Journal of Vietnamese Studies, vol. 12, n° 2, Spring 2017

Journal of Vietnamese Studies, vol. 12, n° 2, Spring 2017  

Special Issue on Globalizing Vietnamese Religions

Table of contents

Introduction

  • Globalizing Vietnamese Religion by Janet Alison Hoskins, Thien-Huong T. Ninh

Research Articles

  • A Reappraisal of Vietnamese Buddhism’s Status as “Ethnic” by Alexander Soucy
  • Global Chain of Marianism : Diasporic Formation among Vietnamese Catholics in the United States and Cambodia by Thien-Huong T. Ninh
  • Quán Thế Âm of the Transpacific by Allison Truitt
  • Sacralizing the Diaspora : Cosmopolitan and Originalist Indigenous Religions by Janet Alison Hoskins

Book Reviews

  • François Guillemot and Agathe Larcher-Goscha, eds, La Colonisation des corps: De L’Indochine au Viet Nam by Judith Henchy
  • Solène Granier, Domestiques Indochinois by Christina Firpo
  • Sophia Suk-Mun Law, The Invisible Citizens of Hong Kong: Art and Stories of Vietnamese Boatpeople by Jana Lipman
  • Mai Na M. Lee, Dreams of the Hmong Kingdom: The Quest for Legitimation in French Indochina, 1850–1960 by Christian C. Lenz

Female Ulama voice : a vision for Indonesia’s future

Female Ulama voice : a vision for Indonesia’s future by Kathryn Robinson, 30 May 2017, New Mandala

In April, Indonesian religious scholars and activists hosted a world first: a convention of female religious authorities (ulama). The conference title, KUPI (Kongres Ulama Perempuan Indonesia), played with a dual meaning: female religious authorities, and scholars (male and female) whose interpretations of the Qur’an and Hadith proclaim gender equity (kesetaraan jender) as a fundamental principle of Islam. Over three days, speakers and delegates discussed the history of female religious authority in Indonesia—a claim that is highly contentious to hard line groups who argue that male authority, as prayer leaders and hence as political leaders, is a fundamental Islamic principle. They also discussed the more abstract concepts of social justice and human rights, as fundamental Islamic values focusing on issues like sexual and domestic violence and child marriage.

The congress ended with a declaration of three fatwa, reinforcing the value of female religious authority. The first fatwa argued for a minimum age of marriage of 18; the second, that sexual violence against women, including within marriage, is haram (forbidden). The third fatwa picked up the theme of environmental protection: environmental destruction is haram as it can trigger social and economic imbalances and place burdens on women. The congress called on the government to stop allowing the destruction of natural resources for ‘development’. Congress attendees have strong links into the community, and the organisers hold significant institutional positions, respect and support from government. This movement has been slowly building for a long time and is a significant voice in defining the future of Indonesia.

Lire l’article sur : http://www.newmandala.org/female-ulama-voice-vision-indonesias-future/

2017 Holland Prize Shortlist Pacific Affairs

2017 Holland Prize Shortlist Pacific Affairs

Professionals and Soldiers: Measuring Professionalism in the Thai Military by Punchada Sirivunnabood (Mahidol University, Nakhorn Phatom, Thailand), Jacob Isaac Ricks (Singapore Management University, Singapore), Pacific Affaires, vol. 89, n° 1, March 2016

Abstract

Thailand’s military has recently reclaimed its role as the central pillar of Thai politics. This raises an enduring question in civil-military relations: why do people with guns choose to obey those without guns? One of the most prominent theories in both academic and policy circles is Samuel Huntington’s argument that professional militaries do not become involved in politics. We engage this premise in the Thai context. Utilizing data from a new and unique survey of 569 Thai military officers as well as results from focus groups and interviews with military officers, we evaluate the attitudes of Thai servicemen and develop a test of Huntington’s hypothesis. We demonstrate that increasing levels of professionalism are generally poor predictors as to whether or not a Thai military officer prefers an apolitical military. Indeed, our research suggests that higher levels of professionalism as described by Huntington may run counter to civilian control of the military. These findings provide a number of contributions. First, the survey allows us to operationalize and measure professionalism at the individual level. Second, using these measures we are able to empirically test Huntington’s hypothesis that more professional soldiers should prefer to remain apolitical. Finally, we provide an uncommon glimpse at the opinions of Thai military officers regarding military interventions, adding to the relatively sparse body of literature on factors internal to the Thai military which push officers toward politics.

A lire sur : http://pacificaffairs.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2017/05/pdfHollandShortlistSirivunnabood_Ricks.pdf

Why Are Gender Reforms Adopted in Singapore? Party Pragmatism and Electoral Incentives by Netina Tan (McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada), Pacific Affairs, vol. 89, n° 1, March 2016

Abstract

In Singapore, the percentage of elected female politicians rose from 3.8 percent in 1984 to 22.5 percent after the 2015 general election. After years of exclusion, why were gender reforms adopted and how did they lead to more women in political office? Unlike South Korea and Taiwan, this paper shows that in Singapore party pragmatism rather than international diffusion of gender equality norms, feminist lobbying, or rival party pressures drove gender reforms. It is argued that the ruling People’s Action Party’s (PAP) strategic and electoral calculations to maintain hegemonic rule drove its policy u-turn to nominate an average of about 17.6 percent female candidates in the last three elections. Similar to the PAP’s bid to capture women voters in the 1959 elections, it had to alter its patriarchal, conservative image to appeal to the younger, progressive electorate in the 2000s. Additionally, Singapore’s electoral system that includes multi-member constituencies based on plurality party bloc vote rule also makes it easier to include women and diversify the party slate. But despite the strategic and electoral incentives, a gender gap remains. Drawing from a range of public opinion data, this paper explains why traditional gender stereotypes, biased social norms, and unequal family responsibilities may hold women back from full political participation.

A lire sur : http://pacificaffairs.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2017/05/pdfHollandshortlistTan.pdf

33 Burmese manuscripts now digitised at the British Library

33 Burmese manuscripts now digitised by San San May, 24/05/2017, Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library)

The Burmese manuscript collection in the British Library consists of approximately 1800 manuscripts. The majority are written on palm leaf, but there are also many paper folding books (parabaik), and texts written on diverse materials such as gold, silver, copper and ivory sheets in the shape of palm leaves. The collection is particularly strong in historical, legal and grammatical texts, and in illustrated material. In particular, there are many folding books with illustrations of the Life of the Buddha, Jataka stories, court scenes and other subjects.

Since 2013 the British Library has digitised some of the finest Burmese manuscripts in its collection, supported by the Henry D. Ginsburg Legacy. To date 33 manuscripts have been fully digitised, covering a wide range of genres and subjects.  All these manuscripts are now accessible through the Digitised Manuscripts website. A new webpage, Digital Access to Burmese Manuscripts, also lists all the Burmese manuscripts digitised so far, with hyperlinks to the images and to blog posts featuring the manuscripts. Future digitised manuscripts will be also be listed on this page. Shown in this post are a selection of our digitised Burmese manuscripts; clicking on the hyperlinked shelfmarks below the images will take you directly to the digitised versions.

Quick link to: Digital access to Burmese manuscripts

Lire la suite sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2017/05/33-burmese-manuscripts-now-digitised.html

Visiting fellowships Indonesia Studies ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute Singapore

Visiting fellowships Indonesia Studies  ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute Singapore

Deadline for application : 30 june 2017

  1. Research officer for the project « Christianity in Southeast Asia : Comparative Growth, Politics and Networks in Urban Centres.
  2. Research officer for the project : »Singapore Islamic Studies Graduates : Their Role and Impact in a Plural Society ».

Preference will be given to candidates who have done or can work on projects associated with one or more of the following themes: The impact of ethnicity and religion on Indonesian domestic politics and elections; The evolving role of the military in post-1998 Indonesia; Urbanization, decentralization and socio-political change in Indonesia; The application of quantitative analysis and/or GIS to the study of social trends in Southeast Asia. Applicants must have received their Ph.D. degree no earlier than August 2012. The successful applicant is expected to start no later than January 2, 2018 and must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. degree at the point of employment.

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/about-us/opportunities

2017 Vietnam Update: The Politics of Life 20-21 November 2017

2017 Vietnam Update: The Politics of Life

20-21 November 2017

Australian National University, Canberra

Vietnamese people often tell their foreign visitors that Vietnam is the most secure place in the world. The country has no terrorists, no political disorder, and the police are second to none. Decades of devastating warfare are long-past. Poverty is declining and incomes are rising in a region with good economic prospects. People in Vietnam appear to fling themselves at life’s everyday challenges with intensity and no little optimism.

 

Continuer la lecture de 2017 Vietnam Update: The Politics of Life 20-21 November 2017

LÊ THANH NGHỊ, « REPORT ON MEETINGS WITH PARTY LEADERS OF EIGHT SOCIALIST COUNTRIES » [1965]

Sources : http://indomemoires.hypotheses.org/25154

[ndlr] Signalement d’une archive en ligne sur le site du Wilson Center.

https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/134601

North Vietnamese Deputy Prime Minister and Politburo member Le Thanh Nghi recounts his discussions with socialist leaders in the summer of 1965, just as the war in the south was heating up.

Continuer la lecture de LÊ THANH NGHỊ, « REPORT ON MEETINGS WITH PARTY LEADERS OF EIGHT SOCIALIST COUNTRIES » [1965]

Call for papers: graduate student symposium

Mass Meditation: Practices and Discourses in Contemporary Global Buddhisms
October 6, 2017—Institute of Buddhist Studies, Berkeley, California

This conference will focus on the phenomenon of mass meditation (e.g., lay meditation practices, mindfulness, secularization) in contemporary global Buddhism. Of particular focus will be the means by which Buddhist meditation is understood and promoted in various contexts. We welcome submissions that consider how meditation has gained an ambivalent relationship to Buddhism—sometimes being promoted as a “spiritual technology” not connected to any particular tradition, sometimes as the condition sine qua non for Buddhist identity and the only practice recommended by the Buddha. Through the presentations given, we hope to reflect not only on the ways that meditation has been constructed through the Buddhist encounter with modernity, but how it has altered modernity and modern peoples through its global impact.

Topics include but are not limited to: the origins and popularization of lay meditation practices in Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka; the Vipassanā (Insight) and Mindfulness movements in  North America, Europe, and Asia; meditation practice and the construction of Buddhist identity or subjectivity; the “mystification” of meditation in promotional literature; the use of scientific language to justify and promote meditation both within and beyond Buddhist contexts.

Dr. Erik Braun, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia and author of The Birth of Insight (co-winner of the 2014 Toshihide Numata Book Award in Buddhism), will serve as the symposium’s keynote speaker.

Graduate students at any stage of their program are encouraged to submit paper proposals. Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to Thomas Calobrisi (tcalobrisi@ses.gtu.edu). The deadline for submission is July 15, 2017. Applicants will be notified about their submission by August 15, 2017.

Limited travel funds may be available; low-cost housing is available on site at the Jodo Shinshu Center.

5th Borneo International Beads Conference | Malaysia

The 5th Borneo International Beads Conference (BIBCo), entitled ‘Our Universal Beads’, will take place in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia, on 13-15 October 2017. The conference takes place in the context of the What About Kuching Festival 2017, a month-long celebration of local arts, culture and lifestyle.

The conference celebrates the bead culture of Sarawak, part of a greater Malaysian heritage, rooted in centuries of tradition.  An ancient maritime trading network linked Sarawak to the world; the beads most treasured today came from production centres on the Malay Peninsula, India, China and even further afield.

In the hands of Sarawak’s craftswomen and collectors, these masterpieces of the glassmaker’s art became intrinsically ‘Borneo Beads.’

Continuer la lecture de 5th Borneo International Beads Conference | Malaysia

Call for papers « Care in Asia: beyond and across a clinic » Workshop

Call for papers « Care in Asia: beyond and across a clinic » Workshop

Date:
Monday, July 3, 2017
Call for papers « Care in Asia: beyond and across a clinic » Workshop
While care is widely discussed across feminist studies and anthropology, it remains still undertheorized and subject to western-centric conceptualizations, as some recent studies point out (Aulino 2016). Frequently, explorations of care practices are limited to specific sites of inquiry – medical institutions or domestic space. For instance, scholars explore how care occurs at the clinics, and how it intertwines with knowledge production, governance of bodies and subject formation. However, in Asia (but to a large extent elsewhere as well), care is dispersed across a complex terrain of healthcare ecologies. Firstly, anthropologists have since long also been interested in care generated by relations, such as kin. Secondly, numerous studies show that healing (and thus care) takes place in and across diverse biomedical and ‘traditional’ medical institutions. Still, in attempts to conceptualize it, care is often designated as ‘self-care’; and familial or ‘traditional’ forms of care often remain to be viewed as hindrances for hegemonic biomedical care.

Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641−1699

Sher Banu A.L. Khan, Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641−1699, NUS Press, 2017

The Islamic kingdom of Aceh was ruled by queens for half of the 17th century. Was female rule an aberration? Unnatural? A violation of nature, comparable to hens instead of roosters crowing at dawn? Indigenous texts and European sources offer different evaluations. Drawing on both sets of sources, this book shows that female rule was legitimised both by Islam and adat (indigenous customary laws), and provides original insights on the Sultanah’s leadership, their relations with male elites, and their encounters with European envoys who visited their court. The book challenges received views on kingship in the Malay world and the response of indigenous polities to east-west encounters in Southeast Asia’s Age of Commerce.

« We have waited too long for a book such as this. It explores the extraordinary phenomenon of a preference for queens in the golden age of Islamic Aceh. Countering the dominant nationalist, feminist and Islamic scholarship, all of which find uncongenial the striking phenomenon of a preference for queens in early modern Asian Islam, Banu has utilized rich primary sources to reveal a queenship that was truly Islamic, effective and benign. This book is a revelation. Read it. »
Anthony Reid, The Australian National University

« Sher Banu’s superb study based on a host of newly discovered contemporary source materials throws new light on a hotly discussed topic among historians of Southeast Asian statecraft in Early Modern time. »
Leonard Blusse, Leiden University

« The author is to be congratulated on a book that makes a significant contribution both to the history of Southeast Asia and to comparative studies on women in early modern Asia. »
Barbara Watson Andaya and Leonard Y. Andaya, University of Hawai‘i 

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/products/sovereign-women-in-a-muslim-kingdom-the-sultanahs-of-aceh-1641-1699

Inside Indonesia 128, apr – jun 2017

Inside Indonesia 128 : april – june 2017 : New law, new villages ? Written by Ward Berenschot and Jacqueline Vel

The new Village Law could substantially change Indonesia’s villages. Not necessarily for the better.

Table of contents

  • Creating Indonesia’s Village Law by Jacqueline Vel, Yando Zakaria and Adriaan Bedner
  • The myth of the harmonious village by Ben White
  • New law, old bureaucracy by Yando Zakaria and Jacqueline Vel
  • The village head as patron by Ward Berenschot and Prio Sambodho
  • Participation in Ngada by Lily Hoo
  • When village development fails by Yulia Indri Sari
  • Traditional village institutions and the Village Law by Agung Wardana and Darmanto

A lire sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/

Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia

Arahmaiani Feisal (1961- ), No More Shadow Play ;Courtesy of the artist.

Thomas J. Berghuis, Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia, 25/05/2017, SOAS

Description

This seminar introduces the development of performance art in Indonesia, from the 1980s until the present day. It considers ways in which performance art in Indonesia has its art historical origins in the conceptual art movement of the 1970s, when artists across Southeast Asia began to consider new social and artistic realities in their artworks. But the the seminar will also draw on the multiple interwoven strands of performance practices and performance traditions that connect the development of contemporary performance art in Indonesia.

The seminar will examine the role of performance art in Indonesia in relation to place, time and media. Artists whose works will be examined include Arahmaiani, Heri Dono, FX Harsono, Mella Jaarsma, Tisna Sanjaya, Melati, Iwan Wijono, W. Christiawan, Mimi Fadmi, Redza Afisina, and Performance Club 69 — a recently established platform for study and practices of performance art initiated by Forum Lenteng in Jakarta, starting in 2016.

About the speaker

Dr. Thomas J. Berghuis is currently a Visiting Fellow at Tate Research Centre: Asia. He is Principal Fellow (Honorary) with the School of Culture and Communication at The University of Melbourne in Australia and is currently based in Leiden, the Netherlands. An art historian and curator of contemporary Asian art, with focus on contemporary art in China and Indonesia, Berghuis previously worked as Lecturer in Asian Art History at the University of Sydney (2008-2013); The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Curator of Chinese Art (2013-2015) at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York; and Director of the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara (Museum MACAN) in Jakarta, Indonesia (2015-2016). Berghuis’ writings have been published in prominent journals and art magazines. He is the author of Performance Art in China (Hong Kong: Timezone 8, 2006).

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/art/events/contemporary-arts-research-seminar/25may2017-place-time-and-media-in-performance-art-in-indonesia.html

Careful What You Wish For: Salafi Islamisation and the Shifting Structures of the Malaysian State

Lily Zubaidah Rahim, « Careful What You Wish For: Salafi Islamisation and the Shifting Structures of the Malaysian State », 31/05/2017, ANU Malaysia Institute

Abstract

Malaysia appears to be fragmenting under the weight of salafiIslamisation – threatening the country’s secular and democratic constitutional foundations. Initially instigated by state-led Islamisation initiatives under the Mahathir administration, the promotion of salafi Islam has become increasing assertive, particularly since the 2013 general elections. In this election, the UMNO-led Barisan Nasional (BN) government lost the popular vote. More recently, UMNO and the conservative opposition Islamist party PAS have attempted to introduce hudud (sharia penal code) legislation through the Federal parliament – further reconstructing the character of the post-colonial state. The lecture examines Malaysia’s salafiIslamisation in conjunction with the broader socio-political and economic pressures confronting the ruling BN government. The ambiguous and fragmented responses of the predominantly Muslim-led opposition parties (Amanah, Parti Keadilan Rakyat and Bersatu) towards salafi Islamisation will also be considered. After sixty years of independence, Malaysians continue to be challenged by the following questions: What is the constitutional status of sharia law?; How should the dual legal jurisdictions (civil and codified sharia) be managed?; Can traditional interpretations of sharia genuinely accommodate principles such as citizenship rights, gender equality and democratic constitutionalism?

Bio-profile

Lily Zubaidah Rahim is an Assoc Professor at the Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney. She is a specialist in authoritarian governance, ethnic politics and democratisation in Southeast Asia and political Islam in Muslim-majority states. Her publications include The Singapore Dilemma: The Political and Educational Marginality of the Malay Community, (Oxford University Press 1998/2001; translated to Malay by the Malaysian National Institute for Translation); Singapore in the Malay World: Building and Breaching Regional Bridges (Routledge, 2009); Muslim Secular Democracy (PalgraveMacmillan, 2013) and The Politics of Islamism: Diverging Visions and Trajectories(PalgraveMacmillan, 2017, Forthcoming). Lily is completing her fifth book on governance reform in Singapore. She has published in international journals such as Democratization,Contemporary Politics, Journal of Contemporary Asia andAustralian Journal of International Affairs. Her sole-authored journal article ‘Governing Muslims in Singapore’s Secular Authoritarian State’ was short-listed for the Boyer Prize by the Australian Journal of International Affairs (AJIA) in 2011.

Voir : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/cap-events/2017-05-31/careful-what-you-wish-salafi-islamisation-and-shifting-structures-malaysian

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder, chronique édifiante du discours de la haine par Frédéric Strauss,  20/05/2017, Télérama

Dans un documentaire exemplaire car méthodique, présenté en séance spéciale à Cannes, le Suisse Barbet Schroeder part à la rencontre de Wirathu. Ce moine birman qui, par ses sermons extrémistes, a encouragé le massacre des musulmans dans son pays. Quand le bouddhisme confine au fascisme.

Le film sortira en France le 7 juin 2017.

Il a la haine. Les vieux arbres qui gardaient ses plus beaux souvenirs, à côté de chez lui, le voisin les a fait couper. Pour oublier ce crime, Barbet Schroeder part à Mandalay, en Birmanie, où il découvrit, à 20 ans, le bouddhisme. Une religion qui apprend à vivre sans haine. S’il n’a pas perdu la foi, le cinéaste ne croit cependant plus aux miracles. Le but de son voyage est de rencontrer un moine qui, tel un pompier pyromane, allume des incendies, attise les flammes d’un fanatisme meurtrier : le vénérable et pourtant détestable Wirathu.

Sous ses allures de bonze, c’est une sorte d’héritier d’Hitler qu’on découvre, tout entier voué à la persécution et à l’extermination d’une population : les musulmans de Birmanie, et particulièrement la minorité des Rohingyas. Wirathu les compare à des animaux sauvages qui se reproduisent comme des lapins, se dévorent entre eux et détruisent l’environnement. Monstrueux et glaçant, son discours veut faire naître chez les Birmans bouddhistes « la peur de la disparition de la race », titre d’un de ses livres. Il faut éliminer les musulmans, ou ils seront, eux, éliminés… Face à cet apôtre de la haine, Barbet Schroeder garde un étonnant sang-froid. Son regard droit, objectif, rend la confrontation impressionnante. Avec ce film, il clôt une « trilogie du Mal », commencée avec les documentaires Général Idi Amin Dada : autoportrait (1974) et L’Avocat de la terreur (2007), sur Jacques Vergès…

Lire la suite et voir la bande annonce sur : http://www.telerama.fr/festival-de-cannes/2017/cannes-2017-le-venerable-w-de-barbet-schroeder-chronique-edifiante-du-discours-de-la-haine,158235.php