Archives de catégorie : DOCUMENTATION

Dreams of Prosperity

Silvia Vignato (ed.), Dreams of Prosperity: Inequality and Integration in Southeast Asia, EFEO, Silkworm Books, 2017

Dreams of Prosperity offers a critical composite reflection on Southeast Asia as a progressively integrated and globalized space of production, exchange, and circulation within and beyond national boundaries. Through a broad array of contexts united by the theme of integration, the essays describe the successful or unsuccessful entry of specific individuals or groups into wider markets and networks in their quest for prosperity—in Thailand, by Lua peasant farmers, slum families, the last century’s teak laborers, and ethnic tour hosts; in Indonesia, by the urban poor and communities resisting environmental destruction; and in Vietnam, by human trafficking returnees. The authors examine how these groups are socially and symbolically defined and redefined in the process of integration, and consider the imaginaries of future that enable both active participation and unmitigated manipulation. Two key topics are the cognitive struggle that peasants and laborers face with their material environment and the process of sense-making that characterizes many destitute people in urban contexts.

Contributors are Matteo Carlo Alcano, Amnuayvit Thitibordin, Monika Arnez, Giuseppe Bolotta, Olivier Evrard, Karnrawee Sratongno, Runa Lazzarino, Manoj Potapohn, Amalia Rossi, Sakkarin Na Nan, and Silvia Vignato.

Contents 

  1. Green Aspirations and the Dynamics of Integration in Two East Kalimantan Cities— Monika Arnez 
  2. Neoliberalism and the Integration of Labor and Natural Resources: Contract Farming and Biodiversity Conservation in Northern Thailand—Amalia Rossi and Sakkarin Na Nan 
  3. Integration and Marginality in the Tourist Economy: The Geopolitics of Trekking in Chiang Mai Province—Olivier Evrard, Manoj Potapohn, and Karnrawee Stratongno 
  4. Migration and the Ethnic Division of Labor in Siam’s Teak Business, 1880s–1910s— Amnuayvit Thitibordin 
  5. After the Shelter: The Nuances of Reintegrating Human Trafficking Returnees in Northern Vietnam—Runa Lazzarino 
  6. Playing the NGO System: How Mothers and Children Design Political Change in the Slums of Bangkok—Giuseppe Bolotta 
  7. Making Sense of Poverty in Aceh and Surabaya—Silvia Vignato and Matteo Carlo Alcano 

Bagan and the World: Early Myanmar and Its Global Connections

Goh Geok Yian, John N. Miksic, Michael Aung-Thwin (eds), Bagan and the World: Early Myanmar and Its Global Connections, ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute, 2017

The archaeological site of Bagan and the kingdom which bore its name contains one of the greatest concentrations of ancient architecture and art in Asia. Much of what is visible today consists of ruins of Buddhist monasteries. While these monuments are a major tourist attraction, recent advances in archaeology and textual history have added considerable new understanding of this kingdom, which flourished between the 11th and 14th centuries. Bagan was not an isolated monastic site; its inhabitants participated actively in networks of Buddhist religious activity and commerce, abetted by the sites location near the junction where South Asia, China and Southeast Asia meet.

This volume presents the result of recent research by scholars from around the world, including indigenous Myanmar people, whose work deserves to be known among the international community. The perspective on Myanmar’s role as an integral part of the intellectual, artistic and economic framework found in this volume yields a glimpse of new themes which future studies of Asian history will no doubt explore.

Voir la table des matières sur : https://bookshop.iseas.edu.sg/publication/2278

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive, Sejarah Nusantara, Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia

The paper archives created by the Dutch East India Company (VOC, 1602-1799) and dealing with its commercial operations in Asian waters are preserved in the national archives of Indonesia, the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, South Africa and India. In particular, the archives in Jakarta contain thousands of documents originating from Asian persons, including many local rulers from around the Indonesian archipelago. The most voluminous collections spanning 2,000 metres are in the Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia (ANRI). On 9 March 2004, the archives of the VOC were included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.

The 2.000 metres of archives in ANRI can be roughly divided into two sections:
1) The archives created in and formerly kept at Batavia Castle, the former headquarters of the VOC in Asia. This is the archive of the Supreme Government (the Governor-General and the ordinary Councillors of Dutch Asia).
2) The archives of local private and public institutions in Batavia.

For this digitalization and public access project, a selection had to be made. The Daily Journals of Batavia Castle which can be found in the archives of the Supreme Government were digitalized and published first. This series reflects the principle concerns of the Supreme Government.  Prominent here were internal Company affairs in matters as diverse as the general management of trade, personnel and financial affairs, shipping and logistics. The Supreme Government also dealt with all political and diplomatic affairs, the administration of justice and correspondence with other VOC factories in Asia as well as the VOC Chambers and their Governing Board, theso-called Gentlemen Seventeen (Heren XVII) or Directors of the VOC  in the Dutch Republic. The Daily Journals were created to maintain an ongoing overview of such activities.

During the course of the eighteenth century, the Resolution Books of the Supreme Government became more and more important and voluminous while the registration of correspondence in the Daily Journals gradually declined. In particular, the handling of all matters to do with the regional establishments of the Company were included in the General Resolution Books. In 1743, such matters were recorded in a separate yearbook, giving birth to a separate series: the General (Foreign) Affairs Books (Net-Generale Besogneboeken).

Another, hitherto unresearched and historically unique series are the Appendices to the General Resolution Books. These total together some 742 volumes numbering some 550,000 folio pages. This series contain a variety of documents which may gradually become accessible via a special database. The first document descriptions for this database were started in 2013 by ANRI’s Content Team (see organisation).

Liste des archives consultables moyennant une inscription sur le site:

  • General Resolutions of Batavia Castle 1613-1810
  • Realia 1610-1808
  • Appendices to General Resolutions 1686-1811
  • The Placards of Batavia Castle 1602-1808
  • Daily Journals of Batavia Castle 1624-1806
  • Marginalia to the Daily Journals 1659-1807
  • Diplomatic Letters 1625-1812
  • Corpus Diplomaticum 1595-1799

Plus d’informations sur : https://sejarah-nusantara.anri.go.id/archive/

 

Podcast : Islamist politics and political survival in Malaysia

Podcast Malaysian’dreamings: Islamist politics and political survival in Malaysia with Clive Kessler and Norani Othman, Sidney Southeast Asia Center

The rise of using Islam for political survival in Malaysia as its ruling party and leadership are mired in a multi-billion dollar global corruption scandal. And how the long-term agenda of the Islamist Pas party crashes into the secular founding of Malaysia, and the threats to the Federal Constitution and the future of the nation. Speakers, in order, are: Professor Clive Kessler, emeritus UNSW; and Professor Norani Othman, emeritus UKM and co-founder Sisters in Islam. Introduced by Dr Lis Kramer, moderated by Kean Wong. Hosted by Sydney University’s SouthEast Asia Research Centre, and globalbersih.org.

A écouter sur : https://soundcloud.com/matrokr/islamist-politics-political-survival-in-malaysia-w-profs-clive-kessler-norani-othman

Vous trouverez sur la même page d’autres podcasts de la collection Malaysian’dreamings à laquelle vous pouvez vous abonner sur SoundCloud.

 

 

Becoming Better Muslims

David Kloos, Becoming Better Muslims : Religious Authority and Ethical Improvement in Aceh, Indonesia, Princeton University Press, 2017

How do ordinary Muslims deal with and influence the increasingly pervasive Islamic norms set by institutions of the state and religion? Becoming Better Muslims offers an innovative account of the dynamic interactions between individual Muslims, religious authorities, and the state in Aceh, Indonesia. Relying on extensive historical and ethnographic research, David Kloos offers a detailed analysis of religious life in Aceh and an investigation into today’s personal processes of ethical formation.

Aceh is known for its history of rebellion and its recent implementation of Islamic law. Debunking the stereotypical image of the Acehnese as inherently pious or fanatical, Kloos shows how Acehnese Muslims reflect consciously on their faith and often frame their religious lives in terms of gradual ethical improvement. Revealing that most Muslims view their lives through the prism of uncertainty, doubt, and imperfection, he argues that these senses of failure contribute strongly to how individuals try to become better Muslims. He also demonstrates that while religious authorities have encroached on believers and local communities, constraining them in their beliefs and practices, the same process has enabled ordinary Muslims to reflect on moral choices and dilemmas, and to shape the ways religious norms are enforced.

Arguing that Islamic norms are carried out through daily negotiations and contestations rather than blind conformity, Becoming Better Muslims examines how ordinary people develop and exercise their religious agency.

Plus d’informations sur : https://press.princeton.edu/titles/11204.html

 

Suvannabhumi, vol. 9, n° 1, 2017

Suvannabhumi : Multi-disciplinary Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, vol. 9, n° 1, June 2017

Revue en libre accès dirigée par Victor T. King (Emeritus Professor, University of Leeds) et Park Jang Sik (Busan University of Foreign Studies, Korea) avec Kim Dong-Yeob (Busan University of Foreign Studies, Korea), Kim Yekyoum (Busan University of Foreign Studies, Korea) et Louie Jon A. Sanchez (Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines) et publiée par l’ISEAS.

Articles

  • “Local” vs. “Cosmopolitan” in the Study of Premodern Southeast Asia by Andrea Acri
  • Affective-discursive Practices in Southeast Asia: Appropriating emotive roles in the case of a Filipina domestic helper in Hong Kong who fell to her death while cleaning windows by Alwin C. Aguirre
  • Things Fall Apart? Thailand’s Post-Colonial Politics by Duncan McCargo
  • Articulations of Southeast Asian Religious Modernisms: Islam in Early 20th Century Cambodia & Cochinchina by William B. Noseworthy
  • An Overview of Southeast Asian Area Studies in the Philippines by Meynardo P. Mendoza
  • Nation-Building in Independent Myanmar: A Comparative Study of a History Textbook and a Civic Textbook by Myo Oo
  • Social Capital Revitalization of the Sasaq Community in Lombok, Indonesia through Learning Organization by Mansur Afifi and Sitti Latifah

Télécharger les PDF des articles sur : http://suvannabhumi.iseas.kr/?ckattempt=3

 

Asian Politics and Policy, vol. 9, n° 2, 2017

Asian Politics and Policy, vol. 9, n° 2, October 2017

Special Issue : The Philippines confront a post-American world

Table of contents

Editor’s Introduction

  • The Philippines, through the Looking Glass by Aileen S. P. Baviera

Original Articles

  • The Philippines Confronts a Post-American World: Geopolitical-Domestic-Institutional Intersections by Alice D. Ba
  • Developing a Credible Defense Posture for the Philippines: From the Aquino to the Duterte Administrations by Renato Cruz de Castro
  • Evolving Philippines-U.S.-China Strategic Triangle: International and Domestic Drivers by Richard Javad Heydarian
  • Sea Power in the 21st Century: Challenges and Opportunities for the Philippine Navy by Dianne Faye Co Despi
  • Great Power Dynamics and the Waning of ASEAN Centrality in Regional Security by Herman Joseph S. Kraft
  • Domestic Factors and Strategic Partnership: Redefining Philippines-Japan Relations in the 21st Century by Dennis D. Trinidad

Book Reviews (ASE)

  • Le Hong Hiep, « Living Next to the Giant: The Political Economy of Vietnam’s Relations with China Under Doi Moi », Singapore: ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute by Thuy T. Do
  • Jong-sung You, « Democracy, Inequality and Corruption: Korea, Taiwan and the Philippines Compared », Cambridge: Cambridge University Press by Hélder Ferreira do Vale

Pour plus d’informations voir : http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/aspp.2017.9.issue-4/issuetoc

 

Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, vol. 36, n° 2, 2017

Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, vol. 36, n° 2, 2017

Table of contents

Research Articles

  • The Purnawirawan and Party Development in Post-Authoritarian Indonesia, 1998–2014 by M Faishal Aminuddin
  • Mechanisms of Vietnam’s Multidirectional Foreign Policy by Nicholas William Chapman
  • From Impediment to Adaptation: Chinese Investments in Myanmar’s New Regulatory Environment by SiuSue Mark, Youyi Zhang
  • A Strategy of Attrition through Enforcement: The Unmaking of Irregular Migration in Malaysia by Choo Chin Low

Review Articles

  • Civil–Military Relations during Transition and Post-Democratisation Periods: A View from Southeast Asia by Hipolitus Yolisandry Ringgi Wangge

Articles à télécharger sur : https://www.giga-hamburg.de/de/news/neues-journal-of-current-southeast-asian-affairs-22017

Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 38, n° 2, 2017

Philippine Political Science Journal, vol. 38, n° 2, August 2017

Table of contents

Articles

  • Judicialized governance in the Philippines: toward new environmental judicial principles that translate into effective “green” policies and citizen empowerment by Eduardo T. Gonzalez
  • Exemplars in the coverage of the Bangsamoro framework agreement: using computational tools to compare Qatari and Philippine news framing by Mark L. Cabling, Fabrizio Drago and Amanda T. Andrei
  • The venture into higher education: exploring politics of education in a Philippine local government college by Ronald A. Pernia

Book Reviews

  • « Mindanao: the long journey to peace and prosperity » by Dennis Quilala
  • « Territorial disputes in the South China Sea: navigating rough waters » by Melquiades A. Acomular Jr.

Voir la suite sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rpsj20/current?nav=tocList

 

Religion and the morality of the market

Daromir Rudnyckyj, Filippo Osella (eds), Religion and the morality of the market, Cambridge University Press, 2017

Since the collapse of the Berlin Wall, there has been a widespread affirmation of economic ideologies that conceive the market as an autonomous sphere of human practice, holding that market principles should be applied to human action at large. In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, the ascendance of market reason has been countered by calls for reforms of financial markets and for the consideration of moral values in economic practice. This book intervenes in these debates by showing how neoliberal market practices engender new forms of religiosity, and how religiosity shapes economic actions. It reveals how religious movements and organizations have reacted to the increasing prominence of market reason in unpredictable, and sometimes counterintuitive, ways. Using a range of examples from different countries and religious traditions, the book illustrates the myriad ways in which religious and market moralities are closely imbricated in diverse global contexts.

A signaler :

  • Assembling Islam and Liberalism: Market Freedom and the Moral Project of Islamic Finance by Daromir Rudnyckyj
  • Marketizing Piety through Charitable Work: Islamic Charities and the Islamization of Middle- Class Families in Indonesia by Hilman Latief

Table des matières sur : https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/religion-and-the-morality-of-the-market/AEA3F2A0EECD7D3A65F5063D9AFE1470#fndtn-contents

 

 

Indonesia Update 2017 : GLOBALISATION, NATIONALISM AND SOVEREIGNTY

ANU Indonesia Project Blog : Indonesia Update 2017 : Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty, 15-16/09/2017, The Australian National University

Today, globalisation is more complex than ever. The effects of the global financial crisis and increased inequality have, in many countries, spurred anti-global sentiment and encouraged the adoption of populist and inward-looking policies. Discontent has manifested in some surprising results: Brexit, Trump, and possibly more to come. In Indonesia, it has led to rising protectionism, a rejection of foreign interference in the name of nationalism, and economic policies dominated by calls for self-sufficiency. Meanwhile, human trafficking and the abuse of migrant workers have shown the other side of globalisation.

Againts this background the ANU Indonesia Project held its 35th Indonesia Update conference on 15 and 16 September in Canberra. As usual, the coference kicked off with the updates on politic and economic development. Then centered on the theme “Indonesia in the New World: Globalisation, Nationalism and Sovereignty”, fourteen papers were presented to the audience of more than 500 during the one-and-half-day event. The topics included the historical dynamics of Indonesia’s engagement with the global world, its stance in the South China Sea, and the emergence of new nationalism. Speakers also examined nationalism in practice (for example, food sovereignty and resource nationalism) and the impact of and response to globalisation, as well as poverty, inequality, and gender issues.

Following the Canberra conference, we held two “Mini Indonesia Updates” on 18 September, in Sydney (in collaboration with the Lowy Institute) and in Adelaide (in collaboration with the University of Adelaide’s Institute for International Trade).

The papers presented in the conference will be published in the Indonesia Update book series and will be launched next year, in collaboration with the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS)/ Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore.

Vous trouverez sur cette page les vidéos des conférences suivantes :

Political Update : Indonesia’s year of democratic setback: toward a new era of deepening illiberalism? by Vedi Hadiz (University of Melbourne)

Economic Update : Effectivity of policy reform in democracy and regional autonomy regime by Raden Pardede (CReco Consulting)

Globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty: the Indonesian experience by Anthony Reid (ANU), Edward Aspinall (ANU), Shafiah Muhibat (Nanyang Technological University) with an Overview by Mari Pangestu (Universitas Indonesia)

Nationalism in practice by Jeffrey Neilson (The University of Sydney), Eve Warburton (ANU), Yose Rizal Damuri (Centre for Strategic and International Studies)

Poverty, inequality and gender issues by Arief Anshory Yusuf (Padjadjaran University), Peter Warr (ANU), Janneke Pieters (Wageningen University), Robert Sparrow (Wageningen University)

The human face of globalisation by Anis Hidayah (Migrant CARE), Dominggus Elcid Li (Institute of Resource Governance and Social Change)

Response to globalisation by Manggi Habir (Bank Danamon Indonesia), Titik Anas (Presisi Indonesia)

Concluding remarks: navigating the new globalisation by Hal Hill (ANU), Deasy Pane (ANU), Danny Quah (National University of Singapore)

A voir sur : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/blogs/indonesiaproject/?page_id=8559

Southeast of Now, vol. 1, n° 2, October 2017

Southeast of Now : Directions in Contemporary and Modern Art in Asia,  vol. 1, n° 2, October 2017

Numéro en libre accès

Table of contents

  • Editorial : Discomfort

Articles

  • Felicitous « Misalignments »: Bagyi Aung Soe’s Manaw Maheikdi Dat Pangyi by Yin Ker
  • The Painting of Prostitutes in Indonesian Modern Art by Matt Cox
  • Rites of Change: Artistic Responses to Recent Street Protests in Kuala Lumpur by Fiona Lee
  • The Third Avant-garde: Messages of Discontent by Leonor Veiga

Curatorial Intervention

  • Queering Postnational Tendencies in Contemporary Art from Thailand by Brian Curtin

Translations

  • « We Know Where We Will Be Taking Indonesian Art », 1948 by Sindudarsono Sudjojono translated by Brigitta Isabella
  • « Untitled Letter to Editor », Jakarta, 25 December 1942 by Sindudarsono Sudjojono translated by Matt Cox

Review

  • Michelle Antoinette, « Reworlding Art History: Contemporary Southeast Asian Art after 1990 » by Clare Veal

Short Response

  • A Flimsy Image: A Case Study for Learning to Listen by Fiona Amundsen

Articles à télécharger sur : https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/37275

 

Muslim NGOs and civil society in Indonesia

Podcast: Muslim NGOs and civil society in Indonesia
Religion and NGOs

Produced by R. Michael Feener

While the service provision activities of some religious NGOs complement and enhance systems of low state capacity, in others they compete with state services and in still others service delivery by religious NGOs is associated with political parties and forms part of their electoral strategies. Across diverse engagements, then, religious NGOs depend on their ability to elude, enrol, and subvert the state institutions – while states themselves adjust to the impact of these new actors in turn. In this interview with Robert Hefner about his research on Muslim NGOs in the Javanese city of Yogyakarta, and what his findings can show us about Islam and civil society in contemporary Southeast Asia.

Since the turn of the twenty-first century, there has been a remarkable surge of interest among both academics and policy makers in the effects that religion has on international aid and development. Within this broad field, the work of ‘religious NGOs’ or ‘Faith-Based Organisations’ (FBOs) has garnered considerable attention. This series of podcasts for The Religious Studies Project seeks to explore how the discourses, practices, and institutional forms of both religious actors and purportedly secular NGOs intersect, and how these engagements result in changes in our understanding of both ‘religion’ and ‘development’. These interviews with leading scholars working on the topic across diverse contexts in Asia (and beyond) have been conducted by Dr. Catherine Scheer & Dr. Giuseppe Bolotta of the National University of Singapore’s Asia Research Institute. Our work on this has been generously supported by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

Podcast et transcription de l’interview de Robert W. Hefner sur : http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/podcast/muslim-ngos-and-civil-society-in-indonesia/?

EYE OF THE ARCHITECT: THE MADE WIJAYA PHOTOGRAPHIC ARCHIVE

Soft-launch of ISEAS Library database: Eye of the architect: the Made Wijaya photographic archive, 11/10/2017, ISEAS

Regional social and cultural studies programme seminar

Wednesday, 11 October 2017 – This seminar, in part a soft-launch of ISEAS Library database on Made Wijaya’s (alias Michael White) photographic archive, welcomed its four speakers: Dr Hélène Njoto, Visiting Fellow at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute; Mr Soedarmaji Damais, founder and head of Indonesian Arts Cooperation Body (BKKI); Mr Richard Hassell, co-founder of WOHA, and lastly, Professor Adrian Vickers from the University of Sydney who is concurrently a Visiting Fellow at ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute. They were greeted by a diverse audience that comprised of students, landscape architects from public and private agencies, researchers, as well as previous clients and friends of Made Wijaya. Hosting an insightful conversation with participants, the seminar addressed the importance of preserving and engaging with such archives for the study of landscape design and architecture history in Southeast Asia.

Dr Hélène Njoto’s prelude to the seminar was a survey of Made Wijaya’s photographic collection as it is now archived at ISEAS Library. She walked us through the online database of over 40,000 items, highlighting one of Wijaya’s gardens trademarks: the layering of vernacular architectural history. She demonstrated this by showing an “architectural history enigma” Wijaya liked to feature in his work, the Javanese and Balinese single-post and platform tree structures. She effectively showed how this collection not only documents Wijaya’s achievements but assembles an important number of photographs from fieldtrips throughout the world. Wijaya was concerned about sharing his sources of inspiration with future landscape designers, architects, and architecture history students, as his popular books have shown.

As a close and long-time acquaintance of Made Wijaya, Mr Soedarmaji Damais brought a personal note to the seminar as he shared stories about Wijaya’s first arrival in Bali, his assimilation as a Balinese and passion for the island and the way his garden designs were based on the search for connections with Chinese and other gardens.

Mr Richard Hassell then introduced Made Wijaya from a practitioner’s perspective, sharing Wijaya’s architectural and landscape architecture legacies through projects, and his role as a role model and mentor. Mr Hassell saw the archive as a way to engage with Wijaya’s attitudes to landscape history, the basis of his creation and design of gardens; a knowledge imperative for current practitioners.

The final speaker, Professor Adrian Vickers, another close acquaintance of Made Wijaya, affirmed Wijaya’s remarkable visual sensibility. Using photographs from the archive, Professor Vickers illustrated how Wijaya’s eye and curiosity for details in both modern adaptations and pre-modern spaces nurtured his unique visual repertoire and syntax. Professor Vickers closed the session with a tribute to Wijaya’s personal wish to preserve aspects of otherwise lost cultures, emphasising the need to capture and document these vulnerable and impermanent landscapes.

The Made Wijaya database at ISEAS Library is now publicly accessible online at ISEAS Library’s SeaLionPLUS. Upon registering, the archive can be explored by geographic regions or keywords. Made Wijaya’s video collections on ethnography (Balinese dance and rituals) can also be found at the University of Sydney.

Voir : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/medias/event-highlights/item/6360-soft-launch-of-iseas-library-database-eye-of-the-architect-the-made-wijaya-photographic-archive

 

 

U.S. Embassy Tracked Indonesia Mass Murder 1965

General Suharto in the days after the September 30th Movement

Newly Declassified U.S. Embassy Jakarta Files Detail Army Killings, U.S. support for Quashing Leftist Labor Movemen, Briefing Book # 607, edited by Brad Simpson, National Security Archive, The George Washington University

Washington, D.C., October 17, 2017 – The U.S. government had detailed knowledge that the Indonesian Army was conducting a campaign of mass murder against the country’s Communist Party (PKI) starting in 1965, according to newly declassified documents posted today by the National Security Archive at The George Washington University.  The new materials further show that diplomats in the Jakarta Embassy kept a record of which PKI leaders were being executed, and that U.S. officials actively supported Indonesian Army efforts to destroy the country’s left-leaning labor movement.

The 39 documents made available today come from a collection of nearly 30,000 pages of files constituting much of the daily record of the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia, from 1964-1968. The collection, much of it formerly classified, was processed by the National Declassification Center in response to growing public interest in the remaining U.S. documents concerning the mass killings of 1965-1966.  American and Indonesian human rights and freedom of information activists, filmmakers, as well as a group of U.S. Senators led by Tom Udall (D-NM), had called for the materials to be made public.

The documents concern one of the most important and turbulent chapters in Indonesian history and U.S.-Indonesian relations, which witnessed the gradual collapse of ties between Jakarta and Washington, a low-level war with Britain over the formation of Malaysia, rising tension between the Indonesian Army and the Indonesian Communist Party, the growing radicalization of Indonesian President Sukarno, and the expansion of U.S. covert operations aimed at provoking a clash between the Army and PKI. These tensions erupted in the aftermath of an attempted purge of the Army by the September 30th Movement – a group of military officers with the collaboration of a handful of PKI leaders.  After crushing the Movement, which had kidnapped and killed six high-ranking Army generals, the Indonesian Army and its paramilitary allies launched a campaign of annihilation against the PKI and its affiliated organizations, killing up to 500,000 alleged PKI supporters between October 1965 and March 1966, imprisoning up to a million more, and eventually ousting Sukarno and replacing him with General Suharto, who ruled Indonesia for the next 32 years before he himself was overthrown in May 1998.

In an unprecedented collaboration, the National Security Archive worked with the National Declassification Center (NDC) to make the entirety of this collection available to the public by scanning and digitizing the collection, which will be incorporated into the National Archives and Records Administration’s (NARA) digital finding aids. When completed, scholars, journalists, and researchers will be able to search the documents by date, keyword, or name, providing unparalleled access, in particular for the Indonesian public, to a unique collection of records concerning one of the most important periods of Indonesian history.

Of the 30,000 pages processed by the NDC, several hundred documents remain classified and are undergoing further review before their scheduled release in early 2018. While some of the documents in this collection were declassified and deposited at NARA or the Lyndon Johnson Presidential Library in the late 1990s, many thousands of pages are being made available for the first time in more than 50 years.

Le texte des documents déclassifiés et leurs fac-similés sont sur la page ainsi que des liens, des ouvrages et une liste d’articles de presse : http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/briefing-book/indonesia/2017-10-15/indonesia-mass-murder-1965-us-embassy-files