Archives de catégorie : Iconographie, etc.

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder, chronique édifiante du discours de la haine par Frédéric Strauss,  20/05/2017, Télérama

Dans un documentaire exemplaire car méthodique, présenté en séance spéciale à Cannes, le Suisse Barbet Schroeder part à la rencontre de Wirathu. Ce moine birman qui, par ses sermons extrémistes, a encouragé le massacre des musulmans dans son pays. Quand le bouddhisme confine au fascisme.

Le film sortira en France le 7 juin 2017.

Il a la haine. Les vieux arbres qui gardaient ses plus beaux souvenirs, à côté de chez lui, le voisin les a fait couper. Pour oublier ce crime, Barbet Schroeder part à Mandalay, en Birmanie, où il découvrit, à 20 ans, le bouddhisme. Une religion qui apprend à vivre sans haine. S’il n’a pas perdu la foi, le cinéaste ne croit cependant plus aux miracles. Le but de son voyage est de rencontrer un moine qui, tel un pompier pyromane, allume des incendies, attise les flammes d’un fanatisme meurtrier : le vénérable et pourtant détestable Wirathu.

Sous ses allures de bonze, c’est une sorte d’héritier d’Hitler qu’on découvre, tout entier voué à la persécution et à l’extermination d’une population : les musulmans de Birmanie, et particulièrement la minorité des Rohingyas. Wirathu les compare à des animaux sauvages qui se reproduisent comme des lapins, se dévorent entre eux et détruisent l’environnement. Monstrueux et glaçant, son discours veut faire naître chez les Birmans bouddhistes « la peur de la disparition de la race », titre d’un de ses livres. Il faut éliminer les musulmans, ou ils seront, eux, éliminés… Face à cet apôtre de la haine, Barbet Schroeder garde un étonnant sang-froid. Son regard droit, objectif, rend la confrontation impressionnante. Avec ce film, il clôt une « trilogie du Mal », commencée avec les documentaires Général Idi Amin Dada : autoportrait (1974) et L’Avocat de la terreur (2007), sur Jacques Vergès…

Lire la suite et voir la bande annonce sur : http://www.telerama.fr/festival-de-cannes/2017/cannes-2017-le-venerable-w-de-barbet-schroeder-chronique-edifiante-du-discours-de-la-haine,158235.php

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence by Maggie Lee, 21/05/2017, Variety

Something invigorating and full-bodied is brewing in Indonesia, and it’s not a cup of mocha java. It’s a cinematic resurgence, the biggest since the early 2000s, when Rudy Soedjarwo’s 2002 teen romance Apa ada dengan cinta? (What’s With Love?) rocked the Southeast Asia market while in the same year Riri Riza’s Eliana Eliana stunned the festival circuit with femme-centric social realism.

In September 2016, Warkop DKI Reborn: Jangkrik Boss Part 1, a reboot of a police slapstick comedy by 1980s comic trio Dono, Kasino and Indro (DKI), became the most-viewed Indonesian film in history, with 6.8 million tickets sold. For the first time, the top 10 domestic films enjoyed more than 1 million admissions, with horror Danur taking the top spot in 2017. According to Korean industry giant CJ CGV, exhibition of local films at its theatrical chain in Indonesia rose from 5% to 23% last year.

The arthouse scene is also flourishing, with second-generation directors Edwin, Joko Anwar, Lucky Kuswandi and Teddy Soeriaatmadja turning up at top festivals alongside relative newcomers including Eddie Cahyono (Siti) and Yosep Anggi Noen (Solo Solitude). In fact, there is talk of a new wave, or neo-neorealism, that explores gritty contemporary subjects about politics or gender with stylized, poetic film language.

A new height has been scored by the selection of Marlina, the Murderer in Four Acts in this year’s Directors’ Fortnight, the third Indonesian feature to bow in Cannes. It is also the third feature by Mouly Surya, whose sophomore feature, What They Don’t Talk About When They Talk About Love, premiered at Sundance 2013.

Australia-educated Surya, whose auteur influences are Stanley Kubrick, Michael Haneke and Abbas Kiarostami, cites Garin Nugroho’s Of Love and Eggs and Sjumandjaja’s biopic of women’s rights champion R.A. Kartini as her entry point to national cinema. It was Nugroho, the country’s most distinguished filmmaker, who proposed her to direct Marlina, based on a treatment developed from his visit to Sumba Island, an isolated, arid territory that resembles Texas.

Taking cues from Japanese samurai and Chinese martial arts that fused Western elements, she refashioned the Italo-American genre into a vehicle to examine male violence and patriarchal dominance in Southeast Asian backwaters such as Sumba, while highlighting the indigenous women’s unique air of mystery, sensuality and reliance. The women in Surya’s films bleed in key moments and there will be blood in Marlina, too.

“In my debut Fiksi [written by Joko Anwar], the heroine lost her virginity; in my second film, the blind protagonist had her first period,” Surya says. “Marlina doesn’t spill her own blood, but that of others, symbolizing the strength of women from Sumba. My female characters have grown up. Marlina is a full-grown woman, a widow who finds strength in grief.”

Voir : http://variety.com/2017/film/asia/indonesia-film-industry-recognized-at-cannes-1202437479/

 

Podcast : Archiving Indonesian art

Talking Indonesia podcast : Archiving Indonesian art, 11/05/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

The past decade has seen increased global interest in Indonesian art and along with it, interest in the long-neglected field of Indonesian art history. Until quite recently, art history resources were limited, particularly those relating to lesser known artists and works produced during tumultuous periods.

Today, institutions like the Indonesian Visual Arts Archive (IVAA) in Yogyakarta are doing their best to fill these gaps by building art archives and making them accessible to the public. But much work still needs to be done in cataloguing Indonesia’s extensive collection of old and new art. What are the main challenges faced by those who are trying to build Indonesia’s art archives? What is the relevance of art history to contemporary Indonesian society?

I [Charlotte Setijadi] discuss these issues with Farah Wardani, art historian, curator, author, and assistant director in charge of archives at the National Gallery of Singapore (NGS). Before joining NGS in 2015, Farah was the executive director of IVAA, the first institution dedicated to archiving contemporary Indonesian art.

In 2017, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore, Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-archiving-indonesian-art/

TRANSNATIONALISM AND ITS LIMITS: MOBILITY AND CONTEMPORANEITY IN THAI ART

Tate Modern Talk : Transnationalism and its limits : mobility and contemporaneity in Thai art, 22 June 2017, Tate Modern

Hear David Teh, author of Thai Art: Currencies of the Contemporary​, discuss the possibilities and constraints of transnationalism.

In this seminar, David Teh gives artistic mobility a discrete history with reference to the contemporary art of Thailand, a nation on edge after decades of sovereign insecurity, economic boom and bust, and constitutional meltdown. While Thai artists reflect these tribulations in their work, since the 1990s many have downplayed their identity and become conspicuously mobile. What can their excursions tell us about the transnationalism of contemporary art? Their mobility allows them to dodge local limitations, but it also recalls a much older spatial imaginary, a worldliness that is no symptom of art’s globalisation but a condition of its possibility.

Teh’s paper is followed by a response from May Adadol Ingawanij. The subsequent panel discussion is chaired by Lucy Steeds.

Biographies

May Adadol Ingawanij is a moving image theorist and curator. She is currently writing a book titled Animistic Cinema: Moving Image Performance and Ritual in Thailand. Her publications include Long Walk to Life: the Films of Lav Diaz (2015); Animism and the Performative Realist Cinema of Apichatpong Weerasethakul, (2013). May’s curatorial projects include Lav Diaz Journeys (London, 2017), and Attachments and Unknowns (Phnom Penh, 2017). She teaches at CREAM, University of Westminster.

Lucy Steeds is Reader in Art Theory and Exhibition Histories at Central Saint Martins (CSM), University of the Arts London (UAL). She is Senior Research Fellow for Afterall at CSM – leading on the Exhibition Histories strand – and she teaches on the MRes Art: Exhibition Studies course. Her recent books include The Curatorial Conundrum (co-edited with Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson), MIT Press, 2016; and Exhibition (for the Documents of Contemporary Art series), Whitechapel Gallery and MIT Press, 2014.

David Teh is a curator and researcher based at the National University of Singapore. His essays have appeared in Afterall Journal, Third Text, ARTMargins and Theory, Culture and Society, and his book Thai Art: Currencies of the Contemporary was published this year by MIT Press. His most recent curatorial project, Misfits: Pages from a loose-leaf modernity, is showing at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin until 3 July.

Voir : http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/talk/transnationalism-limits

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank by Denis D. Gray, 16/04/2017, Nikkei Asian Review

Evolution of Thai northern city into creative hub fuels hopes of gaining UNESCO status.

The millions of tourists who flock to the ancient, mountain-ringed city of Chiang Mai in northern Thailand might not immediately notice, but the alleys, riversides and Bohemian cafes here are percolating with striking imagery, innovative design and digital wizardry. It is a heady brew that has prompted some to predict a real explosion — a creative one, that is.

The city is already home to more than 40 art galleries and a world-class contemporary arts museum, with others planned. It hosts design and arts festivals and was listed on a widely consulted digital nomad website as No. 1 of 991 places in the world for roving techies to plug in their computers. A creative resource guide to the city runs to 199 pages, focusing on venues ranging from the Wandering Moon Theater to Chiang Mai University’s College of Arts, Media and Technology.

Among a growing base of arts enthusiasts, Chiang Mai has become Thailand’s Left Bank, a part of Paris long known for its artistic and intellectual community.

Lire la suite sur : http://asia.nikkei.com/Life-Arts/Arts/Chiang-Mai-Thailand-s-modern-day-Left-Bank?page=1

Iswadi Pratama, an auteur of Indonesian theatre

Iswadi Pratama, an auteur of Indonesian theatre by Caranissa Djatmiko, 12/04/2017, Inside Indonesia

Indonesia’s foremost theatre director, the internationally acclaimed Iswadi Pratama, staged an extraordinary eight productions in 2016.

There is no simple way of describing Iswadi Pratama. He claims to be a self-taught artist, yet his exceptional talents seem to suggest otherwise. Having spent most of his life bringing realities to the stage he insists that he only has the books he reads (stacked quite untidily at his private library) and the mentors who have guided him in the past to thank. Yet, after staging eight ambitious productions in 2016, it would be hard to dispute the fact that he has revolutionised Indonesian theatre.

The 45-year old poet and theatre director always knew that art was his true calling. He considers it to be the only space where he can express himself unapologetically, while also being a vehicle for helping others. ‘Everything that I do is motivated by an awareness that art must make people find their turning points in life,’ he says. ‘So I always choose projects based on [various] priorities: to what extent do the people involved in a certain program require my ability and capacity, and the relevance of it to my creative work and my vision regarding social transformation.’

Pratama’s plays have been showcased around the globe. His play Nostalgia di Sebuah Kota (Nostalgia in a City) was translated and performed in Germany in 2010. He has worked with some of the best artists in the world including American director Julie Taymor (Frida, The Lion King stage musical) who mentored Pratama when he became the first Indonesian to be a part of the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/iswadi-pratama-an-auteur-of-indonesian-theatre

NYT lensman wins Pulitzer for Duterte drug war story photo

A freelance lensman of The New York Times won a Pulitzer Prize in the breaking news photography category for a picture published with the a story on the war on drugs in the Philippines, 11/04/2017, GMA News Online

The announcement, which was posted on the official Pulitzer Prize Twitter account, declared freelance photographer of The New York Times Daniel Berehulak as winner of the prestigious award.

The article in the New York Times published on the 7th of December 2016 was titled « They are Slaughtering Us Like Animals. » Inside President Rodrigo Duterte’s brutal anti-drug campaign in the Philippines our photojournalist documented 57 homicide victims over 35 days.

I have worked in 60 countries, covered wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and spent much of 2014 living inside West Africa’s Ebola zone, a place gripped by fear and death. What I experienced in the Philippines felt like a new level of ruthlessness: police officers’ summarily shooting anyone suspected of dealing or even using drugs, vigilantes’ taking seriously Mr. Duterte’s call to “slaughter them all.”

Payut Ngaokrachang: cartoons for the United States Information Service

Payut Ngaokrachang: cartoons for USIS, Part 1, 24/01/2017, propagandainsoutheastasia

Payut Ngaokrachang was a Thai cartoonist who worked for most of his career with the United States Information Service (USIS). He was originally from a rural background, born in Wako, in the province of Prachuap Khiri Khan. In 1955 Payut created his first animated short film, Haed Mahasajan [The Miracle Incident] in which a traffic policeman causes a pile up due to some questionable dancing on the job. According to Jonathan Clements, Payut was subsequently spotted by USIS who awarded him roughly $400 and the opportunity to spend 6 months either at the Walt Disney Studios in California or Toei in Japan. He chose the later, meaning he was in many ways there at the very start of the Japanese anime industry. His time there resulted in his first (and as it happens last) propaganda film, completed in 1957.

Hanuman in Danger

Hanuman Phachoen Phai [Hanuman in danger], takes its principal character from the Ramayana, a classic Hindu epic that is also the basis for the classic Thai text the Ramakien. Hanuman, who is the God-King of the apes, was one of major characters who fought with Rama [Phra Ram] against the Devil King Ravana [Totsapak], and is therefore highly revered. In the propaganda film, Hanuman is depicted with a white face, and is based in the countryside. The film starts with him at home as his sons watch the television. They are watching a dancing competition, commenting on the prettiness of female dancer, when her partner the screen morphs from a handsome young man into a brutal looking dictator, who begins to spout what is supposed to be Communist ideology. He instructs the audience that they no longer need to respect their mothers, fathers, religion or King Rama [Phra Ram].

Lire la suite sur : https://propagandainsoutheastasia.wordpress.com/

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem de Linus Suryadi A. G., vendredi 28 avril 2017 à 13h, Salon Peillot, Musée Guimet

Au programme, un long poème narratif en prose : « Confidences de Pariyem. L’univers d’une femme de Java » de l’indonésien Linus Suryadi AG (1951-1999).

« Confidences de Pariyem » a paru en 1981 à Jakarta. A travers les confidences de l’héroïne au jeune Païman, c’est une description rare et puissante de la vie quotidienne et des états d’âme d’une jeune fille de la fin des années 60 qui transparaît.
Embauchée dans une vieille famille noble de Yogyakarta, dernier bastion de l’héritage culturel des cours javanaises, Pariyem nous offre avec candeur, fierté et humour un saisissant voyage.

La lecture sera ensuite prolongée par une rencontre littéraire animée par Etienne Naveau, qui donnera quelques clefs sur Java, les femmes, l’Islam et la place proéminente des écrivaines sur la scène littéraire de l’archipel.
Etienne Naveau est professeur de langue et de littérature indonésienne à l’INALCO.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/1730539373639915/

 

 

Framing Asia

Framing Asia is a monthly film screening and discussion on Asia during the Leiden Asia Year.

Framing Asia is organised by by the KITLV (Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean), the IIAS (International Institute for Asian Studies), the department CA-DS (Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology) and Studium Generale of University Leiden.

You are welcome to join us on Tuesday 11 April at 19.30 h at Lipsius 028. This edition will screen two films on Popcultures and subcultures.

The first film is titled That’s Wicked (11 min) and directed by Joycelyn Lee. It follows the 15 year old Martin who introduces us to the world of beatboxing in Singapore.

The second film, The Silk Road of Pop (53 min), produced by Sameer Farooq, Ursula Engel and Stijn Deklerck shows us the vibrant music scene of the Uyghur youth in Xinjiang, China.

Afterwards, Ursula Engel (co-director of The Silk Road of Pop) will join our discussion with Bart Barendregt. Bart Barendregt is an associate professor at the Leiden Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology. He has an interest in popular and digital culture, and has published on Southeast Asian performance, new and mobile media, and (Islamic) pop music.

Voir les séances précédentes, Transgender issues in Indonesia, Disaster and the failing state sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/framing-asia

Brutalism and Traditional Khmer Design Come Together in Phnom Penh’s Hiroshima House

Brutalism and Traditional Khmer Design Come Together in Phnom Penh’s Hiroshima House by Ben Valentine, 17/03/2017, Hyperallergic

Osamu Ishiyama’s structure exemplifies the surprising adaptability of humans in the face of dehumanizing events.

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — During the 1994 Asian Games in Hiroshima, atomic bomb survivor Keiko Kunichika was inspired by a Cambodian athlete’s desire for his country to grow as Hiroshima had after the devastation of war. The Association for the Exchange Between Hiroshima Citizens and Cambodians was founded, and volunteers from Japan began building the Hiroshima House in Phnom Penh, brick by brick, from 1995 until its opening in 2007.

[…]

As a monument for peace, a site for children, and a building within one of Phnom Penh’s oldest and most important temple complexes, Wat Ounalom, the building itself is somewhat bizarre. From the outside, it’s an awkward, nearly cube-shaped five-story structure of progressively smaller cement and brick horizontal stripes. The weirdness culminates in a traditional Khmer roof plopped on top of the modern building. Surrounded by traditional Buddhist temple buildings, which are heavily ornate with highly circumscribed meanings, the Hiroshima House sticks out like a sore thumb.

Lire la suite sur : http://hyperallergic.com/364076/brutalism-and-traditional-khmer-design-come-together-in-phnom-penhs-hiroshima-house/

Khmer Battleground by Aizzat Nordin

aizzat-nordin-khmer-battleground-007

Khmer Battleground by Aizzat Nordin, 17/01/2017, Invisible Photographer Asia

Aizzat Nordin was a Malaysian recipient of the Angkor Photo Travel Grants. Khmer Battleground was made during the 2016 Angkor Photo Workshop in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

Pradal Serey or Kun Khmer is a form of ancient martial arts practiced by the Kingdom of Angkor army since the 9th century to wage war against their main enemy, the Vietnam-based kingdom of Champa, and later Siam, resulting in the domination of what is now known as Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, and Laos. In an effort to erase this art, many Kun Khmer lok kru (Masters) were targeted by the vicious Khmer Rouge Regime and executed in the 70’s, leaving Cambodian struggling with poverty and socioeconomic growth after the regime era. Today, Kun Khmer fighters fight hard with pride and dignity in the arena or at the pagoda in the rural areas for extra money, hoping that it’s enough to feed their loved ones.

Interview avec Aizzat Nordin et portfolio sur : http://invisiblephotographer.asia/2017/01/17/khmerbattleground-aizzatnordin/

Site d’Aizzat Nordin : http://cargocollective.com/aizzatnordin

Brotherhood – The Drug War in Philippines

“SALVAGED” DRUG RELATED SUSPECTS AT THE OFFICIAL POLICE MORGUE,1994. FROM THE AWARD WINNING PHOTO BOOK, BROTHERHOOD BY ALEX BALUYUT AND GEMMA LUZ COROTAN. PUBLISHED BY THE PHILIPPINE CENTER FOR INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM. © ALEX BALUYUT PHOTOGRAPH.
“Salvaged” drug related suspects at the official police morgue,1994. From the award winning photo book, Brotherhood by Alex Baluyut and Gemma Luz Corotan. published by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism. © Alex Baluyut photograph.

Brotherhood – The Drug War in Philippines by Alex Baluyut, 16/07/2016, Invisible Photographer Asia

Voir : http://invisiblephotographer.asia/2016/07/16/alexbaluyut-brotherhood/

Brotherhood

In 1994, I received a grant from the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) to shoot a documentary on the Manila Police. I focused on the Western Police District Headquarters (WPD) as it is the premier police station located in the tourist district in a sprawling metropolis with millions of inhabitants.

The resulting photo book, titled Brotherhood, ultimately garnered me a second national book award along with Gemma Luz Corotan who wrote the text.

Continuer la lecture de Brotherhood – The Drug War in Philippines

I Want To Live – The Rohingyas, by Suthep Kritsanavarin

Mohammad Hussein came to Malaysia three years ago with the dream of finding work to send money home to support his family in Myanmar. During the land journey crossing into Malaysia, he contracted an infection in the jungle that was left untreated. When he finally received medical attention in Malaysia, his leg was amputated. He relies on begging and help from other Rohingya for his survival.
Mohammad Hussein came to Malaysia three years ago with the dream of finding work to send money home to support his family in Myanmar. During the land journey crossing into Malaysia, he contracted an infection in the jungle that was left untreated. When he finally received medical attention in Malaysia, his leg was amputated.
He relies on begging and help from other Rohingya for his survival.

 

I Want To Live – The Rohingyas, by Suthep Kritsanavarin, 13/11/2016, Invisible Photographer Asia

Thai Photojournalist Suthep Kritsanavarin has worked on an investigative report on the Rohingyas since 2008, chronicling their horrifying journeys from Burma and Bangladesh to Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and even to Australia.

http://invisiblephotographer.asia/2016/11/13/rohingyas-suthepkritsanavarin/

Rohingyas are Burmese Muslims who are labeled as aliens by their own government and marginalized and persecuted in Myanmar and other South and Southeast Asian countries where they take refuge. Their predicament is exacerbated by their statelessness and the lack of concerted efforts by regional governments, political bodies, and international NGOs.

Continuer la lecture de I Want To Live – The Rohingyas, by Suthep Kritsanavarin