature and culture.

Crowdfunding

Digitising ancient manuscripts is expensive and time-consuming. With financial support from the public, these Panji tales can now be made accessible. A special Panji-website has been set up for the crowdfunding campaign. The website provides background information, including a film by Panji expert Dr Roger Tol, and offers the possibility to make donations to help digitise these manuscripts.

Panji Tales – Make Prince Panji digital!

8th LUCIS Annual Conference | Islamic Visualities and In/Visibilities: Reimagining Public Citizenship?

8th LUCIS Annual Conference | Islamic Visualities and In/Visibilities: Reimagining Public Citizenship?

Date
13 December 2017 – 15 December 2017
Address
Gravensteen Building
Pieterskerkhof 6
2311 SR Leiden

From Wednesday 13 until Friday 15 December 2017, the 8th annual conference of LUCIS will take place in Leiden. This year’s theme is Islamic Visualities and In/Visibilities: Reimagining Public Citizenship? Our keynote speaker is James Hoesterey from Emory University. The conference will take place in multiple locations of the Gravensteen Building. For more information, please consult the programme.

About the conference

This conference invites speakers from different disciplines to reflect on images as sites of religious inspiration, contestation, and imagination among Muslims in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The conference brings into conversation different aspects of the relationship between Islam and (ideas about) visuality.

What is the impact of images, visual communication, and the emergence of (new) visual cultures on the ways in which Islam is practiced, experienced, and interpreted? How do processes of religious change, such as the so-called Islamic revival, affect ways of seeing and ideas about what may and what may not be seen, and by whom?

These questions are increasingly urgent in an era of visual excess, in which the questioning and fragmentation of traditional religious authority goes hand in hand with the emergence of new Islamic visualities, and in which images of Islam are increasingly prolific in public spaces in both Muslim-majority and minority settings, drawing a variety of responses.

At the same time, we see this conference as an opportunity to discuss and evaluate much needed methodological and conceptual innovation in the study of Islam, which remains until this day dominated by an emphasis on oral and textual traditions and often passes over the everyday visual practices that are equally part of the religious lives of Muslims. How might the study of Islam benefit (more) from the turn to the visual in the humanities and the social sciences? What possibilities, practices, problems, questions, techniques, and agendas have arisen from this turn, and how can they help advance the study of Islam?

We approach these questions by focusing on practices of image-making. Islamic visualities, in our approach, comprise images and ways of seeing that are charged with religious meaning, as well as images and ways of seeing that bear on the image of the Islamic religion or culture as a whole. The concept of image-making – referring to the creativity and agency vested in the creation of images as well as the practices, relationships, and politics that inform the way in which “Islam” is seen – provides a fruitful starting point for the study of Islamic visualities and their impact on people and societies throughout the world.

Our goal is not to replace a “textual” approach by one that is “visual” in orientation. Instead, speakers are encouraged to take into account the mutuality of visual and verbal/textual traditions and its analysis. The setup of this conference thus serves to address a broad range of possibilities, creativities, contradictions, and tensions associated with Islamic visualities.

Keynote speaker

James Hoesterey (Emory University) on Digital Duplicity: Piety, Scandal, and the (Un)making of Islamism in Indonesia.

le site de la conférence

Religion and Violence in Myanmar: Sitagu Sayadaw’s Case for Mass Killing

Religion and Violence in Myanmar: Sitagu Sayadaw’s Case for Mass Killing by Matthew J. Walton, 06/11/2017, Foreign Affairs

The most common explanation given for the persecution of the Rohingya revolves around their nationality. Government officials, media commentators, and religious leaders have claimed that the Rohingya are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh. Ethnicity plays a role, as well. The government officially recognizes 135 indigenous ethnic groups, and Myanmar’s 2008 Constitution grants those groups certain rights. The Rohingya are not among them. More broadly, people in Myanmar insist that the Rohingya are not a real ethnic group because they worry about the unlikely possibility that the Rohingya will seek to secede, threatening the country’s territorial sovereignty.

Sitagu’s words could provide the final cover for Myanmar’s Buddhists to ignore international criticism and cloak themselves in the righteousness of holy war.

National identity in Myanmar has long been intertwined with Buddhist religious identity. But religion has had a particular effect in the case of the Rohingya. The so-called War on Terror—waged primarily against Muslims around the world—has made it easier for Myanmar’s elites to label the Rohingya as terrorists and for government officials to defend the violence against them as a legitimate response to extremism. The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army’s attacks on government targets in October 2016 and August 2017, meanwhile, have validated many citizens’ belief that Islam is inherently violent and poses an existential threat to Buddhism, Myanmar’s majority religion. It has also allowed political and religious elites to unfairly and inaccurately associate all Rohingya with terrorism. Thanks to anti-Muslim ideas spread through social media sites, the popular press, and the writings and sermons of influential laypeople and monks, Myanmar’s citizens have come to see the Rohingya as doubly unwanted—as both national and religious “others.”

Lire la suite sur : https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/burma-myanmar/2017-11-06/religion-and-violence-myanmar

Appel à contributions : CFP Harvard Asia Review : Transmission of Knowledge in the Oceanic Asia

 

Harvard Asia Review is now accepting submissions for its 2018 issue on the theme ofTransmission of Knowledge in the Oceanic Asia.” As one of the oldest professional academic journals of Asian studies based out of Harvard University, Harvard Asia Review publishes works on multidisciplinary topics related to issues in East, South, Central, and Southeast Asia. Submission Deadline: January 15th, 2018.

link: https://www.facebook.com/Harvard-Asia-Review-2917394213187…/

#CfP #SSEAsia

Harvard Asia review accepte maintenant des communications pour son numéro de 2018 sur le thème  » transmission des connaissances en Asie de l’océan. » comme l’une des plus anciennes revues universitaires professionnelles d’études asiatiques basées à L’Université Harvard, Harvard Asia review publie des travaux Sur des sujets multidisciplinaires liés à des questions en Asie de l’est, du sud, du centre et du Sud-est. Date limite de soumission : 15 janvier 2018.

Lien : https://www.facebook.com/Harvard-Asia-Review-291739421318716/

Changing political landscape allowing for greater public criticism in Vietnam

Changing political landscape allowing for greater public criticism in Vietnam

07
By student correspondent Diana Tung

 

Public criticism of the Vietnamese government has become commonplace in a nation previously known for strict political censorship, according to Emeritus Professor Ben Kerkvliet.
Professor Kerkvliet’s research focuses on data collection from the early 1990s through to 2015 to trace the emergence of increasingly vocal and public political complaints.  He presented his findings at a recent talk on political criticism in Vietnam at the Department of Political and Social Change.
“Prior to the 1990s, there was certainly a lot of criticism among citizens in Vietnam, but it was very low key. Since the mid-1990s political criticism in Vietnam has become very, very common,” said Professor Kerkvliet.
In contrast to foreign depictions of Vietnam as totalitarian and authoritarian, Professor Kerkvliet found ample evidence that challenged this simplistic view.
“Some scholars have written that the government tolerates no criticism. Other scholars though, have pointed out that’s really not the case. It’s much more nuanced and much more diverse by way of government reactions” added Professor Kerkvliet.
During the course of his research, Professor Kerkvliet and his assistant Pham Thu Thuy amassed hundreds of news articles, books, essays, blogs, and reports of political criticism. He also identified several themes and decided to explore four: labour, land, nation, and democratisation.
To vent their frustrations, Vietnamese citizens turned to various methods such as protests, petitions, and strikes. Meanwhile, government officials have been trying to navigate a fine line in responding to citizens’ public actions.
“To a considerable degree, authorities either let citizens speak or could not stop them. Moreover, authorities took rather seriously the idea that the government was ‘of the people, for the people, and by the people”, said Professor Kerkvliet.
Still, there have been limits to what the government has tolerated, with authorities resorting to evictions, intimidation and imprisonment.
To date, there has been insufficient attention paid to the changing nature of public political criticism in Vietnam. As Professor Kerkvliet said, “nobody has put it all together and done an analysis of some depth across the different topics.”
Professor Kerkvliet’s upcoming book will address this gap in scholarship and provide an in-depth understanding of contemporary public criticism in Vietnam.

 

http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/news-events/all-stories/changing-political-landscape-allowing-greater-public-criticism-vietnam

Youth and a culture of protest in Southeast Asia

Bersih-2012-Sham-Hardy

Youth and a culture of protest in Southeast Asia by Julian CH Lee, 08/11/2017, Regional Learning Hub, New Mandala

Shortly before Malaysia’s general elections in 2008, I sat on a cool floor with blank placards and marker pens, beneath a whirring ceiling fan in a bungalow house in Kuala Lumpur. I sat there with friends, some younger, some older than my 31 year old self, thinking of slogans for our campaign to educate voters about the representation of women in Parliament and the hurdles that women face in having their voices heard and issues addressed…

The particular energy that these young people brought to our campaign is worth drawing attention to. Malaysians, and especially young Malaysians, have often been characterised as being averse to political activism. But the work of scholars like Meredith Weiss has persuasively demonstrated that Malaysia has a rich history of student activism, one which has been actively suppressed and obscured such that many young people today have little idea of it. In this context, work such as Weiss’s book, activist Fahmi Reza’s documentary Sepuluh Tahun Sebelum Merdeka, and discussions such as this on New Mandala, have a potentially important role in reconnecting people with lost histories and stories.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/youth-culture-protest-southeast-asia/

Antropologia, vol. 4, n° 2, 2017

Antropologia, vol. 4, n° 2, 2017

Special Focus- Independent Children

Introduction

  • Independent Children and their Fields of Relatedness by Giuseppe Bolotta, Silvia Vignato

Articles sur l’Asie du Sud-Est

  • Orphans, Victims and Families: An Ethnography of Children in Aceh by Silvia Vignato
  • “God’s Beloved Sons”: Religion, Attachment, and Children’s Self-Formation in the Slums of Bangkok by Giuseppe Bolotta
  • Yogyakarta Street Careers – Feelings of Belonging and Dealing with Sticky Stigma by Thomas Stodulka

 

FOUND Cambodia : an archive of everyday Cambodian photography

1992, Kratie Province, Girl with an umbrella

‘FOUND Cambodia’ is a project that traces some of the sociocultural changes Cambodia has witnessed since 1979. It is a constantly growing archive of everyday Cambodian photography, brought to light from individuals’ and families’ drawers, albums, and closets. The images provide a vernacular lens to how individuals in post-Khmer Rouge Cambodia have experienced the social and cultural revival following the regime’s fall. Further, the project also includes photographs taken before the Khmer Rouge came into power. These images serve as poignant testimonies of the effects that macroscopic socio-political changes bear on the individual. A unique glimpse into Cambodians’ day-to-day lives over the past four decades, ‘FOUND Cambodia’ serves as a visual archive for anyone interested in understanding societal changes through the eyes of an individual.

A explorer sur : http://foundcambodia.com/

Asian Review of World Histories, vol. 5, n° 2, 2017

Asian Review of World Histories, vol. 5, n° 2, 2017

Table of contents

  • Introduction.  Ancient Studies in Vietnam: The Late Professor Nishimura’s Area Studies and the Integration of Archaeology and History by John N. Miksic
  • Preface by Nishino Noriko
  • An Introduction to Dr. Nishimura Masanari’s Research on the Lung Khe Citadel by Nishino Noriko
  • A Reconsideration of the Leilou – Longbian Debate: A Continuation of Research by Nishimura Masanari by Lê Huy Phạm
  • Lung Khe and the Cultural Relationship between Northern and Southern Vietnam by Thi Liên Lê
  • Champa Citadels: An Archaeological and Historical Study by Trường Giang Đỗ, Tomomi Suzuki, Văn Quảng Nguyễn and Mariko Yamagata
  • Nishimura Masanari’s Study of the Earliest Known Shipwreck Found in Vietnam by Nishino Noriko,  Aoyama Toru, Kimura Jun, Nogami Takenori and Le Thi Lien
  • The International Ceramics Trade and Social Change in the Red River Delta in the Early Modern Period : A Case Study of Bát Tràng and Kim Lan Villages by Ueda Shinya and Nishino Noriko
  • The Keyi Mappila Muslim Merchants of Tellicherry and the Making of Coastal Cosmopolitanism on the Malabar Coast by Santosh Abraham

Book Reviews

  • Jürgen Osterhammel, The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by David E. L. Beecher
  • Miriam Gross, Farewell to the God of Plague: Chairman Mao’s Campaign to Deworm China by Margaret Mih Tillman

Voir : http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22879811/5/2

Dreams of Prosperity

Silvia Vignato (ed.), Dreams of Prosperity: Inequality and Integration in Southeast Asia, EFEO, Silkworm Books, 2017

Dreams of Prosperity offers a critical composite reflection on Southeast Asia as a progressively integrated and globalized space of production, exchange, and circulation within and beyond national boundaries. Through a broad array of contexts united by the theme of integration, the essays describe the successful or unsuccessful entry of specific individuals or groups into wider markets and networks in their quest for prosperity—in Thailand, by Lua peasant farmers, slum families, the last century’s teak laborers, and ethnic tour hosts; in Indonesia, by the urban poor and communities resisting environmental destruction; and in Vietnam, by human trafficking returnees. The authors examine how these groups are socially and symbolically defined and redefined in the process of integration, and consider the imaginaries of future that enable both active participation and unmitigated manipulation. Two key topics are the cognitive struggle that peasants and laborers face with their material environment and the process of sense-making that characterizes many destitute people in urban contexts.

Contributors are Matteo Carlo Alcano, Amnuayvit Thitibordin, Monika Arnez, Giuseppe Bolotta, Olivier Evrard, Karnrawee Sratongno, Runa Lazzarino, Manoj Potapohn, Amalia Rossi, Sakkarin Na Nan, and Silvia Vignato.

Contents 

  1. Green Aspirations and the Dynamics of Integration in Two East Kalimantan Cities— Monika Arnez 
  2. Neoliberalism and the Integration of Labor and Natural Resources: Contract Farming and Biodiversity Conservation in Northern Thailand—Amalia Rossi and Sakkarin Na Nan 
  3. Integration and Marginality in the Tourist Economy: The Geopolitics of Trekking in Chiang Mai Province—Olivier Evrard, Manoj Potapohn, and Karnrawee Stratongno 
  4. Migration and the Ethnic Division of Labor in Siam’s Teak Business, 1880s–1910s— Amnuayvit Thitibordin 
  5. After the Shelter: The Nuances of Reintegrating Human Trafficking Returnees in Northern Vietnam—Runa Lazzarino 
  6. Playing the NGO System: How Mothers and Children Design Political Change in the Slums of Bangkok—Giuseppe Bolotta 
  7. Making Sense of Poverty in Aceh and Surabaya—Silvia Vignato and Matteo Carlo Alcano