Archives de catégorie : Ressources

Thai Art Archives

Thai Art Archives

Thai Art Archives is an independent, not-for-profit « knowledge platform » for the recovery, study, preservation, and exhibition of Thai modern and contemporary art and ephemera.

Welcome to Thailand’s only heritage-preservation organization that actively identifies, collects, catalogues, preserves, and exhibits the historically valuable ephemera—professional documents, personal papers, photographs, notebooks, sketchbooks and other studio-based items—of Thailand’s renowned modern and contemporary artists, independent/artist-run (« alternative ») art spaces, and related Thai “avant-garde” phenomena.

Unlike primary works of art, such as painting and sculpture, comparatively “ephemeral” materials are frequently lost or destroyed on the passing of a prominent Thai artist, or even during her/his lifetime. Given this potential loss to Thai cultural heritage, the Thai Art Archives’ mission is to proactively identify, recover, study, document, and preserve such materials for the benefit of future generations.

  • Exhibitions (Modern & Contemporary)
  • Educational & Public Events/Programs
  • Curatorial & Museum Studies for University Students
  • Student Internships
  • Knowledge Hub & Research Platform
  • Residencies for Visiting Scholars
  • Oral History Initiative
  • Publications, Special Projects, Cataloguing
  • Cataloguing of Private Collections

The Thai Art Archives aims in all its programs to explore and enrich cultural exchange, to promote global access to transcultural histories, and to encourage regional and international dialogues over the research into, the writing, and the documentation of diverse perspectives on the most progressive currents in modern and contemporary art since the early 20th century to the present.

A explorer sur : http://www.thaiartarchives.mono.net/

Angkor Wat Apsara and Devata : Khmer women in divine context

« Angkor Wat Apsara and Devata : Khmer women in divine context» by Jana Igunma, 05/07/2017, Southeast Asia Library Group (SEALG)

Angkor Wat Apsara and Devata : Khmer women in divine context is a rich and well researched online resource dedicated to the women of the Khmer Empire (9th-15th century). Being great builders, the Khmer filled the landscape with monumental temples, huge reservoirs and canals, and laid an extensive network of roads with bridges. Angkor Wat is the best known and most stunning temple. It is, in fact, a microcosm of the Hindu universe. Covering 200 hectares it is the world’s largest religious complex. Its construction was started by the Khmer king Suryavarman II around 1122 CE and took some 30 years to complete. The walls of Angkor Wat house a royal portrait gallery with 1,795 women realistically rendered in stone. Although the temple complex has been researched extensively in terms of architecture, art and archaeology, not much is known about these women.

Devata.org aims to provide answers to questions like:

  •  Who were the women of Angkor Wat?
  • Why are images of women immortalized with the most prominent placement in the largest temples the Khmer civilization ever built?
  • What did these women mean to the Khmer rulers, priests and people?
  • How does the Cambodian dance tradition relate to the women of Angkor Wat?
  • Do the women of Angkor Wat embody information important to us in modern times?

This online resource gives access to articles about books and authors relating to Khmer history, Cambodian dance, children of Angkor, women’s history and heritage preservation. The focus, however, is on the women of Angkor Wat and other Khmer temples. Features like an Angkor Wat Devata Inventory, the Devata Database Project, Facial Pattern Recognition of the Angkor Wat portraits, photo galleries and a range of research articles provide insight into the rich culture of the Khmer people.

Voir : https://southeastasianlibrarygroup.wordpress.com/2017/07/05/khmer-women-in-divine-context/

How Has the Islamic Party of Malaysia’s Stance Towards Popular Culture Evolved?

Vidéo : Dominik Müller, « How Has the Islamic Party of Malaysia’s Stance Towards Popular Culture Evolved ? »

The academic platform Latest Thinking has done an interview with Dominik Müller in which he presents one of his articles and new developments in his research.

This article was published in the journal Indonesia and the Malay World, vol. 43, n° 127 (2015) : « Islamic politics and popular culture in Malaysia: Negotiating normative change between Shariah law and electric guitars ».

While doing anthropological fieldwork in Malaysia, Dominik Müller noticed that the Islamic Party of Malaysia organizes events and activities that are frequently embellished with popular culture elements, such as bands playing on electric guitars. This seemed at odds with common Western assumptions that Islamic political movements tend to condemn popular culture as un-Islamic. Müller then investigated how the change of the party’s religious stance – a Sharia-framed stance that had still been adamant twenty years before – came about. He found that not only the Islamic Party has opened itself to new forms of modern pop culture but also these elements have been appropriated and reframed in an Islamic context to convey the political messages of the party. This ethnographic study shows that Islamist ideologies can be much more complex and flexible than many people would normally assume.

A regarder sur : https://lt.org/publication/how-has-islamic-party-malaysias-stance-towards-popular-culture-evolved

 

Talking Indonesia: Urban villages and activism

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: Urban villages and activism, 06/07/2017, Host : Charlotte Setijadi

Jakarta’s urban village (kampung) communities have received considerable attention over the past few months amid the hotly contested Jakarta gubernatorial election. While most of the election coverage focused on racial and religious issues, former Governor Basuki ‘Ahok’ Tjahaja Purnama’s forced evictions of kampung along Jakarta’s riverbanks also stirred much controversy. Kampung residents and activist groups condemn these evictions as unlawful and undemocratic. Yet many Jakartans argue that evictions are necessary measures to fix the city’s notorious traffic and seasonal flooding. Many also argue that the evictions are justified since many of the kampung dwellers do not possess certificates of ownership for the lands they occupy.

Is there a middle ground? Can Jakarta’s kampung co-exist with residential, infrastructure, and commercial projects planned for the city? What do the controversies surrounding evictions and Jakarta’s kampung communities reveal about social and economic divides in Indonesia’s capital?

I discuss these issues with Dr Rita Padawangi, Senior Lecturer at Singapore University of Social Sciences. She was previously a Senior Fellow at the Asian Urbanisms cluster at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. Rita is a passionate researcher and proponent of participatory urban development, and has worked with kampung communities in Jakarta to get the government to engage in more dialogue with kampung residents in urban planning.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-urban-villages-and-activism/

Capturing time : Preserving Wat Phra Si San Phet and other historical sites, in 3D and forever

Capturing time : Preserving Wat Phra Si San Phet and other historical sites, in 3D and forever, 28/06/2017, Bangkok Post

From now people will be able to virtually experience the historic city of Ayutthaya anytime and anywhere, as Wat Phra Si San Phet has been digitally preserved thanks to CyArk, an international non-profit organisation that works in collaboration with Seagate Thailand and UNESCO.

Wat Phra Si San Phet was selected by CyArk as part of their international programme for digital preservation through aerial surveys conducted with drones, terrestrial laser scanning known as Lidar, and photogrammetry exercises.

Earlier this month, digital scanning and archiving of the Unesco World Heritage site commenced. Data and images from the field exercise will be turned into photo-real 3D models for future generations of students, tourists and cultural-heritage enthusiasts. It will be launched next month.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.bangkokpost.com/tech/local-news/1277039/capturing-time

Journals Van Vollenhoven Institute digitized

Journals Van Vollenhoven Institute digitized

As part of Metamorfoze, the national digitalization project for the preservation of paper heritage, journals of The Van Vollenhoven Institute’s library have been digitized.

1. Het regt in Nederlandsch-Indië: regtskundig tijdschrift, 1849-1914
2. Indisch tijdschrift van het recht: orgaan der Nederlandsch-Indische Juristen-Vereeniging, 1915-1942
3. Tijdschrift van het recht / Vereniging van Juristen in Indonesië, 1947-1950

The journals are available via the website www.delpher.nl. Delpher is an initiative of the university libraries of Groningen, Leiden, Utrecht and Amsterdam, and the National Library of the Netherlands.

Pinle (Maingmaw): Research at an Ancient Pyu City, Myanmar

Archeology Report Series : Pinle (Maingmaw): Research at an  Ancient Pyu City, Myanmar by Myo Nyunt and  Kyaw Myo Win, Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre, ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute

The walled Pinle (Maingmaw) occupies a special place in the early urbanisation of Myanmar with this collaborative publication being the first solely focused on the site. It follows the NSC Archaeology Unit Report on Beikthano (Thein Lwin 2016). The present publication is an edited translation of two excavation reports of Pinle with editors’ comments adding background to the documentation of the unearthing of a brick structure and gate as well as exploration of potential sites in the surrounding region. Pinle was one of the network of independent Pyu polities in the first millennium CE, larger than Halin, one of the Pyu Ancient Cities. The importance of the Pinle region continued through the 9th to 13th centuries CE Bagan period. A significant multi-lingual inscription of the late 11th century was unearthed in Myittha, 14 km to the north and a contemporaneous walled rice fort is located south of Pinle. These details underline the fertility and strategic location of Pinle, vital in understanding the prosperity of Pyu cities of the first millennium CE and the formation of the first Myanmar state at Bagan.

Télécharger le rapport sur : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/images/pdf/AU6%20Pinle%202-reduced.pdf

Mapping the Maps – a guest post from Natasha Pairaudeau

Mapping the Maps – a guest post from Natasha Pairaudeau, 18/04/2017, Cambridge University Library Special Collections Blog

Imagine maps as big as bedsheets, and then imagine the sheets big enough for beds made wide enough to sleep extended families. Only such a double stretch of the imagination can provide the scale of the three Burmese maps in the University Library’s collection, which have recently been made available online in digital format.

From bedsheet to map is not a great leap: all three maps are inked or painted on to generous lengths of cloth. Yet they do not depict lines on a map as the eye in the 21st century is accustomed to seeing them. The most colourful of the three maps, the map of the Maingnyaung region [Maps.Ms.Plans.R.c.1 ; see also above for an extract from this map] is the one which forces the most abrupt lurch, down from that comfortable view on high of modern mapping convention.  Instead, the viewer is positioned near ground level, and invited here to view a stupa, there a crocodile down in the river, away in the distance a noble line of hills. Trees are no mere generic features. While the perspective is mostly from the ground, it co-exists with other even less familiar conventions. Pagodas and stupas either loom large or sit very small, their size and their sanctity apparently intermeshed. Towns and villages, rivers and streams are the sole features which come close to appearing from a bird’s eye view. Yet the neat tracings of brickwork, and of waves on the water’s surface, suggest they may be meant to convey not the lay of the land from the air but other rules of belonging, of enclosure or of flow.

The other two maps, the map of the Royal Lands [Maps.Ms.Plans.R.c.3] and map of Sa-lay township [Maps.Ms.Plans.R.c.2], are less colourful than the first, but in some respects even more intriguing. Like the Maingnyaung map, they take many of their bearings from ground level. Manmade landmarks use scales which vary, apparently,  according to their importance rather than their physical size. With vegetation, there is an insistence on specifics. Yet both maps feature grids traced carefully and evenly across the entire surface. These maps present two worlds at once. There are vistas to be contemplated and meaningful features to be explored in the landscape. But there is also a view from on high, where trees were counted and areas under crop were calculated, and probably, somewhere off the surface of the map, converted into tax exactions.

These maps have already received a share of attention. Allegra Giovine (a doctoral student in the History of Science who studies the production of economic knowledge in colonial Burma) helped to translate notes on the Maingnyaung map from Burmese. The Cambridge maps formed the core of a survey of indigenous Burmese maps in UK collections by Professor Tin Naing Win, the inaugural Charles Wallace Burma Trust Fellow (2015) at the Cambridge Centre of South Asian Studies. They sparked the interest of Marie de Rugy in her recent thesis (Paris 1 – Sorbonne) on Maps and the Making of Imperial Territories in the Northern Indochinese Peninsula. François Tainturier of the Inya Institute continues to study these maps and to re-assess their role in pre-colonial Upper Burma. Much remains nonetheless to be learned about these maps, by those equipped to read the Burmese script which annotates them, and to interpret the wider context of their production and the modes of representation they employ.

Lire la suite sur : https://specialcollections.blog.lib.cam.ac.uk/?p=14308

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: online feminism

Podcast : Talking Indonesia: online feminism by Devi Asmarani, 08/06/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

In Talking Indonesia this week, we continue our recent conversation on the state of women’s activism amid growing religious conservatism, and explore the ways in which issues important to women, including sexuality and religion, are being shared and communicated beyond the conventional media. What is the state of the mediascape in Indonesia today? How has digital media created spaces for a diversity of views written by and for Indonesians? What does an Indonesian ‘feminist’ publication look like?

Host Dr Jemma Purdey spoke to Devi Asmarani, chief editor of online magazine Magdalene, which publishes under the tagline “a slanted guide to women’s issues” and also calls itself a feminist publication. Magdalene publishes in both English and Indonesian and has a growing readership in and outside of Indonesia.

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/talking-indonesia

33 Burmese manuscripts now digitised at the British Library

33 Burmese manuscripts now digitised by San San May, 24/05/2017, Asian and African Studies Blog (British Library)

The Burmese manuscript collection in the British Library consists of approximately 1800 manuscripts. The majority are written on palm leaf, but there are also many paper folding books (parabaik), and texts written on diverse materials such as gold, silver, copper and ivory sheets in the shape of palm leaves. The collection is particularly strong in historical, legal and grammatical texts, and in illustrated material. In particular, there are many folding books with illustrations of the Life of the Buddha, Jataka stories, court scenes and other subjects.

Since 2013 the British Library has digitised some of the finest Burmese manuscripts in its collection, supported by the Henry D. Ginsburg Legacy. To date 33 manuscripts have been fully digitised, covering a wide range of genres and subjects.  All these manuscripts are now accessible through the Digitised Manuscripts website. A new webpage, Digital Access to Burmese Manuscripts, also lists all the Burmese manuscripts digitised so far, with hyperlinks to the images and to blog posts featuring the manuscripts. Future digitised manuscripts will be also be listed on this page. Shown in this post are a selection of our digitised Burmese manuscripts; clicking on the hyperlinked shelfmarks below the images will take you directly to the digitised versions.

Quick link to: Digital access to Burmese manuscripts

Lire la suite sur : http://blogs.bl.uk/asian-and-african/2017/05/33-burmese-manuscripts-now-digitised.html

LÊ THANH NGHỊ, « REPORT ON MEETINGS WITH PARTY LEADERS OF EIGHT SOCIALIST COUNTRIES » [1965]

Sources : http://indomemoires.hypotheses.org/25154

[ndlr] Signalement d’une archive en ligne sur le site du Wilson Center.

https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/134601

North Vietnamese Deputy Prime Minister and Politburo member Le Thanh Nghi recounts his discussions with socialist leaders in the summer of 1965, just as the war in the south was heating up.

Continuer la lecture de LÊ THANH NGHỊ, « REPORT ON MEETINGS WITH PARTY LEADERS OF EIGHT SOCIALIST COUNTRIES » [1965]

RESOURCES ON DIGITAL (VISUAL) ANTHROPOLOGY AND ETHNOGRAPHY

Ressources on digital (visual) anthropology and ethnography

This is a selection of resources on digital visual anthropology & digital ethnography, collected via the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) Visual Anthropology Network’s & Media Anthropology Network’s mailing lists.

Elle comprend des projets et plateformes en ligne, des e-séminaires et des bibliographies.

Voir la liste complète sur : https://01anthropology.wordpress.com/2017/01/27/resources-on-digital-visual-anthropology-ethnography/

Music of Timor : an online exhibit for the ITLSC meeting at AAS 2017

Music of Timor: an online exhibit for the ITLSC meeting at AAS 2017

This is a website about the music and music-related academic research that has been undertaken on the island of Timor.

Voir : http://aaronpettigrew.com/music_of_timor/

You can browse the site in a few different ways:

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java in ResearchWorks Archive of the University of Washington Libraries

The University of Washington Libraries collaborated with Anthropology Ph.D. student, Evi Sutrisno, who was conducting her dissertation field research on Chinese Indonesian Confucianism, to digitize the rare and fragile Sino-Malay literature owned by two temple libraries in Java. The first project was conducted in Boen Bio (Wen Miao) – a Confucian temple of Surabaya, East Java – in 2010-2011. The temple was founded in 1907 and had a collection of religious books and magazines in Chinese and Malay languages in its abandoned library. The second project was conducted in the Hok An Kiong temple, Muntilan, Central Java in 2014-2016. The temple was founded in 1898 and had became the religious, social and learning space for the Chinese in the area. As in the case of Boen Bio, the Hok An Kiong also has an abandoned library, where popular Sino-Malay novels and magazines were collected.

Between 1967 and1998 Confucian practices and Chinese identity were severely repressed under the Indonesian New Order regime, so these materials were hidden away in the corners of dark and humid storage rooms to avoid state confiscation. Due to climate conditions, biological pests, and lack of appropriate storage facilities, the collection was in great danger and in urgent need of preservation. These projects are parts of a larger effort to identify materials in all known collections belonging to temples and private collections in four cities: Jakarta/Tangerang, Bandung, Solo, and Pontianak, where the Confucian communities during the period of 1900s to 1940s were vibrant. The first project consists of about 5,000 pages scanned from the collections of the Boen Bio temple and three other private collections in Surabaya. The second digitizes about 12,500 pages from the collection of the Hok An Kiong temple in Muntilan. Each project has been done in collaboration with other scholars and the temple communities who are interested in preserving the precious documents and history of the Chinese-Indonesians. For the second project, Evi Sutrisno would like to thank Sutrisno Murtiyoso of Tarumanegara University, Jakarta, Endy Saputro of State College for Islamic Studies, Surakarta and Elizabeth Chandra of Keio University, Tokyo for their supports and collaborations. Thanks also to Laurie Sears for her decision to provide funding. For further description of the project and the importance of the materials preserved, see: Evi Sutrisno. Forgotten Confucian Periodicals in Indonesia, CORMOSEA Bulletin, no 34 (Summer 2016): 8-14.

Vous pouvez faire des recherches dans la collection et consulter la liste des deniers documents mis en ligne sur : https://digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/21474

Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia

Ward Berenschot, Henk Schulte Nordholt and Laurens Bakker (eds), Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia, Brill, 2017

Ouvrage en ligne et en libre accès.

Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia redirects the largely western-oriented study of citizenship to postcolonial states. Providing various fascinating first-hand accounts of how citizens interpret and realize the recognition of their property, identity, security and welfare in the context of a weak rule of law and clientelistic politics, this study highlights the importance of studying citizenship for understanding democratization processes in Southeast Asia. With case studies from Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and Cambodia, this book provides a unique bottom-up perspective on the character of public life in Southeast Asia.

Table des matières 

1. Introduction: Citizenship and Democratization in Postcolonial Southeast Asia, Ward Berenschot, Henk Schulte Nordholt and Laurens Bakker

Part I: Clientelism and Citizenship
2. Citizen Participation and Decentralization in the Philippines, Emma Porio
3. Everyday Citizenship in Village Java, Takeshi Ito
4. Elections and Emerging Forms of Citizenship in Cambodia, Astrid Norén-Nilsson
5. Sosialisasi, Citizenship and Street Vendors in Yogyakarta, Sheri Lynn Gibbings

Part II: Identity and Citizenship
6. Militias, Security and Citizenship in Indonesia, Laurens Bakker
7. Custom and Citizenship in the Philippine Uplands, Oona Thommes Paredes
8. Citizenship and Islam in Malaysia and Indonesia, David Kloos and Ward Berenschot

Part III: Middle Classes Engaging the State
9. Digital Media and Malaysia’s Electoral Reform Movement, Merlyna Lim
10. Citizenship, Rights and Adversarial Legalism in Thailand, Wolfram Schaffar
11. Defending Indonesia’s Migrant Domestic Workers, Mary Austin
12. The Yellow Shirts versus the Red Shirts and the Rise of a New Middle Class in Thailand, Apichat Satitniramai

A télécharger sur : http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/9789004329669