Archives de catégorie : DOCUMENTATION

Music of Timor : an online exhibit for the ITLSC meeting at AAS 2017

Music of Timor: an online exhibit for the ITLSC meeting at AAS 2017

This is a website about the music and music-related academic research that has been undertaken on the island of Timor.

Voir : http://aaronpettigrew.com/music_of_timor/

You can browse the site in a few different ways:

New Religiosities, Modern Capitalism, and Moral Complexities in Southeast Asia

Juliette Koning, Gwenaël Njoto-Feillard (eds), New Religiosities, Modern Capitalism, and Moral Complexities in Southeast Asia, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017

As Southeast Asia experiences unprecedented economic modernization, religious and moral practices are being challenged as never before. From Thai casinos to Singaporean megachurches, from the practitioners of Islamic Finance in Jakarta to Pentecostal Christians in rural Cambodia, this volume discusses the moral complexities that arise when religious and economic developments converge. In the past few decades, Southeast Asia has seen growing religious pluralism and antagonisms as well as the penetration of a market economy and economic liberalism. Providing a multidisciplinary, cross-regional snapshot of a region in the midst of profound change, this text is a key read for scholars of religion, economists, non-governmental organization workers, and think-tankers across the region.

Voir : https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9789811029684

 

The Mists of Ramanna : The Legend That Was Lower Burma

Michael A. Aung-Thwin, The Mists of Ramanna : The Legend That Was Lower Burma, University of Hawaii Press, 2005

Scholars have long accepted the belief that a Theravada Buddhist Mon kingdom, Ramannadesa, flourished in coastal Lower Burma until it was conquered in 1057 by King Aniruddha of Pagan—which then became, in essence, the new custodian and repository of Mon culture in the Upper Burmese interior. This scenario, which Aung-Thwin calls the «  »Mon Paradigm, » » has circumscribed much of the scholarship on early Burma and significantly shaped the history of Southeast Asia for more than a century. Now, in a masterful reassessment of Burmese history, Michael Aung-Thwin reexamines the original contemporary accounts and sources without finding any evidence of an early Theravada Mon polity or a conquest by Aniruddha. The paradigm, he finds, cannot be sustained. Aung-Thwin meticulously traces the paradigm’s creation to the merging of two temporally, causally, and contextually unrelated Mon and Burmese narratives.

A télécharger sur Oapen Library : http://oapen.org/search?identifier=625896#.WPAx4CBr-mw.email

Early Views of Indonesia: Drawings from the British Library

Annabel Teh Gallop, Early Views of Indonesia: Drawings from the British Library, London : The British Library, Jakarta : Yayasan Lontar, 1995, p. 132.

Annabel Gallop’s bilingual book, Early Views of Indonesia: Drawings from the British Library, is now available free online. This book is the catalogue of an exhibition held in Jakarta in 1995 to mark the presentation to the National Library of Indonesia of a complete set of facsimile reproductions of 510 archaeological drawings of Indonesia in the British Library. The presentation was a gift from the British government to the people of the Republic of Indonesia to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Indonesian independence.

A lire sur : http://library.lontar.org/flipbooks/Early Views Of Indonesia/Early Views Of Indonesia.html#/1/

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java

The Chinese-Indonesian Community documents collection from Java in ResearchWorks Archive of the University of Washington Libraries

The University of Washington Libraries collaborated with Anthropology Ph.D. student, Evi Sutrisno, who was conducting her dissertation field research on Chinese Indonesian Confucianism, to digitize the rare and fragile Sino-Malay literature owned by two temple libraries in Java. The first project was conducted in Boen Bio (Wen Miao) – a Confucian temple of Surabaya, East Java – in 2010-2011. The temple was founded in 1907 and had a collection of religious books and magazines in Chinese and Malay languages in its abandoned library. The second project was conducted in the Hok An Kiong temple, Muntilan, Central Java in 2014-2016. The temple was founded in 1898 and had became the religious, social and learning space for the Chinese in the area. As in the case of Boen Bio, the Hok An Kiong also has an abandoned library, where popular Sino-Malay novels and magazines were collected.

Between 1967 and1998 Confucian practices and Chinese identity were severely repressed under the Indonesian New Order regime, so these materials were hidden away in the corners of dark and humid storage rooms to avoid state confiscation. Due to climate conditions, biological pests, and lack of appropriate storage facilities, the collection was in great danger and in urgent need of preservation. These projects are parts of a larger effort to identify materials in all known collections belonging to temples and private collections in four cities: Jakarta/Tangerang, Bandung, Solo, and Pontianak, where the Confucian communities during the period of 1900s to 1940s were vibrant. The first project consists of about 5,000 pages scanned from the collections of the Boen Bio temple and three other private collections in Surabaya. The second digitizes about 12,500 pages from the collection of the Hok An Kiong temple in Muntilan. Each project has been done in collaboration with other scholars and the temple communities who are interested in preserving the precious documents and history of the Chinese-Indonesians. For the second project, Evi Sutrisno would like to thank Sutrisno Murtiyoso of Tarumanegara University, Jakarta, Endy Saputro of State College for Islamic Studies, Surakarta and Elizabeth Chandra of Keio University, Tokyo for their supports and collaborations. Thanks also to Laurie Sears for her decision to provide funding. For further description of the project and the importance of the materials preserved, see: Evi Sutrisno. Forgotten Confucian Periodicals in Indonesia, CORMOSEA Bulletin, no 34 (Summer 2016): 8-14.

Vous pouvez faire des recherches dans la collection et consulter la liste des deniers documents mis en ligne sur : https://digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/21474

Journal of Contemporary Asia, vol. 47, no. 3, July 2017

Journal of Contemporary Asia, vol. 47, no. 3, July 2017

Interpreting Communal Violence in Myanmar

Table of contents

Original articles

  • Introduction: Interpreting Communal Violence in Myanmar by Nick Cheesman
  • The Contentious Politics of Anti-Muslim Scapegoating in Myanmar by Gerry van Klinken and Su Mon Thazin Aung
  • Reconciling Contradictions: Buddhist-Muslim Violence, Narrative Making and Memory in Myanmar by Matt Schissler, Matthew J. Walton and Phyu Phyu Thi
  • Gendered Rumours and the Muslim Scapegoat in Myanmar’s Transition by Gerard McCarthy and Jacqueline Menager
  • Communal Conflict in Myanmar: The Legislature’s Response, 2012–2015 by Chit Win and Thomas Kean
  • Producing the News: Reporting on Myanmar’s Rohingya Crisis by Lisa Brooten and Yola Verbruggen
  • How in Myanmar “National Races” Came to Surpass Citizenship and Exclude Rohingya by Nick Cheesman

Book Reviews

  • Nick Cheesman, Opposing the Rule of Law: How Myanmar’s Courts Make Law and Order by Susanne Prager-Nyein
  • Melissa Crouch (ed.), Islam and the State in Myanmar: Muslim-Buddhist Relations and the Politics of Belonging by Iza R. Hussin
  • Jayde Lin Roberts, Mapping Chinese Rangoon: Place and Nation among the Sino-Burmese by Elaine L.E. Ho
  • Pia Joliffe, Learning, Migration and Intergenerational Relations: The Karen and the Gift of Education by Shirley Worland

Voir : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rjoc20/47/3

Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia

Ward Berenschot, Henk Schulte Nordholt and Laurens Bakker (eds), Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia, Brill, 2017

Ouvrage en ligne et en libre accès.

Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia redirects the largely western-oriented study of citizenship to postcolonial states. Providing various fascinating first-hand accounts of how citizens interpret and realize the recognition of their property, identity, security and welfare in the context of a weak rule of law and clientelistic politics, this study highlights the importance of studying citizenship for understanding democratization processes in Southeast Asia. With case studies from Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and Cambodia, this book provides a unique bottom-up perspective on the character of public life in Southeast Asia.

Table des matières 

1. Introduction: Citizenship and Democratization in Postcolonial Southeast Asia, Ward Berenschot, Henk Schulte Nordholt and Laurens Bakker

Part I: Clientelism and Citizenship
2. Citizen Participation and Decentralization in the Philippines, Emma Porio
3. Everyday Citizenship in Village Java, Takeshi Ito
4. Elections and Emerging Forms of Citizenship in Cambodia, Astrid Norén-Nilsson
5. Sosialisasi, Citizenship and Street Vendors in Yogyakarta, Sheri Lynn Gibbings

Part II: Identity and Citizenship
6. Militias, Security and Citizenship in Indonesia, Laurens Bakker
7. Custom and Citizenship in the Philippine Uplands, Oona Thommes Paredes
8. Citizenship and Islam in Malaysia and Indonesia, David Kloos and Ward Berenschot

Part III: Middle Classes Engaging the State
9. Digital Media and Malaysia’s Electoral Reform Movement, Merlyna Lim
10. Citizenship, Rights and Adversarial Legalism in Thailand, Wolfram Schaffar
11. Defending Indonesia’s Migrant Domestic Workers, Mary Austin
12. The Yellow Shirts versus the Red Shirts and the Rise of a New Middle Class in Thailand, Apichat Satitniramai

A télécharger sur : http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/books/9789004329669

Contemporary Indonesian Art: Artists, Art Spaces, and Collectors

Yvonne Spielmann, Contemporary Indonesian Art: Artists, Art Spaces, and Collectors, NUS Press, 2017

Indonesian art entered the global contemporary art world of independent curators, art fairs, and biennales in the 1990s. By the mid-2000s, Indonesian works were well-established on the Asian secondary art market, achieving record-breaking prices at auction houses in Singapore and Hong Kong. This comprehensive overview introduces Indonesian contemporary art in a fresh and stimulating manner, demonstrating how contemporary art breaks from colonial and post-colonial power structures, and grapples with issues of identity and nation-building in Indonesia. Across different media, in performance and installation, it amalgamates ethnic, cultural, and religious references in its visuals, and confidently brings together the traditional (batik, woodcut, dance, Javanese shadow puppet theater) with the contemporary (comics and manga, graffiti, advertising, pop culture).

Spielmann’s Contemporary Indonesian Art surveys the key artists, curators, institutions, and collectors in the local art scene and looks at the significance of Indonesian art in the Asian context. Through this book, originally published in German, Spielmann stakes a claim for the global relevance of Indonesian art.

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/collections/frontpage/products/contemporary-indonesian-art-artists-art-spaces-and-collectors

The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand

Angela S. Chiu, The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power, and Place in Northern Thailand, University of Hawaii Press, 2017

For centuries, wherever Thai Buddhists have made their homes, statues of the Buddha have provided striking testament to the role of Buddhism in the lives of the people. The Buddha in Lanna offers the first in-depth historical study of the Thai tradition of donation of Buddha statues. Drawing on palm-leaf manuscripts and inscriptions, many never previously translated into English, the book reveals the key roles that Thai Buddha images have played in the social and economic worlds of their makers and devotees from the fifteenth to twentieth centuries.

Author Angela Chiu introduces stories from chronicles, histories, and legends written by monks in Lanna, a region centered in today’s northern Thailand. By examining the stories’ themes, structures, and motifs, she illuminates the complex conceptual and material aspects of Buddha images that influenced their functions in Lanna society. Buddha images were depicted as social agents and mediators, the focal points of pan-regional political-religious lineages and rivalries, indeed, as the very generators of history itself. In the chronicles, Buddha images also unified the Buddha with the northern Thai landscape, thereby integrating Buddhist and local conceptions of place. By comparing Thai Buddha statues with other representations of the Buddha, the author underscores the contribution of the Thai evidence to a broader understanding of how different types of Buddha representations were understood to mediate the “presence” of the Buddha.

The Buddha in Lanna focuses on the Thai Buddha image as a part of the wider society and history of its creators and worshippers beyond monastery walls, shedding much needed light on the Buddha image in history. With its impressive range of primary sources, this book will appeal to students and scholars of Buddhism and Buddhist art history, Thai studies, and Southeast Asian religious studies.

Voir : http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9745-9780824858742.aspx

Malaysia Cartoon And Comic House

There’s now a place to go to admire Malaysia’s comic book art by Daryl Goh, 03/04/2017, star2.com

The newly-opened Malaysia Cartoon And Comic House, nestled in leafy Taman Botani Perdana in Kuala Lumpur, is set to be a major attraction for comic book enthusiasts and the more curious-minded. The building, which is now home to the nation’s cartoon and comic book story, is practically packed out, wall-to-wall, with original comic book art, editorial cartoon strips, storyboard sketches, studio notes and vintage youth culture magazines, all dedicated to chronicling Malaysian comic book history and culture.

Over 500 cartoon and comic book works – spanning mid-1930s to the late 1990s – are on display now at the gallery, with Tazidi revealing that less than 10% of the Malaysia Cartoon And Comic House archive has been made public in this opening exhibition.

Atlas of deforestation and industrial plantations in Borneo

Atlas of deforestation and industrial plantations in Borneo : new interactive atlas developed by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR).

For a better Borneo, new map reveals how much terrain has changed, 15/02/2017, Forests News, CIFOR blog

New atlas displays 40 years of human impacts on forests – from fires to logging to industrial plantations and more

Incorporating 40 years of maps of Borneo (the world’s third largest island), the tool reveals both the forest remaining and what is being reshaped due to degradation and extraction industries. With the ability to search by oil palm or pulpwood concessions, and view the locations of intact peatland, as well as determine the speed with which forest is converted to plantation, the atlas offers the first significant opportunity to distinguish companies that are avoiding deforestation to a large degree.

CIFOR scientist David Gaveau, who developed the atlas, said, “The tool is an open platform for researchers, advocacy groups, journalists and anyone interested in deforestation, wildlife habitats and corporate actions.”

The data provided by the atlas is free to download, and informs whether a particular oil palm concession is certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)- the organization that implements a global standard for sustainability in the palm oil industry.

Lire la suite sur : http://blog.cifor.org/48167/for-a-better-borneo-new-map-reveals-how-much-terrain-has-changed?fnl=en

The Blooming Years : Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia

Pavin Chachavalpongpun (ed.), The Blooming Years : Kyoto  Review of Southeast Asia

This collection of articles from the Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia (KRSEA) is published with the financial support of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), Kyoto University. We have compiled all the English articles from Issue 13 (March 2013), to Issue 20 (September 2016). This period marked a turning point for KRSEA with the re-launch of the website in March 2013 and the new online archive of earlier issues.

A télécharger sur : https://kyotoreview.org/the-blooming-years/

Liberalism and the Postcolony: Thinking the State in 20th-Century Philippines

Lisandro E. Claudio, Liberalism and the Postcolony: Thinking the State in 20th-Century Philippines, NUS Press, 2017

Extricating liberalism from the haze of anti-modernist and anti-European caricature, this book traces the role of liberal philosophy in the building of a new nation. It examines the role of toleration, rights, and mediation in the postcolony. Through the biographies of four Filipino scholar-bureaucrats—Camilo Osias, Salvador Araneta, Carlos P. Romulo, and Salvador P. Lopez—Lisandro E. Claudio argues that liberal thought served as the grammar of Filipino democracy in the 20th century. By looking at various articulations of liberalism in pedagogy, international affairs, economics, and literature, Claudio not only narrates an obscured history of the Philippine state, he also argues for a new liberalism rooted in the postcolonial experience, a timely intervention considering current developments in politics in Southeast Asia.

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/products/liberalism-and-the-postcolony-thinking-the-state-in-20th-century-philippines?variant=29097674706

The Rise of the Octobrists in Contemporary Thailand

Kanokrak Lertchoosakul, The Rise of the Octobrists in Contemporary Thailand : Power and Conflict Among Former Left-Wing Student Activists in Thai Politics, Yale Southeast Asia Studies Monograph #65, 2017

This book chronicles the history of the “Octobrist” students in Thai politics from the 1970s to the present. It examines the reasons why these former leftist student activists have managed to remain a significant force over the past three decades despite the collapse of left-wing politics in Thailand at both the national and international levels. At the same time, it asks why the Octobrists have become increasingly divided, particularly during the last decade’s protracted conflict in Thai politics. In addition, it fills in gaps in studies of leftists in transition at the global level on the question of the historical development of leftist and progressive forces in the post–Cold War era. The book is also important for readers interested in social movement theory, demonstrating how it has influenced political actors outside the boundaries of typical social movements. Finally, political opportunity structure, resource mobilization theory, and the framing process are used to conduct a  comprehensive analysis of the origins, emergence, and transformation of the Octobrists in contemporary Thai politics.

Kanokrat Lertchoosakul completed her PhD in government at the London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom. She is a lecturer in the Faculty of Political Science, Department of Government, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Voir : http://cseas.yale.edu/rise-octobrists

Asian ethnicity, vol. 28, no. 3, june 2017

Asian Ethnicity, vol. 28, no. 3, June 2017

Table of contents

  • Infrastructures for ethnicity: understanding the diversification of contemporary Indonesia by Zane Goebel
  • Ethnic Chinese in Malaysian citizenship: gridlocked in historical formation and political hierarchy by Cheun Hoe Yaw
  • Multi-ethnic school environment from the school leader’s perspective: challenges and approaches to improve multi-cultural competency among teachers in Malaysia by Yasmin Ahmad and Najeemah Mohd Yusof
  • Chinese Indonesians: how many, who and where? by Evi Nurvidya Arifin, M. Sairi Hasbullah and Agus Pramono
  • ‘Green Tibetans’ in China: Tibetan geopiety and environmental protection in a multilayered Tibetan landscape by Joshua Esler
  • Oppositional consciousness, cultural preservation, and everyday resistance on the Uyghur Internet by Rebecca A. Clothey and Emmanuel F. Koku
  • ‘Don’t discriminate against minority nationalities’: practicing Tibetan ethnicity on social media by Andrew Grant
  • Translating culture: missionaries and linguists in contemporary Yunnan Province by Gideon Elazar
  • Understanding ethnic visibility through language use: the case of Taiwan Hakka by Huei-ling Lai

Book Reviews

Voir : http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/caet20/18/3