Archives de catégorie : Ressources

RESOURCES ON DIGITAL (VISUAL) ANTHROPOLOGY AND ETHNOGRAPHY

Ressources on digital (visual) anthropology and ethnography

This is a selection of resources on digital visual anthropology & digital ethnography, collected via the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) Visual Anthropology Network’s & Media Anthropology Network’s mailing lists.

Elle comprend des projets et plateformes en ligne, des e-séminaires et des bibliographies.

Voir la liste complète sur : https://01anthropology.wordpress.com/2017/01/27/resources-on-digital-visual-anthropology-ethnography/

Music of Timor : an online exhibit for the ITLSC meeting at AAS 2017

Music of Timor: an online exhibit for the ITLSC meeting at AAS 2017

This is a website about the music and music-related academic research that has been undertaken on the island of Timor.

Voir : http://aaronpettigrew.com/music_of_timor/

You can browse the site in a few different ways:

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java in ResearchWorks Archive of the University of Washington Libraries

The University of Washington Libraries collaborated with Anthropology Ph.D. student, Evi Sutrisno, who was conducting her dissertation field research on Chinese Indonesian Confucianism, to digitize the rare and fragile Sino-Malay literature owned by two temple libraries in Java. The first project was conducted in Boen Bio (Wen Miao) – a Confucian temple of Surabaya, East Java – in 2010-2011. The temple was founded in 1907 and had a collection of religious books and magazines in Chinese and Malay languages in its abandoned library. The second project was conducted in the Hok An Kiong temple, Muntilan, Central Java in 2014-2016. The temple was founded in 1898 and had became the religious, social and learning space for the Chinese in the area. As in the case of Boen Bio, the Hok An Kiong also has an abandoned library, where popular Sino-Malay novels and magazines were collected.

Between 1967 and1998 Confucian practices and Chinese identity were severely repressed under the Indonesian New Order regime, so these materials were hidden away in the corners of dark and humid storage rooms to avoid state confiscation. Due to climate conditions, biological pests, and lack of appropriate storage facilities, the collection was in great danger and in urgent need of preservation. These projects are parts of a larger effort to identify materials in all known collections belonging to temples and private collections in four cities: Jakarta/Tangerang, Bandung, Solo, and Pontianak, where the Confucian communities during the period of 1900s to 1940s were vibrant. The first project consists of about 5,000 pages scanned from the collections of the Boen Bio temple and three other private collections in Surabaya. The second digitizes about 12,500 pages from the collection of the Hok An Kiong temple in Muntilan. Each project has been done in collaboration with other scholars and the temple communities who are interested in preserving the precious documents and history of the Chinese-Indonesians. For the second project, Evi Sutrisno would like to thank Sutrisno Murtiyoso of Tarumanegara University, Jakarta, Endy Saputro of State College for Islamic Studies, Surakarta and Elizabeth Chandra of Keio University, Tokyo for their supports and collaborations. Thanks also to Laurie Sears for her decision to provide funding. For further description of the project and the importance of the materials preserved, see: Evi Sutrisno. Forgotten Confucian Periodicals in Indonesia, CORMOSEA Bulletin, no 34 (Summer 2016): 8-14.

Vous pouvez faire des recherches dans la collection et consulter la liste des deniers documents mis en ligne sur : https://digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/21474

Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia

Ward Berenschot, Henk Schulte Nordholt and Laurens Bakker (eds), Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia, Brill, 2017

Ouvrage en ligne et en libre accès.

Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia redirects the largely western-oriented study of citizenship to postcolonial states. Providing various fascinating first-hand accounts of how citizens interpret and realize the recognition of their property, identity, security and welfare in the context of a weak rule of law and clientelistic politics, this study highlights the importance of studying citizenship for understanding democratization processes in Southeast Asia. With case studies from Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and Cambodia, this book provides a unique bottom-up perspective on the character of public life in Southeast Asia.

Table des matières 

1. Introduction: Citizenship and Democratization in Postcolonial Southeast Asia, Ward Berenschot, Henk Schulte Nordholt and Laurens Bakker

Part I: Clientelism and Citizenship
2. Citizen Participation and Decentralization in the Philippines, Emma Porio
3. Everyday Citizenship in Village Java, Takeshi Ito
4. Elections and Emerging Forms of Citizenship in Cambodia, Astrid Norén-Nilsson
5. Sosialisasi, Citizenship and Street Vendors in Yogyakarta, Sheri Lynn Gibbings

Part II: Identity and Citizenship
6. Militias, Security and Citizenship in Indonesia, Laurens Bakker
7. Custom and Citizenship in the Philippine Uplands, Oona Thommes Paredes
8. Citizenship and Islam in Malaysia and Indonesia, David Kloos and Ward Berenschot

Part III: Middle Classes Engaging the State
9. Digital Media and Malaysia’s Electoral Reform Movement, Merlyna Lim
10. Citizenship, Rights and Adversarial Legalism in Thailand, Wolfram Schaffar
11. Defending Indonesia’s Migrant Domestic Workers, Mary Austin
12. The Yellow Shirts versus the Red Shirts and the Rise of a New Middle Class in Thailand, Apichat Satitniramai

A télécharger sur : http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/9789004329669

Malaysia Cartoon And Comic House

There’s now a place to go to admire Malaysia’s comic book art by Daryl Goh, 03/04/2017, star2.com

The newly-opened Malaysia Cartoon And Comic House, nestled in leafy Taman Botani Perdana in Kuala Lumpur, is set to be a major attraction for comic book enthusiasts and the more curious-minded. The building, which is now home to the nation’s cartoon and comic book story, is practically packed out, wall-to-wall, with original comic book art, editorial cartoon strips, storyboard sketches, studio notes and vintage youth culture magazines, all dedicated to chronicling Malaysian comic book history and culture.

Over 500 cartoon and comic book works – spanning mid-1930s to the late 1990s – are on display now at the gallery, with Tazidi revealing that less than 10% of the Malaysia Cartoon And Comic House archive has been made public in this opening exhibition.

Atlas of deforestation and industrial plantations in Borneo

Atlas of deforestation and industrial plantations in Borneo : new interactive atlas developed by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

For a better Borneo, new map reveals how much terrain has changed, 15/02/2017, Forests News, CIFOR blog

New atlas displays 40 years of human impacts on forests – from fires to logging to industrial plantations and more

Incorporating 40 years of maps of Borneo (the world’s third largest island), the tool reveals both the forest remaining and what is being reshaped due to degradation and extraction industries. With the ability to search by oil palm or pulpwood concessions, and view the locations of intact peatland, as well as determine the speed with which forest is converted to plantation, the atlas offers the first significant opportunity to distinguish companies that are avoiding deforestation to a large degree.

CIFOR scientist David Gaveau, who developed the atlas, said, “The tool is an open platform for researchers, advocacy groups, journalists and anyone interested in deforestation, wildlife habitats and corporate actions.”

The data provided by the atlas is free to download, and informs whether a particular oil palm concession is certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)- the organization that implements a global standard for sustainability in the palm oil industry.

Lire la suite sur : http://blog.cifor.org/48167/for-a-better-borneo-new-map-reveals-how-much-terrain-has-changed?fnl=en

Talking Indonesia podcast : Volunteers and Indonesian elections

Talking Indonesia: Volunteers and Indonesian elections by Dirk Tomsa

The last five years have seen the emergence of volunteer organisations as new actors in the campaigns of some of Indonesia’s most important elections. Who are these volunteers, what motivates them and what role do they play in elections? Have volunteer organisations changed the role of political parties, or opened new access for the citizens mobilising as part of them? How will they influence the 2019 presidential elections?

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae explore these issues with Dr Dirk Tomsa, senior lecturer in the Department of Politics and Philosophy at La Trobe University and a new co-host in 2017 of Talking Indonesia.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-volunteers-and-elections/

Bibliographie des thèses et des mémoires sur les massacres de 1965 en Indonésie

Le site indonésien Genosida 1965-1966 propose une bibliographie des thèses et des mémoires consacrés aux massacres de 1965 en Indonésie qui vient s’ajouter à la liste d’ouvrages et de vidéos en ligne sur la question déjà parue sur le même site sous la rubrique Rumah Baca (Pustaka) Genosida 1965.

Voir : https://genosida1965wordpress.wordpress.com/2016/05/29/kumpulan-tesis-dan-disertasi-terkait-genosida-1965-thesis-and-dissertation-on-1965-massacre/

Digitising Malay writing in Sri Lanka – Endangered Archives Program

 

EAP609 : Digitising Malay writing in Sri Lanka – Endangered Archives Program (British Library)

Dr Ronit Ricci, The Australian University
Archival partner: National Archives of Sri Lanka
Project Overview

This project aims to create a digital archive of Malay writing (including manuscripts, printed books, letters, other documents) held in private collections in Sri Lanka. Written for the most part in Arabic script (but also in the Roman, Tamil and Sinhala scripts) by descendants of exiles, convicts, and soldiers from the Indonesian archipelago and the Malay Peninsula between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, these rare and fragile documents attest to social and cultural aspects of the community’s life, allow for an expansion of our definitions of the ‘Malay World,’ and provide insight into local forms of Islam. There is urgent need to document and preserve such collections, endangered not only by tropical weather and the ravages of time, but also by their owners’ lack of knowledge in archival preservation and a contemporary ignorance regarding the manuscripts’ content and significance …

The project will result in the creation of a digital archive freely available to all. Copies will be accessible via the National Archives of Sri Lanka, the British Library and the library at the Australian National University.

Project Outcome

The project encompasses a range of materials written in the Malay language, in Sri Lanka, from around the mid 19th century to the late 20th century. It includes manuscipts, printed books, prayer booklets, wedding invitations, personal letters, family records, poems and songs. These diverse materials testify to the variety of ways in which Malay was, and is, used in Sri Lanka. The majority of older materials are Islamic in nature, including theological manuals, poems in praise of the Prophet, and tales and histories written in the hikayat genre. These are written in gundul (Malay-Arabic script) and/or romanised Malay. The collection also includes modern examples of Malay written in the Tamil and Sinhala script, as well as older materials in Arabic and Arabu-Tamil owned by Malay families, testifying to the lingusitic and orthographic diversity of the community’s writing practices.

Plus d’information sur : http://eap.bl.uk/database/overview_project.a4d?projID=EAP609;r=41

Voir les textes : http://eap.bl.uk/database/results.a4d?projID=EAP609;r=41

 

Southeast Asia Crossroads : a podcast of the CSEAS, Northern Illinois University

Southeast Asia Crossroads : a podcast of the CSEAS, Northern Illinois University

Cymbals, symbols and Burmese music is the subject of the newest conversation up on our Southeast Asia Crossroads podcast series. Hear also conversations with political scientist Duncan McCargo, art historian Catherine Raymond (with graduate assistant Carmin Berchiolly),and historian Shane Strate and Vietnamese American poet Hai-Dang Phan. Stay tuned every two weeks for more interviews with SEA experts, writers, artists and musicians from around the world.

A signaler :

Cymbals & Symbols: Music in Burma publié il y a 15 jours

In this special episode we sit down with musicians and musicologists Naomi Gingold, Heather MacLachlan, Gavin Douglas and Michael McSweeney to explore a broad spectrum of music in Burma.

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/seacrossroads/cymbals-symbols-music-in-burma-southeast-asia-crossroads-podcast

Liste des épisodes sur : https://soundcloud.com/seacrossroads

Talking Indonesia – Indonesia at Melbourne

Podcast : Talking Indonesia sur le blog Indonesia at Melbourne

The Indonesia at Melbourne blog was launched in July 2015 to present analysis, research and commentary on contemporary Indonesia from academics and postgraduate students affiliated with the University of Melbourne. It aims to stimulate debate and provide a forum for exchange of information and opinion on current events in Indonesia.

The emphasis is on politics but the blog also covers law, anthropology, culture, history, economics, architecture and public health, reflecting the diversity of expertise on contemporary Indonesia at the university.

Indonesia at Melbourne is edited by Tim Mann. Professor Tim Lindsey, Director of CILIS, and Dr Dave McRae, from The Asia Institute, serve on the blog’s advisory board.

Plus d’informations sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/about/

In 2017, the Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne’s Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore and Dr Dirk Tomsa from La Trobe University. Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes (link is external) or listen via your favourite podcasting app.

Talking Indonesia: Ahok, race, religion & democracy (part 2)

In the race for Jakarta’s next governor, Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama’s ethnic Chinese and Christian identity has become a controversial feature of the campaign. As Dave McRae discussed with Dr Nadirsyah Hosen in November, complaints from the Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) about comments Ahok made on the campaign trail late last year sparked a series of mass protests opposing the governor. Charges of blasphemy were eventually laid against Ahok and he is now on trial.

Ahok is the first ethnic Chinese governor of Jakarta and one of very few ethnic Chinese Indonesians to have reached positions of high public office since the fall of New Order. But just how much is the controversy around Ahok related to his ethnicity and religion and how much is it about popular politics in Indonesia today? How has Ahok’s own political style played a part? What does racism look like almost 20 years after the fall of the New Order?

Jemma Purdey discusses these issues and more with Professor Ariel Heryanto, formerly professor at the School of Culture, History and Language of Australian National University and the incoming Herb Feith professor for the study of Indonesia at Monash University.

Voir l’ensemble des épisodes sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/topic/talking-indonesia/

 

 

 

 

Malay literary manuscripts in the John Leyden collection

Hikayat Silindung Dalima
Hikayat Silindung Dalima

Malay literary manuscripts in the John Leyden collection by Annabel Teh Gallop, 09/01/2017, Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library)

The collection of Malay manuscripts formed by the Scottish poet and scholar of Oriental languages John Leyden (1775-1811), now held in the British Library, is an exceptionally important resource for Malay literature. Leyden spent four months in Penang from late 1805 to early 1806, staying in the house of Thomas Stamford Raffles, initiating a deep friendship which lasted until Leyden’s early death in Batavia in 1811. The 25 volumes of Malay manuscripts in the Leyden collection contain 33 literary works, comprising 28 hikayat in prose and five syair in narrative verse, with some titles existing in multiple copies. Nearly all the manuscripts come from the environs of Kedah, Perlis and Penang and were collected by Leyden or Raffles, while a few were copied in Melaka, where Raffles was stationed in 1811 and where Leyden spent some weeks en route to Batavia. 24 of the works are dated to between 1802 and 1808, and over ten names of scribes are found in the colophons. The collection thus affords a remarkable snapshot of literary activity along the northwest coast of the Malay peninsula in the first decade of the 19th century.

Lire la suite et accéder aux mss numérisés : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2017/01/malay-literary-manuscripts-in-the-john-leyden-collection.html

Read rare, old publications on biodiversity for free

st_20161209_aubook09_2794123

« Read rare, old publications on biodiversity for free » by Audrey Tan, 09/12/2016, The Straits Times

Singapore’s National Library Board became the first Southeast Asian partner to join the Smithsonian initiative, which now has 16 members, including Harvard University, and the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, London

In 1854, tigers roamed Singapore and, on average, a person was killed every day. This was the account of famed British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, who detailed his observations in The Malay Archipelago, The Land Of The Orangutan And The Bird Of Paradise.

Until recently, the public had limited access to the 1874 book and other manuscripts that tell the stories of old Singapore. Many of them are among the rare collection of the National Library Board’s (NLB’s) Lee Kong Chian Reference Library and not available for loan.

But Wallace’s book and more than 100 other manuscripts from Singapore are now just a click away.They have been scanned and are published at www.biodiversitylibrary.org. It is part of an international initiative known as the Biodiversity Heritage Library driven by the Smithsonian Institution.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/read-rare-old-publications-on-biodiversity-for-free

O graceful fawn, o gentle doe: Deer in Thai manuscript art

6a00d8341c464853ef01b7c8baa5d9970b-500wi

O graceful fawn, o gentle doe: Deer in Thai manuscript art by Jana Igunma, 12/12/2016, Asian and African Studies (British Library)

Among the most gorgeous images in Thai manuscript painting are those of forest animals. Illustrations of the heavenly forest Himmaphan (Pali: Himavanta), which in Buddhist cosmology is thought to surround the base of the mythical Mount Meru, are unthinkable without squirrels, rabbits, birds, lions, tigers, monkeys, elephants and deer. Scenes involving birds, elephants and deer, usually against a background of trees, plants and rocks, express an atmosphere of tranquillity and peace. Deer seem to be of particular importance as they often feature in funeral books containing extracts from the Pali canon. In Thai Buddhism, symbolic meanings of deer include harmony, happiness and serenity, but also sensitivity and watchfulness. According to the Buddhist scriptures, there could have been no better place for Gautama Buddha to give his first sermon than in the tranquil landscape of the Deer Park at Sarnath.

Lire la suite et accéder aux manuscrits sur : http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/asian-and-african/