Call for abstracts : 2017 Canadian Council for Southeast Asian Studies Conference

Call for abstracts : 2017 Canadian Council for Southeast Asian Studies Conference, 26-27 october 2017, York University, Toronto, Canada

Theme of the conference : People in and out of place

Abstract / proposal submission: 30 April 2017

The 33rd Biennial Canadian Council for Southeast Asian Studies (CCSEAS) conference theme, “People In and Out of Place,” represents a long standing and yet often forgotten dynamic of a region known as the crossroads of different peoples, histories, cultures, and politics.

We welcome panels or roundtables to discuss the meaning of this condition by exploring the conflicting formation and transformation of institutions, knowledge, ideologies, identities, places, and practices in the rural, urban, and peri-urban spaces of the region, and in diasporic Southeast Asian communities. We also welcome submission of fiction and documentary films for consideration for screening.

Click here to submit an abstract: http://laps.apps01.yorku.ca/machform/view.php?id=220691

Plus d’informations sur : https://ccseas.ca/

Peace and nation-building in Myanmar

Peace and nation-building in Myanmar by James T. Davies, 24/03/2017, New Mandala

James T. Davies reflects on the challenges to establishing a unified and conflict-free Myanmar.

Inclusion, understanding, autonomy, conflict and poverty – often far from the reach of the state — reflect just some of the challenges, as opportunities and progress, linked to the emergence of an inclusive national identity in Myanmar.

They were also the focus of an excellent panel discussion as part of the 2017 Myanmar Update hosted by the Australian National University on 17-18 February.

Cecile Medail, PhD Candidate at the University of New South Wales, began the panel with a look at the grassroots voices of Mon people in forming an inclusive national identity in Myanmar. The challenges of national identity during transition, and particularly for minority communities, were noted …

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/peace-nation-building-myanmar/

 

Call for papers : New York Conference on Asian Studies (NYCAS) 2017

Call for papers : New York Conference on Asian Studies (NYCAS) 2017

Conference theme : Consuming Asia

Scholars in New York, neighboring states, Canada, and elsewhere are cordially invited to submit proposals for individual papers, panels, and roundtables. Panels, papers, and roundtables may focus on the conference theme “Consuming Asia” or other aspects of East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, or Asian American Studies. Submissions within the conference theme might focus on how “Asia” is both the object of consumption and the consumer.

Paper and panel proposals from graduate students and established scholars are equally welcome. We will make every effort to assemble a program that represents Asia and Asia scholars in all of their diversity.

Paper and panel proposals may be submitted via the online form between January 15, 2017 and May 1, 2017 (DEADLINE EXTENDED!).

Voir : https://nycas2017.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

Historicizing fiction, fictionalizing history

Historicizing fiction, fictionalizing history by Taufiq Hanafi, 31/03/2017, KITLV Blog

Sometimes fiction tells the truth and history perpetuates a fiction. This blog tells us about how history has been used to serve the creation of a national mythology, while fiction has allowed a space for more difficult histories to be worked out.

Similarly, the bleakest moment in Indonesian history is ignored and silenced. Almost all Indonesian written history skips over the mass killings of the communists and left-wing sympathizers after the aborted coup blamed on the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) in 1965.

Take the obligatory read for elementary students in the 1990s, Pendidikan Sejarah Perjuangan Bangsa (The History of the National Struggle). We Indonesians were so accustomed to this that we thought the historical events presented in the book were all objectively true. The book instructed students to show admiration for the Indonesian Army for their outstanding success in crushing the September movement of the PKI. It also wanted us to believe that the anti-communist purge was the right thing to do in order to support the national struggle for the just and prosperous society under Pancasila. Furthermore, it created a make-believe world in which Soeharto was a hero who had so much love and respect for his people and his country. As for the massacre, the book remained silent.

In fiction, however, the killings were made (more) clear. Ahmad Tohari in the Ronggeng Dukuh Paruk (Dancer of Paruk Hamlet) trilogy narrates the mass killings in Central Java, and describes the close cooperation between the army and paramilitary groups. Mencoba Tidak Menyerah (Trying not to Surrender) by Yudhistira ANM Masardi vividly portrays the systematic massacre and politics of fear through the eyes of a small boy who is searching for his father after he was made to disappear due to his affiliation with the communists. Ashadi Siregar centers his novel, Jentera Lepas, on students who were massacred by the army after the aborted coup, while Umar Kayam in Bawuk questions how society has been dehumanized for not having the courage to address the issue.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/blog-historicizing-fiction-fictionalizing-history/

The wisdom in the literature by Andrew Selth

The wisdom in the literature by Andrew Selth, 21/03/2017, New Mandala

Andrew Selth outlines why past generations’ accumulated literary and scholarly work on Myanmar is at risk of being lost — and what this might mean for the country’s future.

There is an old Myanmar saying that ‘wisdom is in the literature’. This was particularly the case before 1988, when the country was virtually closed to foreigners and fieldwork of any kind was very difficult. The Internet was still in its infancy and Myanmar-watchers of all kinds were heavily reliant on books, serials and other documentary sources, both to acquire information and to present their findings to a wider audience.

Access to Myanmar is now much easier and the past few decades have seen a flood of foreign officials, scholars and others intent on conducting primary research. As noted on New Mandala, this has contributed to a dramatic increase in the number of books, reports and articles written about the country. A new Griffith Asia Institute study lists over 1,800 monographs published in English alone, and in hard copy, over the past 25 years.

At the same time, however, there is an increasing danger that the accumulated knowledge of earlier generations of Myanmar-watchers will become dispersed, if not actually lost.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/the-wisdom-in-the-literature/

REVIEW : Keyakinan dan Kekuatan: Seni Bela Diri Silat Banten

Gabriel Facal, Keyakinan dan Kekuatan: Seni Bela Diri Silat Banten (Faith and Force: The Silat Martial Arts of Banten), Yayasan Pustaka Obor Indonesia and O’ong Maryono Pencak Silat Award, 2016

Reviewed by Abdul Hamid in Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, no. 21

Keyakinan dan Kekuatan is developed from a Ph.D. dissertation, originally entitled (in French) “La foi et la force: L’art Silat martial de Banten en Indonésie,” written by Gabriel Facal. Facal is an ethnographer and a martial artist who has been practicing in various silat (traditional martial art) schools (paguron) in Banten, Indonesia. Nicely translated by Arya Seta, it was first published in Indonesian to target Indonesian readers.

As its title suggests, there are two unique aspects of the Bantenese Martial Arts: faith (“keyakinan”) and force (“kekuatan”). Facal argues that the interweaving of these two aspects has differentiated Bantenese Silat from other kind of martial arts, even within Indonesia’s regional martial arts traditions.

Strengthening faith is considered the first step to learn silat rituals. After this first step, faith is instrumental to be integrated in the fighting techniques/the forces of the silat. Faith and fighting techniques complement each other in order to gain physical, mental, and moral power, at the same time. Thus, in Bantenese martial arts, both religion and ritual practice are blended and in turn strengthen each other to perfection…

Lire la suite sur : https://kyotoreview.org/book-review/keyakinan-dan-kekuatan/

 

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, no. 21, March 2017 : Political assassinations in Southeast Asia

Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, no. 21, March 2017 : Political assassinations in Southeast Asia

Sommaire :

  • Political assassinations in Southeast Asia by guest editor Jafar Suryomenggolo
  • Murder without Progress in Siam: From Hired Gunmen to Men in Uniform by Prajak Kongkirati
  • Assassination in Thai Local Politics: A Decade of Decentralization (2000-2009) by Nuttakorn Vititanon
  • Wars of Extinction: The Lumad Killings in Mindanao, Philippines by Arnold P.  Alamon
  • Killing for whom? Extrajudicial killing cases in the Philippines by Bub Mo Jung
  • Why Does Indonesia Kill Us? Political Assassination of KNPB Activists in Papua by Budi Hernawan

A lire sur : https://kyotoreview.org/issue-21/political-assassinations-in-southeast-asia/

New Perspectives in Southeast Asian and Pacific Prehistory

Philip J. Piper, Hirofumi Matsumura, David Bulbeck (eds), New Perspectives in Southeast Asian and Pacific Prehistory,  ANU Press, Terra Australis 45

Ouvrage en ligne et en libre accès

Table des matières :

  1. Professor Peter Bellwood’s Ongoing Journey in Archaeology by Hsiao-chun Hung
  2. Initial Movements of Modern Humans in East Eurasia by Naruya Saitou, Timothy A. Jinam, Hideaki Kanzawa-Kiriyama and Katsushi Tokunaga
  3. Ancient DNA Analysis of Palaeolithic Ryukyu Islanders by Ken-ichi Shinoda and Noboru Adachi
  4. Mid-Holocene Hunter-Gatherers ‘Gaomiao’ in Hunan, China: The First of the Two-layer Model in the Population History of East/Southeast Asia by Hirofumi Matsumura, Hsiao-chun Hung  Nguyen Lan Cuong, Ya-feng Zhao, Gang He and Zhang Chi
  5. Using Dental Metrical Analysis to Determine the Terminal Pleistocene and Holocene Population History of Java by Sofwan Noerwidi
  6. Terminal Pleistocene and Early Holocene Human Occupation in the Rainforests of East Kalimantan by Karina Arifin
  7. Understanding the Callao Cave Depositional History by Armand Salvador Mijares
  8. Traditions of Jars as Mortuary Containers in the Indo-Malaysian Archipelago by David Bulbeck
  9. An Son Ceramics in the Neolithic Landscape of Mainland Southeast Asia by Carmen Sarjeant
  10. The Ryukyu Islands and the Northern Frontier of Prehistoric Austronesian Settlement by Mark J. Hudson
  11. The Western Route Migration: A Second Probable Neolithic Diffusion to Indonesia by Truman Simanjuntak
  12. Enter the Ceramic Matrix: Identifying the Nature of the Early Austronesian Settlement in the Cagayan Valley, Philippines by Helen Heath, Glenn R. Summerhayes and Hsiao-chun Hung
  13. Colonisation and/or Cultural Contacts: A Discussion of the Western Micronesian Case by Michiko Intoh
  14. Integrating Experimental Archaeology, Phytolith Analysis and Ethnographic Fieldwork to Study the Origin of Farming in China by Tracey L.-D. Lu
  15. The Origins and Arrival of the Earliest Domestic Animals in Mainland and Island Southeast Asia: A Developing Story of Complexity by Philip J. Piper
  16. Historical Linguistics and Archaeology: An Uneasy Alliance by Robert Blust
  17. Were the First Lapita Colonisers of Remote Oceania Farmers as Well as Foragers? by Andrew Pawley
  18. The Sa Huynh Culture in Ancient Regional Trade Networks: A Comparative Study of Ornaments by Nguyen Kim Dung
  19. Austronesian Migration to Central Vietnam: Crossing over the Iron Age Southeast Asian Sea by Mariko Yamagata and Hirofumi Matsumura
  20. Matting Impressions from Lo Gach: Materiality at Floor Level by Judith Cameron
  21. The Prehistoric House: A Missing Factor in Southeast Asia by Charles Higham

A télécharger sur : http://press.anu.edu.au/publications/series/terra-australis/new-perspectives-southeast-asian-and-pacific-prehistory-terra/download

CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities

CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities, 16-17 August 2017, Asia Research Institute, NUS

Deadline : 30 April 2017

For Zukin (1982, 1987, 1995) culture has been central to the development of the new ‘symbolic’ or ‘creative’ economy, but she also cautions against its appropriation for urban redevelopment that can lead displacement of local communities. Castells (2010), on the other hand, suggests that cultural materials, including digital media, facilitate social change, especially in relation to social movements, because they enable social actors to redefine their subjectivities and transform the social structure. While local and regional governments are striving towards the ‘rejuvenation’ of urban spaces as a form of city branding, citizens and artists alike are seeking ways to maintain the viability of local arts and culture along with (in)tangible heritage. In many Asian cities, heritage preservation has played an important role in the democratisation of urban spaces and community building. Tensions between different interest groups have been unavoidable but mutual ground is needed for feasible policies and practices to construct inclusive and socially just urban spaces.

With the rise of local governance, and changing state-society relationships, we believe that the full potential of arts, heritage, and cultural production in the social transformation and civic participation has not yet been fully acknowledged. Given differences in urban governance, planning and civic participation in East and Southeast Asia, more nuanced research is needed to identify what kind of cultural policies and creative practices could be developed and how they might provide innovative approaches beyond the Western paradigms of ‘creative’ or ‘cultural’ cities, and gentrification. Similarly, Douglass (2015) has raised policy questions about how to strengthen civic engagement, belonging and community building in cities through the cultivation of civic participation. Innovative forms of civic participation resonate with the ‘worlding practices’ defined by Ong (2011:4) as ‘projects that attempt to establish or break established horizons of urban standards in and beyond a particular city’. The purpose of this multidisciplinary conference is thus to explore both government-led cultural policies and the organically emerging artistic and creative practices aimed at the empowerment of local communities and neighborhoods in contemporary East and Southeast Asian cities.

We invite the submission of papers from early career and established scholars, policy makers, activists, and creative practitioners to explore the role of arts, culture, and heritage in developing more progressive urban societies in East and Southeast Asia cities. We encourage applicants to consider empirical case studies and theories within comparative contexts and to extrapolate policy options for other regions apart from the East and Southeast Asia that explore innovative ways to build co-operation between varied social groups, institutions, and local governance. Questions that will guide the conference proceedings speak to integrated themes across disciplinary and geographical boundaries and include:

  • How do arts, heritage, and creative practices provide opportunities for ‘creative communities’ to resist the encroachment of the corporate economy (Douglass 2015)? What challenges do they face in asserting their right to urban space?
  • How and to what extent could ‘gentrification aesthetics’ (Chang 2014) open up new approaches for analysing both positive and negative impact of urban redevelopment?
  • What kind of innovations in governance are needed to support art communities, heritage preservation, and cultural and creative industries in ways that are socially inclusive, viable, and enhance civil participation? Can an approach based on the interconnectedness of cultural and social sustainability (Kong 2009) benefit the understanding of the collective processes emerging in cities today?
  • How does public art reflect the ways in which forms of vernacular heritage, culture, and socio-spatial identity are bound up with the representation and (re)shaping of place and landscape in cities? What controversies and political fault lines might emerge through these processes?
  • What kind of novel forms of ‘art activism’ or ‘cultural activism’ are emerging, and how do they benefit, interact, or hinder the aims of social transformations?
  • To what extent are arts, heritage, and cultural productions contributing to the development of ‘tourist cities’? How is this being resisted or embraced by local populations?
  • What new approaches are emerging that transcend purely physical space? Can intangible forms, such as digital networks, forums and sites, benefit the survival of local communities?

Plus d’informations sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Event/Detail/f767b24e-9d53-4d4b-9f72-0ec54a53689b

BIES: Read our latest free-access collection

BIES: Read our latest free-access collection

Each year, the editors of the Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies (BIES) make six recently published articles free to access online. Their selections for 2017 are below.

Jokowi and the New Developmentalism by Eve Warburton
December 2016 (52.3)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1249262

Authoritarian Legacies in Post–New Order Indonesia: Evidence from a New Dataset by Sharon Poczter and Thomas B. Pepinsky April 2016 (52.1)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2015.1129051

 Village Governance, Community Life, and the 2014 Village Law in Indonesia by Hans Antlöv, Anna Wetterberg, and Leni Dharmawan
August 2016 (52.2)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00074918.2015.1129047

Consistency between Sakernas and the IFLS for Analyses of Indonesia’s Labour Market: A Cross-Validation Exercise by Sarah Xue Dong
December 2016 (52.3)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1228828

Could a Resource Export Boom Reduce Workers’ Earnings? The Labour-Market Channel in Indonesia by Ian Coxhead and Rashesh Shrestha
August 2016 (52.2)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1184745

How Robust Is Indonesia’s Poverty Profile? Adjusting for Differences in Needs by Jan Priebe
August 2016 (52.2)

 

Communal Violence in Myanmar

CSEAS Lecture. Communal Violence in Myanmar: Roundtable Discussion, 27/03/2017, University of Michigan

Since 2012, Myanmar has experienced recurrent, sporadic, collective acts of lethal violence, realized through repeated public expressions that Muslims constitute an existential threat to Buddhists. Much of this has been directed at those who identify as Rohingya, but it has not been limited to this category. The panelists discuss the narratives, genealogies and typologies of this violence, drawing on scholarship from South and Southeast Asia.

Panelists:

Nick Cheesman, Fellow, Department of Political & Social Change Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, Australian National University, 2016-17 Member of Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study

Mike McGovern, Associate Professor, Anthropology & Director of Undergraduate Studies, University of Michigan

Matt Schissler, Doctoral Student in Anthropology, University of Michigan

Moderated by Allen Hicken, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan

Voir : https://www.ii.umich.edu/cseas/news-events/events.detail.html/39698-8241180.html

 

Brutalism and Traditional Khmer Design Come Together in Phnom Penh’s Hiroshima House

Brutalism and Traditional Khmer Design Come Together in Phnom Penh’s Hiroshima House by Ben Valentine, 17/03/2017, Hyperallergic

Osamu Ishiyama’s structure exemplifies the surprising adaptability of humans in the face of dehumanizing events.

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — During the 1994 Asian Games in Hiroshima, atomic bomb survivor Keiko Kunichika was inspired by a Cambodian athlete’s desire for his country to grow as Hiroshima had after the devastation of war. The Association for the Exchange Between Hiroshima Citizens and Cambodians was founded, and volunteers from Japan began building the Hiroshima House in Phnom Penh, brick by brick, from 1995 until its opening in 2007.

[…]

As a monument for peace, a site for children, and a building within one of Phnom Penh’s oldest and most important temple complexes, Wat Ounalom, the building itself is somewhat bizarre. From the outside, it’s an awkward, nearly cube-shaped five-story structure of progressively smaller cement and brick horizontal stripes. The weirdness culminates in a traditional Khmer roof plopped on top of the modern building. Surrounded by traditional Buddhist temple buildings, which are heavily ornate with highly circumscribed meanings, the Hiroshima House sticks out like a sore thumb.

Lire la suite sur : http://hyperallergic.com/364076/brutalism-and-traditional-khmer-design-come-together-in-phnom-penhs-hiroshima-house/

Malaysia and the world : cross-regional perspective on race, religion and ethnic identity

Malaysia and the world : cross-regional perspective on race, religion and ethnic identity, International Conference at Ohio University, 24-26/03/2017, Athens, Ohio

The conference aims to highlight Malaysia’s profile and role on the world stage by bringing together leading scholars from Malaysia, Europe, and North America. The intellectual academic exchange will provide a venue for competing comparative perspectives on Malaysia and other countries. It is the broader intention that this academic activism will benefit and enrich Malaysian studies.

The highlights of the International Conference will include keynote addresses by:

  • Malaysia’s Distinguished Professor Datuk Shamsul Amri Baharuddin of UKM and the National Council of Professors, who will speak on “The Making of Malaysia’s National Unity Blueprint: Redefining Unity in Malaysia”
  • UPM VC, Prof Datin Paduka Aini Ideris, who will speak on the role of research universities in nation building.

The conference will also feature talks by leading American scholars who have done extensive work on Malaysia such as:

  • Donald L. Horowitz, the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science Emeritus of Duke University
  • Professor Meredith Weiss of the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs, State University of NY at Albany.

Other distinguished and notable speakers from Malaysia will include:

  • The well-known former Imam of Perlis, the Honorable Dato Dr Juanda Jaya, who is a member of Sarawak Legislative Assembly and will speak on a subject that addresses the themes “Islam, the state and law”
  • UPM’s Visiting Professor at Wailalak University, Thailand, Professor Ahmad Tarmizi Talib, who will speak on “Muslim – Non-Muslim Relations in Malaysia »
  • UNIMAS Professor Stanley Bye Kadam Kiai, who will speak on “the Politics of Federalism: reflecting on the role Sarawak and Sabah played in the formation of Malaysia »
  • Tun Abdul Razak Chair Professor Jayum Jawan, who is from UPM, will speak on “Race & Ethnic Relations: What can Malaysia and the US learn from each other?”

The three day conference will have speakers addressing four major themes:

  1. Post-Colonial Legacies and Its Impact
  2. Majority-Minority Relations
  3. Electoral Politics
  4. Islam, the State and Law

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.ohio.edu/global/cis/activities-events.cfm

What’s (written) history for? On James C. Scott’s Zomia, especially Chapter 6½

Jean Michaud, « What’s (written) history for? On James C. Scott’s Zomia, especially Chapter 6½, » Anthropology Today, vol. 33, no. 1 (february 2017)

« Zomia. It sounds like a skin disease or some alarming bacteria. As it turns out, Zomia is a recently named space in Asia. As referred to in this article, Zomia encompasses the highlands of northeast India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and southwest China. Within these countries resides a combined population of over 100 million1 individuals officially registered as ‘national minorities’ by each respective government. For anthropologists who might have spent the last few years on a solitary digging trip to North Korea or foraging for tasty ontologies in Amazonia, let me start by teasing apart the term Zomia a little more, before I weigh in further on the Zomia debate. »

PDF à télécharger sur :  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-8322.12322/full

Spirits and Ships: Cultural Transfers in Early Monsoon Asia

Andrea Acri, Roger Blench, Alexandra Landmann,  Spirits and Ships: Cultural Transfers in Early Monsoon Asia, ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute, 2017

Abstract

This volume seeks to foreground a borderless history and geography of South, Southeast, and East Asian littoral zones that would be maritime-focused, and thereby explore the ancient connections and dynamics of interaction that favoured the encounters among the cultures found throughout the region stretching from the Indian Ocean littorals to the Western Pacific, from the early historical period to the present. Transcending the artificial boundaries of macro-regions and nation-states, and trying to bridge the arbitrary divide between (inherently cosmopolitan) high cultures (e.g. Sanskritic, Sinitic, or Islamicate) and local or indigenous cultures, this multidisciplinary volume explores the metaphor of Monsoon Asia as a vast geo-environmental area inhabited by speakers of numerous language phyla, which for millennia has formed an integrated system of littorals where crops, goods, ideas, cosmologies, and ritual practices circulated on the sea-routes governed by the seasonal monsoon winds. The collective body of work presented in the volume describes Monsoon Asia as an ideal theatre for circulatory dynamics of cultural transfer, interaction, acceptance, selection, and avoidance, and argues that, despite the rich ethnic, linguistic and sociocultural diversity, a shared pattern of values, norms, and cultural models is discernible throughout the region.

Voir la table des matières sur :