Archives de catégorie : VIE ARTISTIQUE

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank

Chiang Mai: Thailand’s modern-day Left Bank by Denis D. Gray, 16/04/2017, Nikkei Asian Review

Evolution of Thai northern city into creative hub fuels hopes of gaining UNESCO status.

The millions of tourists who flock to the ancient, mountain-ringed city of Chiang Mai in northern Thailand might not immediately notice, but the alleys, riversides and Bohemian cafes here are percolating with striking imagery, innovative design and digital wizardry. It is a heady brew that has prompted some to predict a real explosion — a creative one, that is.

The city is already home to more than 40 art galleries and a world-class contemporary arts museum, with others planned. It hosts design and arts festivals and was listed on a widely consulted digital nomad website as No. 1 of 991 places in the world for roving techies to plug in their computers. A creative resource guide to the city runs to 199 pages, focusing on venues ranging from the Wandering Moon Theater to Chiang Mai University’s College of Arts, Media and Technology.

Among a growing base of arts enthusiasts, Chiang Mai has become Thailand’s Left Bank, a part of Paris long known for its artistic and intellectual community.

Lire la suite sur : http://asia.nikkei.com/Life-Arts/Arts/Chiang-Mai-Thailand-s-modern-day-Left-Bank?page=1

Recalling a forgotten kingdom in Venice Biennale

Recalling a forgotten kingdom in Venice Biennale by Helmi Yusof, 14/04/2017, The Business Times

Zai Kuning will be showcasing Dapunta Hyang: Transmission of Knowledge at the Singapore Pavilion of the 57th Venice Biennale from May 13 to Nov 26, 2017.

After18 years criss-crossing South-east Asia, Zai Kuning’s artistic journey is now going beyond the region to make a stop at the most important art event in the world: the Venice Biennale.

There, at the Singapore Pavilion in Arsenale, Zai is constructing a massive Phinisi ship out of rattan, string and beeswax. It will be 17 metres long – a metre perhaps for each year he’s spent exploring the history of Malays in South-east Asia – and it will be surrounded by 100 books that have been dipped in wax, never to be opened and read again, a metaphor for lost histories.

Since 1999, the artist has been obsessed with the meta-historical questions of: « Who am I? Where do I come from? Whom do I belong to? Whom do I answer to? » He’s less interested in issues of national identity and family genealogy than the broader field of the ethnogenesis and migration of Malays. The central figure in his research is Dapunta Hyang, the first ruler of the Srivijaya kingdom that dominated the Malay Archipelago from the 8th to the 12th century. As a Malay Buddhist, Dapunta Hyang also helped spread Buddhism throughout his kingdom.

At the Venice showcase, Zai will be putting up 30 photographic portraits of living mak yong performers on a facing wall running parallel to the ship. An audio recording of a mak yong master speaking in an ancient Malay dialect will also be played on loop.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/lifestyle/arts/recalling-a-forgotten-kingdom-in-venice-biennale

Iswadi Pratama, an auteur of Indonesian theatre

Iswadi Pratama, an auteur of Indonesian theatre by Caranissa Djatmiko, 12/04/2017, Inside Indonesia

Indonesia’s foremost theatre director, the internationally acclaimed Iswadi Pratama, staged an extraordinary eight productions in 2016.

There is no simple way of describing Iswadi Pratama. He claims to be a self-taught artist, yet his exceptional talents seem to suggest otherwise. Having spent most of his life bringing realities to the stage he insists that he only has the books he reads (stacked quite untidily at his private library) and the mentors who have guided him in the past to thank. Yet, after staging eight ambitious productions in 2016, it would be hard to dispute the fact that he has revolutionised Indonesian theatre.

The 45-year old poet and theatre director always knew that art was his true calling. He considers it to be the only space where he can express himself unapologetically, while also being a vehicle for helping others. ‘Everything that I do is motivated by an awareness that art must make people find their turning points in life,’ he says. ‘So I always choose projects based on [various] priorities: to what extent do the people involved in a certain program require my ability and capacity, and the relevance of it to my creative work and my vision regarding social transformation.’

Pratama’s plays have been showcased around the globe. His play Nostalgia di Sebuah Kota (Nostalgia in a City) was translated and performed in Germany in 2010. He has worked with some of the best artists in the world including American director Julie Taymor (Frida, The Lion King stage musical) who mentored Pratama when he became the first Indonesian to be a part of the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/iswadi-pratama-an-auteur-of-indonesian-theatre

NYT lensman wins Pulitzer for Duterte drug war story photo

A freelance lensman of The New York Times won a Pulitzer Prize in the breaking news photography category for a picture published with the a story on the war on drugs in the Philippines, 11/04/2017, GMA News Online

The announcement, which was posted on the official Pulitzer Prize Twitter account, declared freelance photographer of The New York Times Daniel Berehulak as winner of the prestigious award.

The article in the New York Times published on the 7th of December 2016 was titled « They are Slaughtering Us Like Animals. » Inside President Rodrigo Duterte’s brutal anti-drug campaign in the Philippines our photojournalist documented 57 homicide victims over 35 days.

I have worked in 60 countries, covered wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and spent much of 2014 living inside West Africa’s Ebola zone, a place gripped by fear and death. What I experienced in the Philippines felt like a new level of ruthlessness: police officers’ summarily shooting anyone suspected of dealing or even using drugs, vigilantes’ taking seriously Mr. Duterte’s call to “slaughter them all.”

Payut Ngaokrachang: cartoons for the United States Information Service

Payut Ngaokrachang: cartoons for USIS, Part 1, 24/01/2017, propagandainsoutheastasia

Payut Ngaokrachang was a Thai cartoonist who worked for most of his career with the United States Information Service (USIS). He was originally from a rural background, born in Wako, in the province of Prachuap Khiri Khan. In 1955 Payut created his first animated short film, Haed Mahasajan [The Miracle Incident] in which a traffic policeman causes a pile up due to some questionable dancing on the job. According to Jonathan Clements, Payut was subsequently spotted by USIS who awarded him roughly $400 and the opportunity to spend 6 months either at the Walt Disney Studios in California or Toei in Japan. He chose the later, meaning he was in many ways there at the very start of the Japanese anime industry. His time there resulted in his first (and as it happens last) propaganda film, completed in 1957.

Hanuman in Danger

Hanuman Phachoen Phai [Hanuman in danger], takes its principal character from the Ramayana, a classic Hindu epic that is also the basis for the classic Thai text the Ramakien. Hanuman, who is the God-King of the apes, was one of major characters who fought with Rama [Phra Ram] against the Devil King Ravana [Totsapak], and is therefore highly revered. In the propaganda film, Hanuman is depicted with a white face, and is based in the countryside. The film starts with him at home as his sons watch the television. They are watching a dancing competition, commenting on the prettiness of female dancer, when her partner the screen morphs from a handsome young man into a brutal looking dictator, who begins to spout what is supposed to be Communist ideology. He instructs the audience that they no longer need to respect their mothers, fathers, religion or King Rama [Phra Ram].

Lire la suite sur : https://propagandainsoutheastasia.wordpress.com/

Transformative traditions: Dana Langlois and Reaksmey Yean of Cambodia’s JavaArts – in conversation

Transformative traditions: Dana Langlois and Reaksmey Yean of Cambodia’s JavaArts – in conversation, 04/04/2017, Art Radar

Prominent Phnom Penh gallery seeks to make contemporary art accessible through initiatives. 

Based in Phnom Penh since 1998, Dana Langlois founded JavaArts in 2000. In addition to the café and gallery that makes up JavaArts, Langlois also founded experimental gallery Sala Artspace and Our City Festival.

Java Gallery’s current Curator for Creative Programmes, Reaksmey Yean worked for art organization Phare Ponleu Selpak as an Assistant to the Department of Performing Arts and Administrator of Artist Residency Programmes (EU) and Cambodian Living Arts as a Communication and Advertising Officer and Production and Logistic Officer. Yean is also the founder of Trotchaek Pneik.

Langlois and Yean talked with Art Radar about the rapid changes engulfing Cambodia’s urban capital and the echo of the country’s brutal genocide under Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, where an estimated 1.7 to 2.5 million people perished between 1975 and 1979.

Lire la suite sur : http://artradarjournal.com/2017/04/04/transformative-traditions-dana-langlois-and-reaksmey-yean-of-cambodias-javaarts-in-conversation/

Ramayana : the divine poem as revealed by the Rajbansi masks (India, Nepal, Indonesia)

Exposition : Ramayana : the divine poem as revealed by the Rajbansi masks (India, Nepal, Indonesia), 08/04/2017 – 10/09/2017, Museo Arte Orientale di Venezia

Il Museo d’Arte Orientale di Venezia, presenta la mostra Rāmāyaa. The divine poem as revealed by the Rājbanśī masks, Museo d’Arte Orientale di Venezia, 8 aprile – 10 settembre 2017, prodotta da ICI Venice – Istituto Culturale Internazionale e dall’Association pour le Rayonnement des Cultures Himalayennes, a cura di Marta Boscolo Marchi e François Pannier, con il contributo scientifico di Stefano Beggiora.

La mostra, patrocinata dall’UNESCO, dall’Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia e dall’ICOO, Istituto di Cultura per l’Oriente e l’Occidente, offre un suggestivo percorso tra Nepal, India e Indonesia, seguendo la diffusione del Rāmāyana, testo sacro dell’induismo.

Tradizionalmente attribuito al saggio Vālmīki (fine II – inizio I sec. a.C.), il nucleo originario del grande poema venne composto in realtà tra il VI e il III secolo a.C. e trovò la sua definizione nei primi secoli della nostra era. Analogamente ai poemi omerici, il Rāmāyana è un insieme organico delle conoscenze e dei modelli culturali di un’intera civiltà.

In esposizione alcune splendide maschere in legno dipinto della collezione di Alain Rouveure, che rappresentano alcuni dei numerosi personaggi della saga di Rāma, avatāra (discesa) di Viṣṇu e furono realizzate per le sacre rappresentazioni che si tenevano nei villaggi, testimoniano il radicamento di questa tradizione presso l’etnia Rājbanśī, tra il sud del Nepal, il Bihar e il Bengala indiano.

Come si potrà vedere nel docu-film girato da Anne e Ludovic Segarra nel 1975, nel Mithila le donne continuano a dipingere le loro case con scene sacre, e nei villaggi di quella regione gli attori mettono in scena il Rāmāyana col volto semplicemente dipinto.

Dall’India il Rāmāyana si diffuse anche in Indonesia: la sua messa in scena nel teatro di figura indonesiano e in particolare nel wayang kulit, il teatro delle ombre, lo ha reso una delle storie più popolari e note del paese. Nell’ultima sala del percorso espositivo, le marionette della collezione del Museo d’Arte Orientale raffigurano molti degli stessi personaggi delle maschere Rājbanśī, creando un suggestivo legame culturale tra India e Indonesia.

Pour plus d’informations : https://icivenice.wordpress.com/2017/03/14/ramayana-the-divine-poem-as-revealed-by-the-rajbansi-masks-exhibition-museo-arte-orientale-di-venezia-exhibition-08-04-2017-10-09-2017/

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem

Lecture : Confidences de Pariyem de Linus Suryadi A. G., vendredi 28 avril 2017 à 13h, Salon Peillot, Musée Guimet

Au programme, un long poème narratif en prose : « Confidences de Pariyem. L’univers d’une femme de Java » de l’indonésien Linus Suryadi AG (1951-1999).

« Confidences de Pariyem » a paru en 1981 à Jakarta. A travers les confidences de l’héroïne au jeune Païman, c’est une description rare et puissante de la vie quotidienne et des états d’âme d’une jeune fille de la fin des années 60 qui transparaît.
Embauchée dans une vieille famille noble de Yogyakarta, dernier bastion de l’héritage culturel des cours javanaises, Pariyem nous offre avec candeur, fierté et humour un saisissant voyage.

La lecture sera ensuite prolongée par une rencontre littéraire animée par Etienne Naveau, qui donnera quelques clefs sur Java, les femmes, l’Islam et la place proéminente des écrivaines sur la scène littéraire de l’archipel.
Etienne Naveau est professeur de langue et de littérature indonésienne à l’INALCO.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/1730539373639915/

 

 

Framing Asia

Framing Asia is a monthly film screening and discussion on Asia during the Leiden Asia Year.

Framing Asia is organised by by the KITLV (Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean), the IIAS (International Institute for Asian Studies), the department CA-DS (Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology) and Studium Generale of University Leiden.

You are welcome to join us on Tuesday 11 April at 19.30 h at Lipsius 028. This edition will screen two films on Popcultures and subcultures.

The first film is titled That’s Wicked (11 min) and directed by Joycelyn Lee. It follows the 15 year old Martin who introduces us to the world of beatboxing in Singapore.

The second film, The Silk Road of Pop (53 min), produced by Sameer Farooq, Ursula Engel and Stijn Deklerck shows us the vibrant music scene of the Uyghur youth in Xinjiang, China.

Afterwards, Ursula Engel (co-director of The Silk Road of Pop) will join our discussion with Bart Barendregt. Bart Barendregt is an associate professor at the Leiden Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology. He has an interest in popular and digital culture, and has published on Southeast Asian performance, new and mobile media, and (Islamic) pop music.

Voir les séances précédentes, Transgender issues in Indonesia, Disaster and the failing state sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/framing-asia

Brutalism and Traditional Khmer Design Come Together in Phnom Penh’s Hiroshima House

Brutalism and Traditional Khmer Design Come Together in Phnom Penh’s Hiroshima House by Ben Valentine, 17/03/2017, Hyperallergic

Osamu Ishiyama’s structure exemplifies the surprising adaptability of humans in the face of dehumanizing events.

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — During the 1994 Asian Games in Hiroshima, atomic bomb survivor Keiko Kunichika was inspired by a Cambodian athlete’s desire for his country to grow as Hiroshima had after the devastation of war. The Association for the Exchange Between Hiroshima Citizens and Cambodians was founded, and volunteers from Japan began building the Hiroshima House in Phnom Penh, brick by brick, from 1995 until its opening in 2007.

[…]

As a monument for peace, a site for children, and a building within one of Phnom Penh’s oldest and most important temple complexes, Wat Ounalom, the building itself is somewhat bizarre. From the outside, it’s an awkward, nearly cube-shaped five-story structure of progressively smaller cement and brick horizontal stripes. The weirdness culminates in a traditional Khmer roof plopped on top of the modern building. Surrounded by traditional Buddhist temple buildings, which are heavily ornate with highly circumscribed meanings, the Hiroshima House sticks out like a sore thumb.

Lire la suite sur : http://hyperallergic.com/364076/brutalism-and-traditional-khmer-design-come-together-in-phnom-penhs-hiroshima-house/

Lav Diaz : Journeys

Lav Diaz : Journeys, 27/01/2017 – 12/03/2017, London Gallery West

London Gallery West is proud to be the first London venue to present six films by Lav Diaz, one of the greatest radical artists of contemporary cinema. For this exhibition the gallery space will be transformed into an inviting cinema environment to screen a rotating programme of Diaz’s extraordinary epics.

Independent Filipino filmmaker Diaz describes himself as a storyteller who makes films about the struggles of his people. His films tell quiet tales of everyday sorrow and resilience, and of the existential quest of a people betrayed by the postcolonial nation state. His films demonstrate a radical reworking of melodrama that extends the possibilities of cinema by combining physical cinematic realism with poetry, modernist literature, painterly landscape, musical improvisation, theatrical performance, ritual intensity and duration.

Shot mostly in black and white, Diaz makes notoriously long films with the economy of means afforded by digital. Diaz’s method of filmmaking exemplifies an organic process that merges fictional storytelling with the material density and tempo of the locality of shooting. Astonishing rhythmic pacing creates a powerful dialectic between the microscopic gestures and steadfast movements of powerless bodies, the immensity of natural and historical forces, and spectral presence.

Diaz was winner of the Golden Lion at the 2016 Venice Film Festival, the Silver Bear Alfred Bauer award at the 2016 Berlin Film Festival, among other prestigious prizes. He is a Radcliffe–Harvard Film Study Center Fellow. Retrospectives of his work have recently been held at the Jeu de Paume Museum, Courtisane Festival, and the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

A programme of talks will take place throughout the exhibition and Diaz will be in attendance in March for an international symposium on his films and artistic practice hosted by the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media.

For the screening programme schedule, Gallery talks and symposium see : https://www.westminster.ac.uk/news-and-events/events/lav-diaz-journeys

La femme qui est partie, Lav Diaz

109459-jpg-r_1920_1080-f_jpg-q_x-xxyxx

La femme qui est partie, Lav Diaz (2016)

Le dernier film de Lav Diaz, qui a remporté le Lion d’Or lors de la 73e Mostra de Venise, sort aujourd’hui, 1er février 2017, sur les écrans en France.

Synopsis

Horacia Somorostro sort de prison en 1997 après avoir passé trente ans derrière les verrous pour un crime qu’elle n’a pas commis. Alors qu’elle retrouve sa fille, Horacia apprend que son mari est mort et que son fils a disparu. Elle comprend rapidement que son ancien amant, le riche Rodrigo Trinidad, fait partie de ceux qui ont conspiré pour la faire arrêter. Trinidad vit désormais reclus chez lui, dans la terreur d’être victime d’un enlèvement. Horacia commence alors à fomenter un plan pour se venger…

Lire la critique de Pierre Murat et voir la bande-annonce officielle sur : http://www.telerama.fr/cinema/films/la-femme-qui-est-partie,512185.php

Khmer Battleground by Aizzat Nordin

aizzat-nordin-khmer-battleground-007

Khmer Battleground by Aizzat Nordin, 17/01/2017, Invisible Photographer Asia

Aizzat Nordin was a Malaysian recipient of the Angkor Photo Travel Grants. Khmer Battleground was made during the 2016 Angkor Photo Workshop in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

Pradal Serey or Kun Khmer is a form of ancient martial arts practiced by the Kingdom of Angkor army since the 9th century to wage war against their main enemy, the Vietnam-based kingdom of Champa, and later Siam, resulting in the domination of what is now known as Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, and Laos. In an effort to erase this art, many Kun Khmer lok kru (Masters) were targeted by the vicious Khmer Rouge Regime and executed in the 70’s, leaving Cambodian struggling with poverty and socioeconomic growth after the regime era. Today, Kun Khmer fighters fight hard with pride and dignity in the arena or at the pagoda in the rural areas for extra money, hoping that it’s enough to feed their loved ones.

Interview avec Aizzat Nordin et portfolio sur : http://invisiblephotographer.asia/2017/01/17/khmerbattleground-aizzatnordin/

Site d’Aizzat Nordin : http://cargocollective.com/aizzatnordin