Archives de catégorie : Ressources

FOUND Cambodia : an archive of everyday Cambodian photography

1992, Kratie Province, Girl with an umbrella

‘FOUND Cambodia’ is a project that traces some of the sociocultural changes Cambodia has witnessed since 1979. It is a constantly growing archive of everyday Cambodian photography, brought to light from individuals’ and families’ drawers, albums, and closets. The images provide a vernacular lens to how individuals in post-Khmer Rouge Cambodia have experienced the social and cultural revival following the regime’s fall. Further, the project also includes photographs taken before the Khmer Rouge came into power. These images serve as poignant testimonies of the effects that macroscopic socio-political changes bear on the individual. A unique glimpse into Cambodians’ day-to-day lives over the past four decades, ‘FOUND Cambodia’ serves as a visual archive for anyone interested in understanding societal changes through the eyes of an individual.

A explorer sur : http://foundcambodia.com/

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive, Sejarah Nusantara, Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia

The paper archives created by the Dutch East India Company (VOC, 1602-1799) and dealing with its commercial operations in Asian waters are preserved in the national archives of Indonesia, the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, South Africa and India. In particular, the archives in Jakarta contain thousands of documents originating from Asian persons, including many local rulers from around the Indonesian archipelago. The most voluminous collections spanning 2,000 metres are in the Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia (ANRI). On 9 March 2004, the archives of the VOC were included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.

The 2.000 metres of archives in ANRI can be roughly divided into two sections:
1) The archives created in and formerly kept at Batavia Castle, the former headquarters of the VOC in Asia. This is the archive of the Supreme Government (the Governor-General and the ordinary Councillors of Dutch Asia).
2) The archives of local private and public institutions in Batavia.

For this digitalization and public access project, a selection had to be made. The Daily Journals of Batavia Castle which can be found in the archives of the Supreme Government were digitalized and published first. This series reflects the principle concerns of the Supreme Government.  Prominent here were internal Company affairs in matters as diverse as the general management of trade, personnel and financial affairs, shipping and logistics. The Supreme Government also dealt with all political and diplomatic affairs, the administration of justice and correspondence with other VOC factories in Asia as well as the VOC Chambers and their Governing Board, theso-called Gentlemen Seventeen (Heren XVII) or Directors of the VOC  in the Dutch Republic. The Daily Journals were created to maintain an ongoing overview of such activities.

During the course of the eighteenth century, the Resolution Books of the Supreme Government became more and more important and voluminous while the registration of correspondence in the Daily Journals gradually declined. In particular, the handling of all matters to do with the regional establishments of the Company were included in the General Resolution Books. In 1743, such matters were recorded in a separate yearbook, giving birth to a separate series: the General (Foreign) Affairs Books (Net-Generale Besogneboeken).

Another, hitherto unresearched and historically unique series are the Appendices to the General Resolution Books. These total together some 742 volumes numbering some 550,000 folio pages. This series contain a variety of documents which may gradually become accessible via a special database. The first document descriptions for this database were started in 2013 by ANRI’s Content Team (see organisation).

Liste des archives consultables moyennant une inscription sur le site:

  • General Resolutions of Batavia Castle 1613-1810
  • Realia 1610-1808
  • Appendices to General Resolutions 1686-1811
  • The Placards of Batavia Castle 1602-1808
  • Daily Journals of Batavia Castle 1624-1806
  • Marginalia to the Daily Journals 1659-1807
  • Diplomatic Letters 1625-1812
  • Corpus Diplomaticum 1595-1799

Plus d’informations sur : https://sejarah-nusantara.anri.go.id/archive/

 

Podcast : Islamist politics and political survival in Malaysia

Podcast Malaysian’dreamings: Islamist politics and political survival in Malaysia with Clive Kessler and Norani Othman, Sidney Southeast Asia Center

The rise of using Islam for political survival in Malaysia as its ruling party and leadership are mired in a multi-billion dollar global corruption scandal. And how the long-term agenda of the Islamist Pas party crashes into the secular founding of Malaysia, and the threats to the Federal Constitution and the future of the nation. Speakers, in order, are: Professor Clive Kessler, emeritus UNSW; and Professor Norani Othman, emeritus UKM and co-founder Sisters in Islam. Introduced by Dr Lis Kramer, moderated by Kean Wong. Hosted by Sydney University’s SouthEast Asia Research Centre, and globalbersih.org.

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/matrokr/islamist-politics-political-survival-in-malaysia-w-profs-clive-kessler-norani-othman

Vous trouverez sur la même page d’autres podcasts de la collection Malaysian’dreamings à laquelle vous pouvez vous abonner sur SoundCloud.

 

 

Indonesia Update 2017 : GLOBALISATION, NATIONALISM AND SOVEREIGNTY

ANU Indonesia Project Blog : Indonesia Update 2017 : Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty, 15-16/09/2017, The Australian National University

Today, globalisation is more complex than ever. The effects of the global financial crisis and increased inequality have, in many countries, spurred anti-global sentiment and encouraged the adoption of populist and inward-looking policies. Discontent has manifested in some surprising results: Brexit, Trump, and possibly more to come. In Indonesia, it has led to rising protectionism, a rejection of foreign interference in the name of nationalism, and economic policies dominated by calls for self-sufficiency. Meanwhile, human trafficking and the abuse of migrant workers have shown the other side of globalisation.

Againts this background the ANU Indonesia Project held its 35th Indonesia Update conference on 15 and 16 September in Canberra. As usual, the coference kicked off with the updates on politic and economic development. Then centered on the theme “Indonesia in the New World: Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty”, fourteen papers were presented to the audience of more than 500 during the one-and-half-day event. The topics included the historical dynamics of Indonesia’s engagement with the global world, its stance in the South China Sea, and the emergence of new nationalism. Speakers also examined nationalism in practice (for example, food sovereignty and resource nationalism) and the impact of and response to globalisation, as well as poverty, inequality, and gender issues.

Following the Canberra conference, we held two “Mini Indonesia Updates” on 18 September, in Sydney (in collaboration with the Lowy Institute) and in Adelaide (in collaboration with the University of Adelaide’s Institute for International Trade).

The papers presented in the conference will be published in the Indonesia Update book series and will be launched next year, in collaboration with the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS)/ Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore.

Vous trouverez sur cette page les vidéos des conférences suivantes :

Political Update : Indonesia’s year of democratic setback: toward a new era of deepening illiberalism? by Vedi Hadiz (University of Melbourne)

Economic Update : Effectivity of policy reform in democracy and regional autonomy regime by Raden Pardede (CReco Consulting)

Globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty: the Indonesian experience by Anthony Reid (ANU), Edward Aspinall (ANU), Shafiah Muhibat (Nanyang Technological University) with an Overview by Mari Pangestu (Universitas Indonesia)

Nationalism in practice by Jeffrey Neilson (The University of Sydney), Eve Warburton (ANU), Yose Rizal Damuri (Centre for Strategic and International Studies)

Poverty, inequality and gender issues by Arief Anshory Yusuf (Padjadjaran University), Peter Warr (ANU), Janneke Pieters (Wageningen University), Robert Sparrow (Wageningen University)

The human face of globalisation by Anis Hidayah (Migrant CARE), Dominggus Elcid Li (Institute of Resource Governance and Social Change)

Response to globalisation by Manggi Habir (Bank Danamon Indonesia), Titik Anas (Presisi Indonesia)

Concluding remarks: navigating the new globalisation by Hal Hill (ANU), Deasy Pane (ANU), Danny Quah (National University of Singapore)

A voir sur : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/blogs/indonesiaproject/?page_id=8559

Muslim NGOs and civil society in Indonesia

Podcast: Muslim NGOs and civil society in Indonesia
Religion and NGOs

Produced by R. Michael Feener

While the service provision activities of some religious NGOs complement and enhance systems of low state capacity, in others they compete with state services and in still others service delivery by religious NGOs is associated with political parties and forms part of their electoral strategies. Across diverse engagements, then, religious NGOs depend on their ability to elude, enrol, and subvert the state institutions – while states themselves adjust to the impact of these new actors in turn. In this interview with Robert Hefner about his research on Muslim NGOs in the Javanese city of Yogyakarta, and what his findings can show us about Islam and civil society in contemporary Southeast Asia.

Since the turn of the twenty-first century, there has been a remarkable surge of interest among both academics and policy makers in the effects that religion has on international aid and development. Within this broad field, the work of ‘religious NGOs’ or ‘Faith-Based Organisations’ (FBOs) has garnered considerable attention. This series of podcasts for The Religious Studies Project seeks to explore how the discourses, practices, and institutional forms of both religious actors and purportedly secular NGOs intersect, and how these engagements result in changes in our understanding of both ‘religion’ and ‘development’. These interviews with leading scholars working on the topic across diverse contexts in Asia (and beyond) have been conducted by Dr. Catherine Scheer & Dr. Giuseppe Bolotta of the National University of Singapore’s Asia Research Institute. Our work on this has been generously supported by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

Podcast et transcription de l’interview de Robert W. Hefner sur : http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/podcast/muslim-ngos-and-civil-society-in-indonesia/?

EYE OF THE ARCHITECT: THE MADE WIJAYA PHOTOGRAPHIC ARCHIVE

Soft-launch of ISEAS Library database: Eye of the architect: the Made Wijaya photographic archive, 11/10/2017, ISEAS

Regional social and cultural studies programme seminar

Wednesday, 11 October 2017 – This seminar, in part a soft-launch of ISEAS Library database on Made Wijaya’s (alias Michael White) photographic archive, welcomed its four speakers: Dr Hélène Njoto, Visiting Fellow at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute; Mr Soedarmaji Damais, founder and head of Indonesian Arts Cooperation Body (BKKI); Mr Richard Hassell, co-founder of WOHA, and lastly, Professor Adrian Vickers from the University of Sydney who is concurrently a Visiting Fellow at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute. They were greeted by a diverse audience that comprised of students, landscape architects from public and private agencies, researchers, as well as previous clients and friends of Made Wijaya. Hosting an insightful conversation with participants, the seminar addressed the importance of preserving and engaging with such archives for the study of landscape design and architecture history in Southeast Asia.

Dr Hélène Njoto’s prelude to the seminar was a survey of Made Wijaya’s photographic collection as it is now archived at ISEAS Library. She walked us through the online database of over 40,000 items, highlighting one of Wijaya’s gardens trademarks: the layering of vernacular architectural history. She demonstrated this by showing an “architectural history enigma” Wijaya liked to feature in his work, the Javanese and Balinese single-post and platform tree structures. She effectively showed how this collection not only documents Wijaya’s achievements but assembles an important number of photographs from fieldtrips throughout the world. Wijaya was concerned about sharing his sources of inspiration with future landscape designers, architects, and architecture history students, as his popular books have shown.

As a close and long-time acquaintance of Made Wijaya, Mr Soedarmaji Damais brought a personal note to the seminar as he shared stories about Wijaya’s first arrival in Bali, his assimilation as a Balinese and passion for the island and the way his garden designs were based on the search for connections with Chinese and other gardens.

Mr Richard Hassell then introduced Made Wijaya from a practitioner’s perspective, sharing Wijaya’s architectural and landscape architecture legacies through projects, and his role as a role model and mentor. Mr Hassell saw the archive as a way to engage with Wijaya’s attitudes to landscape history, the basis of his creation and design of gardens; a knowledge imperative for current practitioners.

The final speaker, Professor Adrian Vickers, another close acquaintance of Made Wijaya, affirmed Wijaya’s remarkable visual sensibility. Using photographs from the archive, Professor Vickers illustrated how Wijaya’s eye and curiosity for details in both modern adaptations and pre-modern spaces nurtured his unique visual repertoire and syntax. Professor Vickers closed the session with a tribute to Wijaya’s personal wish to preserve aspects of otherwise lost cultures, emphasising the need to capture and document these vulnerable and impermanent landscapes.

The Made Wijaya database at ISEAS Library is now publicly accessible online at ISEAS Library’s SeaLionPLUS. Upon registering, the archive can be explored by geographic regions or keywords. Made Wijaya’s video collections on ethnography (Balinese dance and rituals) can also be found at the University of Sydney.

Voir : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/medias/event-highlights/item/6360-soft-launch-of-iseas-library-database-eye-of-the-architect-the-made-wijaya-photographic-archive

 

 

U.S. Embassy Tracked Indonesia Mass Murder 1965

General Suharto in the days after the September 30th Movement

Newly Declassified U.S. Embassy Jakarta Files Detail Army Killings, U.S. support for Quashing Leftist Labor Movemen, Briefing Book # 607, edited by Brad Simpson, National Security Archive, The George Washington University

Washington, D.C., October 17, 2017 – The U.S. government had detailed knowledge that the Indonesian Army was conducting a campaign of mass murder against the country’s Communist Party (PKI) starting in 1965, according to newly declassified documents posted today by the National Security Archive at The George Washington University.  The new materials further show that diplomats in the Jakarta Embassy kept a record of which PKI leaders were being executed, and that U.S. officials actively supported Indonesian Army efforts to destroy the country’s left-leaning labor movement.

The 39 documents made available today come from a collection of nearly 30,000 pages of files constituting much of the daily record of the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, from 1964-1968. The collection, much of it formerly classified, was processed by the National Declassification Center in response to growing public interest in the remaining U.S. documents concerning the mass killings of 1965-1966.  American and Indonesian human rights and freedom of information activists, filmmakers, as well as a group of U.S. Senators led by Tom Udall (D-NM), had called for the materials to be made public.

The documents concern one of the most important and turbulent chapters in Indonesian history and U.S.-Indonesian relations, which witnessed the gradual collapse of ties between Jakarta and Washington, a low-level war with Britain over the formation of Malaysia, rising tension between the Indonesian Army and the Indonesian Communist Party, the growing radicalization of Indonesian President Sukarno, and the expansion of U.S. covert operations aimed at provoking a clash between the Army and PKI. These tensions erupted in the aftermath of an attempted purge of the Army by the September 30th Movement – a group of military officers with the collaboration of a handful of PKI leaders.  After crushing the Movement, which had kidnapped and killed six high-ranking Army generals, the Indonesian Army and its paramilitary allies launched a campaign of annihilation against the PKI and its affiliated organizations, killing up to 500,000 alleged PKI supporters between October 1965 and March 1966, imprisoning up to a million more, and eventually ousting Sukarno and replacing him with General Suharto, who ruled Indonesia for the next 32 years before he himself was overthrown in May 1998.

In an unprecedented collaboration, the National Security Archive worked with the National Declassification Center (NDC) to make the entirety of this collection available to the public by scanning and digitizing the collection, which will be incorporated into the National Archives and Records Administration’s (NARA) digital finding aids. When completed, scholars, journalists, and researchers will be able to search the documents by date, keyword, or name, providing unparalleled access, in particular for the Indonesian public, to a unique collection of records concerning one of the most important periods of Indonesian history.

Of the 30,000 pages processed by the NDC, several hundred documents remain classified and are undergoing further review before their scheduled release in early 2018. While some of the documents in this collection were declassified and deposited at NARA or the Lyndon Johnson Presidential Library in the late 1990s, many thousands of pages are being made available for the first time in more than 50 years.

Le texte des documents déclassifiés et leurs fac-similés sont sur la page ainsi que des liens, des ouvrages et une liste d’articles de presse : http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/briefing-book/indonesia/2017-10-15/indonesia-mass-murder-1965-us-embassy-files

Archiving the ignored 6 October Massacre

Archiving the ignored 6 October Massacre by Kornkritch Somjittranukit, 06/10/2017, Prachatai (English)

Entretien avec Puangthong Pawakapan

To break the taboo in Thai society surrounding the 1976 Massacre, a group of scholars have founded an online archive of the incident in the hope that Thai society will be able to learn from its bloody past.

In the early morning of 6 October 1976, Thai right-wing groups staged a massacre of students at Thammasat University. More than a hundred student activists were killed by military and paramilitary forces and right-wing mobs and over 3,000 were arrested allegedly for being communists and threatening Thailand’s monarchy.

Even though the incident occurred over 40 years ago, knowledge of the event is very limited, partly because it is a sensitive issue and the “Octobrists” (people who joined the student movements around 14 October 1971 and 6 October 1976) who survived the massacre have rarely talked about it in detail.

The incident shows that Thai society can be extremely brutal against those who think differently from the establishment. The fear of talking about the massacre is, therefore, strongly rooted in Thai society, preventing serious discussion and investigation of the incident.

But some have bitten the bullet. On 24 September 2017, the “Documentation of 6 Oct” project launched its website www.doct6.com at Chulalongkorn University’s Faculty of Political Science. The website is an online archive of material and information related to the massacre which has been largely ignored by Thai society.

The contents of the archive include documentary films, witness testimonies, photographs and interviews with massacre survivors and the families of those who were killed.

To commemorate the massacre, Prachatai interviewed Puangthong Pawakapan, the project coordinator. She hopes that this website will help Thai people to see a clearer picture of what actually happened on 6 October 1976.

Talking Indonesia : Higher education

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: higher education by Andrew Rosser, 14/09/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

Indonesia’s tertiary education institutions have long performed poorly in global university rankings. Among the various deficits that are routinely recorded are low teaching and research quality, inadequate levels of knowledge transfer and a lack of an international outlook. The Indonesian government has repeatedly expressed concern about the dismal results in the rankings, but despite a number of initiatives to transform the country’s leading universities into world class institutions, the higher education sector remains riddled with problems. Why do Indonesian universities struggle to deliver better academic programs? What reforms have been attempted and why have they failed? Who are the actors and organisations involved in the politics of higher education in Indonesia?

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these issues with Andrew Rosser, Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute.

Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

A écouter : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-higher-education/

 

La Galigo manuscript – UNESCO heritage – digitally available

La Galigo manuscript – UNESCO heritage – digitally available, 27/07/2017, Leiden University

The La Galigo manuscript at Leiden University Libraries (UBL) has been digitized. The manuscript, which was inscribed in 2011 on UNESCO’s ‘Memory of the World’ Register, is now freely available online and can be used for teaching and research. La Galigo is the world’s longest epic, written in the Buginese language and script. The UBL holds one of the most extensive and valuable La Galigo manuscripts. The digitization of the Leiden La Galigo manuscript was made possible with support from Yayasan La Galigo.

Leiden manuscript
The Leiden manuscript (NBG-Boeg 188) consists of twelve parts and includes the first part of the Buginese epic poem. It tells the story about the origins of mankind according to South Sulawesi tradition. It is the longest fragment of the manuscript in existence. It was transcribed in Makassar, approximately in 1852-1858, by order of Colliq Pujie (Arung Pancana Toa), Queen Mother of Tanete, a small kingdom in South Sulawesi (Indonesia). The manuscript is part of the Makassarese Buginese manuscript collection of the Nederlands Bijbelgenootschap (Dutch Bible Society) and has been on permanent loan since 1905.

World Heritage
The majority of La Galigo manuscripts that have been preserved are located in Indonesia and the Netherlands. Along with one other La Galigo manuscript, which is kept at the La Galigo Museum in Makassar, the Leiden manuscript was inscribed in 2011 on the UNESCO’s ‘Memory of the World’ Register. This entry underlines the global significance and importance of the La Galigo manuscript.

Accessibility
The digitized La Galigo manuscript can be found in Leiden’s digital collections: https://digitalcollections.universiteitleiden.nl/LaGaligo. In addition, transcripts of the Buginese text in Dutch are available, as are relevant documents, maps and images taken from Leiden’s special collections. The digitized text can also be downloaded.

Inspiration
La Galigo is also known as a musical work by the American avant-garde theatre director and artist Robert Wilson. His La Galigo-based performance premiered in Singapore in 2004 and has been performed in many cities worldwide. In the UBL’s online video series World Treasures, Gert Oostindie, director of the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV) and Professor of History at Leiden University, gives more background and discusses the importance of the Leiden manuscript.

Festive meeting in Makassar
On Saturday 19 August, the digital La Galigo manuscript was officially made available online at the Hasanuddin University in Makassar. This event was combined with the launch of the reprints of Volume 1 and 2 and the new print of Volume 3.  The seminar was attended by more than 250 interested participants and representatives of local Indonesian governmental institutions, Hasanuddin University and Leiden University.

Voir : https://www.library.universiteitleiden.nl/news/2017/08/la-galigo-manuscript—unesco-heritage-%E2%80%93-digitally-available

Center for Patani Studies

Center for Patani Studies : Resources for the Study of Patani’s History, Culture, and Society by Francis Bradley

This is an internet center for the study of Patani’s history, culture, and society with a focus on the period prior to its formal inclusion into Siam/Thailand in 1909. Founded in July 2013 by Francis R. Bradley, assistant professor of history in the department of social sciences and cultural studies at the Pratt Institute, the project aims to create a meeting place for people with a scholarly interest in Patani. Current projects include the building of relevant bibliographies and the forging of links between scholars and institutions dedicated to the growth of the field of Patani Studies.

On trouve sur le site des bibliographies : une des sources primaires (manuscrits malais) pour les études sur Patani, une des sources secondaires  (monographies historiques) ainsi qu’une liste des savants musulmans de la région avec quelques données biographiques et leurs oeuvres.

Les chercheurs intéressés sont invités à collaborer au site.

Adresse du site : https://patanistudies.com/

Malay manuscripts from Patani

« Malay manuscripts from Patani » by Annabel Teh Gallop, 04/08/2017, Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library)

Patani is a culturally Malay-Muslim region located on the northeast coast of the Malay peninsula, in the southern part of Thailand. It has long been renowned as a cradle of Malay art and culture, and especially as a centre for Islamic learning, with close links with the Holy Cities of Arabia. Patani has produced many notable Islamic scholars, the most prominent being Daud bin Abdullah al-Patani (1769-1847), who lived and wrote in Mecca in the first half of the 19th century. scholars, and Wan Ahmad al-Patani (1856-1908), the first Superintendent of the Malay press in Mecca. Patani is one of the great centres of the Malay manuscript tradition, and many manuscripts from Patani are now held in the National Library of Malaysia and the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur.

The British Library holds two manuscripts probably from Patani, both of which may have been copied very recently, and which have been fully digitised. One contains a well-known Malay tale, Hikayat Raja Khandak dan Raja Badar (Or.16128), set during the early wars of Islam, in which the eponymous villain, Raja Khandak (known in some versions as Raja Handak or Raja Handik) and his son Raja Badar battle against the forces of the Prophet. It was a very popular story, and is also found in Javanese, Sundanese, Acehnese and Makassar versions.

The second manuscript aquired from the same source, Or. 16129, consists of only 11 folios and contains an unidentified religious work (or fragment of a work) by Imām Aḥmad (the Sunni jurist Aḥmad bin Ḥanbal, 780-855) on the shahādah (profession of faith), set within frames with a commentary written in the margins. The main text has a colophon stating that it was written on 24 Muharam 1[2]60 (14 February 1844) in Mecca. This manuscript is also written in a small neat hand with a ‘modern’ feel, but in this case modern influences are clearly manifest in the use of certain punctuation elements such as brackets and numbered points within the text, indicating a date of production in the 20th century and perhaps even suggesting that the manuscript might have been copied from a printed source.

Lire la suite et accéder aux manuscrits sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2017/08/malay-manuscripts-from-patani.html?

Aural archipelago : field recordings from around Indonesia

Aural archipelago : field recordings from around Indonesia

Aural Archipelago is the lovechild of Palmer Keen, an American DIY ethnomusicologist wandering the vast archipelago of Indonesia to find, document, expose and promote little-known traditional musics around the country. Within a few years, Palmer has travelled from vast islands like Sumatra, Java, and Borneo to small dots in the ocean like Rote and Selayar in search of the diverse and beautiful music that fascinates him. With this project, his hope is to allow unprecedented audiences (local and foreign) free access to music that is often difficult or impossible to hear otherwise.

Palmer can be contacted at auralarchipelago@gmail.com

Enregistrements à écouter sur : http://www.auralarchipelago.com/

 

Book-hunting in the City of Heroes

« Book-hunting in the City of Heroes » by Tom Hoogervorst, 20/07/2017, KITLV blog

Situated in an inconspicuous residential area in the south of Surabaya, one could easily overlook one of Indonesia’s most intriguing libraries and its equally fascinating owner. Tom Hoogervorst looks back on a fruitful week of research spent at Medayu Agung.

“Some of the books are a bit sticky”, says Mr. Oei Hiem Hwie, as he deftly separates the pages of a 1919 book on traditional medicine. “I had to hide my collection above the ceiling of my old house. They burnt many of my possessions. In the end, everything was buried under a 15 cm coat of dust.”

Known to his friends as Pak Wie, the Malang-born septuagenarian and life-long book collector heads a unique library open to Indonesian and international visitors: Medayu Agung. Every day, students, journalists, intellectuals, and cultural activists can be spotted browsing through its books and newspapers. The library contains material in Indonesian, Chinese, Javanese, Dutch, English and German – among others – ranging from colonial to recent times. In addition to this wealth of printed sources, innumerable beautiful black-and-white photos of old Surabaya and other historical paraphernalia make it a living museum. Even an original edition of Mein Kampf signed by Adolf Hitler himself has found its way into the library.

The history of Medayu Agung is closely connected with the history of Indonesia. In 1965, at the peak of his journalistic career, Pak Wie was imprisoned without a trial on the unfounded suspicion of involvement with Indonesia’s communist party. As a result, he was detained for 13 years in some of the country’s most notorious prisons, including the gulag-style internment camps of Nusakembangan and Buru. While incarcerated, he developed a close friendship with fellow convict Pramoedya Ananta Toer, who later became Indonesia’s most famous writer. His ground-breaking “This Earth of Mankind” (Bumi Manusia) was first written down on pieces of paper smuggled in by Pak Wie. They are still kept in the library.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/book-hunting-city-heroes/

Thai Art Archives

Thai Art Archives

Thai Art Archives is an independent, not-for-profit « knowledge platform » for the recovery, study, preservation, and exhibition of Thai modern and contemporary art and ephemera.

Welcome to Thailand’s only heritage-preservation organization that actively identifies, collects, catalogues, preserves, and exhibits the historically valuable ephemera—professional documents, personal papers, photographs, notebooks, sketchbooks and other studio-based items—of Thailand’s renowned modern and contemporary artists, independent/artist-run (« alternative ») art spaces, and related Thai “avant-garde” phenomena.

Unlike primary works of art, such as painting and sculpture, comparatively “ephemeral” materials are frequently lost or destroyed on the passing of a prominent Thai artist, or even during her/his lifetime. Given this potential loss to Thai cultural heritage, the Thai Art Archives’ mission is to proactively identify, recover, study, document, and preserve such materials for the benefit of future generations.

  • Exhibitions (Modern & Contemporary)
  • Educational & Public Events/Programs
  • Curatorial & Museum Studies for University Students
  • Student Internships
  • Knowledge Hub & Research Platform
  • Residencies for Visiting Scholars
  • Oral History Initiative
  • Publications, Special Projects, Cataloguing
  • Cataloguing of Private Collections

The Thai Art Archives aims in all its programs to explore and enrich cultural exchange, to promote global access to transcultural histories, and to encourage regional and international dialogues over the research into, the writing, and the documentation of diverse perspectives on the most progressive currents in modern and contemporary art since the early 20th century to the present.

A explorer sur : http://www.thaiartarchives.mono.net/