Archives de catégorie : Ressources

Talking Indonesia : Higher education

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: higher education by Andrew Rosser, 14/09/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

Indonesia’s tertiary education institutions have long performed poorly in global university rankings. Among the various deficits that are routinely recorded are low teaching and research quality, inadequate levels of knowledge transfer and a lack of an international outlook. The Indonesian government has repeatedly expressed concern about the dismal results in the rankings, but despite a number of initiatives to transform the country’s leading universities into world class institutions, the higher education sector remains riddled with problems. Why do Indonesian universities struggle to deliver better academic programs? What reforms have been attempted and why have they failed? Who are the actors and organisations involved in the politics of higher education in Indonesia?

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dirk Tomsa discusses these issues with Andrew Rosser, Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute.

Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

A écouter : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-higher-education/

 

La Galigo manuscript – UNESCO heritage – digitally available

La Galigo manuscript – UNESCO heritage – digitally available, 27/07/2017, Leiden University

The La Galigo manuscript at Leiden University Libraries (UBL) has been digitized. The manuscript, which was inscribed in 2011 on UNESCO’s ‘Memory of the World’ Register, is now freely available online and can be used for teaching and research. La Galigo is the world’s longest epic, written in the Buginese language and script. The UBL holds one of the most extensive and valuable La Galigo manuscripts. The digitization of the Leiden La Galigo manuscript was made possible with support from Yayasan La Galigo.

Leiden manuscript
The Leiden manuscript (NBG-Boeg 188) consists of twelve parts and includes the first part of the Buginese epic poem. It tells the story about the origins of mankind according to South Sulawesi tradition. It is the longest fragment of the manuscript in existence. It was transcribed in Makassar, approximately in 1852-1858, by order of Colliq Pujie (Arung Pancana Toa), Queen Mother of Tanete, a small kingdom in South Sulawesi (Indonesia). The manuscript is part of the Makassarese Buginese manuscript collection of the Nederlands Bijbelgenootschap (Dutch Bible Society) and has been on permanent loan since 1905.

World Heritage
The majority of La Galigo manuscripts that have been preserved are located in Indonesia and the Netherlands. Along with one other La Galigo manuscript, which is kept at the La Galigo Museum in Makassar, the Leiden manuscript was inscribed in 2011 on the UNESCO’s ‘Memory of the World’ Register. This entry underlines the global significance and importance of the La Galigo manuscript.

Accessibility
The digitized La Galigo manuscript can be found in Leiden’s digital collections: https://digitalcollections.universiteitleiden.nl/LaGaligo. In addition, transcripts of the Buginese text in Dutch are available, as are relevant documents, maps and images taken from Leiden’s special collections. The digitized text can also be downloaded.

Inspiration
La Galigo is also known as a musical work by the American avant-garde theatre director and artist Robert Wilson. His La Galigo-based performance premiered in Singapore in 2004 and has been performed in many cities worldwide. In the UBL’s online video series World Treasures, Gert Oostindie, director of the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV) and Professor of History at Leiden University, gives more background and discusses the importance of the Leiden manuscript.

Festive meeting in Makassar
On Saturday 19 August, the digital La Galigo manuscript was officially made available online at the Hasanuddin University in Makassar. This event was combined with the launch of the reprints of Volume 1 and 2 and the new print of Volume 3.  The seminar was attended by more than 250 interested participants and representatives of local Indonesian governmental institutions, Hasanuddin University and Leiden University.

Voir : https://www.library.universiteitleiden.nl/news/2017/08/la-galigo-manuscript—unesco-heritage-%E2%80%93-digitally-available

Center for Patani Studies

Center for Patani Studies : Resources for the Study of Patani’s History, Culture, and Society by Francis Bradley

This is an internet center for the study of Patani’s history, culture, and society with a focus on the period prior to its formal inclusion into Siam/Thailand in 1909. Founded in July 2013 by Francis R. Bradley, assistant professor of history in the department of social sciences and cultural studies at the Pratt Institute, the project aims to create a meeting place for people with a scholarly interest in Patani. Current projects include the building of relevant bibliographies and the forging of links between scholars and institutions dedicated to the growth of the field of Patani Studies.

On trouve sur le site des bibliographies : une des sources primaires (manuscrits malais) pour les études sur Patani, une des sources secondaires  (monographies historiques) ainsi qu’une liste des savants musulmans de la région avec quelques données biographiques et leurs oeuvres.

Les chercheurs intéressés sont invités à collaborer au site.

Adresse du site : https://patanistudies.com/

Malay manuscripts from Patani

« Malay manuscripts from Patani » by Annabel Teh Gallop, 04/08/2017, Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library)

Patani is a culturally Malay-Muslim region located on the northeast coast of the Malay peninsula, in the southern part of Thailand. It has long been renowned as a cradle of Malay art and culture, and especially as a centre for Islamic learning, with close links with the Holy Cities of Arabia. Patani has produced many notable Islamic scholars, the most prominent being Daud bin Abdullah al-Patani (1769-1847), who lived and wrote in Mecca in the first half of the 19th century. scholars, and Wan Ahmad al-Patani (1856-1908), the first Superintendent of the Malay press in Mecca. Patani is one of the great centres of the Malay manuscript tradition, and many manuscripts from Patani are now held in the National Library of Malaysia and the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia in Kuala Lumpur.

The British Library holds two manuscripts probably from Patani, both of which may have been copied very recently, and which have been fully digitised. One contains a well-known Malay tale, Hikayat Raja Khandak dan Raja Badar (Or.16128), set during the early wars of Islam, in which the eponymous villain, Raja Khandak (known in some versions as Raja Handak or Raja Handik) and his son Raja Badar battle against the forces of the Prophet. It was a very popular story, and is also found in Javanese, Sundanese, Acehnese and Makassar versions.

The second manuscript aquired from the same source, Or. 16129, consists of only 11 folios and contains an unidentified religious work (or fragment of a work) by Imām Aḥmad (the Sunni jurist Aḥmad bin Ḥanbal, 780-855) on the shahādah (profession of faith), set within frames with a commentary written in the margins. The main text has a colophon stating that it was written on 24 Muharam 1[2]60 (14 February 1844) in Mecca. This manuscript is also written in a small neat hand with a ‘modern’ feel, but in this case modern influences are clearly manifest in the use of certain punctuation elements such as brackets and numbered points within the text, indicating a date of production in the 20th century and perhaps even suggesting that the manuscript might have been copied from a printed source.

Lire la suite et accéder aux manuscrits sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2017/08/malay-manuscripts-from-patani.html?

Aural archipelago : field recordings from around Indonesia

Aural archipelago : field recordings from around Indonesia

Aural Archipelago is the lovechild of Palmer Keen, an American DIY ethnomusicologist wandering the vast archipelago of Indonesia to find, document, expose and promote little-known traditional musics around the country. Within a few years, Palmer has travelled from vast islands like Sumatra, Java, and Borneo to small dots in the ocean like Rote and Selayar in search of the diverse and beautiful music that fascinates him. With this project, his hope is to allow unprecedented audiences (local and foreign) free access to music that is often difficult or impossible to hear otherwise.

Palmer can be contacted at auralarchipelago@gmail.com

Enregistrements à écouter sur : http://www.auralarchipelago.com/

 

Book-hunting in the City of Heroes

« Book-hunting in the City of Heroes » by Tom Hoogervorst, 20/07/2017, KITLV blog

Situated in an inconspicuous residential area in the south of Surabaya, one could easily overlook one of Indonesia’s most intriguing libraries and its equally fascinating owner. Tom Hoogervorst looks back on a fruitful week of research spent at Medayu Agung.

“Some of the books are a bit sticky”, says Mr. Oei Hiem Hwie, as he deftly separates the pages of a 1919 book on traditional medicine. “I had to hide my collection above the ceiling of my old house. They burnt many of my possessions. In the end, everything was buried under a 15 cm coat of dust.”

Known to his friends as Pak Wie, the Malang-born septuagenarian and life-long book collector heads a unique library open to Indonesian and international visitors: Medayu Agung. Every day, students, journalists, intellectuals, and cultural activists can be spotted browsing through its books and newspapers. The library contains material in Indonesian, Chinese, Javanese, Dutch, English and German – among others – ranging from colonial to recent times. In addition to this wealth of printed sources, innumerable beautiful black-and-white photos of old Surabaya and other historical paraphernalia make it a living museum. Even an original edition of Mein Kampf signed by Adolf Hitler himself has found its way into the library.

The history of Medayu Agung is closely connected with the history of Indonesia. In 1965, at the peak of his journalistic career, Pak Wie was imprisoned without a trial on the unfounded suspicion of involvement with Indonesia’s communist party. As a result, he was detained for 13 years in some of the country’s most notorious prisons, including the gulag-style internment camps of Nusakembangan and Buru. While incarcerated, he developed a close friendship with fellow convict Pramoedya Ananta Toer, who later became Indonesia’s most famous writer. His ground-breaking “This Earth of Mankind” (Bumi Manusia) was first written down on pieces of paper smuggled in by Pak Wie. They are still kept in the library.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/book-hunting-city-heroes/

Thai Art Archives

Thai Art Archives

Thai Art Archives is an independent, not-for-profit « knowledge platform » for the recovery, study, preservation, and exhibition of Thai modern and contemporary art and ephemera.

Welcome to Thailand’s only heritage-preservation organization that actively identifies, collects, catalogues, preserves, and exhibits the historically valuable ephemera—professional documents, personal papers, photographs, notebooks, sketchbooks and other studio-based items—of Thailand’s renowned modern and contemporary artists, independent/artist-run (« alternative ») art spaces, and related Thai “avant-garde” phenomena.

Unlike primary works of art, such as painting and sculpture, comparatively “ephemeral” materials are frequently lost or destroyed on the passing of a prominent Thai artist, or even during her/his lifetime. Given this potential loss to Thai cultural heritage, the Thai Art Archives’ mission is to proactively identify, recover, study, document, and preserve such materials for the benefit of future generations.

  • Exhibitions (Modern & Contemporary)
  • Educational & Public Events/Programs
  • Curatorial & Museum Studies for University Students
  • Student Internships
  • Knowledge Hub & Research Platform
  • Residencies for Visiting Scholars
  • Oral History Initiative
  • Publications, Special Projects, Cataloguing
  • Cataloguing of Private Collections

The Thai Art Archives aims in all its programs to explore and enrich cultural exchange, to promote global access to transcultural histories, and to encourage regional and international dialogues over the research into, the writing, and the documentation of diverse perspectives on the most progressive currents in modern and contemporary art since the early 20th century to the present.

A explorer sur : http://www.thaiartarchives.mono.net/

Angkor Wat Apsara and Devata : Khmer women in divine context

« Angkor Wat Apsara and Devata : Khmer women in divine context» by Jana Igunma, 05/07/2017, Southeast Asia Library Group (SEALG)

Angkor Wat Apsara and Devata : Khmer women in divine context is a rich and well researched online resource dedicated to the women of the Khmer Empire (9th-15th century). Being great builders, the Khmer filled the landscape with monumental temples, huge reservoirs and canals, and laid an extensive network of roads with bridges. Angkor Wat is the best known and most stunning temple. It is, in fact, a microcosm of the Hindu universe. Covering 200 hectares it is the world’s largest religious complex. Its construction was started by the Khmer king Suryavarman II around 1122 CE and took some 30 years to complete. The walls of Angkor Wat house a royal portrait gallery with 1,795 women realistically rendered in stone. Although the temple complex has been researched extensively in terms of architecture, art and archaeology, not much is known about these women.

Devata.org aims to provide answers to questions like:

  •  Who were the women of Angkor Wat?
  • Why are images of women immortalized with the most prominent placement in the largest temples the Khmer civilization ever built?
  • What did these women mean to the Khmer rulers, priests and people?
  • How does the Cambodian dance tradition relate to the women of Angkor Wat?
  • Do the women of Angkor Wat embody information important to us in modern times?

This online resource gives access to articles about books and authors relating to Khmer history, Cambodian dance, children of Angkor, women’s history and heritage preservation. The focus, however, is on the women of Angkor Wat and other Khmer temples. Features like an Angkor Wat Devata Inventory, the Devata Database Project, Facial Pattern Recognition of the Angkor Wat portraits, photo galleries and a range of research articles provide insight into the rich culture of the Khmer people.

Voir : https://southeastasianlibrarygroup.wordpress.com/2017/07/05/khmer-women-in-divine-context/

How Has the Islamic Party of Malaysia’s Stance Towards Popular Culture Evolved?

Vidéo : Dominik Müller, « How Has the Islamic Party of Malaysia’s Stance Towards Popular Culture Evolved ? »

The academic platform Latest Thinking has done an interview with Dominik Müller in which he presents one of his articles and new developments in his research.

This article was published in the journal Indonesia and the Malay World, vol. 43, n° 127 (2015) : « Islamic politics and popular culture in Malaysia: Negotiating normative change between Shariah law and electric guitars ».

While doing anthropological fieldwork in Malaysia, Dominik Müller noticed that the Islamic Party of Malaysia organizes events and activities that are frequently embellished with popular culture elements, such as bands playing on electric guitars. This seemed at odds with common Western assumptions that Islamic political movements tend to condemn popular culture as un-Islamic. Müller then investigated how the change of the party’s religious stance – a Sharia-framed stance that had still been adamant twenty years before – came about. He found that not only the Islamic Party has opened itself to new forms of modern pop culture but also these elements have been appropriated and reframed in an Islamic context to convey the political messages of the party. This ethnographic study shows that Islamist ideologies can be much more complex and flexible than many people would normally assume.

A regarder sur : https://lt.org/publication/how-has-islamic-party-malaysias-stance-towards-popular-culture-evolved

 

Talking Indonesia: Urban villages and activism

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: Urban villages and activism, 06/07/2017, Host : Charlotte Setijadi

Jakarta’s urban village (kampung) communities have received considerable attention over the past few months amid the hotly contested Jakarta gubernatorial election. While most of the election coverage focused on racial and religious issues, former Governor Basuki ‘Ahok’ Tjahaja Purnama’s forced evictions of kampung along Jakarta’s riverbanks also stirred much controversy. Kampung residents and activist groups condemn these evictions as unlawful and undemocratic. Yet many Jakartans argue that evictions are necessary measures to fix the city’s notorious traffic and seasonal flooding. Many also argue that the evictions are justified since many of the kampung dwellers do not possess certificates of ownership for the lands they occupy.

Is there a middle ground? Can Jakarta’s kampung co-exist with residential, infrastructure, and commercial projects planned for the city? What do the controversies surrounding evictions and Jakarta’s kampung communities reveal about social and economic divides in Indonesia’s capital?

I discuss these issues with Dr Rita Padawangi, Senior Lecturer at Singapore University of Social Sciences. She was previously a Senior Fellow at the Asian Urbanisms cluster at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. Rita is a passionate researcher and proponent of participatory urban development, and has worked with kampung communities in Jakarta to get the government to engage in more dialogue with kampung residents in urban planning.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-urban-villages-and-activism/

Capturing time : Preserving Wat Phra Si San Phet and other historical sites, in 3D and forever

Capturing time : Preserving Wat Phra Si San Phet and other historical sites, in 3D and forever, 28/06/2017, Bangkok Post

From now people will be able to virtually experience the historic city of Ayutthaya anytime and anywhere, as Wat Phra Si San Phet has been digitally preserved thanks to CyArk, an international non-profit organisation that works in collaboration with Seagate Thailand and UNESCO.

Wat Phra Si San Phet was selected by CyArk as part of their international programme for digital preservation through aerial surveys conducted with drones, terrestrial laser scanning known as Lidar, and photogrammetry exercises.

Earlier this month, digital scanning and archiving of the Unesco World Heritage site commenced. Data and images from the field exercise will be turned into photo-real 3D models for future generations of students, tourists and cultural-heritage enthusiasts. It will be launched next month.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.bangkokpost.com/tech/local-news/1277039/capturing-time

Journals Van Vollenhoven Institute digitized

Journals Van Vollenhoven Institute digitized

As part of Metamorfoze, the national digitalization project for the preservation of paper heritage, journals of The Van Vollenhoven Institute’s library have been digitized.

1. Het regt in Nederlandsch-Indië: regtskundig tijdschrift, 1849-1914
2. Indisch tijdschrift van het recht: orgaan der Nederlandsch-Indische Juristen-Vereeniging, 1915-1942
3. Tijdschrift van het recht / Vereniging van Juristen in Indonesië, 1947-1950

The journals are available via the website www.delpher.nl. Delpher is an initiative of the university libraries of Groningen, Leiden, Utrecht and Amsterdam, and the National Library of the Netherlands.

Pinle (Maingmaw): Research at an Ancient Pyu City, Myanmar

Archeology Report Series : Pinle (Maingmaw): Research at an  Ancient Pyu City, Myanmar by Myo Nyunt and  Kyaw Myo Win, Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre, ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute

The walled Pinle (Maingmaw) occupies a special place in the early urbanisation of Myanmar with this collaborative publication being the first solely focused on the site. It follows the NSC Archaeology Unit Report on Beikthano (Thein Lwin 2016). The present publication is an edited translation of two excavation reports of Pinle with editors’ comments adding background to the documentation of the unearthing of a brick structure and gate as well as exploration of potential sites in the surrounding region. Pinle was one of the network of independent Pyu polities in the first millennium CE, larger than Halin, one of the Pyu Ancient Cities. The importance of the Pinle region continued through the 9th to 13th centuries CE Bagan period. A significant multi-lingual inscription of the late 11th century was unearthed in Myittha, 14 km to the north and a contemporaneous walled rice fort is located south of Pinle. These details underline the fertility and strategic location of Pinle, vital in understanding the prosperity of Pyu cities of the first millennium CE and the formation of the first Myanmar state at Bagan.

Télécharger le rapport sur : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/images/pdf/AU6%20Pinle%202-reduced.pdf

Mapping the Maps – a guest post from Natasha Pairaudeau

Mapping the Maps – a guest post from Natasha Pairaudeau, 18/04/2017, Cambridge University Library Special Collections Blog

Imagine maps as big as bedsheets, and then imagine the sheets big enough for beds made wide enough to sleep extended families. Only such a double stretch of the imagination can provide the scale of the three Burmese maps in the University Library’s collection, which have recently been made available online in digital format.

From bedsheet to map is not a great leap: all three maps are inked or painted on to generous lengths of cloth. Yet they do not depict lines on a map as the eye in the 21st century is accustomed to seeing them. The most colourful of the three maps, the map of the Maingnyaung region [Maps.Ms.Plans.R.c.1 ; see also above for an extract from this map] is the one which forces the most abrupt lurch, down from that comfortable view on high of modern mapping convention.  Instead, the viewer is positioned near ground level, and invited here to view a stupa, there a crocodile down in the river, away in the distance a noble line of hills. Trees are no mere generic features. While the perspective is mostly from the ground, it co-exists with other even less familiar conventions. Pagodas and stupas either loom large or sit very small, their size and their sanctity apparently intermeshed. Towns and villages, rivers and streams are the sole features which come close to appearing from a bird’s eye view. Yet the neat tracings of brickwork, and of waves on the water’s surface, suggest they may be meant to convey not the lay of the land from the air but other rules of belonging, of enclosure or of flow.

The other two maps, the map of the Royal Lands [Maps.Ms.Plans.R.c.3] and map of Sa-lay township [Maps.Ms.Plans.R.c.2], are less colourful than the first, but in some respects even more intriguing. Like the Maingnyaung map, they take many of their bearings from ground level. Manmade landmarks use scales which vary, apparently,  according to their importance rather than their physical size. With vegetation, there is an insistence on specifics. Yet both maps feature grids traced carefully and evenly across the entire surface. These maps present two worlds at once. There are vistas to be contemplated and meaningful features to be explored in the landscape. But there is also a view from on high, where trees were counted and areas under crop were calculated, and probably, somewhere off the surface of the map, converted into tax exactions.

These maps have already received a share of attention. Allegra Giovine (a doctoral student in the History of Science who studies the production of economic knowledge in colonial Burma) helped to translate notes on the Maingnyaung map from Burmese. The Cambridge maps formed the core of a survey of indigenous Burmese maps in UK collections by Professor Tin Naing Win, the inaugural Charles Wallace Burma Trust Fellow (2015) at the Cambridge Centre of South Asian Studies. They sparked the interest of Marie de Rugy in her recent thesis (Paris 1 – Sorbonne) on Maps and the Making of Imperial Territories in the Northern Indochinese Peninsula. François Tainturier of the Inya Institute continues to study these maps and to re-assess their role in pre-colonial Upper Burma. Much remains nonetheless to be learned about these maps, by those equipped to read the Burmese script which annotates them, and to interpret the wider context of their production and the modes of representation they employ.

Lire la suite sur : https://specialcollections.blog.lib.cam.ac.uk/?p=14308

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: online feminism

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: online feminism by Devi Asmarani, 08/06/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

In Talking Indonesia this week, we continue our recent conversation on the state of women’s activism amid growing religious conservatism, and explore the ways in which issues important to women, including sexuality and religion, are being shared and communicated beyond the conventional media. What is the state of the mediascape in Indonesia today? How has digital media created spaces for a diversity of views written by and for Indonesians? What does an Indonesian ‘feminist’ publication look like?

Host Dr Jemma Purdey spoke to Devi Asmarani, chief editor of online magazine Magdalene, which publishes under the tagline “a slanted guide to women’s issues” and also calls itself a feminist publication. Magdalene publishes in both English and Indonesian and has a growing readership in and outside of Indonesia.

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/talking-indonesia