Archives de catégorie : Vie de la recherche

Symposium: Tradition and Contemporaneity in the Arts of Asia

Symposium: Tradition and Contemporaneity in the Arts of Asia, 09/11/2017, Department of Art & Art History, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

About the Talk

Modern and contemporary artists in Asia have had to cope with many challenges, from the influx of Western artistic priorities often intent on redefining or even erasing local artistic traditions, to the wholesale destruction of national infrastructure through unstable political systems and devastating wars. That artists have successfully risen to these challenges, as well as the resilience of local artistic systems and values, is eminently manifest in the vibrant contemporary arts of Asia today.

This symposium will explore the inspirational potential of traditional materials, methods, and styles of art making among modern and contemporary artists of India, China, Korea, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Thailand. It will feature illustrated presentations by three eminent scholars of modern and contemporary Asian art, followed by a moderated discussion, all focusing on the various ways regional “traditions” of art and culture function as inspiration, catalyst, or foil, some times honoring them, other times contrasting and even undermining them, often with humorous or ironic intent.

Speakers & Presentation Titles

headshot of Joan Kee

Joan Kee, “Tradition as ‘Contemporaneity’s Raw Materials’: Korea, China, and the Philippines”
Kee is an art historian specializing in art and law, with special research focus on modern and contemporary East and Southeast Asian art. She teaches at the University of Michigan, where she is Associate Professor in the History of Art. She is author of Contemporary Korean Art: Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method (2013), curated the exhibition From All Sides: Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method (2014), and serves as contributing editor to Artforum.

headshot of Sonal Khullar

Sonal Khullar, “The Pearl Divers and Shipwrecks of Marine Drive: History, Tradition, and Modernism in India.” Khullar is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Washington. Her research focus is on Indian art of the eighteenth century to the present, with additional teaching and research interests in transnational histories of art, feminist theory, and postcolonial studies. Publications include the award-winning Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930-1990 (2015).

Headshot of Iola Lenzi

Iola Lenzi, ““Not Nostalgia: How Tradition is Critically Co-opted in Thai and Vietnamese Contemporary Art” Lenzi is a Singapore-based curator, lecturer, and critic specializing in contemporary arts of Southeast Asia. She has curated exhibitions in in Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta and Bangkok, serves as lecturer for the Asian Art Histories MA program at Lasalle College, Singapore, and as regional correspondent for Asian Art, London. She is author of Museums of Southeast Asia (2005).

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.cseashawaii.org/event/symposium-tradition-and-contemporaneity-in-the-arts-of-asia/

 

Natures and Cultures in Southeast Asia

International Workshop : « Natures and Cultures in Southeast Asia », 7-8/11/2017, Chiang Mai University

With the participation of Philippe Descola
Professor at Collège de France, Chair in Anthropology of Nature

The Institute of Research on Contemporary Southeast Asia (IRASEC) and the Regional Center for Social Science and Sustainable Development (RCSD), Faculty of Social Science of Chiang Mai University

The objective of this international workshop is to explore the relations between societies and their environments in Southeast Asia. Following Philippe Descola’s proposition to overcome the western dualism that opposes nature and culture, we will revisit Southeast Asian ethnographic material concerning, in particular, the modes of being and engaging practically and conceptually to the world. In the presence of the French anthropologist, we will question the diversity of natures in the region through the study of the articulations between animisms, Hindu-Buddhist cosmologies and any other forms of connecting the social, ecological and cosmic orders.

Télécharger le programme sur : http://www.irasec.com/page234

 

Muharram practices and colonial histories at the cutting edge of a forgotten scroll

Muharram practices and colonial histories at the cutting edge of a forgotten scroll by Julia Byl and David Lunn, 16/11/2017, IIAS, Leiden

The lecture

The Syair Tabut, or ‘Poem of the tomb effigies’, is a recently rediscovered Malay-language, Jawi-script narrative poem on Muharram in 1864. In this talk, we explore the literary, linguistic, and performative aspects of the syair, focusing on what it reveals to us about cultural and religious linkages between and around South and Southeast Asia in the 19th century.

This hybrid lithograph/manuscript scroll offers a wealth of details on the practice of Muharram in the region, and contains in its stanzas direct evidence of linguistic and cultural exchange between the various communities that populated the region in that period.

We introduce the poem and its author, Encik Ali, using excerpts from our recent translation that range through colourful costumes and petty vandalism, fervent devotion and violinists intoxicated by their own music. Through this reading, we demonstrate how an engagement with the poem’s nuances opens up a window onto histories of performance, language, and inter-communal interactions in the context of colonial-era contestations over public religiosity.

The speakers

Julia Byl is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of Alberta. Her research interests have centered around musical performance in north Sumatra, and have recently spread to the broader Malay world and to East Timor, where she is beginning a study of music, the individual and the institution.

David Lunn is the Simon Digby Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. His research interests span the literary, cultural, and intellectual history of modern South and, increasingly, Southeast Asia, with a particular focus on the politics of language.

Voir : https://iias.asia/event/scroll

Between earth and water: Mainamati and Vikrampur in South and East Bengal

Masterclass : Between earth and water: Mainamati and Vikrampur in South and East Bengal by Claudine Bautze-Picron, 10/11/2017, Leiden University

Mainamati was the most important Buddhist settlement in Southeast Bengal from the eighth century onwards, being the gateway to the land of the Buddha for monks and merchants having navigated from insular Southeast Asia and for those who came on foot from various regions of nearby Burma.

Its position was inherited by Vikrampur, a vast area located South of Dhaka, which was a major political centre in South and Southeast Bengal from the eleventh up to the early thirteenth century. Although it was also located on the road followed by Buddhist monks and pilgrims when travelling from the region of Chittagong, with its port open on the Bay of Bengal, up to Bihar and thus partly inherited the position earlier held by Mainamati, Vikrampur  was a stronghold of Brahmanism, offering thus a radical departure with the religious situation encountered up to the 10th century.

The artistic production of this region between Vikrampur, Mainamati and Chittagong had a huge impact on the transfer of iconographic models towards Southeast Asia: Eleventh and twelfth-century murals in the temples of Bagan prove the existence of trade relations with Southeast Bengal, and cast images from the region of Mainamati were exported to Java in the eighth and ninth centuries, opening a way which was going to be followed up to the early thirteenth century with images found in Sumatra and Java that are clearly inspired from models created in Vikrampur.

A careful scrutiny of the artistic material found in continental and insular Southeast Asia proves the importance of the Mainamati-Vikrampur region as source of inspiration but also shows how these ‘imported’ models were assimilated before becoming part of the local culture. Moreover, these testimonies might help in trying to get a better understanding of how images were regarded in Bengal: besides the fact that they were worshipped, could they have had other functions? Could they inform about the way the Buddhist community perceived itself in the cultural landscape of the time?

Dr Claudine Bautze-Picron studied at the Universities of Brussels (MA), Lille, Jawaharlal Nehru in New Delhi (M.Phil. in Indian History) and Aix-en-Provence (“Thèse d’État” = Ph.D.). She was a research fellow at the National Centre of Scientific Research (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) in Paris, UMR 7528 (“Mondes Iranien et Indien”) and Lecturer at the Free University of Brussels (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

Research and publications:

Her research has focused for a long period on the art of Eastern India (Bihar/West Bengal/Bangladesh) from the 8th to the 12th c. and on various issues related to Buddhist iconography in India.  This work culminated also in the publication of the catalogue of the collection of eastern Indian sculpture in the Museum of Asian Art, Berlin (Eastern Indian Sculpture in the Museum of Indian Art, Berlin, Berlin, 1998) and of two books concerned with the image of the bejewelled or crowned Buddha in India and Burma (The Bejewelled Buddha from India to Burma, New Considerations, New Delhi, 2010) and with the Buddhist site of Kurkihar in Bihar (The forgotten Place, Stone Sculpture at Kurkihar, New Delhi: Archaeological Survey of India, 2014).

Since nearly 15 years, she has also been working on the murals of Pagan (Burma) from the 10th to the 13th c. (The Buddhist Murals of Pagan, Timeless vistas of the cosmos, Bangkok, 2003).

Voir : https://iias.asia/event/between-earth-water-mainamati-vikrampur-south-east-bengal

Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia

International Conference Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia, 10-11/11/2017, Binghamton University, The State University of New York

Plenary lectures by:

ERIC TAGLIACOZZO (Cornell University)
Ghosts in the Machine: Technology and Maritime Imperialism in Southeast Asia
ANAND YANG (University of Washington)
Empire of Labor: Indian Convict Workers in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Southeast Asia
ANGELA SCHOTTENHAMMER (University of Salzburg)
Surgeons and Physicians on the Move in the Indo-Pacific Waters (15th to 18th Centuries)
RANABIR SAMADDAR (Calcutta Research Group)
Rohingyas: The Emergence of a Stateless Population

The celebrated author AMITAV GHOSH will deliver the keynote address:
Embattled Earth: Commodities, Conflict and Climate Change in the Indian Ocean Region
5 pm, Friday, November 10, 2017
Chamber Hall, Anderson Center, main campus of Binghamton University

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.binghamton.edu/iaad/conference/index.html

 

 

 

The legendary lives of Thai Buddha statues

Figure of the Buddha. Northern Thailand, 1540–1541.

The legendary lives of Thai Buddha statues, lecture by Angela Chiu, 06/11/2017, British Museum

In this talk, Angela Chiu, author of The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power and Place in Northern Thailand (2017), introduces the ancient Thai Buddha statues, some still enshrined today, whose miraculous origins and adventures promoted the growth of Buddhism in Southeast Asia. She considers what motivated the people of the past to create these statues, often at great expense and with significant effort, and reveals how each statue has its own unique ‘life’, initially as the creation of individuals whose hopes and values were embodied in these extraordinary pieces of art.

Voir : http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/events_calendar/event_detail.aspx?eventId=4050&title=The+legendary+lives+of+Thai+Buddha+statues&eventType=Lecture

Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Management

Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Management, 23/10/2017, Ethnological Museum, Leiden

An international symposium in honour of the work of Prof. Dr. Gerard Persoon on the occasion of his retirement from Leiden University. 

The international symposium in honour of the work of retiring Professor Dr. Gerard Persoon, who held the IIAS Chair Environment and Development at the Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, will take place on October 23, 2017, at the Ethnological Museum in Leiden.

The symposium will consist of a series of presentations on the interdisciplinary theme of Indigenous Peoples and Natural Resource Management by scholars from the Philippines, Indonesia, Taiwan, Cameroon and the Netherlands, and will be closed by a lecture by Prof. Gerard Persoon himself (see the tentative program below).

Please register for the symposium by sending an email to the secretariat of the Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology (secrcaos@fsw.leidenuniv.nl) specifying your name and affiliation. As seats are limited, be advised to register early.

Tentative Program

Opening remarks by Prof. Dr. Cristina Grasseni (Scientific Director of the Insitute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, Leiden University)

Keynote address and Fifth Louwes Lecture by Mr. Dave de Vera (Executive Director Philippine Assoc. For Intercultural Development, Inc. (PAFID))

Title: Indigenous Community Conservation in the Philippines

Presentation by Dr. Dante Aquino (Professor/University Director, Research and Development)

Title: Promoting Indigenous Peoples Rights in the Philippines: Policy implementation and onsite field realities

Presentation by Dr. Tessa Minter (Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, Leiden University)

Title: Does ownership matter? Resource rights in the Philippines and Solomon Islands.  

Presentation by Dr. Louis Defo (World Wildlife Fund Cameroon)

Title: Hunters-gatherers and best practices in forestry industry. The case of the Baka of South East Cameroon

Presentation by Dr. Haman Unusa (Ministry of Environment; Protection of Nature and Sustainable Development; Visiting lecturer University of Dschang)

Title: Nomadic Pastoralism in Far North Cameroon: A response to environmental pressures rather than a cultural trait 

Presentation by Dr. Huei-Min Tsai (Associate Professor, Graduate Institute of Environmental Education, National Taiwan Normal University; Executive Secretary, International Geographic Union (IGU) Commission on Islands)

Title: A new hope for nature conservation: Indigenous movements in natural resource management and participatory approaches to biodiversity conservation on the Mentawai Islands of Indonesia 

Presentation by Prof. Dr. Gerard Persoon

Title: Indigenous Peoples: Local impact of international rights 

Voir : https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/en/events/2017/10/symposium-indigenous-peoples-and-natural-resource-management

Imperial Rice Transportation of Nguyen Vietnam (1802-1883)

« Imperial Rice Transportation of Nguyen Vietnam (1802-1883) » by Tana Li, 01/11/2017, Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre, ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute

About The Lecture

In the first volume of his monumental work Strange Parallels: Southeast Asia in Global Context, Victor Lieberman compared three geographically-based regions of Mainland Southeast Asia, namely the western, the central and the eastern mainland. Lieberman saw coherence in the three regions in that they were all politically and culturally integrated as the result of a series of synchronised cycles between 1000 and 1830. The major difference between Vietnam and its two neighbouring regions, in Lieberman’s analysis, was that Vietnam’s integration was neither as complete or sustained at the same level as achieved by Burma and Siam, even as late as the 19th century Nguyen dynasty (from 1802). Instead of three sustained imperial integrations, he saw two and a fraction. Geography was an important factor. Vietnam lacked one dominant, integrating river system like the Irrawaddy (2170 km long) in Burma or Chao Phraya (372 km long) in Thailand. Yet it did have one geographical feature which might have played a compensatory role in integration, a 3260 km coast line. Moreover, early 19th century Vietnam had a long maritime tradition and a powerful navy, plus close commercial relations with southern China. Why did these potential positives fail to promote closer integration of the new state?

This seminar considers that question by focusing on one of the most important economic factors implicated in that failure, imperial rice transportation. This system formed a major cornerstone of Nguyen policy, but its practical costs and operational failures combined to ensure that Vietnam’s coastal sea lanes did not play a similar unifying role as the major river systems in Burma and Siam.

About The Speaker

Dr Tana Li is Visiting Senior Fellow at Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre and emeritus senior fellow at the College of Asia and Pacific Studies, the Australian National University. She works on maritime and environmental histories of Vietnam and southern China. Her works includes The Nguyen Cochinchina; Water Frontier: Commerce and the Chinese in the Lower Mekong Region, 1750-1880, and Gulf of Tongking Through History, among others. At the ISEAS, Li Tana is working on a manuscript of Maritime history of Vietnam. She is also leading an international collaborative project, “The Making of the Red River”, financially supported by the Chiang Chingkuo Foundation, Taiwan. This study of ecological history of the Greater Red River region is carried out by a team of historians, geologists, and GIS experts based in Austria, France, Vietnam, and Taiwan.

Voir : https://www.iseas.edu.sg/events/upcoming-events/item/6342-lecture-imperial-rice-transportation-of-nguyen-vietnam-18021883

Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories

Phaptawan Suwannakudt, Wat Tha Suthawat Angthong (detail), 1994. Photograph by: Aroon Permpoonsophon

Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories Symposium, 11–13 October 2017, Power Institute, University of Sydney

Studies focused on gender in Southeast Asian societies have emerged, in recent decades, in approximate concurrence with the development of regionally focused Southeast Asian art histories. The founding premise of this international symposium is that there has to date been insufficient intersection between these two fields.

As the first symposium of its kind, Gender in Southeast Asian Art Histories aims to establish the parameters of current research, and to develop inter-disciplinary and transnational frameworks for future studies in the field. Bringing together a range of scholars working on the pre-modern, modern, and contemporary, we seek to consider new perspectives and methodological approaches brought to the fore in art history through studies that are attentive to gender, or how we might reassess art historical narratives through the lens of gender.

The symposium will be launched by a keynote address from Professor Ashley Thompson, the Hiram W. Woodward Chair in Southeast Asian Art at SOAS, University of London. Symposium participants and up to twelve additional attendees, on a competitive basis, will also be invited to participate in a half-day masterclass led by Professor Thompson, and a professional development workshop.

Masterclass and workshop

Introduction to the Masterclass, by Professor Ashley Thompson, with a list of readings.

Speakers

The symposium will be launched by a keynote address from Professor Ashley Thompson, the Hiram W. Woodward Chair in Southeast Asian Art at SOAS, University of London : Figuring the Buddha.

Chanon Kenji Praepipatmongkol | Ph.D. candidate, University of Michigan
Chang Saetang’s Self-Portraits and the Inversion of ‘Barami’

Eileen Legaspi-Ramirez | Assistant Professor, Department of Art Studies, University of the Philippine
Art on the Back Burner: Gender as the Elephant in the Room of SEA Art Histories

Eksuda Singhalampong | Lecturer in Art History, Silpakorn University
Picturing Femininity: Portraits of the Early Modern Siamese Women

May Adadol Ingawanij | Reader and Co-director, Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media, University of Westminster
The Essay Film as Feminist Cinema in Southeast Asia: Nguyen Trinh Thi and Anocha Suwichakornpong

Qui Ha Nguyen | PhD candidate, University of Southern California
Womanhood and Modernity: Revisiting Cinematic Representation of Women’s Social Transformation in Vietnamese Revolutionary Cinema during the Wartime (1945-1975)

Roger Nelson | Postdoctoral Fellow, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Women as Passengers, Men as Drivers? On Urban Movement in Post-Independence ‘Cambodian Arts’

Soumya James | Independent Scholar, New Haven, CT
Exploring the Feminine in Angkor’s Visual Imagery

Tina Le | PhD candidate, University of Michigan
Crafting the Indigenous: Paz Abad Santos and the Feminine Arts

Wulan Dirgantoro | Postdoctoral Fellow, Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices 2016/2017 program, Forum Transregionale Studien, Berlin, Germany
Correcting, Interrogating: A proposal for feminist framework for Indonesian visual arts

Yvonne Low | Sessional Lecturer in Asian Art, Department of Art History, University of Sydney
Recovering the Nation’s Woman (Artists): Mia Bustam and Lai Foong Moi

Programme complet et abstracts sur : http://www.powerpublications.com.au/gender-in-southeast-asian-art-histories/

 

 

Alexandra de Mersan  » Retour en Arakan ou comment comprendre la lente exclusion des Rohingyas « 

Zones de conflits au Myanmar depuis 1995 (carte datée de 2016). CentreLeftRight, Aoetearoa/Wikimedia

 

 

Le 25 août dernier, des membres d’une organisation armée dénommée l’Armée de libération des Rohingyas de l’Arakan (ARSA) ont mené une série d’attaques contre des postes de police dans l’État d’Arakan (ou Rakhine), à l’ouest de la Birmanie, afin de « défendre et de protéger la communauté musulmane d’Arakan ».

En octobre 2016, ce groupe avait déjà attaqué trois postes frontière dans la région. La réponse de l’armée birmane et les affrontements qui ont suivi ont provoqué en l’espace de deux semaines, un nouvel exode de musulmans dans le Bangladesh voisin. Quelques 300 000 réfugiés sont alors venus s’ajouter à d’autres dizaines de milliers, installés dans des camps, ou alentours, près de la frontière, tandis que les autres populations civiles d’Arakan non musulmanes, bouddhistes et hindoues surtout, se réfugiaient vers le sud de la région.

Lire la suite

intervention d’Alexandra de Mersan sur RFI – samedi 16 sept. 20h10 Géopolitique, le débat Podcast La transition démocratique et la stabilité de la Birmanie sont-elles menacées?

Des Rohingyas dans le camp de réfugiés de Kutapalong, au Bangladesh, où ils ont fui la répression de l’armée birmane, le 9 septembre 2017.© AFP/Munir UZ ZAMAN

 

Le cap des 350.000 musulmans Rohingyas réfugiés au Bangladesh pour fuir les violences a été franchi. L’ONU évoque ce qui semble être un exemple classique de nettoyage ethnique. Que veut l’armée birmane ? Aung Saan Suu Kyi à la tête de l’Etat birman est-elle impuissante ou indifférente ?

Invités :
Sophie Boisseau du Rocher, chercheure associée au Centre Asie de l’IFRI.
Alexandra de Mersan, enseignante chercheure à l’INALCO. Rattachée du Centre Asie du Sud-Est au CNRS. Détachée à l’IRASEC, l’Institut de Recherche sur l’Asie du Sud-Est Contemporaine.

 

Intervention de Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière sur France Culture « Nettoyage ethnique » en Birmanie : pourquoi la minorité musulmane Rohingya est-elle persécutée ? » – 13/09/2017

Le moine de Myanmar Wirathu, à la célébration de l’organisation MaBaTha (Comité de Protection de la Race et de la Religion), à Mandalay, le 21 septembre 2015.• Crédits : PHYO MG MG – AFPPodcast :  https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/linvite-des-matins/nettoyage-ethnique-en-birmanie-pourquoi-la-minorite-musulmane-rohingya

ASEAN Forum 2017 : Women in ASEAN

ASEAN Forum 2017 : Women in ASEAN, 06/10/2017, New Law School, Camperdown Campus, University of Sydney

In the 50th year of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, ASEAN Forum 2017 explores the role of women in our region; acknowledging accomplishments and shedding light on the challenges faced by women in Southeast Asia.

ASEAN Forum 2017 will bring together leading academic thinkers, activists and policy makers to discuss and debate the political, economic and social position of women in Southeast Asia and what is being done to advance the standing of women in the region. The forum will focus on women’s involvement in three key domains: work, politics and development.

As part of ASEAN Forum 2017, two additional events will be held on 5 October 2017.

  • Women in Business
  • Women and Health

Voir le programme et la  liste des intervenants sur : http://sydney.edu.au/sydney-southeast-asia-centre/events/ASEAN-Forum-2017.html

Postgraduate Conference – Movement: Southeast Asia

Postgraduate Conference : « Movement: Southeast Asia », 22/09/2017, SOAS

Summary

With evolving political, social, and cultural currents in Southeast Asia, movement is an important discursive lens to understand the dynamism of the region. Reflecting on movements, and change—from prehistory to the contemporary period—can improve our understanding of Southeast Asia, in terms of its constituent nation-states, peoples, and cultures, and as a region as well as an area of study. For this first postgraduate conference on Southeast Asia at SOAS, we invite papers that consider “movement.” For example, how can we critically investigate migration? Conflict and displacement? Diaspora and transnationalism? Trade? The movement of objects in and out of the region? Political movements? Social movements? Artistic movements? The movement of bodies in performance? Exchanges of ideas? Musical, visual, or filmic influences? Translation? Changes in the natural or architectural landscape? Climate change, resources, and resilience? Or indeed rethinking the delimitations of Southeast Asia as a region—and as an object of “area studies”?

Registration

The conference is open to all, free of charge but registration is essential. Please register here

This conference is organised by postgraduate students with the generous support from the SOAS Centre of South East Asian Studies and the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/22sep2017-postgraduate-conference-movement-southeast-asia-.html

Continuer la lecture de Postgraduate Conference – Movement: Southeast Asia

Indonesia in the new world: globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty

Indonesia Update 2017 : Indonesia in the new world: globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty, 15-16 /09/ 2017, Australian National University

Today, globalisation is more complex than ever. The effects of the global financial crisis and increased inequality have in many countries spurred anti-global sentiment, and encouraged the adoption of populist and inward-looking policies. Discontent has manifested in some surprising results: Brexit, Trump, and possibly more to come. In Indonesia it has led to rising protectionism, a rejection of foreign interference in the name of nationalism, and economic policies dominated by calls for self-sufficiency. Meanwhile, human trafficking and the abuse of migrant workers have shown the other side of globalisation.

At the 2017 Indonesia Update conference, leading experts will explore key issues around globalisation, nationalism, and sovereignty in modern Indonesia. Topics will include the historical dynamics of Indonesia’s engagement with the global world, its stance in the South China Sea, and the emergence of new nationalism. Speakers will also examine nationalism in practice (for example, food sovereignty and resource nationalism) and the impact of and response to globalisation, as well as poverty, inequality, and gender issues.

LIVE STREAMING

The Political Update and Economic Update sessions will be live streamed at the ANU Indonesia Project Facebook page from 09:00AEST/06:00WIB on Friday 15 September. Other sessions will be video recorded and uploaded to the Indonesia Project YouTube channel in the weeks after the conference.

Voir le programme complet sur : http://www.newmandala.org/home/indonesia-new-world-globalisation-nationalism-sovereignty/