Archives de catégorie : Expositions

Passion and procession : art of the Philippines

Passion and procession : art of the Philippines, 24/06/2017 – 12/11/2017, Art Gallery New South Wales

Celebrating the diverse and vibrant art of the Philippines.

Passion and procession brings together painting, sculpture, video and installation works from ten contemporary Filipino artists, revealing their very personal responses to faith, history, politics and life in the Philippines.

The works draw on folk mythology, family archives, nature and religious ceremony to reconsider established narratives of history and nation. The artists have used found as well as ritual objects, plant specimens and symbols of precolonial histories to address the ambiguities of faith and science, social inequality and relationship to place. In doing so, they demonstrate a belief in the potential of art to inspire, heal and effect social change.

The artists include Santiago Bose, Marina Cruz, Alfredo Esquillo Jr, Nona Garcia, Renato Habulan, Geraldine Javier, Mark Justiniani, Alwin Reamillo, Norberto Roldan and Rodel Tapaya.

Accompanying their works is a selection of textiles and sculptural objects from the Philippines given to the Gallery in 2005 by Dr John Yu and Dr George Soutter.

This exhibition is part of the Bayanihan Philippine Art Project, a collaboration between the Art Gallery of NSW, Blacktown Arts Centre, Mosman Art Gallery, Peacock Gallery (Auburn) and Campbelltown Arts Centre in association with Museums & Galleries of NSW, to celebrate the art and culture of the Philippines through a series of exhibitions, performances, creative writing and community programs across multiple venues.

The last issue of TAASA Review : The Journal of the Asian Arts Society of Australia (vol. 26, n° 2, June 2017) is dedicated to the Bayanihan Philippine Art Project, and the art and culture of the Philippines.

Voir : https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/passion-and-procession/

Patani semasa : pameran seni dari Patani

Exhibition : Patani Semasa : Pameran Seni dari Patani, 19/07/2017 – 14/02/2018, MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum

An exhibition on contemporary art from the Golden Peninsula. Ranging from different time periods, works of art as well as cultural representations of the « Patani region » from 27 artists have been selected – both locals and those engaged with issues relevant to the area in question.

Voir : http://www.maiiam.com/exhibition/

Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now

« Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now », 05/07/2017 – 23/10/2017, The National Art Center, Tokyo & Mori Art Museum

With its total population counting around 600 million, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-faith Southeast Asia has nurtured a truly dynamic and diverse culture. Contemporary art from the emerging economic powerhouse of Southeast Asia is currently earning widespread international attention. The “sunshower” – rain falling from clear skies – is an intriguing yet frequently-seen meteorological phenomenon in Southeast Asia, and serves as a metaphor for the vicissitudes of the region. This exhibition, the largest-ever in scale, seeks to explore the many practices of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since 1980s from 9 different perspectives. It aims to showcase its inconceivable dynamism of Southeast Asia that is somewhat nostalgic yet extraordinarily new.

Nine sections :  Fluid World, Passion and Revolution, Archiving, Diverse Identities, Day by Day, Growth and Loss, What is Art ? Why Do It ?, Medium as Meditation, Dialogue with History.

Voir la liste des artistes par pays, les oeuvres et le programme des discussions sur :  http://sunshower2017.jp/en/index.html

« Sunshower »Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks

« Stormy Weather » (2009) by Filipino artist Felix Bacolor (Image courtesy of @katrinav_)

« Sunshower Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks » by Yunyi Lau, 08/07/2017, The Artling

The tropical climate of Southeast Asia lends for torrential downpours across the year. For those not used to the weather, one can be shocked to find what was a pleasantly sunny day, suddenly turn into a very wet situation in under a minute. Known as a sunshower, this frequent meteorological phenomenon in the region is the paradox of rain falling from clear skies.

It is this phenomenon that has been the inspiration behind a major show of Southeast Asian Contemporary Art that commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The sunshower is a poetic metaphor for the developments within Southeast Asia that resulted from the post-WWII decolonisation. Despite the turmoil that many countries were thrown into, many experienced democratisation and globalisation that caused rapid economic and urban development, resulting in drastic changes that have since changed the socio-political landscape of the region.

Sunshower originally began as an idea conceived between the Director-General of the National Art Center, Tokyo and the Director of the Mori Art Museum, and was assented by The Japan Foundation. The three parties came together to set up a 14-member curatorial team, which conducted a two and a half year field research, culminating in a selection of about 180 artworks by 86 artist groups from the ten ASEAN member countries, exhibited across the two museums.

Through the works selected, the exhibition seeks to explore the development of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since the 1980s against the backdrop of the currents and fluctuations of the times from nine different perspectives, with the goal of capturing its dynamism and diversity. Below is a selection of some of the works that we suggest you check out if you plan on checking out the exhibition!

The nine sections that Sunshower is divided into include: Fluid World that looks at maps and how they reflect socio-poltical economic values, Passion and Revolution that focuses on some of the major wars that shaped the region, Archiving that looks at the development of document-collection in Southeast Asian art, Diverse Identities focuses on postcolonialism and the emergence of independence and democracy, Day by Day is a look at artists’ exploration of local everyday life, Growth and Loss is the observation of the changes of globalisation and urbanisation that have impacted Southeast Asia, What is Art? Why Do It? is a look at the development of institutions and the characteristics of the art community in the region, Medium as Meditation focuses on how local traditional culture has affected the way artists use materials as their museums, and finally, Dialogue with History is an exploration into how artists engage with their histories in the present day.

A voir sur : https://theartling.com/en/artzine/2017/07/03/sunshowers-bring-flowers-with-this-major-exhibition-of-180-southeast-asian-artworks/

Vintage Photographs Capture the Beauty of Classical Dance – Avec les danseuses royales du Cambodge

Photos of Khmer classical dancers printed on canvas are exhibited at the Institut Francais. (Siv Channa/The Cambodia Daily)

Vintage Photographs Capture the Beauty of Classical Dance by Michelle Vachon, 15/06/2017, The Cambodia Daily

When George Groslier first approached Nou Nam in March 1927 with the idea of photographing her while she performed Khmer classical dance, she refused. “People no longer know how to dance, she told me with disdain,” he later wrote.

A few minutes later, the dancer—a favorite of both King Norodom and King Sisowath—relented.

Then in her 50s, Nou Nam agreed to help the photographer archive Khmer classical dance movements in photographic form.

As he began to capture the former star dancer, George Groslier realized that “the hand stops two centimeters higher than on Wednesday, and the head turns two degrees more than in Nou Nam’s day,” showing how the dance form had evolved.

For Khmer classical dancers whose slightest movements are painstakingly executed, this was profoundly troubling. Master dancers watching Nou Nam became agitated, he wrote.

Capturing these changing styles for posterity was Groslier’s goal. He wanted to provide a historical record for generations to come.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.cambodiadaily.com/news/vintage-photographs-capture-the-beauty-of-classical-dance-131369/

Exposition :  « Avec les danseuses royales du Cambodge », 15/06/2017 au 07/09/2017, Galerie de l’Institut Français du Cambodge

En 1927, George Groslier, directeur du musée National, entreprend pour conserver la mémoire des postures de danse du ballet royal, un exceptionnel travail de documentation photographique. Longtemps resté à l’écart, le corpus de négatifs sur verre a été récemment catalogué et numérisé. Après leur présentation au Musée National du Cambodge en 2012 puis à New York, Paris et Siem Reap, ces photographies sont exposées à l’Institut Français du Cambodge.

Exposition conçue par le MNC et l’EFEO à Phnom Penh (avec le soutien de l’IFC et de l’UNESCO)

Voir : https://institutfrancais-cambodge.com/expo-avec-les-danseuses-royales-du-cambodge/

Indonésie, les fermiers du miel

Exposition : Indonésie, les fermiers du miel, du 20/05/2017 au 27/11/2017, Musée de l’Homme, Balcon des Sciences

Par Nicolas Césard, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle

Au détour de la forêt indonésienne, à Bornéo, découvrez comment des hommes se rendent en haut des arbres, en pleine nuit, pour récolter le miel produit par la plus grande des abeilles mellifères, Apis dorsata.

Cette apicollecte évolue vers une apiculture par l’aménagement d’emplacements favorables à l’installation des essaims sauvages. Ainsi, la destruction des abeilles est limitée et la récolte du miel est rendue plus aisée. Ces nouvelles pratiques permettent une gestion plus durable des ressources mellifères.

À travers des objets, des spécimens et des reconstitutions, et grâce à plusieurs dispositifs multimédias – jeux interactifs et vidéos de terrain -, cette exposition présente les diverses techniques et outils utilisé par ces fermiers du miel, et explore les relations entre les sociétés et les abeilles en Indonésie.

Voir : http://www.museedelhomme.fr/fr/visitez/agenda/exposition/indonesie-fermiers-miel

Balthazar, Prince Noir de Timor et de Solor en Chine, en Amérique et en Europe au XVIIIe siècle

 

Exposition : Balthazar, Prince Noir de Timor et de Solor en Chine, en Amérique et en Europe au XVIIIe siècle, du 22/05/2017 au 02/06/2017, INALCO

Par Frédéric Durand, Professeur, Université Toulouse II – Jean Jaurès

Originaire des îles de la Sonde (Indonésie et Timor-Oriental) où il est né en 1737, dans la communauté de métis Timorais/Portugais des Topasses-Larentuqueiros, Balthazar est selon toute vraisemblance le fils de Gaspar da Costa, le chef des métis portugais qui vivaient entre Flores, Solor et Timor-ouest, et avait le statut de « roi ».
Gaspar da Costa est mort en 1749, lors de la bataille de Penfui contre les Hollandais, à la tête d’une armée de 50 000 hommes. Il est considéré comme un des pionniers de la lutte anti-coloniale aux Indes néerlandaises et sa mémoire est commémorée par un monument à Timor-ouest.

Le Prince Balthazar, se rend à Batavia, à Macao et à Canton, avant de prendre un bateau pour la France, où il est abandonné à l’âge de treize ans par son précepteur, un prêtre portugais. Pour survivre, le jeune Prince embarque sur des bateaux, dont des navires corsaires, qui l’emmène notamment aux Pays-Bas, en Angleterre, en Ecosse et au Québec. Il revient ensuite en France, où il écrit à de nombreuses personnalités dont les rois Louis XV et Louis XVI et le philosophe Voltaire. Il n’est alors pas évident pour lui de se faire reconnaître en France, car en concurrence avec d’autres étrangers se disant « princes », dont ceux d’Angola et de Macao. Au cours des années 1760/70, la presse internationale parle de lui, de l’Italie à l’Angleterre et de Paris à Bratislava. Balthazar fréquente de nombreux milieux intellectuels où religieux, dont des académiciens, des alchimistes, des encyclopédistes et des francs-maçons. Il est également l’ami de la communauté des Noirs et des Asiatiques de Paris. Dans les années 1780, Balthazar devient conteur et poète dans la grande société parisienne, mais en 1789, la Révolution française fait s’effondrer le monde dans lequel il s’était intégré. Il est mort en 1791 à l’Hôtel Dieu de Paris.

Oublié au XXe siècle, plusieurs articles à son sujet on été publiés dans des revues scientifiques, et notamment dans Archipel, à propos de mémoires qu’il avait fait publier dans les années 1760. Les historiens qui avaient travaillé sur lui n’avaient cependant pas perçu sa notoriété et pensaient qu’il était mort pauvre et inconnu.

Les vingt-quatre panneaux de l’exposition reproduisent chronologiquement les étapes importantes de la vie du Prince de Timor et de Solor.

Voir : http://www.inalco.fr/evenement/exposition-balthazar-prince-noir-timor-solor-chine-amerique-europe-xviiie-siecle

Photographer Captures Intimacy of Daily Life in Cambodia

« Photographer Captures Intimacy of Daily Life in Cambodia » by Michelle Vachon, 02/05/2017, The Cambodia Daily

When French-Canadian photographer Serey Siv embarked on a project two years ago to photograph ordinary life across small-town Cambodia, his goal was far from simple.

Assuming the role of an observer, he sought to capture the “timeless” side of life in the country: the small episodes in people’s daily lives that could have taken place in the 1960s or on Monday. To better set the photographs out of time, he shot in black and white.

“I played a bit with this notion of past and present,” he said on Friday.

An exhibition of Mr. Siv’s series, “La balade de Serey,” or “Serey’s Stroll,” opens today in Siem Reap City.

It took a year for Mr. Siv to capture the images of daily life, waiting to seize the moments as they happened in the “beautiful natural light” that occurs for only a few hours each day. The result is images in which the gray and black tones make the scenes all the more striking and create a quiet intimacy with the people portrayed, drawing in the viewer.

Lire la suite sur :  https://www.cambodiadaily.com/news/photographer-captures-intimacy-of-daily-life-in-cambodia-128957/

New photo exhibition takes on Cambodian gender double standards

An image from Neak Sophal’s Flower series. Photo supplied

New photo exhibition takes on Cambodian gender double standards by Anna Koo, 05/05/2017, The Phnom Penh Post

Neak Sophal’s Flower opens at Java Café and Gallery at 6:30pm on Tuesday, May 9. The exhibition, which will be displayed on the second floor of the café, runs through June 25.

The series, which was the product of six months work, is based on a Khmer saying that compares women to white paper and men to gold. If gold were dropped in the mud, the saying goes, it could be polished and cleaned and will never tarnish.

White paper, meanwhile, gets permanently stained and, once considered dirty, no longer has value. The proverb is a not-so-subtle reminder of the need for women to behave themselves sexually, or else they “lose their value”.

“If you are virginal, you are a valued woman. If you don’t have it, you are not a good woman . . . For me, it is an unacceptable comparison, because women and men are human and we live together,” she says.

Gender studies has long been a subject of interest for the 28-year-old Royal University of Fine Arts graphic design graduate. Her distinctive conceptual style results in work that often serves as social commentary, highlighting what she sees as invisible social issues in Cambodian culture.

She won the Photo Prize at the Angkor Photo Festival in 2013 with her exhibition The Hang On, featuring subjects from all walks of life in Cambodia with their faces obscured by objects, usually related to their jobs, which have overtaken their identity.

In Sophal’s images, the subjects are framed by flowers a motif inspired by the frequent comparisons in songs, movies and stories of women to flowers. She then drops paint on the photograph to produce her final product, to prove that stains do not always have to be dirty and can be an element of beauty itself…

Lire la suite sur : http://www.phnompenhpost.com/post-weekend/new-photo-exhibition-takes-cambodian-gender-double-standards

Recalling a forgotten kingdom in Venice Biennale

Recalling a forgotten kingdom in Venice Biennale by Helmi Yusof, 14/04/2017, The Business Times

Zai Kuning will be showcasing Dapunta Hyang: Transmission of Knowledge at the Singapore Pavilion of the 57th Venice Biennale from May 13 to Nov 26, 2017.

After18 years criss-crossing South-east Asia, Zai Kuning’s artistic journey is now going beyond the region to make a stop at the most important art event in the world: the Venice Biennale.

There, at the Singapore Pavilion in Arsenale, Zai is constructing a massive Phinisi ship out of rattan, string and beeswax. It will be 17 metres long – a metre perhaps for each year he’s spent exploring the history of Malays in South-east Asia – and it will be surrounded by 100 books that have been dipped in wax, never to be opened and read again, a metaphor for lost histories.

Since 1999, the artist has been obsessed with the meta-historical questions of: « Who am I? Where do I come from? Whom do I belong to? Whom do I answer to? » He’s less interested in issues of national identity and family genealogy than the broader field of the ethnogenesis and migration of Malays. The central figure in his research is Dapunta Hyang, the first ruler of the Srivijaya kingdom that dominated the Malay Archipelago from the 8th to the 12th century. As a Malay Buddhist, Dapunta Hyang also helped spread Buddhism throughout his kingdom.

At the Venice showcase, Zai will be putting up 30 photographic portraits of living mak yong performers on a facing wall running parallel to the ship. An audio recording of a mak yong master speaking in an ancient Malay dialect will also be played on loop.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/lifestyle/arts/recalling-a-forgotten-kingdom-in-venice-biennale

Transformative traditions: Dana Langlois and Reaksmey Yean of Cambodia’s JavaArts – in conversation

Transformative traditions: Dana Langlois and Reaksmey Yean of Cambodia’s JavaArts – in conversation, 04/04/2017, Art Radar

Prominent Phnom Penh gallery seeks to make contemporary art accessible through initiatives. 

Based in Phnom Penh since 1998, Dana Langlois founded JavaArts in 2000. In addition to the café and gallery that makes up JavaArts, Langlois also founded experimental gallery Sala Artspace and Our City Festival.

Java Gallery’s current Curator for Creative Programmes, Reaksmey Yean worked for art organization Phare Ponleu Selpak as an Assistant to the Department of Performing Arts and Administrator of Artist Residency Programmes (EU) and Cambodian Living Arts as a Communication and Advertising Officer and Production and Logistic Officer. Yean is also the founder of Trotchaek Pneik.

Langlois and Yean talked with Art Radar about the rapid changes engulfing Cambodia’s urban capital and the echo of the country’s brutal genocide under Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, where an estimated 1.7 to 2.5 million people perished between 1975 and 1979.

Lire la suite sur : http://artradarjournal.com/2017/04/04/transformative-traditions-dana-langlois-and-reaksmey-yean-of-cambodias-javaarts-in-conversation/

Ramayana : the divine poem as revealed by the Rajbansi masks (India, Nepal, Indonesia)

Exposition : Ramayana : the divine poem as revealed by the Rajbansi masks (India, Nepal, Indonesia), 08/04/2017 – 10/09/2017, Museo Arte Orientale di Venezia

Il Museo d’Arte Orientale di Venezia, presenta la mostra Rāmāyaa. The divine poem as revealed by the Rājbanśī masks, Museo d’Arte Orientale di Venezia, 8 aprile – 10 settembre 2017, prodotta da ICI Venice – Istituto Culturale Internazionale e dall’Association pour le Rayonnement des Cultures Himalayennes, a cura di Marta Boscolo Marchi e François Pannier, con il contributo scientifico di Stefano Beggiora.

La mostra, patrocinata dall’UNESCO, dall’Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia e dall’ICOO, Istituto di Cultura per l’Oriente e l’Occidente, offre un suggestivo percorso tra Nepal, India e Indonesia, seguendo la diffusione del Rāmāyana, testo sacro dell’induismo.

Tradizionalmente attribuito al saggio Vālmīki (fine II – inizio I sec. a.C.), il nucleo originario del grande poema venne composto in realtà tra il VI e il III secolo a.C. e trovò la sua definizione nei primi secoli della nostra era. Analogamente ai poemi omerici, il Rāmāyana è un insieme organico delle conoscenze e dei modelli culturali di un’intera civiltà.

In esposizione alcune splendide maschere in legno dipinto della collezione di Alain Rouveure, che rappresentano alcuni dei numerosi personaggi della saga di Rāma, avatāra (discesa) di Viṣṇu e furono realizzate per le sacre rappresentazioni che si tenevano nei villaggi, testimoniano il radicamento di questa tradizione presso l’etnia Rājbanśī, tra il sud del Nepal, il Bihar e il Bengala indiano.

Come si potrà vedere nel docu-film girato da Anne e Ludovic Segarra nel 1975, nel Mithila le donne continuano a dipingere le loro case con scene sacre, e nei villaggi di quella regione gli attori mettono in scena il Rāmāyana col volto semplicemente dipinto.

Dall’India il Rāmāyana si diffuse anche in Indonesia: la sua messa in scena nel teatro di figura indonesiano e in particolare nel wayang kulit, il teatro delle ombre, lo ha reso una delle storie più popolari e note del paese. Nell’ultima sala del percorso espositivo, le marionette della collezione del Museo d’Arte Orientale raffigurano molti degli stessi personaggi delle maschere Rājbanśī, creando un suggestivo legame culturale tra India e Indonesia.

Pour plus d’informations : https://icivenice.wordpress.com/2017/03/14/ramayana-the-divine-poem-as-revealed-by-the-rajbansi-masks-exhibition-museo-arte-orientale-di-venezia-exhibition-08-04-2017-10-09-2017/

Lav Diaz : Journeys

Lav Diaz : Journeys, 27/01/2017 – 12/03/2017, London Gallery West

London Gallery West is proud to be the first London venue to present six films by Lav Diaz, one of the greatest radical artists of contemporary cinema. For this exhibition the gallery space will be transformed into an inviting cinema environment to screen a rotating programme of Diaz’s extraordinary epics.

Independent Filipino filmmaker Diaz describes himself as a storyteller who makes films about the struggles of his people. His films tell quiet tales of everyday sorrow and resilience, and of the existential quest of a people betrayed by the postcolonial nation state. His films demonstrate a radical reworking of melodrama that extends the possibilities of cinema by combining physical cinematic realism with poetry, modernist literature, painterly landscape, musical improvisation, theatrical performance, ritual intensity and duration.

Shot mostly in black and white, Diaz makes notoriously long films with the economy of means afforded by digital. Diaz’s method of filmmaking exemplifies an organic process that merges fictional storytelling with the material density and tempo of the locality of shooting. Astonishing rhythmic pacing creates a powerful dialectic between the microscopic gestures and steadfast movements of powerless bodies, the immensity of natural and historical forces, and spectral presence.

Diaz was winner of the Golden Lion at the 2016 Venice Film Festival, the Silver Bear Alfred Bauer award at the 2016 Berlin Film Festival, among other prestigious prizes. He is a Radcliffe–Harvard Film Study Center Fellow. Retrospectives of his work have recently been held at the Jeu de Paume Museum, Courtisane Festival, and the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

A programme of talks will take place throughout the exhibition and Diaz will be in attendance in March for an international symposium on his films and artistic practice hosted by the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media.

For the screening programme schedule, Gallery talks and symposium see : https://www.westminster.ac.uk/news-and-events/events/lav-diaz-journeys

Vietnam : National treasures go on display

20170105161547-3

« National treasures go on display », 05/01/2017, VietNamNet

16 national treasures will be displayed for the first time at the National Museum of Vietnamese History.

The items were recognised as national treasures due to their special cultural and historical value following an appraisal report of the National Council for Cultural Heritage.

The exhibits include a Ngoc Lu bronze drum related to the Dong Son culture dating back up to 2,500 years ago. It is the most beautiful and intact drum of its type yet discovered and was recognised as a national treasure in 2012.

Other exhibited items include a Dao Thinh bronze jar from the Dong Son culture that dates back 2,500 years, a Dong Son statue depicting two men playing pan pipes dating to around 700 BC, and a large Dong Son bronze lamp in the form of a kneeling person, dating back to around 200 AD.

A Viet Khe boat tomb, a bell from Van Ban Pagoda, an 11th century Le Dynasty stele from Nam Giao Temple and a bronze royal stamp from the 12th century Tran Dynasty are also on display.

Other national treasures include the Prison Diary, a 1927 book entitled Revolutionary Road by Ho Chi Minh, and the handwritten draft of President Ho Chi Minh’s appeal to the nation for a resistance war written in late 1946.

The exhibition will run until May.

Voir : http://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/art-entertainment/170710/national-treasures-go-on-display.html

Secrets of the Sea: A Tang Shipwreck and Early Trade in Asia

Exhibition : « Secrets of the Sea: A Tang Shipwreck and Early Trade in Asia », 7 March – 4 June 2017, Asia Society, New York

This exhibition brings the precious contents of a shipwreck discovered off Belitung Island in the Java Sea to American audiences for the first time. The remarkable cargo of spice-filled jars and all together more than 60,000 ceramics produced in China during the Tang dynasty (618–907), plus luxury items of gold and silver, was bound for Iran and Iraq. Selected objects illustrate the story of the active exchange of goods, ideas, and culture in Asia more than one thousand years ago. The exhibition will bring to light how this discovery—one of the most important archaeological revelations of the twentieth century—has changed the way we understand ninth-century Asia.

Secrets of the Sea: A Tang Shipwreck and Trade in Early Asia is jointly organized with the Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore. Objects are from the Khoo Teck Puat Gallery, Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore. The Tang Shipwreck Collection was made possible by the generous donation of the Estate of Khoo Teck Puat in honor of the Late Khoo Teck Puat.

Voir un échantillon des objets exposés : http://asiasociety.org/new-york/exhibitions/secrets-sea-tang-shipwreck-and-early-trade-asia#!artworks