Call for papers : ASEAS 11 (2) : Forced Migration in Southeast Asia

Call for papers : ASEAS 11 (2) : Forced Migration in Southeast Asia

Deadline for submission : 31 december 2017

Issue 11(2) of the Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies (ASEAS), to be published in December 2018, features a focus on forced migration in Southeast Asia, assessing past, current, and future trends, reasons, and drivers as well as the cultural, social, economic, ecological, and legal dimensions of forced migration in the region.

Recently, movements of forced mass migration have mainly been associated with war torn countries such as Syria and Iraq. However, Southeast Asian countries are not only hosting a significant number of international refugees and asylum seekers but have also been witnessing regional crises of transnational and domestic mass displacement due to armed conflicts, cultural, ethnic, and religious prosecution, or environmental degradation and natural disasters. Two most recent cases include the so-called Rohingya crisis of 2016 and the conflict in Marawi, Philippines, where most of its 200,000 inhabitants fled the city after it had been overrun by a local offshoot of the Islamic State. From an area studies perspective, these and many more examples raise the question of how the issue of domestic and transnational forced migration is being addressed at domestic as well as bi- and multilateral levels within the region.

Thus far, little do we know about the current state of refugees and internally displaced persons in Southeast Asia. There are only rough estimates available on the actual number of people that migrate involuntarily to or within the region. However, according to UNHCR, 14% of the 65.3 million forced migrant population worldwide are currently hosted by countries in the Asia-Pacific Region. Regarding refugees and asylum seekers in Southeast Asian countries, official numbers only exist for Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Philippines which, according to UNHCR, hosted close to 285,000 in 2015 (UNHCR, 2016, Global Trends Forced Displacement in 2015). In Southeast Asia, only Cambodia, the Philippines, and Timor-Leste have ratified the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 protocol. Although the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration mentions ASEAN’s and its member states’ commitment to guarantee the right to seek asylum, thus far, member states’ way to address the issue of forced migration has been rather individualist.

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.seas.at/our-journal-aseas/call-for-papers-aseas-112-forced-migration-in-southeast-asia/

ASEAS 10(1) – Gender, Ethnicity, and Environmental Transformations

Austrian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies (ASEAS) 10(1) – Gender, Ethnicity, and Environmental Transformations – June 2017

Online and open access journal of the Society of Southeast Asian Studies (Austria)

Table of contents

Editorial

  • Gender, Ethnicity, and Environmental Transformations in Indonesia and Beyond by Kristina Großmann, Martina Padmanabhan, Suraya Afiff

Current Research on Southeast Asia

  • Contested Development in Indonesia: Rethinking Ethnicity and Gender in Mining by Kristina Großmann, Martina Padmanabhan, Katharina von Braun
  • Men, Women, and Environmental Change in Indonesia: The Gendered Face of Development Among the Dayak Benuaq by Michaela Haug
  • Separating Sisters From Brothers: Ethnic Relations and Identity Politics in the Context of Indigenous Land Titling in Indonesia by Stefanie Steinebach, Yvonne Kunz
  • Transdisciplinary Responses to Climate Change: Institutionalizing Agrometeorological Learning Through Science Field Shops in Indonesia by Yunita Triwardani Winarto, Cornelis Johan (Kees) Stigter, Muki Trenggono Wicaksono
  • “Only if You Really, Really Need It”: Social Rights Consciousness in the Philippines by Niklas Reese

Research Workshop

  • Community-Based Disaster Risk Management in the Philippines: Achievements and Challenges of the Purok System by Angelina Matthies

In Dialogue

  • “I Don’t Want to Limit Myself to Binary Thinking”: An Interview With the Indonesian Artist Arahmaiani by Gunnar Stange

Book Reviews

  • Keller, A. (Hg.). (2015). Indonesien 1965ff. Die Gegenwart eines Massenmordes. Ein politisches Lesebuch.  Franziska Blum
  • Chandler, D., Cribb, R., & Narangoa, L. (Eds.). (2016). End of Empire. 100 Days in 1945 That Changed Asia and the World.  Iris O’Rourke
  • Aspinall, E. & Sukmajati, M. (Eds.). (2016). Electoral Dynamics in Indonesia. Money Politics, Patronage and Clientelism at the Grassroots. Gunnar Stange

A télécharger sur : http://www.seas.at/our-journal-aseas/browse-issues/aseas-101-gender-ethnicity-and-environmental-transformations/

 

With Social Media, Vietnam’s Dissidents Grow Bolder Despite Crackdown

Nguyen Anh Tuan, a human rights activist, said that when police interrogated him in 2011, he had no one to turn to. But now with supporters on Facebook, “I cannot feel lonely anymore,” he said.

« With Social Media, Vietnam’s Dissidents Grow Bolder Despite Crackdown » by Julia Wallace, 02/07/2017, The New York Times

HANOI, Vietnam — A prominent blogger and environmental activist in Vietnam was sentenced last week to 10 years in prison on charges of national security offenses, including sharing anti-state propaganda on social media.

Nguyen Ngoc Nhu Quynh, better known by her online handle Mother Mushroom, had been held incommunicado since she was arrested in October, and attendance at her trial was strictly controlled.

But barely one hour after the verdict was handed down on Thursday, one of Ms. Quynh’s lawyers summarized his arguments and posted her final statement at the trial to his 61,000 Facebook followers.

“I hope that everyone will speak up and fight, overcome their own fears to build a better country,” she said, according to the lawyer. The statement was reposted thousands of times.

 In authoritarian Vietnam, the internet has become the de facto forum for the country’s growing number of dissenting voices. Facebook connections in particular have mobilized opposition to government policies; they played a key role in mass protests against the state’s handling of an environmental disaster last year. Now, the government is tightening its grip on the internet, arresting and threatening bloggers, and pressing Facebook and YouTube to censor what appears on their sites.

“Facebook is being used as an organizing tool, as a self-publishing platform, as a monitoring device for people when they are being detained and when they get released,” said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch.

Lire la suite sur : https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/07/02/world/asia/vietnam-mother-mushroom-social-media-dissidents.html?

Photographing the Soul of Cambodia: Interview with Sophal Neak

Photographing the Soul of Cambodia: Interview with Sophal Neak by Francesca Masoero, 04/07/2017 in ArtAsiaPacific

Sophal Neak was born in Takeo, a province in southern Cambodia, in 1989. Since 2011, her works—in particular her photographs—have been showcased across Asia, Europe and Australia. Her unique and uncompromising take on history and people, as well as her distinctive and powerful vision, has played an important role in contributing to the cultural re-awakening of her country. In an interview with ArtAsiaPacific, the photographer discusses her art and creative processes, her take on gender in Cambodia and more.

“Flowers,” your most recent exhibition, is currently being showcased in Phnom Penh, but your work has travelled quite a bit across the globe. How do you feel about the fact that your photographs are allowing more people to get to know Cambodia?

Allowing people outside Cambodia to understand the complexity of my country is really important, but I’d actually like my work to serve as a certain reminder for the Khmer people as well. Most Cambodians tend to stick with the traditional culture and perceptions. This includes, for example, that women have to be young and beautiful, or that they have to cook and have children. By drawing attention to these concepts in my work, I try to raise the awareness of viewers and invite them to move forward from these ideas.

Lire la suite sur : http://artasiapacific.com/Blog/PhotographingTheSoulOfCambodiaInterviewWithSophalNeak

Patani semasa : pameran seni dari Patani

Exhibition : Patani Semasa : Pameran Seni dari Patani, 19/07/2017 – 14/02/2018, MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum

An exhibition on contemporary art from the Golden Peninsula. Ranging from different time periods, works of art as well as cultural representations of the « Patani region » from 27 artists have been selected – both locals and those engaged with issues relevant to the area in question.

Voir : http://www.maiiam.com/exhibition/

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: Research among the Karen, Past and Present [Part 2]

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: « Research among the Karen, Past and Present » [Part 2]

Pia Jolliffe interviews anthropologist Mikael Gravers.

This week on Tea Circle, we’re pleased to feature a two-part interview with anthropologist Mikael Gravers, an expert on nationalism, ethnic conflict, and peace and reconciliation, with extensive experience working among Karen communities in Thailand and Myanmar. He is the author of a number of books on Burma/Myanmar, including Burma/Myanmar— Where Now?, Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Burma, and Nationalism as Political Paranoia in Burma. He is also a researcher on the project “Everyday Justice and Security in the Myanmar Transition”.

Lire l’article sur : https://teacircleoxford.com/2017/07/06/a-conversation-with-mikael-gravers-research-among-the-karen-past-and-present-part-2/

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: Research among the Karen, Past and Present [Part 1]

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: « Research among the Karen, Past and Present » [Part 1]

Pia Jolliffe interviews anthropologist Mikael Gravers.

This week on Tea Circle, we’re pleased to feature a two-part interview with anthropologist Mikael Gravers, an expert on nationalism, ethnic conflict, and peace and reconciliation, with extensive experience working among Karen communities in Thailand and Myanmar. He is the author of a number of books on Burma/Myanmar, including Burma/Myanmar— Where Now?, Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Burma, and Nationalism as Political Paranoia in Burma. He is also a researcher on the project “Everyday Justice and Security in the Myanmar Transition”.

Lire https://teacircleoxford.com/2017/07/05/a-conversation-with-mikael-gravers-research-among-the-karen-past-and-present-part-1/

 

How Has the Islamic Party of Malaysia’s Stance Towards Popular Culture Evolved?

Vidéo : Dominik Müller, « How Has the Islamic Party of Malaysia’s Stance Towards Popular Culture Evolved ? »

The academic platform Latest Thinking has done an interview with Dominik Müller in which he presents one of his articles and new developments in his research.

This article was published in the journal Indonesia and the Malay World, vol. 43, n° 127 (2015) : « Islamic politics and popular culture in Malaysia: Negotiating normative change between Shariah law and electric guitars ».

While doing anthropological fieldwork in Malaysia, Dominik Müller noticed that the Islamic Party of Malaysia organizes events and activities that are frequently embellished with popular culture elements, such as bands playing on electric guitars. This seemed at odds with common Western assumptions that Islamic political movements tend to condemn popular culture as un-Islamic. Müller then investigated how the change of the party’s religious stance – a Sharia-framed stance that had still been adamant twenty years before – came about. He found that not only the Islamic Party has opened itself to new forms of modern pop culture but also these elements have been appropriated and reframed in an Islamic context to convey the political messages of the party. This ethnographic study shows that Islamist ideologies can be much more complex and flexible than many people would normally assume.

A regarder sur : https://lt.org/publication/how-has-islamic-party-malaysias-stance-towards-popular-culture-evolved

 

Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now

« Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now », 05/07/2017 – 23/10/2017, The National Art Center, Tokyo & Mori Art Museum

With its total population counting around 600 million, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-faith Southeast Asia has nurtured a truly dynamic and diverse culture. Contemporary art from the emerging economic powerhouse of Southeast Asia is currently earning widespread international attention. The “sunshower” – rain falling from clear skies – is an intriguing yet frequently-seen meteorological phenomenon in Southeast Asia, and serves as a metaphor for the vicissitudes of the region. This exhibition, the largest-ever in scale, seeks to explore the many practices of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since 1980s from 9 different perspectives. It aims to showcase its inconceivable dynamism of Southeast Asia that is somewhat nostalgic yet extraordinarily new.

Nine sections :  Fluid World, Passion and Revolution, Archiving, Diverse Identities, Day by Day, Growth and Loss, What is Art ? Why Do It ?, Medium as Meditation, Dialogue with History.

Voir la liste des artistes par pays, les oeuvres et le programme des discussions sur :  http://sunshower2017.jp/en/index.html

« Sunshower »Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks

« Stormy Weather » (2009) by Filipino artist Felix Bacolor (Image courtesy of @katrinav_)

« Sunshower Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks » by Yunyi Lau, 08/07/2017, The Artling

The tropical climate of Southeast Asia lends for torrential downpours across the year. For those not used to the weather, one can be shocked to find what was a pleasantly sunny day, suddenly turn into a very wet situation in under a minute. Known as a sunshower, this frequent meteorological phenomenon in the region is the paradox of rain falling from clear skies.

It is this phenomenon that has been the inspiration behind a major show of Southeast Asian Contemporary Art that commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The sunshower is a poetic metaphor for the developments within Southeast Asia that resulted from the post-WWII decolonisation. Despite the turmoil that many countries were thrown into, many experienced democratisation and globalisation that caused rapid economic and urban development, resulting in drastic changes that have since changed the socio-political landscape of the region.

Sunshower originally began as an idea conceived between the Director-General of the National Art Center, Tokyo and the Director of the Mori Art Museum, and was assented by The Japan Foundation. The three parties came together to set up a 14-member curatorial team, which conducted a two and a half year field research, culminating in a selection of about 180 artworks by 86 artist groups from the ten ASEAN member countries, exhibited across the two museums.

Through the works selected, the exhibition seeks to explore the development of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since the 1980s against the backdrop of the currents and fluctuations of the times from nine different perspectives, with the goal of capturing its dynamism and diversity. Below is a selection of some of the works that we suggest you check out if you plan on checking out the exhibition!

The nine sections that Sunshower is divided into include: Fluid World that looks at maps and how they reflect socio-poltical economic values, Passion and Revolution that focuses on some of the major wars that shaped the region, Archiving that looks at the development of document-collection in Southeast Asian art, Diverse Identities focuses on postcolonialism and the emergence of independence and democracy, Day by Day is a look at artists’ exploration of local everyday life, Growth and Loss is the observation of the changes of globalisation and urbanisation that have impacted Southeast Asia, What is Art? Why Do It? is a look at the development of institutions and the characteristics of the art community in the region, Medium as Meditation focuses on how local traditional culture has affected the way artists use materials as their museums, and finally, Dialogue with History is an exploration into how artists engage with their histories in the present day.

A voir sur : https://theartling.com/en/artzine/2017/07/03/sunshowers-bring-flowers-with-this-major-exhibition-of-180-southeast-asian-artworks/

Talking Indonesia: Urban villages and activism

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: Urban villages and activism, 06/07/2017, Host : Charlotte Setijadi

Jakarta’s urban village (kampung) communities have received considerable attention over the past few months amid the hotly contested Jakarta gubernatorial election. While most of the election coverage focused on racial and religious issues, former Governor Basuki ‘Ahok’ Tjahaja Purnama’s forced evictions of kampung along Jakarta’s riverbanks also stirred much controversy. Kampung residents and activist groups condemn these evictions as unlawful and undemocratic. Yet many Jakartans argue that evictions are necessary measures to fix the city’s notorious traffic and seasonal flooding. Many also argue that the evictions are justified since many of the kampung dwellers do not possess certificates of ownership for the lands they occupy.

Is there a middle ground? Can Jakarta’s kampung co-exist with residential, infrastructure, and commercial projects planned for the city? What do the controversies surrounding evictions and Jakarta’s kampung communities reveal about social and economic divides in Indonesia’s capital?

I discuss these issues with Dr Rita Padawangi, Senior Lecturer at Singapore University of Social Sciences. She was previously a Senior Fellow at the Asian Urbanisms cluster at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. Rita is a passionate researcher and proponent of participatory urban development, and has worked with kampung communities in Jakarta to get the government to engage in more dialogue with kampung residents in urban planning.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-urban-villages-and-activism/

Murder and black magic: Cambodia’s modern-day witch-hunts

« Murder and black magic: Cambodia’s modern-day witch-hunts » by Paul Millar, 06/07/2017, Southeast Asia Globe

A single word from one of Cambodia’s traditional healers can turn a whole community against outsiders in their ranks – often with fatal results.

… With the country’s feeble healthcare system struggling to keep up with the undiagnosed death and disease plaguing rural Cambodians, kru khmer or lou kru – wide-reaching terms describing traditional healers ranging from fortune tellers to spirit mediums – continue to play a central role across the country. Men and women, monks and laity, these healers call spirits into their bodies, ink protection spells onto their patients’ skin and root out black magic within the community – sometimes to devastating effect. In Kong Pisei alone, which has a population of just under 113,000 as of the 2008 census, two other alleged sorcerers have been beheaded in the past two years. Others accused of witchcraft have barely managed to escape with their lives.

On the second day of Khmer New Year in April, Prak Kong and his wife were forced to flee their home in Kong Pisei’s Prey Vihear commune just hours before a mob of villagers tore their house apart with hammers and rocks. As the crowd swelled to more than 600, the most violent attackers splintered the family’s spirit house and splashed petrol around the inside of the house, hoping to set it ablaze. According to Kong’s brother-in-law, who now lives there, the violence was unleashed by a local kru khmer who had accused the man of using sorcery to murder his newborn nephew-in-law.

“The problem started before the water festival [last year],” he said. “[His relative’s] child died after surgery. They wanted to find out why their child died so they went to see a lou kru. The lou kru gave him Kong’s name. They said he was responsible for the child’s death.”

Fabienne Luco, a social anthropologist in Cambodia who has done extensive research on the killing of people accused of being sorcerers, said that kru khmer often used accusations of witchcraft to provide a scapegoat for suffering or chronic disease within the community.

Lire la suite sur : http://sea-globe.com/cambodia-witch-hunts/

 

Capturing time : Preserving Wat Phra Si San Phet and other historical sites, in 3D and forever

Capturing time : Preserving Wat Phra Si San Phet and other historical sites, in 3D and forever, 28/06/2017, Bangkok Post

From now people will be able to virtually experience the historic city of Ayutthaya anytime and anywhere, as Wat Phra Si San Phet has been digitally preserved thanks to CyArk, an international non-profit organisation that works in collaboration with Seagate Thailand and UNESCO.

Wat Phra Si San Phet was selected by CyArk as part of their international programme for digital preservation through aerial surveys conducted with drones, terrestrial laser scanning known as Lidar, and photogrammetry exercises.

Earlier this month, digital scanning and archiving of the Unesco World Heritage site commenced. Data and images from the field exercise will be turned into photo-real 3D models for future generations of students, tourists and cultural-heritage enthusiasts. It will be launched next month.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.bangkokpost.com/tech/local-news/1277039/capturing-time

Space, Social Conflict, and the Future of Urban Society: a comparative view

Space, Social Conflict, and the Future of Urban Society: a comparative view

Professor Michael Herzfeld, Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

Co-presented with the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre, the China Studies Centre, the Department of Anthropology, and the School of Architecture, Design and Planning

For many years now, anthropologists and urban scholars alike have identified ‘gentrification’ as a process of class conflict in which poorer people get pushed to the margins of urban life in the name of ‘urban renewal.’

Professor Michael Herzfeld will argue that gentrification is the tip of a much larger iceberg, called ‘development’ – a grandiloquent idea that is often coupled with socially and culturally destructive policies and that easily promotes insidious (because unstated) forms of social Darwinism (‘the survival of the fittest’) and paternalism.

Using examples from Thailand, China, Greece, and Italy, he will argue that these short-sighted policies are creating an increasingly disenfranchised and resentful under-class. While reactions in these and other countries will vary with cultural conventions, economic dynamics, and the extent to which development evades socially responsible control, the impact on ordinary people is likely to be devastating, while it will also entail the obliteration of socially viable arrangements that have worked well for centuries or even millennia.

Michael suggests that currently emergent forms of urban protest may not be sufficient to stem the tide, but that more concerted engagement by academics and professionals could and must make a significant difference. He will also briefly address some relatively unusual situations where gentrification has had benign effects and will propose that these could provide models for socially responsible planning in the future.

Professor Michael Herzfeld is Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University, where has taught since 1991, and where he serves as Director of the Asia Center’s Thai Studies Program. He is also IIAS Visiting Professor of Critical Heritage Studies at the University of Leiden (and Senior Advisor to the Critical Heritage Studies Initiative of the International Institute for Asian Studies, Leiden); Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne; and Visiting Professor and Chang Jiang (Yangtze River) Scholar at Shanghai International Studies University (2015-17). The author of eleven books – including Cultural Intimacy: Social Poetics in the Nation-State (1997; 3rd edition, 2016), The Body Impolitic: Artisans and Artifice in the Global Hierarchy of Value (2004), Evicted from Eternity: The Restructuring of Modern Rome (2009), and Siege of the Spirits: Community and Polity in Bangkok (2016) – and numerous articles and reviews, he has also produced two ethnographic films (Monti Moments [2007] and Roman Restaurant Rhythms [2011]). He has served as editor of American Ethnologist (1995-98) and is currently editor-at-large (responsible for “Polyglot Perspectives”) at Anthropological Quarterly. He is also a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including American Ethnologist, Anthropology Today, International Journal of Heritage Studies, Journal of Anthropological Research, and South East Asia Research. An advocate for “engaged anthropology,” he has conducted research in Greece, Italy, and Thailand on, inter alia, the social and political impact of historic conservation and gentrification, the social effects of urban policy, the discourses and practices of crypto-colonialism, social poetics, the dynamics of nationalism and bureaucracy, and the ethnography of knowledge among artisans and intellectuals.

Voir : http://sydney.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/2017/professor_michael_herzfeld.shtml

Imagination and Narrative: Lexical and Cultural Translation in Buddhist Asia

Peter Skilling and Justin Thomas McDaniel (eds), Imagination and Narrative: Lexical and Cultural Translation in Buddhist Asia, Silkworm Books, 2017

The essays in this volume highlight the movement of Buddhist ideas and practices across Asia and how the encounter of far-flung cultures and personalities encouraged adaptation and transformation. At times this meant textual translation and transmission, as seen in the chapters about Chinese and Japanese Buddhist texts and their authors, or the analysis of Buddhist manuscripts in northern Thailand. Other cases entailed cultural translation—local adaptations of jataka tales, the evolution of legal notions within the framework of Theravada Buddhist teachings, localizations embedded in material culture seen through inscriptions and archaeological traces. Some themes go beyond Buddhism writ small to explore the broad canvas of engagement: the East-West encounter in the British geographical and anthropological exploration of Burma, and the place of Brahmanism in early Buddhist thought as expressed through the jatakas.

This expertly curated selection of scholarship shows that the diffusion of ideas and religious thought is much more than a tale of decline and loss or cultural appropriation and impoverishment. The fresh perspectives presented here—all drawn on primary sources—give an overall impression of a singular diversity that somehow participates in an unacknowledged unity. Beyond the fragmentations of sectarian and cultural divides, disparate Buddhist and non-Buddhist traditions have gone beyond arbitrary boundaries and flourished through their simultaneity.

Contributors: Olivier de Bernon, Frédéric Girard, Iyanaga Nobumi, François Lagirarde, Jacques Leider, Michel Lorrillard, Justin McDaniel, Kumkum Roy, Peter Skilling, Warangkana Srikamnerd.

Voir : https://silkwormbooks.com/products/imagination-and-narrative