Archives de catégorie : Ouvrages

Islam and the Limits of the State

R. Michael Feener, David Kloos and Annemarie Samuels (eds), Islam and the Limits of the State : Reconfigurations of Practice, Community and Authority in Contemporary Aceh, Brill, 2015

This book examines the relationship between the state  implementation of Shariʿa and diverse lived realities of everyday Islam in contemporary Aceh, Indonesia. With chapters covering topics ranging from NGOs and diaspora politics to female ulama and punk rockers, the volume opens new perspectives on the complexity of Muslim discourse and practice in a society that has experienced tremendous changes since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. These detailed accounts of and critical reflections on how different groups in Acehnese society negotiate their experiences and understandings of Islam highlight the complexity of the ways in which the state is both a formative and a limited force with regard to religious and social transformation.

A télécharger sur : http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/9789004304864

 

Chinese Ways of Being Muslim

Yew Wai Heng, Chinese Ways of Being Muslim : Negotiating Ethnicity and Religiosity in Indonesia, NIAS Press, 2017

Many recent works on Muslim societies have pointed to the development of ‘de-culturalization’ and ‘purification’ of Islamic practices. Instead, by exploring architectural designs, preaching activities, cultural celebrations, social participations and everyday practices, this book describes and analyses the formation and contestation of Chinese Muslim cultural identities in today’s Indonesia. Chinese Muslim leaders strategically promote their unique identities by rearticulating their histories and cultivating ties with Muslims in China. Yet, their intentional mixing of Chineseness and Islam does not reflect all aspects of the multilayered and multifaceted identities of ordinary Chinese Muslims – there is not a single ‘Chinese way of being Muslim’ in Indonesia. Moreover, the assertion of Chinese identity and Islamic religiosity does not necessarily imply racial segregation and religious exclusion, but can act against them.
The study thus helps us to understand better the cultural politics of Muslim and Chinese identities in Indonesia, and gives insights into the possibilities and limitations of ethnic and religious cosmopolitanism in contemporary societies.

Voir : http://www.niaspress.dk/books/chinese-ways-being-muslim

 

In Plain Sight : Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand

Tyrell Haberkorn, In Plain Sight : Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand, University of Wisconsin Press, 2018

Following a 1932 coup d’état in Thailand that ended absolute monarchy and established a constitution, the Thai state that emerged has suppressed political dissent through detention, torture, forced reeducation, disappearances, assassinations, and massacres. In Plain Sight shows how these abuses, both hidden and occurring in public view, have become institutionalized through a chronic failure to hold perpetrators accountable. Tyrell Haberkorn’s deeply researched revisionist history of modern Thailand highlights the legal, political, and social mechanisms that have produced such impunity and documents continual and courageous challenges to state domination.

Tyrell Haberkorn is an associate professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She is the author of Revolution Interrupted: Farmers, Students, Law, and Violence in Northern Thailand.

Voir : https://uwpress.wisc.edu/books/5453.htm

Of Beggars and Buddhas

Katherine A. Bowie, Of Beggars and Buddhas : The Politics of Humor in the Vessantara Jataka in Thailand, University of Wisconsin Press, 2017

An exploration of the subversive politics of humor in the most important story in Theravada Buddhism

The 547 Buddhist jatakas, or verse parables, recount the Buddha’s lives in previous incarnations. In his penultimate and most famous incarnation, he appears as the Prince Vessantara, perfecting the virtue of generosity by giving away all his possessions, his wife, and his children to the beggar Jujaka. Taking an anthropological approach to this two-thousand-year-old morality tale, Katherine A. Bowie highlights significant local variations in its interpretations and public performances across three regions of Thailand over 150 years.

The Vessantara Jataka has served both monastic and royal interests, encouraging parents to give their sons to religious orders and intimating that kings are future Buddhas. But, as Bowie shows, characterizations of the beggar Jujaka in various regions and eras have also brought ribald humor and sly antiroyalist themes to the story. Historically, these subversive performances appealed to popular audiences even as they worried the conservative Bangkok court. The monarchy sporadically sought to suppress the comedic recitations. As Thailand has changed from a feudal to a capitalist society, this famous story about giving away possessions is paradoxically being employed to promote tourism and wealth.

Katherine A. Bowie is a professor of anthropology and the director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She is the author of Rituals of National Loyalty: An Anthropology of the State and the Village Scout Movement in Thailand.

Voir : https://uwpress.wisc.edu/books/5446.htm

The Killing Season : A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66

Geoffrey Robinson, A Killing Season : A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66, Princeton University Press, 2018

The Killing Season explores one of the largest and swiftest, yet least examined, instances of mass killing and incarceration in the twentieth century—the shocking antileftist purge that gripped Indonesia in 1965–66, leaving some five hundred thousand people dead and more than a million others in detention.

An expert in modern Indonesian history, genocide, and human rights, Geoffrey Robinson sets out to account for this violence and to end the troubling silence surrounding it. In doing so, he sheds new light on broad and enduring historical questions. How do we account for instances of systematic mass killing and detention? Why are some of these crimes remembered and punished, while others are forgotten? What are the social and political ramifications of such acts and such silence?

Challenging conventional narratives of the mass violence of 1965–66 as arising spontaneously from religious and social conflicts, Robinson argues convincingly that it was instead the product of a deliberate campaign, led by the Indonesian Army. He also details the critical role played by the United States, Britain, and other major powers in facilitating mass murder and incarceration. Robinson concludes by probing the disturbing long-term consequences of the violence for millions of survivors and Indonesian society as a whole.

Based on a rich body of primary and secondary sources, The Killing Season is the definitive account of a pivotal period in Indonesian history. It also makes a powerful contribution to wider debates about the dynamics and legacies of mass killing, incarceration, and genocide.

Geoffrey B. Robinson is professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles. His books include The Dark Side of Paradise: Political Violence in Bali and “If You Leave Us Here, We Will Die”: How Genocide Was Stopped in East Timor (Princeton).

Voir : https://press.princeton.edu/titles/11135.html

A Duterte reader

Nicole Curato (ed.), A Duterte Reader : Critical Essays on Rodrigo Duterte’s Early Presidency, SEAP Publications, 2017

A critical analysis of one of the most media-savvy authoritarian rulers of our time, this collection of essays offers an overview of Duterte’s rise to power and actions of his early presidency.  With contributions from leading experts on the society and history of the Phillipines, The Duterte Reader is necessary reading for anyone needing to contextualize and understand the history and social forces that have shaped contemporary Philippine politics.

Voir : http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140109186070

Dreams of Prosperity

Silvia Vignato (ed.), Dreams of Prosperity: Inequality and Integration in Southeast Asia, EFEO, Silkworm Books, 2017

Dreams of Prosperity offers a critical composite reflection on Southeast Asia as a progressively integrated and globalized space of production, exchange, and circulation within and beyond national boundaries. Through a broad array of contexts united by the theme of integration, the essays describe the successful or unsuccessful entry of specific individuals or groups into wider markets and networks in their quest for prosperity—in Thailand, by Lua peasant farmers, slum families, the last century’s teak laborers, and ethnic tour hosts; in Indonesia, by the urban poor and communities resisting environmental destruction; and in Vietnam, by human trafficking returnees. The authors examine how these groups are socially and symbolically defined and redefined in the process of integration, and consider the imaginaries of future that enable both active participation and unmitigated manipulation. Two key topics are the cognitive struggle that peasants and laborers face with their material environment and the process of sense-making that characterizes many destitute people in urban contexts.

Contributors are Matteo Carlo Alcano, Amnuayvit Thitibordin, Monika Arnez, Giuseppe Bolotta, Olivier Evrard, Karnrawee Sratongno, Runa Lazzarino, Manoj Potapohn, Amalia Rossi, Sakkarin Na Nan, and Silvia Vignato.

Contents 

  1. Green Aspirations and the Dynamics of Integration in Two East Kalimantan Cities— Monika Arnez 
  2. Neoliberalism and the Integration of Labor and Natural Resources: Contract Farming and Biodiversity Conservation in Northern Thailand—Amalia Rossi and Sakkarin Na Nan 
  3. Integration and Marginality in the Tourist Economy: The Geopolitics of Trekking in Chiang Mai Province—Olivier Evrard, Manoj Potapohn, and Karnrawee Stratongno 
  4. Migration and the Ethnic Division of Labor in Siam’s Teak Business, 1880s–1910s— Amnuayvit Thitibordin 
  5. After the Shelter: The Nuances of Reintegrating Human Trafficking Returnees in Northern Vietnam—Runa Lazzarino 
  6. Playing the NGO System: How Mothers and Children Design Political Change in the Slums of Bangkok—Giuseppe Bolotta 
  7. Making Sense of Poverty in Aceh and Surabaya—Silvia Vignato and Matteo Carlo Alcano 

Bagan and the World: Early Myanmar and Its Global Connections

Goh Geok Yian, John N. Miksic, Michael Aung-Thwin (eds), Bagan and the World: Early Myanmar and Its Global Connections, ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute, 2017

The archaeological site of Bagan and the kingdom which bore its name contains one of the greatest concentrations of ancient architecture and art in Asia. Much of what is visible today consists of ruins of Buddhist monasteries. While these monuments are a major tourist attraction, recent advances in archaeology and textual history have added considerable new understanding of this kingdom, which flourished between the 11th and 14th centuries. Bagan was not an isolated monastic site; its inhabitants participated actively in networks of Buddhist religious activity and commerce, abetted by the sites location near the junction where South Asia, China and Southeast Asia meet.

This volume presents the result of recent research by scholars from around the world, including indigenous Myanmar people, whose work deserves to be known among the international community. The perspective on Myanmar’s role as an integral part of the intellectual, artistic and economic framework found in this volume yields a glimpse of new themes which future studies of Asian history will no doubt explore.

Voir la table des matières sur : https://bookshop.iseas.edu.sg/publication/2278

Becoming Better Muslims

David Kloos, Becoming Better Muslims : Religious Authority and Ethical Improvement in Aceh, Indonesia, Princeton University Press, 2017

How do ordinary Muslims deal with and influence the increasingly pervasive Islamic norms set by institutions of the state and religion? Becoming Better Muslims offers an innovative account of the dynamic interactions between individual Muslims, religious authorities, and the state in Aceh, Indonesia. Relying on extensive historical and ethnographic research, David Kloos offers a detailed analysis of religious life in Aceh and an investigation into today’s personal processes of ethical formation.

Aceh is known for its history of rebellion and its recent implementation of Islamic law. Debunking the stereotypical image of the Acehnese as inherently pious or fanatical, Kloos shows how Acehnese Muslims reflect consciously on their faith and often frame their religious lives in terms of gradual ethical improvement. Revealing that most Muslims view their lives through the prism of uncertainty, doubt, and imperfection, he argues that these senses of failure contribute strongly to how individuals try to become better Muslims. He also demonstrates that while religious authorities have encroached on believers and local communities, constraining them in their beliefs and practices, the same process has enabled ordinary Muslims to reflect on moral choices and dilemmas, and to shape the ways religious norms are enforced.

Arguing that Islamic norms are carried out through daily negotiations and contestations rather than blind conformity, Becoming Better Muslims examines how ordinary people develop and exercise their religious agency.

Plus d’informations sur : https://press.princeton.edu/titles/11204.html

 

Religion and the morality of the market

Daromir Rudnyckyj, Filippo Osella (eds), Religion and the morality of the market, Cambridge University Press, 2017

Since the collapse of the Berlin Wall, there has been a widespread affirmation of economic ideologies that conceive the market as an autonomous sphere of human practice, holding that market principles should be applied to human action at large. In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, the ascendance of market reason has been countered by calls for reforms of financial markets and for the consideration of moral values in economic practice. This book intervenes in these debates by showing how neoliberal market practices engender new forms of religiosity, and how religiosity shapes economic actions. It reveals how religious movements and organizations have reacted to the increasing prominence of market reason in unpredictable, and sometimes counterintuitive, ways. Using a range of examples from different countries and religious traditions, the book illustrates the myriad ways in which religious and market moralities are closely imbricated in diverse global contexts.

A signaler :

  • Assembling Islam and Liberalism: Market Freedom and the Moral Project of Islamic Finance by Daromir Rudnyckyj
  • Marketizing Piety through Charitable Work: Islamic Charities and the Islamization of Middle- Class Families in Indonesia by Hilman Latief

Table des matières sur : https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/religion-and-the-morality-of-the-market/AEA3F2A0EECD7D3A65F5063D9AFE1470#fndtn-contents

 

 

Popular music in Southeast Asia

Bart Barendregt, Peter Keppy  and Henk Schulte Nordholt, Popular Music in Southeast Asia : Banal Beats, Muted Histories, Amsterdam University Press, 2017  Open Access

From the 1920s on, popular music in Southeast Asia was a mass-audience phenomenon that drew new connections between indigenous musical styles and contemporary genres from elsewhere to create new, hybrid forms. This book presents a cultural history of modern Southeast Asia from the vantage point of popular music, considering not just singers and musicians but their fans as well, showing how the music was intrinsically bound up with modern life and the societal changes that came with it. Reaching new audiences across national borders, popular music of the period helped push social change, and at times served as a medium for expressions of social or political discontent.

Table of contents and Introduction : http://en.aup.nl/download/9789048534555%20ToC%20+%20Intro.pdf

A lire sur : http://oapen.org/search?identifier=637515;keyword=9789462984035

 

« Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash » by Eka Kurniawan

Eka Kurniawan, Vengeance is mine, all others pay cash by Tim Hannigan, 14/09/2017, Asian Review of Books

Eka Kurniawan is the Quentin Tarantino of Indonesian literature: a brash wunderkind, delivering gleeful references to pulp fiction, lashings of stylized violence, and an array of characters and scenarios that far surpass the tropes and clichés which inspire them. But as with Quentin Tarantino, one might occasionally wonder just how much substance lies beneath the indisputably stylish surface.

Vengeance is Mine, All Others Pay Cash (a peculiar rendering of the Indonesian title, Seperti Dendam, Rindu Harus Dibayar Tuntas, which might be better translated as “like revenge, longing must be paid in full”) is Kurniawan’s third novel to be translated into English. It follows his acclaimed debut, the surreal historical epic, Beauty is a Wound, and the short, sharp Man Tiger. As with the previous books there is plenty of sex, brutality and outrageous humor. But this time around there is no direct engagement with Indonesian history and few overtly supernatural elements. What we have instead is the violently quixotic odyssey of a man who can’t get an erection.

The book begins with the protagonist—street thug and sometime assassin Ajo Kawir—sitting on the edge of his bed, staring forlornly at his flaccid penis, “nestling like a newly hatched baby bird—curled into itself, looking hungry and cold”. And the opening dialogue is the first of Ajo Kawir’s many one-sided conversations with his unresponsive member:

He whispered to it, get up, Bird. Get up, you Wretch. You can’t just sleep forever. You have to get up. But that damn little bird didn’t want to get up.

Lire la suite sur : http://asianreviewofbooks.com/content/vengeance-is-mine-all-others-pay-cash-by-eka-kurniawan/

A télécharger : Architects of Buddhist Leisure

A télécharger : Justin Thomas McDaniel, Architects of Buddhist Leisure : Socially Disengaged Buddhism in Asia’s Museums, Monuments, and Amusement Parks, University of Hawaii Press, 2016

Buddhism, often described as an austere religion that condemns desire, promotes denial, and idealizes the contemplative life, actually has a thriving leisure culture in Asia. Creative religious improvisations designed by Buddhists have been produced both within and outside of monasteries across the region—in Nepal, Japan, Korea, Macau, Hong Kong, Singapore, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Justin McDaniel looks at the growth of Asia’s culture of Buddhist leisure—what he calls “socially disengaged Buddhism”—through a study of architects responsible for monuments, museums, amusement parks, and other sites. In conversation with noted theorists of material and visual culture and anthropologists of art, McDaniel argues that such sites highlight the importance of public, leisure, and spectacle culture from a Buddhist perspective and illustrate how “secular” and “religious,” “public” and “private,” are in many ways false binaries. Moreover, places like Lek Wiriyaphan’s Sanctuary of Truth in Thailand, Suối Tiên Amusement Park in Saigon, and Shi Fa Zhao’s multilevel museum/ritual space/tea house in Singapore reflect a growing Buddhist ecumenism built through repetitive affective encounters instead of didactic sermons and sectarian developments. They present different Buddhist traditions, images, and aesthetic expressions as united but not uniform, collected but not concise: together they form a gathering, not a movement.

Despite the ingenuity of lay and ordained visionaries like Wiriyaphan and Zhao and their colleagues Kenzo Tange, Chan-soo Park, Tadao Ando, and others discussed in this book, creators of Buddhist leisure sites often face problems along the way. Parks and museums are complex adaptive systems that are changed and influenced by budgets, available materials, local and global economic conditions, and visitors. Architects must often compromise and settle at local optima, and no matter what they intend, their buildings will develop lives of their own. Provocative and theoretically innovative, Architects of Buddhist Leisure asks readers to question the very category of “religious” architecture. It challenges current methodological approaches in religious studies and speaks to a broad audience interested in modern art, architecture, religion, anthropology, and material culture.

A télécharger sur : http://oapen.org/search?identifier=626388

Hearing Allah’s call : preaching and performance in Indonesian islam

Parution : Julian Millie, Hearing Allah’s call : preaching and performance in Indonesian Islam, Cornell University Press, 2017

Hearing Allah’s Call changes the way we think about Islamic communication. In the city of Bandung in Indonesia, sermons are not reserved for mosques and sites for Friday prayers. Muslim speakers are in demand for all kinds of events, from rites of passage to motivational speeches for companies and other organizations. Julian Millie spent fourteen months sitting among listeners at such events, and he provides detailed contextual description of the everyday realities of Muslim listening as well as preaching. In describing the venues, the audience, and preachers—many of whom are women—he reveals tensions between entertainment and traditional expressions of faith and moral rectitude.

The sermonizers use in-jokes, double entendres, and mimicry in their expositions, playing on their audiences’ emotions, triggering reactions from critics who accuse them of neglecting listeners’ intellects. Millie focused specifically on the listening routines that enliven everyday life for Muslims in all social spaces—imagine the hardworking preachers who make Sunday worship enjoyable for rural as well as urban Americans—and who captivate audiences with skills that attract criticism from more formal interpreters of Islam. The ethnography is rich and full of insightful observations and details. Hearing Allah’s Call will appeal to students of the practice of anthropology as well as all those intrigued by contemporary Islam.

Plus d’informations sur :  http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100973660

 

Viet Thanh Nguyen : Le sympathisant

Nouvelle parution : Viet Thanh Nguyen, Le sympathisant, Belfond, 2017

À la fois fresque épique, reconstitution historique et oeuvre politique, un premier roman à l’ampleur exceptionnelle, qui nous mène du Saigon de 1975 en plein chaos au Los Angeles des années 1980. Saisissant de réalisme et souvent profondément drôle, porté par une prose électrique, un véritable chef-d’oeuvre psychologique. La révélation littéraire de l’année.
Je suis un espion, une taupe, un agent secret, un homme au visage double.

Ainsi commence l’hallucinante confession de cet homme qui ne dit jamais son nom. Un homme sans racines, bâtard né en Indochine coloniale d’un père français et d’une mère vietnamienne, élevé à Saigon mais parti faire ses études aux États-Unis. Un capitaine au service d’un général de l’armée du Sud Vietnam, un aide de camp précieux et réputé d’une loyauté à toute épreuve.
Et, en secret, un agent double au service des communistes. Un homme déchiré, en lutte pour ne pas dévoiler sa véritable identité, au prix de décisions aux conséquences dramatiques. Un homme en exil dans un petit Vietnam reconstitué sous le soleil de L.A., qui transmet des informations brûlantes dans des lettres codées à ses camarades restés au pays. Un homme seul, que même l’amour d’une femme ne saurait détourner de son idéal politique…

SYMPATHISANT n. m. : personne qui approuve les idées et les actions d’un parti sans y adhérer.

Voir : http://www.belfond.fr/livre/litterature-contemporaine/le-sympathisant-viet-thanh-nguyen