Archives de catégorie : VIE ARTISTIQUE

Passion and procession : art of the Philippines

Passion and procession : art of the Philippines, 24/06/2017 – 12/11/2017, Art Gallery New South Wales

Celebrating the diverse and vibrant art of the Philippines.

Passion and procession brings together painting, sculpture, video and installation works from ten contemporary Filipino artists, revealing their very personal responses to faith, history, politics and life in the Philippines.

The works draw on folk mythology, family archives, nature and religious ceremony to reconsider established narratives of history and nation. The artists have used found as well as ritual objects, plant specimens and symbols of precolonial histories to address the ambiguities of faith and science, social inequality and relationship to place. In doing so, they demonstrate a belief in the potential of art to inspire, heal and effect social change.

The artists include Santiago Bose, Marina Cruz, Alfredo Esquillo Jr, Nona Garcia, Renato Habulan, Geraldine Javier, Mark Justiniani, Alwin Reamillo, Norberto Roldan and Rodel Tapaya.

Accompanying their works is a selection of textiles and sculptural objects from the Philippines given to the Gallery in 2005 by Dr John Yu and Dr George Soutter.

This exhibition is part of the Bayanihan Philippine Art Project, a collaboration between the Art Gallery of NSW, Blacktown Arts Centre, Mosman Art Gallery, Peacock Gallery (Auburn) and Campbelltown Arts Centre in association with Museums & Galleries of NSW, to celebrate the art and culture of the Philippines through a series of exhibitions, performances, creative writing and community programs across multiple venues.

The last issue of TAASA Review : The Journal of the Asian Arts Society of Australia (vol. 26, n° 2, June 2017) is dedicated to the Bayanihan Philippine Art Project, and the art and culture of the Philippines.

Voir : https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/passion-and-procession/

Patani semasa : pameran seni dari Patani

Exhibition : Patani Semasa : Pameran Seni dari Patani, 19/07/2017 – 14/02/2018, MAIIAM Contemporary Art Museum

An exhibition on contemporary art from the Golden Peninsula. Ranging from different time periods, works of art as well as cultural representations of the « Patani region » from 27 artists have been selected – both locals and those engaged with issues relevant to the area in question.

Voir : http://www.maiiam.com/exhibition/

Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now

« Sunshower : Contemporary art from Southeast Asia 1980’s to now », 05/07/2017 – 23/10/2017, The National Art Center, Tokyo & Mori Art Museum

With its total population counting around 600 million, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, multi-faith Southeast Asia has nurtured a truly dynamic and diverse culture. Contemporary art from the emerging economic powerhouse of Southeast Asia is currently earning widespread international attention. The “sunshower” – rain falling from clear skies – is an intriguing yet frequently-seen meteorological phenomenon in Southeast Asia, and serves as a metaphor for the vicissitudes of the region. This exhibition, the largest-ever in scale, seeks to explore the many practices of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since 1980s from 9 different perspectives. It aims to showcase its inconceivable dynamism of Southeast Asia that is somewhat nostalgic yet extraordinarily new.

Nine sections :  Fluid World, Passion and Revolution, Archiving, Diverse Identities, Day by Day, Growth and Loss, What is Art ? Why Do It ?, Medium as Meditation, Dialogue with History.

Voir la liste des artistes par pays, les oeuvres et le programme des discussions sur :  http://sunshower2017.jp/en/index.html

« Sunshower »Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks

« Stormy Weather » (2009) by Filipino artist Felix Bacolor (Image courtesy of @katrinav_)

« Sunshower Brings Flowers with this Major Exhibition of 180 Southeast Asian Artworks » by Yunyi Lau, 08/07/2017, The Artling

The tropical climate of Southeast Asia lends for torrential downpours across the year. For those not used to the weather, one can be shocked to find what was a pleasantly sunny day, suddenly turn into a very wet situation in under a minute. Known as a sunshower, this frequent meteorological phenomenon in the region is the paradox of rain falling from clear skies.

It is this phenomenon that has been the inspiration behind a major show of Southeast Asian Contemporary Art that commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The sunshower is a poetic metaphor for the developments within Southeast Asia that resulted from the post-WWII decolonisation. Despite the turmoil that many countries were thrown into, many experienced democratisation and globalisation that caused rapid economic and urban development, resulting in drastic changes that have since changed the socio-political landscape of the region.

Sunshower originally began as an idea conceived between the Director-General of the National Art Center, Tokyo and the Director of the Mori Art Museum, and was assented by The Japan Foundation. The three parties came together to set up a 14-member curatorial team, which conducted a two and a half year field research, culminating in a selection of about 180 artworks by 86 artist groups from the ten ASEAN member countries, exhibited across the two museums.

Through the works selected, the exhibition seeks to explore the development of contemporary art in Southeast Asia since the 1980s against the backdrop of the currents and fluctuations of the times from nine different perspectives, with the goal of capturing its dynamism and diversity. Below is a selection of some of the works that we suggest you check out if you plan on checking out the exhibition!

The nine sections that Sunshower is divided into include: Fluid World that looks at maps and how they reflect socio-poltical economic values, Passion and Revolution that focuses on some of the major wars that shaped the region, Archiving that looks at the development of document-collection in Southeast Asian art, Diverse Identities focuses on postcolonialism and the emergence of independence and democracy, Day by Day is a look at artists’ exploration of local everyday life, Growth and Loss is the observation of the changes of globalisation and urbanisation that have impacted Southeast Asia, What is Art? Why Do It? is a look at the development of institutions and the characteristics of the art community in the region, Medium as Meditation focuses on how local traditional culture has affected the way artists use materials as their museums, and finally, Dialogue with History is an exploration into how artists engage with their histories in the present day.

A voir sur : https://theartling.com/en/artzine/2017/07/03/sunshowers-bring-flowers-with-this-major-exhibition-of-180-southeast-asian-artworks/

Vintage Photographs Capture the Beauty of Classical Dance – Avec les danseuses royales du Cambodge

Photos of Khmer classical dancers printed on canvas are exhibited at the Institut Francais. (Siv Channa/The Cambodia Daily)

Vintage Photographs Capture the Beauty of Classical Dance by Michelle Vachon, 15/06/2017, The Cambodia Daily

When George Groslier first approached Nou Nam in March 1927 with the idea of photographing her while she performed Khmer classical dance, she refused. “People no longer know how to dance, she told me with disdain,” he later wrote.

A few minutes later, the dancer—a favorite of both King Norodom and King Sisowath—relented.

Then in her 50s, Nou Nam agreed to help the photographer archive Khmer classical dance movements in photographic form.

As he began to capture the former star dancer, George Groslier realized that “the hand stops two centimeters higher than on Wednesday, and the head turns two degrees more than in Nou Nam’s day,” showing how the dance form had evolved.

For Khmer classical dancers whose slightest movements are painstakingly executed, this was profoundly troubling. Master dancers watching Nou Nam became agitated, he wrote.

Capturing these changing styles for posterity was Groslier’s goal. He wanted to provide a historical record for generations to come.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.cambodiadaily.com/news/vintage-photographs-capture-the-beauty-of-classical-dance-131369/

Exposition :  « Avec les danseuses royales du Cambodge », 15/06/2017 au 07/09/2017, Galerie de l’Institut Français du Cambodge

En 1927, George Groslier, directeur du musée National, entreprend pour conserver la mémoire des postures de danse du ballet royal, un exceptionnel travail de documentation photographique. Longtemps resté à l’écart, le corpus de négatifs sur verre a été récemment catalogué et numérisé. Après leur présentation au Musée National du Cambodge en 2012 puis à New York, Paris et Siem Reap, ces photographies sont exposées à l’Institut Français du Cambodge.

Exposition conçue par le MNC et l’EFEO à Phnom Penh (avec le soutien de l’IFC et de l’UNESCO)

Voir : https://institutfrancais-cambodge.com/expo-avec-les-danseuses-royales-du-cambodge/

Birmanie, le pouvoir des moines

Birmanie, le pouvoir des moines
un film de Joël Curtz et Benoît Grimont
 
Myanmar, die Macht der Mönche
ein film von Joël Curtz und Benoît Grimont
sera diffusé sur ARTE
auf ARTE ausgestrahlt wird
le mardi 20 JUIN à 23h20
en France et en Belgique
und
am Dienstag 20. Juni um 23h20Uhr
in Deutschland und Österreich
 
 

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder, chronique édifiante du discours de la haine par Frédéric Strauss,  20/05/2017, Télérama

Dans un documentaire exemplaire car méthodique, présenté en séance spéciale à Cannes, le Suisse Barbet Schroeder part à la rencontre de Wirathu. Ce moine birman qui, par ses sermons extrémistes, a encouragé le massacre des musulmans dans son pays. Quand le bouddhisme confine au fascisme.

Le film sortira en France le 7 juin 2017.

Il a la haine. Les vieux arbres qui gardaient ses plus beaux souvenirs, à côté de chez lui, le voisin les a fait couper. Pour oublier ce crime, Barbet Schroeder part à Mandalay, en Birmanie, où il découvrit, à 20 ans, le bouddhisme. Une religion qui apprend à vivre sans haine. S’il n’a pas perdu la foi, le cinéaste ne croit cependant plus aux miracles. Le but de son voyage est de rencontrer un moine qui, tel un pompier pyromane, allume des incendies, attise les flammes d’un fanatisme meurtrier : le vénérable et pourtant détestable Wirathu.

Sous ses allures de bonze, c’est une sorte d’héritier d’Hitler qu’on découvre, tout entier voué à la persécution et à l’extermination d’une population : les musulmans de Birmanie, et particulièrement la minorité des Rohingyas. Wirathu les compare à des animaux sauvages qui se reproduisent comme des lapins, se dévorent entre eux et détruisent l’environnement. Monstrueux et glaçant, son discours veut faire naître chez les Birmans bouddhistes « la peur de la disparition de la race », titre d’un de ses livres. Il faut éliminer les musulmans, ou ils seront, eux, éliminés… Face à cet apôtre de la haine, Barbet Schroeder garde un étonnant sang-froid. Son regard droit, objectif, rend la confrontation impressionnante. Avec ce film, il clôt une « trilogie du Mal », commencée avec les documentaires Général Idi Amin Dada : autoportrait (1974) et L’Avocat de la terreur (2007), sur Jacques Vergès…

Lire la suite et voir la bande annonce sur : http://www.telerama.fr/festival-de-cannes/2017/cannes-2017-le-venerable-w-de-barbet-schroeder-chronique-edifiante-du-discours-de-la-haine,158235.php

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence by Maggie Lee, 21/05/2017, Variety

Something invigorating and full-bodied is brewing in Indonesia, and it’s not a cup of mocha java. It’s a cinematic resurgence, the biggest since the early 2000s, when Rudy Soedjarwo’s 2002 teen romance Apa ada dengan cinta? (What’s With Love?) rocked the Southeast Asia market while in the same year Riri Riza’s Eliana Eliana stunned the festival circuit with femme-centric social realism.

In September 2016, Warkop DKI Reborn: Jangkrik Boss Part 1, a reboot of a police slapstick comedy by 1980s comic trio Dono, Kasino and Indro (DKI), became the most-viewed Indonesian film in history, with 6.8 million tickets sold. For the first time, the top 10 domestic films enjoyed more than 1 million admissions, with horror Danur taking the top spot in 2017. According to Korean industry giant CJ CGV, exhibition of local films at its theatrical chain in Indonesia rose from 5% to 23% last year.

The arthouse scene is also flourishing, with second-generation directors Edwin, Joko Anwar, Lucky Kuswandi and Teddy Soeriaatmadja turning up at top festivals alongside relative newcomers including Eddie Cahyono (Siti) and Yosep Anggi Noen (Solo Solitude). In fact, there is talk of a new wave, or neo-neorealism, that explores gritty contemporary subjects about politics or gender with stylized, poetic film language.

A new height has been scored by the selection of Marlina, the Murderer in Four Acts in this year’s Directors’ Fortnight, the third Indonesian feature to bow in Cannes. It is also the third feature by Mouly Surya, whose sophomore feature, What They Don’t Talk About When They Talk About Love, premiered at Sundance 2013.

Australia-educated Surya, whose auteur influences are Stanley Kubrick, Michael Haneke and Abbas Kiarostami, cites Garin Nugroho’s Of Love and Eggs and Sjumandjaja’s biopic of women’s rights champion R.A. Kartini as her entry point to national cinema. It was Nugroho, the country’s most distinguished filmmaker, who proposed her to direct Marlina, based on a treatment developed from his visit to Sumba Island, an isolated, arid territory that resembles Texas.

Taking cues from Japanese samurai and Chinese martial arts that fused Western elements, she refashioned the Italo-American genre into a vehicle to examine male violence and patriarchal dominance in Southeast Asian backwaters such as Sumba, while highlighting the indigenous women’s unique air of mystery, sensuality and reliance. The women in Surya’s films bleed in key moments and there will be blood in Marlina, too.

“In my debut Fiksi [written by Joko Anwar], the heroine lost her virginity; in my second film, the blind protagonist had her first period,” Surya says. “Marlina doesn’t spill her own blood, but that of others, symbolizing the strength of women from Sumba. My female characters have grown up. Marlina is a full-grown woman, a widow who finds strength in grief.”

Voir : http://variety.com/2017/film/asia/indonesia-film-industry-recognized-at-cannes-1202437479/

 

Indonésie, les fermiers du miel

Exposition : Indonésie, les fermiers du miel, du 20/05/2017 au 27/11/2017, Musée de l’Homme, Balcon des Sciences

Par Nicolas Césard, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle

Au détour de la forêt indonésienne, à Bornéo, découvrez comment des hommes se rendent en haut des arbres, en pleine nuit, pour récolter le miel produit par la plus grande des abeilles mellifères, Apis dorsata.

Cette apicollecte évolue vers une apiculture par l’aménagement d’emplacements favorables à l’installation des essaims sauvages. Ainsi, la destruction des abeilles est limitée et la récolte du miel est rendue plus aisée. Ces nouvelles pratiques permettent une gestion plus durable des ressources mellifères.

À travers des objets, des spécimens et des reconstitutions, et grâce à plusieurs dispositifs multimédias – jeux interactifs et vidéos de terrain -, cette exposition présente les diverses techniques et outils utilisé par ces fermiers du miel, et explore les relations entre les sociétés et les abeilles en Indonésie.

Voir : http://www.museedelhomme.fr/fr/visitez/agenda/exposition/indonesie-fermiers-miel

Balthazar, Prince Noir de Timor et de Solor en Chine, en Amérique et en Europe au XVIIIe siècle

 

Exposition : Balthazar, Prince Noir de Timor et de Solor en Chine, en Amérique et en Europe au XVIIIe siècle, du 22/05/2017 au 02/06/2017, INALCO

Par Frédéric Durand, Professeur, Université Toulouse II – Jean Jaurès

Originaire des îles de la Sonde (Indonésie et Timor-Oriental) où il est né en 1737, dans la communauté de métis Timorais/Portugais des Topasses-Larentuqueiros, Balthazar est selon toute vraisemblance le fils de Gaspar da Costa, le chef des métis portugais qui vivaient entre Flores, Solor et Timor-ouest, et avait le statut de « roi ».
Gaspar da Costa est mort en 1749, lors de la bataille de Penfui contre les Hollandais, à la tête d’une armée de 50 000 hommes. Il est considéré comme un des pionniers de la lutte anti-coloniale aux Indes néerlandaises et sa mémoire est commémorée par un monument à Timor-ouest.

Le Prince Balthazar, se rend à Batavia, à Macao et à Canton, avant de prendre un bateau pour la France, où il est abandonné à l’âge de treize ans par son précepteur, un prêtre portugais. Pour survivre, le jeune Prince embarque sur des bateaux, dont des navires corsaires, qui l’emmène notamment aux Pays-Bas, en Angleterre, en Ecosse et au Québec. Il revient ensuite en France, où il écrit à de nombreuses personnalités dont les rois Louis XV et Louis XVI et le philosophe Voltaire. Il n’est alors pas évident pour lui de se faire reconnaître en France, car en concurrence avec d’autres étrangers se disant « princes », dont ceux d’Angola et de Macao. Au cours des années 1760/70, la presse internationale parle de lui, de l’Italie à l’Angleterre et de Paris à Bratislava. Balthazar fréquente de nombreux milieux intellectuels où religieux, dont des académiciens, des alchimistes, des encyclopédistes et des francs-maçons. Il est également l’ami de la communauté des Noirs et des Asiatiques de Paris. Dans les années 1780, Balthazar devient conteur et poète dans la grande société parisienne, mais en 1789, la Révolution française fait s’effondrer le monde dans lequel il s’était intégré. Il est mort en 1791 à l’Hôtel Dieu de Paris.

Oublié au XXe siècle, plusieurs articles à son sujet on été publiés dans des revues scientifiques, et notamment dans Archipel, à propos de mémoires qu’il avait fait publier dans les années 1760. Les historiens qui avaient travaillé sur lui n’avaient cependant pas perçu sa notoriété et pensaient qu’il était mort pauvre et inconnu.

Les vingt-quatre panneaux de l’exposition reproduisent chronologiquement les étapes importantes de la vie du Prince de Timor et de Solor.

Voir : http://www.inalco.fr/evenement/exposition-balthazar-prince-noir-timor-solor-chine-amerique-europe-xviiie-siecle

Podcast : Archiving Indonesian art

Talking Indonesia podcast : Archiving Indonesian art, 11/05/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

The past decade has seen increased global interest in Indonesian art and along with it, interest in the long-neglected field of Indonesian art history. Until quite recently, art history resources were limited, particularly those relating to lesser known artists and works produced during tumultuous periods.

Today, institutions like the Indonesian Visual Arts Archive (IVAA) in Yogyakarta are doing their best to fill these gaps by building art archives and making them accessible to the public. But much work still needs to be done in cataloguing Indonesia’s extensive collection of old and new art. What are the main challenges faced by those who are trying to build Indonesia’s art archives? What is the relevance of art history to contemporary Indonesian society?

I [Charlotte Setijadi] discuss these issues with Farah Wardani, art historian, curator, author, and assistant director in charge of archives at the National Gallery of Singapore (NGS). Before joining NGS in 2015, Farah was the executive director of IVAA, the first institution dedicated to archiving contemporary Indonesian art.

In 2017, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore, Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-archiving-indonesian-art/

Photographer Captures Intimacy of Daily Life in Cambodia

« Photographer Captures Intimacy of Daily Life in Cambodia » by Michelle Vachon, 02/05/2017, The Cambodia Daily

When French-Canadian photographer Serey Siv embarked on a project two years ago to photograph ordinary life across small-town Cambodia, his goal was far from simple.

Assuming the role of an observer, he sought to capture the “timeless” side of life in the country: the small episodes in people’s daily lives that could have taken place in the 1960s or on Monday. To better set the photographs out of time, he shot in black and white.

“I played a bit with this notion of past and present,” he said on Friday.

An exhibition of Mr. Siv’s series, “La balade de Serey,” or “Serey’s Stroll,” opens today in Siem Reap City.

It took a year for Mr. Siv to capture the images of daily life, waiting to seize the moments as they happened in the “beautiful natural light” that occurs for only a few hours each day. The result is images in which the gray and black tones make the scenes all the more striking and create a quiet intimacy with the people portrayed, drawing in the viewer.

Lire la suite sur :  https://www.cambodiadaily.com/news/photographer-captures-intimacy-of-daily-life-in-cambodia-128957/

New photo exhibition takes on Cambodian gender double standards

An image from Neak Sophal’s Flower series. Photo supplied

New photo exhibition takes on Cambodian gender double standards by Anna Koo, 05/05/2017, The Phnom Penh Post

Neak Sophal’s Flower opens at Java Café and Gallery at 6:30pm on Tuesday, May 9. The exhibition, which will be displayed on the second floor of the café, runs through June 25.

The series, which was the product of six months work, is based on a Khmer saying that compares women to white paper and men to gold. If gold were dropped in the mud, the saying goes, it could be polished and cleaned and will never tarnish.

White paper, meanwhile, gets permanently stained and, once considered dirty, no longer has value. The proverb is a not-so-subtle reminder of the need for women to behave themselves sexually, or else they “lose their value”.

“If you are virginal, you are a valued woman. If you don’t have it, you are not a good woman . . . For me, it is an unacceptable comparison, because women and men are human and we live together,” she says.

Gender studies has long been a subject of interest for the 28-year-old Royal University of Fine Arts graphic design graduate. Her distinctive conceptual style results in work that often serves as social commentary, highlighting what she sees as invisible social issues in Cambodian culture.

She won the Photo Prize at the Angkor Photo Festival in 2013 with her exhibition The Hang On, featuring subjects from all walks of life in Cambodia with their faces obscured by objects, usually related to their jobs, which have overtaken their identity.

In Sophal’s images, the subjects are framed by flowers a motif inspired by the frequent comparisons in songs, movies and stories of women to flowers. She then drops paint on the photograph to produce her final product, to prove that stains do not always have to be dirty and can be an element of beauty itself…

Lire la suite sur : http://www.phnompenhpost.com/post-weekend/new-photo-exhibition-takes-cambodian-gender-double-standards

TRANSNATIONALISM AND ITS LIMITS: MOBILITY AND CONTEMPORANEITY IN THAI ART

Tate Modern Talk : Transnationalism and its limits : mobility and contemporaneity in Thai art, 22 June 2017, Tate Modern

Hear David Teh, author of Thai Art: Currencies of the Contemporary​, discuss the possibilities and constraints of transnationalism.

In this seminar, David Teh gives artistic mobility a discrete history with reference to the contemporary art of Thailand, a nation on edge after decades of sovereign insecurity, economic boom and bust, and constitutional meltdown. While Thai artists reflect these tribulations in their work, since the 1990s many have downplayed their identity and become conspicuously mobile. What can their excursions tell us about the transnationalism of contemporary art? Their mobility allows them to dodge local limitations, but it also recalls a much older spatial imaginary, a worldliness that is no symptom of art’s globalisation but a condition of its possibility.

Teh’s paper is followed by a response from May Adadol Ingawanij. The subsequent panel discussion is chaired by Lucy Steeds.

Biographies

May Adadol Ingawanij is a moving image theorist and curator. She is currently writing a book titled Animistic Cinema: Moving Image Performance and Ritual in Thailand. Her publications include Long Walk to Life: the Films of Lav Diaz (2015); Animism and the Performative Realist Cinema of Apichatpong Weerasethakul, (2013). May’s curatorial projects include Lav Diaz Journeys (London, 2017), and Attachments and Unknowns (Phnom Penh, 2017). She teaches at CREAM, University of Westminster.

Lucy Steeds is Reader in Art Theory and Exhibition Histories at Central Saint Martins (CSM), University of the Arts London (UAL). She is Senior Research Fellow for Afterall at CSM – leading on the Exhibition Histories strand – and she teaches on the MRes Art: Exhibition Studies course. Her recent books include The Curatorial Conundrum (co-edited with Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson), MIT Press, 2016; and Exhibition (for the Documents of Contemporary Art series), Whitechapel Gallery and MIT Press, 2014.

David Teh is a curator and researcher based at the National University of Singapore. His essays have appeared in Afterall Journal, Third Text, ARTMargins and Theory, Culture and Society, and his book Thai Art: Currencies of the Contemporary was published this year by MIT Press. His most recent curatorial project, Misfits: Pages from a loose-leaf modernity, is showing at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin until 3 July.

Voir : http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/talk/transnationalism-limits

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank by Denis D. Gray, 16/04/2017, Nikkei Asian Review

Evolution of Thai northern city into creative hub fuels hopes of gaining UNESCO status.

The millions of tourists who flock to the ancient, mountain-ringed city of Chiang Mai in northern Thailand might not immediately notice, but the alleys, riversides and Bohemian cafes here are percolating with striking imagery, innovative design and digital wizardry. It is a heady brew that has prompted some to predict a real explosion — a creative one, that is.

The city is already home to more than 40 art galleries and a world-class contemporary arts museum, with others planned. It hosts design and arts festivals and was listed on a widely consulted digital nomad website as No. 1 of 991 places in the world for roving techies to plug in their computers. A creative resource guide to the city runs to 199 pages, focusing on venues ranging from the Wandering Moon Theater to Chiang Mai University’s College of Arts, Media and Technology.

Among a growing base of arts enthusiasts, Chiang Mai has become Thailand’s Left Bank, a part of Paris long known for its artistic and intellectual community.

Lire la suite sur : http://asia.nikkei.com/Life-Arts/Arts/Chiang-Mai-Thailand-s-modern-day-Left-Bank?page=1