Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia

International Conference Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia, 10-11/11/2017, Binghamton University, The State University of New York

Plenary lectures by:

ERIC TAGLIACOZZO (Cornell University)
Ghosts in the Machine: Technology and Maritime Imperialism in Southeast Asia
ANAND YANG (University of Washington)
Empire of Labor: Indian Convict Workers in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Southeast Asia
ANGELA SCHOTTENHAMMER (University of Salzburg)
Surgeons and Physicians on the Move in the Indo-Pacific Waters (15th to 18th Centuries)
RANABIR SAMADDAR (Calcutta Research Group)
Rohingyas: The Emergence of a Stateless Population

The celebrated author AMITAV GHOSH will deliver the keynote address:
Embattled Earth: Commodities, Conflict and Climate Change in the Indian Ocean Region
5 pm, Friday, November 10, 2017
Chamber Hall, Anderson Center, main campus of Binghamton University

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.binghamton.edu/iaad/conference/index.html

 

 

 

Asian Politics and Policy, vol. 9, n° 2, 2017

Asian Politics and Policy, vol. 9, n° 2, October 2017

Special Issue : The Philippines confront a post-American world

Table of contents

Editor’s Introduction

  • The Philippines, through the Looking Glass by Aileen S. P. Baviera

Original Articles

  • The Philippines Confronts a Post-American World: Geopolitical-Domestic-Institutional Intersections by Alice D. Ba
  • Developing a Credible Defense Posture for the Philippines: From the Aquino to the Duterte Administrations by Renato Cruz de Castro
  • Evolving Philippines-U.S.-China Strategic Triangle: International and Domestic Drivers by Richard Javad Heydarian
  • Sea Power in the 21st Century: Challenges and Opportunities for the Philippine Navy by Dianne Faye Co Despi
  • Great Power Dynamics and the Waning of ASEAN Centrality in Regional Security by Herman Joseph S. Kraft
  • Domestic Factors and Strategic Partnership: Redefining Philippines-Japan Relations in the 21st Century by Dennis D. Trinidad

Book Reviews (ASE)

  • Le Hong Hiep, « Living Next to the Giant: The Political Economy of Vietnam’s Relations with China Under Doi Moi », Singapore: ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute by Thuy T. Do
  • Jong-sung You, « Democracy, Inequality and Corruption: Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines Compared », Cambridge: Cambridge University Press by Hélder Ferreira do Vale

Pour plus d’informations voir : http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/aspp.2017.9.issue-4/issuetoc

 

Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, vol. 36, n° 2, 2017

Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, vol. 36, n° 2, 2017

Table of contents

Research Articles

  • The Purnawirawan and Party Development in Post-Authoritarian Indonesia, 1998–2014 by M Faishal Aminuddin
  • Mechanisms of Vietnam’s Multidirectional Foreign Policy by Nicholas William Chapman
  • From Impediment to Adaptation: Chinese Investments in Myanmar’s New Regulatory Environment by SiuSue Mark, Youyi Zhang
  • A Strategy of Attrition through Enforcement: The Unmaking of Irregular Migration in Malaysia by Choo Chin Low

Review Articles

  • Civil–Military Relations during Transition and Post-Democratisation Periods: A View from Southeast Asia by Hipolitus Yolisandry Ringgi Wangge

Articles à télécharger sur : https://www.giga-hamburg.de/de/news/neues-journal-of-current-southeast-asian-affairs-22017

Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 38, n° 2, 2017

Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 38, n° 2, August 2017

Table of contents

Articles

  • Judicialized governance in the Philippines: toward new environmental judicial principles that translate into effective “green” policies and citizen empowerment by Eduardo T. Gonzalez
  • Exemplars in the coverage of the Bangsamoro framework agreement: using computational tools to compare Qatari and Philippine news framing by Mark L. Cabling, Fabrizio Drago and Amanda T. Andrei
  • The venture into higher education: exploring politics of education in a Philippine local government college by Ronald A. Pernia

Book Reviews

  • « Mindanao: the long journey to peace and prosperity » by Dennis Quilala
  • « Territorial disputes in the South China Sea: navigating rough waters » by Melquiades A. Acomular Jr.

Voir la suite sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rpsj20/current?nav=tocList

 

Southeast Asia Stakes Its Claim in the Art World

Htein Lin’s “A Show of Hands,” 2013–present, features hundreds of white plaster casts of raised right hands, each one an index of a political prisoner like himself. Credit Maria Baranova-Suzuki

Southeast Asia Stakes Its Claim in the Art World by Jason Farago, 27/09/2017, New York Times

Until recently — the 1990s, let’s say — an American critic keeping tabs on new art would concentrate on New York’s museums and galleries; cast an occasional, often dismissive eye on Western Europe; and perhaps try to visit Los Angeles now and again. No longer. By the ’90s the idea of a single avant-garde was dead and buried, and in its place arose a pluralist art ecosystem that spans the planet. It makes larger intellectual demands than ever, and requires us to accept that we’ll never see everything or understand it completely. In the new global art world, even we New Yorkers are provincials.

Perhaps nowhere benefited as much from this shift to a pluralist art world as Asia, where the 1990s saw an explosion of biennials and triennials. The Gwangju Biennale, Asia’s most important such exhibition, began in 1995 in South Korea, and was soon followed by large-scale shows in Shanghai, Taipei, Fukuoka, Yokohama, Singapore, Jakarta, and a half dozen other Asian megacities — all of which introduced Asian audiences to foreign art and pushed their own region’s figures to the international forefront. In these exhibitions, as well as in the new museums and art schools that arose around them, traditional styles of painting, drawing, pottery or calligraphy fell by the wayside, and installation, video and performance served as lingua franca.

The art in “After Darkness: Southeast Asian Art in the Wake of History,” at the Asia Society on Park Avenue, is the fruit of this global shift. The work here comes from Indonesia, Myanmar (or Burma) and Vietnam, though with just seven artists and one collective, it’s small enough to avoid the curse of the “regional show” and doesn’t force any unity on a diverse lineup. Not every work here is a masterpiece, but all of them plumb the roiling past and fractured present of places that, with a combined population of nearly 400 million, we have no excuse to be clueless about.

Lire la suite et voir les oeuvres sur : https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/arts/design/southeast-asian-art-asia-society.html

 

Religion and the morality of the market

Daromir Rudnyckyj, Filippo Osella (eds), Religion and the morality of the market, Cambridge University Press, 2017

Since the collapse of the Berlin Wall, there has been a widespread affirmation of economic ideologies that conceive the market as an autonomous sphere of human practice, holding that market principles should be applied to human action at large. In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, the ascendance of market reason has been countered by calls for reforms of financial markets and for the consideration of moral values in economic practice. This book intervenes in these debates by showing how neoliberal market practices engender new forms of religiosity, and how religiosity shapes economic actions. It reveals how religious movements and organizations have reacted to the increasing prominence of market reason in unpredictable, and sometimes counterintuitive, ways. Using a range of examples from different countries and religious traditions, the book illustrates the myriad ways in which religious and market moralities are closely imbricated in diverse global contexts.

A signaler :

  • Assembling Islam and Liberalism: Market Freedom and the Moral Project of Islamic Finance by Daromir Rudnyckyj
  • Marketizing Piety through Charitable Work: Islamic Charities and the Islamization of Middle- Class Families in Indonesia by Hilman Latief

Table des matières sur : https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/religion-and-the-morality-of-the-market/AEA3F2A0EECD7D3A65F5063D9AFE1470#fndtn-contents

 

 

CFP : Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia

CFP : UC Berkeley – UCLA Southeast Asian Studies Conference : Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia, 27-28/04/2018, UC Berkeley

Conference chair: Prof. Nancy Lee Peluso (Environmental Science, Policy & Management, UC Berkeley)

The aim of this conference, jointly sponsored by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berkeley (Director: Prof. Pheng Cheah) and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at UCLA (Director: Prof. George Dutton), is to look anew at issues concerning migration and Southeast Asia.

Migrations have characterized Southeast Asian lives and livelihoods in different ways in different eras; they have affected work, settlement patterns, resource use, small and large investments, religion, and culture. Migrations have formed and changed the composition of Southeast Asian societies and given rise to complex cultural, social, environmental, and political problems and opportunities. Past and present, migrations have been both forced and voluntary: forced to make way for certain kinds of development; triggered by violence and war; but also intentional and, at times, pioneering: to change lives, secure new livelihoods, or explore new ecologies.

Contributors to this conference will discuss continuities and changes in migration practices, patterns, and personnel, addressing a wide range of historical periods, disciplines, and themes. For this conference, we solicit papers on such topics as:

  • labor migration and remittances;
  • resource extractions, claims, and trade;
  • shifting policies governing international movements of people, resources and capital; human rights issues raised by transnational migration;
  • transformations in urban and rural spaces brought by domestic and transnational migrants;
  • cultural changes and cultural productions associated with migrant, resource, and capital flows;
  • the ways that mobilities have changed or are changing gender, generational, racial, and cultural relations in families, communities, and across nations.

The two centers invite submissions for presentations from scholars and graduate students conducting original research in the social sciences and humanities that address the primary theme of the conference. Abstracts (up to 500 words) should be sent to CSEAS at UC Berkeley by Friday, January 19, 2018. Abstracts should include your name, affiliation and discipline and contact information (including e-mail address).

The conference is open to all. Some travel funding is available for faculty and graduate students at UC and CSU campuses.

Contact: CSEAS, 1995 University Ave., 520H MC 2318, Berkeley CA 94704, Tel: (510) 642-3609; Fax: (510) 643-7062; E-mail: cseas@berkeley.edu

Voir : https://networks.h-net.org/node/22055/discussions/640298/cfp-migrations-and-new-mobilities-southeast-asia-uc-berkeley-april

Advanced Associate Professor/Professor, East Asia and/or Southeast Asia before 1900

Advanced Associate Professor/Professor, East Asia and/or Southeast Asia before 1900, History departement, University of Texas – Austin

For full consideration, applications should be received by November 15, 2017.

As part of a major departmental initiative in transnational history, the History Department of the University of Texas at Austin invites applications for the position of advanced Associate Professor/Full Professor in East Asian and/or Southeast Asian history before 1900. The area of specialization is open.

Applicants should have an outstanding record of publication and an established international reputation in the field. The successful candidate will be expected to engage in high quality research/scholarly activities, demonstrate effective classroom teaching at the graduate and undergraduate levels, direct graduate research, and exhibit a commitment to service to the department, college, and university.

A PhD degree in History or related field is required. Applicants may currently hold the rank of either associate or full professor. Salary for this position will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Interested applicants are invited to submit a letter of interest, detailed curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation to Jacqueline Jones, Chair, Department of History. All materials should be submitted online via: https://dossier.interfolio.com/apply/44396.

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=55629

Lineage and Legitimacy: Exploring Royal-Familial Visual Configurations in Cambodia

Lineage and Legitimacy: Exploring Royal-Familial Visual Configurations in Cambodia by Joanna Wolfarth in Trans-Asia Photography Review, vol. 8, n° 1, Fall 2017 : Art and Vernacular Photographies in Asia

As with those of many other rulers, the portrait of Norodom Sihanouk (1922–2012), the former king of Cambodia, has been used at various times in order to convey his sovereign status. This was particularly true of his official portrait, which remains a common presence in both public and private spaces throughout Cambodia. This portrait and multiple versions of it were put to work with press photographs and newsreels of Sihanouk engaged with everyday life, along with the king’s own cinematic oeuvre, to create a visual landscape that reinforced his central presence in Cambodia’s spiritual, social, and political life. All versions of Sihanouk’s official portrait comprise a head and shoulder shot, with his face slightly angled to the side and his gaze focused on a space beyond the frame. He wears a suit and tie, although their colors vary. In some versions the digital manipulation is minimal and lines are visible on his face; in others, the portrait has been more obviously altered and his face becomes shadow-less and wrinkle-free, his hair a solid gray mass. The official portrait is often accompanied by those of his wife, Monineath, and his son, King Sihamoni, presenting a royal-familial triad expressing kingship, past and present.

This paper explores this royal-familial portrait-triad by probing how and why legitimacy and lineage are expressed through visual representations of family ties. Consideration will be given to examples of historical antecedents and the particulars of their resurrection in twentieth-century Cambodia. I suggest that there is a structural power inherent within triadic configurations and that such an arrangement reinforces dynamics of legitimacy. Indeed, longstanding notions of political order in Cambodia are grounded within the triune of Nation, Religion, and King.[1] Often more complex, multidirectional flows of power are expressed in these visual configurations, whereby the authority of the sovereign son strengthens that of his parents, which enables the son to retroactively inherit the power conferred upon his ancestors. Although the right to royal inheritance is “in the blood,” royal succession in Cambodia is not tied strictly to primogeniture and thus there are often competing heirs to the throne, meaning lineage and legitimacy must be more forcefully articulated. This paper will also consider the materiality of the images in question: how such portraits are replicated, disseminated, and displayed.

Lire la suite sur : https://quod.lib.umich.edu/t/tap/7977573.0008.104?view=text;rgn=main

Indonesia Update 2017 : GLOBALISATION, NATIONALISM AND SOVEREIGNTY

ANU Indonesia Project Blog : Indonesia Update 2017 : Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty, 15-16/09/2017, The Australian National University

Today, globalisation is more complex than ever. The effects of the global financial crisis and increased inequality have, in many countries, spurred anti-global sentiment and encouraged the adoption of populist and inward-looking policies. Discontent has manifested in some surprising results: Brexit, Trump, and possibly more to come. In Indonesia, it has led to rising protectionism, a rejection of foreign interference in the name of nationalism, and economic policies dominated by calls for self-sufficiency. Meanwhile, human trafficking and the abuse of migrant workers have shown the other side of globalisation.

Againts this background the ANU Indonesia Project held its 35th Indonesia Update conference on 15 and 16 September in Canberra. As usual, the coference kicked off with the updates on politic and economic development. Then centered on the theme “Indonesia in the New World: Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty”, fourteen papers were presented to the audience of more than 500 during the one-and-half-day event. The topics included the historical dynamics of Indonesia’s engagement with the global world, its stance in the South China Sea, and the emergence of new nationalism. Speakers also examined nationalism in practice (for example, food sovereignty and resource nationalism) and the impact of and response to globalisation, as well as poverty, inequality, and gender issues.

Following the Canberra conference, we held two “Mini Indonesia Updates” on 18 September, in Sydney (in collaboration with the Lowy Institute) and in Adelaide (in collaboration with the University of Adelaide’s Institute for International Trade).

The papers presented in the conference will be published in the Indonesia Update book series and will be launched next year, in collaboration with the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS)/ Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore.

Vous trouverez sur cette page les vidéos des conférences suivantes :

Political Update : Indonesia’s year of democratic setback: toward a new era of deepening illiberalism? by Vedi Hadiz (University of Melbourne)

Economic Update : Effectivity of policy reform in democracy and regional autonomy regime by Raden Pardede (CReco Consulting)

Globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty: the Indonesian experience by Anthony Reid (ANU), Edward Aspinall (ANU), Shafiah Muhibat (Nanyang Technological University) with an Overview by Mari Pangestu (Universitas Indonesia)

Nationalism in practice by Jeffrey Neilson (The University of Sydney), Eve Warburton (ANU), Yose Rizal Damuri (Centre for Strategic and International Studies)

Poverty, inequality and gender issues by Arief Anshory Yusuf (Padjadjaran University), Peter Warr (ANU), Janneke Pieters (Wageningen University), Robert Sparrow (Wageningen University)

The human face of globalisation by Anis Hidayah (Migrant CARE), Dominggus Elcid Li (Institute of Resource Governance and Social Change)

Response to globalisation by Manggi Habir (Bank Danamon Indonesia), Titik Anas (Presisi Indonesia)

Concluding remarks: navigating the new globalisation by Hal Hill (ANU), Deasy Pane (ANU), Danny Quah (National University of Singapore)

A voir sur : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/blogs/indonesiaproject/?page_id=8559

Goods and ethnicity : Trade and Bazaars from a Gift Perspective

Heidelberg Ethnology : Occasional Paper N° 6 (2017) : Goods and Ethnicity : Trade and Bazaars from a Gift Perspective; A Discusssion

Guido Sprenger, with commentaries from Chris Gregory, Kostas Retsikas & Hans Peter Hahn

Drawing on ethnographic observations in Lao markets and bazaars, this article proposes a new and experimental framework for the analysis of multi-ethnic trading. It explores bazaars and trade as sites of the (re-)production of ethnicity through the perspective of gift exchange theory. On markets, transcultural differences can be identified and stabilized through the exchange of goods and money. This draws attention to the role of trade items as foci – and perhaps even as non-human agents – in the emergence of ethnicity and other forms of local identity. The value of items’ specific origins is thus linked to social structure. This helps us to see how the shaping of group identity can be better understood by considering how the goods they bring to market carry with them some features of the gift.

Occasional Paper N° 5 (2017) : Studying Sites of Buddhist Leisure : A Discussion of Justin Thomas McDaniel’s Architects of Buddhist Leisure

Thomas N. Patton, David Morgan, Anne Hansen, Thomas Borchert, Richard Fox & Justin Thomas McDaniel

Occasional Paper N° 4 (2016) : The Other Side of the Gift: Soliciting in Java – A Discussion

Konstantinos Retsikas, with commentaries from Carla Jones, Daromir Rudnyckyj and Guido Sprenger

Occasional Paper N° 3 (2015) : Islam and the Perception of Islam in Contemporary Indonesia

Vincent Houben

Occasional Paper N° 2 (2015) : Optical Allusions: Looking at Looking, in Balinese and Dutch Encounters

Margaret Wiener

Occasional Paper N° 1 (2015) : Beyond the Whorfs of Dover: A Study of Balinese Interpretive Practices

Mark Hobart

Télécharger les PDF sur : http://journals.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/index.php/hdethn

 

 

 

 

Book Review : Living with Myths in Singapore

Book Review : Loh Kah Seng, Pingtjin Thum & Jack Chia Meng-That (eds), Living with Myths in Singapore, Ethos Books, Singapore 2017 by Serina Rahman, 23/10/2017, New Mandala

Living with Myths in Singapore is an eye-opener for anyone who has grown up on the institutionalised Singapore stories.

From a young age, the average Singaporean is exposed to tales of the island’s catapulting itself from third world to first, and then fed a constant stream of pride-inducing narratives designed to demonstrate the nation’s success in overcoming abandonment by Malaysia, racial strife, economic struggles, and a constant siege by unfriendly neighbours. To be a citizen of Singapore was to delight in the tiny state’s ability to overtake others in the region in terms of development, economic progress, and “civilisation”. The larger and more unwieldy members of ASEAN were always depicted as those who were envious of Singapore’s progress, and constantly in need of assistance and advice from the island’s growing pool of local and resident international experts in countless fields.

Philip Holden (in Chapter 7) defines myths as “our way of telling a common sense story of the past”. The editors cite Roland Barthes as they point out that the distinguishing mark of myths are their “naturalness”—in other words, myths are stories that are taken as true and “historical”. But “history”, whether people realise it or not, is man-made. Singaporean stories taken as “history” seem to dangle off the edge of reality—and once unpacked, are revealed to be nothing more than myths created, embellished, and perpetuated for whichever use best suits national institutions, the state, and the media at the time.

I was born in Singapore but didn’t grow up there. Instead I travelled the world in a Singaporean bubble, perpetuating the national myths that engendered respect and awe. The occasional holiday in the homeland had the same impact on me as it did any foreigner. We were taken in by the sheen and shine; the spotlessness, safety and efficiency—and we all believed the myths. As an adult, spending my work hours in the “star” of Southeast Asia after decades abroad, the sparkle seems to dull a little. Murmurs on the ground help peel away the layers of flawless cling wrap to reveal the wrinkles and scars of those who lived all their lives in the Little Red Dot.

Living with Myths in Singapore cleared all the doubts that couldn’t be publicly proclaimed and confronted. The book unpacks the myths to reveal the reality hidden beyond the singular “history” that is perpetually propagated. It fills in the fissures of the fables that niggled because the “common sense” didn’t quite make sense—but couldn’t be questioned. The book’s use of researched, academic histories based on multiple sources, facts, and evidence counters the myths and provides previously obscured insight into the truth behind the tales.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/book-review/living-myths-singapore/

 

Southeast of Now, vol. 1, n° 2, October 2017

Southeast of Now : Directions in Contemporary and Modern Art in Asia,  vol. 1, n° 2, October 2017

Numéro en libre accès

Table of contents

  • Editorial : Discomfort

Articles

  • Felicitous « Misalignments »: Bagyi Aung Soe’s Manaw Maheikdi Dat Pangyi by Yin Ker
  • The Painting of Prostitutes in Indonesian Modern Art by Matt Cox
  • Rites of Change: Artistic Responses to Recent Street Protests in Kuala Lumpur by Fiona Lee
  • The Third Avant-garde: Messages of Discontent by Leonor Veiga

Curatorial Intervention

  • Queering Postnational Tendencies in Contemporary Art from Thailand by Brian Curtin

Translations

  • « We Know Where We Will Be Taking Indonesian Art », 1948 by Sindudarsono Sudjojono translated by Brigitta Isabella
  • « Untitled Letter to Editor », Jakarta, 25 December 1942 by Sindudarsono Sudjojono translated by Matt Cox

Review

  • Michelle Antoinette, « Reworlding Art History: Contemporary Southeast Asian Art after 1990 » by Clare Veal

Short Response

  • A Flimsy Image: A Case Study for Learning to Listen by Fiona Amundsen

Articles à télécharger sur : https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/37275

 

Indonesia for Sale

Indonesia for Sale: in-depth series on corruption, palm oil and rainforests launches, by Mongabay

  • The investigative series Indonesia for Sale, launching this week, shines new light on the corruption behind Indonesia’s deforestation and land rights crisis.
  • In-depth stories, to be released over the coming months, will expose the role of collusion between palm oil firms and politicians in subverting Indonesia’s democracy. They will be published in English and Indonesian.
  • The series is the product of nine months’ reporting across the country, interviewing fixers, middlemen, lawyers and companies involved in land deals, and those most affected by them.
  • Indonesia for Sale is a collaboration between Mongabay and The Gecko Project, an investigative reporting initiative established by UK-based nonprofit Earthsight. 

Lire la suite sur : https://news.mongabay.com/2017/10/indonesia-for-sale-in-depth-series-on-corruption-palm-oil-and-rainforests-starts-tomorrow/

Premier épisode de la série : The palm oil fiefdom

A politician in Borneo turned his district into a sea of oil palm. Did it benefit the people who elected him, or the members of his family?

A lire sur : https://news.mongabay.com/2017/10/the-palm-oil-fiefdom/

 

 

The legendary lives of Thai Buddha statues

Figure of the Buddha. Northern Thailand, 1540–1541.

The legendary lives of Thai Buddha statues, lecture by Angela Chiu, 06/11/2017, British Museum

In this talk, Angela Chiu, author of The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power and Place in Northern Thailand (2017), introduces the ancient Thai Buddha statues, some still enshrined today, whose miraculous origins and adventures promoted the growth of Buddhism in Southeast Asia. She considers what motivated the people of the past to create these statues, often at great expense and with significant effort, and reveals how each statue has its own unique ‘life’, initially as the creation of individuals whose hopes and values were embodied in these extraordinary pieces of art.

Voir : http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/events_calendar/event_detail.aspx?eventId=4050&title=The+legendary+lives+of+Thai+Buddha+statues&eventType=Lecture