Archives de catégorie : Vie de la recherche

Space, Social Conflict, and the Future of Urban Society: a comparative view

Space, Social Conflict, and the Future of Urban Society: a comparative view

Professor Michael Herzfeld, Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

Co-presented with the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre, the China Studies Centre, the Department of Anthropology, and the School of Architecture, Design and Planning

For many years now, anthropologists and urban scholars alike have identified ‘gentrification’ as a process of class conflict in which poorer people get pushed to the margins of urban life in the name of ‘urban renewal.’

Professor Michael Herzfeld will argue that gentrification is the tip of a much larger iceberg, called ‘development’ – a grandiloquent idea that is often coupled with socially and culturally destructive policies and that easily promotes insidious (because unstated) forms of social Darwinism (‘the survival of the fittest’) and paternalism.

Using examples from Thailand, China, Greece, and Italy, he will argue that these short-sighted policies are creating an increasingly disenfranchised and resentful under-class. While reactions in these and other countries will vary with cultural conventions, economic dynamics, and the extent to which development evades socially responsible control, the impact on ordinary people is likely to be devastating, while it will also entail the obliteration of socially viable arrangements that have worked well for centuries or even millennia.

Michael suggests that currently emergent forms of urban protest may not be sufficient to stem the tide, but that more concerted engagement by academics and professionals could and must make a significant difference. He will also briefly address some relatively unusual situations where gentrification has had benign effects and will propose that these could provide models for socially responsible planning in the future.

Professor Michael Herzfeld is Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University, where has taught since 1991, and where he serves as Director of the Asia Center’s Thai Studies Program. He is also IIAS Visiting Professor of Critical Heritage Studies at the University of Leiden (and Senior Advisor to the Critical Heritage Studies Initiative of the International Institute for Asian Studies, Leiden); Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne; and Visiting Professor and Chang Jiang (Yangtze River) Scholar at Shanghai International Studies University (2015-17). The author of eleven books – including Cultural Intimacy: Social Poetics in the Nation-State (1997; 3rd edition, 2016), The Body Impolitic: Artisans and Artifice in the Global Hierarchy of Value (2004), Evicted from Eternity: The Restructuring of Modern Rome (2009), and Siege of the Spirits: Community and Polity in Bangkok (2016) – and numerous articles and reviews, he has also produced two ethnographic films (Monti Moments [2007] and Roman Restaurant Rhythms [2011]). He has served as editor of American Ethnologist (1995-98) and is currently editor-at-large (responsible for “Polyglot Perspectives”) at Anthropological Quarterly. He is also a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including American Ethnologist, Anthropology Today, International Journal of Heritage Studies, Journal of Anthropological Research, and South East Asia Research. An advocate for “engaged anthropology,” he has conducted research in Greece, Italy, and Thailand on, inter alia, the social and political impact of historic conservation and gentrification, the social effects of urban policy, the discourses and practices of crypto-colonialism, social poetics, the dynamics of nationalism and bureaucracy, and the ethnography of knowledge among artisans and intellectuals.

Voir : http://sydney.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/2017/professor_michael_herzfeld.shtml

[Talk] Photography and Cold War in Southeast Asia

This is a preliminary presentation, a kind of show-and-tell, based on writer, curator and artist Zhuang Wubin’s recent book, Photography in Southeast Asia: A Survey (NUS Press, 2016). Zhuang’s primary intention is to share with the audience some of the materials that he has accumulated during his decade-long fieldwork relating, directly or indirectly, to the different facets of photographic production during the Cold War period. The aim is to unpack the varying ways in which photography was being mobilised, subject to personal and institutional desires.

This talk is organised in conjunction with the exhibitions “Who wants to remember a war?” and LINES: War Drawings and Posters from the Ambassador Dato’ N. Parameswaran Collection, which features posters, woodcuts and drawings from the French phase of the Indochina war of resistance against the Americans, and drawings and sketches of life and people at the frontlines.

About the speaker
As a writer/curator, Zhuang Wubin focuses on the photographic practices in Southeast Asia. A 2010 recipient of the research grant from Prince Claus Fund (Amsterdam), Zhuang is an editorial board member of Trans-Asia Photography Review, a journal published by the Hampshire College and the University of Michigan Scholarly Publication Office. He has been invited to research residency programmes at Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong (2015) and Institute Technology of Bandung (2013). He is the contributing curator of the biennial Chiang Mai Photo Festival (2015, 2017). Published by NUS Press, Photography in Southeast Asia: A Survey (2016) is his fourth book.

As an artist, Zhuang uses photography and text to visualise the Sinophone communities in Southeast Asia.

Bornéo : dernière terra incognita ?

Colloque international : Bornéo : dernière terra incognita ? 08/09/2017, salle de cinéma, Musée du Quai Branly

Organisée avec le MUSEC (Museo delle Culture de Lugano), cette journée d’étude s’articule autour de sept interventions qui visent à présenter au public une connaissance de Bornéo, par l’analyse de dynamiques qui sont au centre de l’évolution et de la                                    « réappropriation » de son identité.

L’île de Bornéo a de tout temps été un carrefour humain dynamique malgré l’apparent isolement de ses cultures.  Sa taille et sa situation géographique furent stratégiques pour le processus de peuplement pré-austronésien, austronésien et moderne. On retrouve sur ce vaste territoire forestier tout d’abord des traces de civilisations indienne, chinoise, puis malaise, mêlées à l’expansion austronésienne.

Après l’arrivée des Européens au 18e siècle, s’ensuit une longue tradition d’explorateurs et de collecte d’objets appartenant aux “dayak” – les “habitants de l’intérieur” – dont la présence dans les collections occidentales remonte pour certains au 18e siècle.  Avec les artistes d’avant-garde et l’intérêt porté aux arts dits “primitifs” au 20e siècle, des collections privées se constituent. Les grandes capitales européennes comme Amsterdam, Paris ou Berlin favorisent alors la naissance d’un vaste marché international.

Au cours du 20e siècle, l’île, intégrée politiquement au sein des états malais et indonésien, est marginalisée à l’intérieur de ses frontières. De carrefour des cultures, Bornéo devient une région périphérique d’un monde globalisé. De nos jours, cette marginalisation tend à devenir un atout, car elle peut permettre aux habitants de valoriser une identité forte grâce à la réappropriation de ses spécificités culturelles et historiques.

 Programme : http://www.quaibranly.fr/fileadmin/user_upload/2-Evenements/manifestations-scientifiques/2017-manifestations-scientifiques/Borneo/ANL_BORNEO._La_derniere_terra_incognita-programme.pdf

Site and Space in Southeast Asia

Map of Rangoon, ca. 1914. Cartographers Wagner and Debes, Leipzig.
In Karl Baedeker, Indien. Handbuch für Reisende. Verlag Karl Baedeker, Leipzig, 1914, p. 256 f

The Power Institute (Sydney) is thrilled to announce a new collaborative research initiative, Site and Space in Southeast Asia.

The project explores the intersections of urban space, art and culture in three cities—Yangon, Myanmar, Penang, Malaysia, and Huế, Vietnam—through collaborative, site-based research. With major funding from the Getty Foundation’s Connecting Art Histories Initiative and partners from within and beyond the region, including National Gallery Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, and Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Site and Space in Southeast Asia, continues our efforts to support innovative research in the art and architectural histories of the region, foster professional networks among early career scholars, and expand our engagement with an ever more global field.

Site and Space in Southeast Asia builds on the success of our first Connecting Art Histories project, Ambitious Alignments: New Histories of Southeast Asian Art. While Ambitious Alignments was centred around individual research projects exploring histories of modern art between 1950 and 1990, Site and Space expands its chronological reach, from the colonial into the postcolonial and contemporary, while shifting focus to site-based work by small teams of researchers. Engaging with cities as sites that generate cultural narratives, researchers will explore spaces of memory, interaction, and production across national and regional boundaries.

While Field Directors will lead research teams in each city, the overall program is directed by Stephen Whiteman, Lecturer in Asian Art at the University of Sydney, with professors Adrian Vickers, Director of Asian Studies, and Mark Ledbury, Director of the Power Institute. Dr Yin Ker of Nanyang Technological University will be joining the project as Field Director for Yangon, while Dr Simon Soon, a University of Sydney graduate and Senior Lecturer at the University of Malaya, will lead the Penang team. A search for the Field Director for Huế is underway; interested candidates are invited to contact Dr Whiteman at stephen.whiteman@sydney.edu.au with any enquiries.

Site and Space in Southeast Asia will launch with a mini-field school in Singapore in late autumn 2018. A call for participation will be announced in September—please spread the word!

Voir : http://www.powerpublications.com.au/site-and-space-in-southeast-asia/

9e colloque international sur Les langues et la linguistique austronésiennes et papoues (APLL9) 21-23 juin 2017

9e colloque international sur Les langues et la linguistique austronésiennes et papoues (APLL9) 21-23 juin 2017

Le LACITO a le plaisir d’accueillir le neuvième colloque sur les Langues et la linguistique austronésiennes et papoues(APLL9).

Contrairement aux précédentes éditions qui avaient eu lieu au Royaume-Uni, le 9e colloque (APLL9) aura lieu cette fois-ci à Paris – plus précisément sur le campus de l’ lnstitut national des langues et civilisations orientales (INALCO), notre partenaire universitaire.

Notre conférencière invitée sera le Dr Antoinette Schapper (Univ. de Cologne ; KITLV)

Alcohol on pre-Islamic Java (800-1500 CE): Cultural, social and ritual uses of an ‘unholy’ brew

Alcohol on pre-Islamic Java (800-1500 CE): Cultural, social and ritual uses of an ‘unholy’ brew by Jirí Jákl, IIAS Lunch Lecture

In this lecture, Jirí Jákl will discuss five selected themes pertaining to the use of alcohol in Java, Indonesia, before 1500 CE. Each theme reflects one of the five chapters of his book project on a sociocultural history of alcohol and its use in pre-Islamic Java, studied in comparative perspective with the discourse on alcohol in medieval India.

Alcohol is extremely controversial in contemporary, Islamic, Java, and was an ambiguous substance even in pre-modern times. Texts in Old Javanese (800 – 1500 CE), in particular religious works and codes of ecclesiastical rules, present intoxicating drinks as forbidden, addictive, and impure. Other sources, including literary prose and poetry, law texts, texts on eroticism, and historical accounts, describe and represent alcohol as arousing, nourishing, and important in a variety of cultural and political contexts.

Apart from analysing Old Javanese and Sanskrit textual discourses on alcohol, additional insight has been gained by contextualising the pre-modern tradition with the uses of alcohol documented from modern Bali, a mainly Hindu society where palm wine and other fermented and distilled drinks continue to be consumed by many, and where alcohol has a great number of ritual uses, some traceable to pre-Islamic Java, some obviously of local pedigree.

In the lecture, Jirí will first briefly introduce an array of fermented and distilled beverages known and consumed in pre-modern Java, and discuss in more detail drinking comportment, vessels, and other paraphernalia associated with the consumption of alcohol. Then, he will give some details on the consumption of alcohol among the gentry, peasants, and inhabitants of urban centres. Adressed next, is the consumption of alcohol among the religious communities, and its use in ritual. Finally, Jirí will adopt a modern perspective and discuss the uses of alcohol in modern Hindu Bali, in secular as well as in ritual contexts.

Jirí Jákl (Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic) is an affiliate research fellow at IIAS from 15 March 2017 – 15 August 2017.

Voir : http://iias.asia/event/alcohol-pre-islamic-java

Truth and Fiction in the Age of the Strongman: Filipino Writers on Rodrigo Duterte’s Philippines

Truth and Fiction in the Age of the Strongman: Filipino Writers on Rodrigo Duterte’s Philippines, 05/06/2017, SOAS

Miguel Syjuco & Candy Gourlay

This panel discussion looks at the interconnections between Philippine Fiction Writing and Journalism in the time of “tokhang,” schizophrenic populism and Duterte’s unique brand of nationalism. Filipino writers in the diaspora will seek to interrogate the ideas of Post-modernist knowledge construction and its end-games, activism and protest in a post-truth world and the role of fiction in a democracy.

Speaker Biography

Miguel Syjuco’s debut novel, Ilustrado (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010), won the Carlos Palanca Memorial Award for Literature, the Filipino Readers’ Choice Award, the Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction, and the Man Asian Literary Prize and has been translated into more than 10 languages. Miguel, who earned a PhD in literature from the University of Adelaide, was a writing fellow at the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard in 2013 and is currently a visiting professor in the Literature and Creative Writing department at New York University, Abu Dhabi. He is the literary editor of the Manila Review, a member of the Folio Prize Academy and regularly writes for the New York Times International.

Discussant Biography

Candy Gourlay  is a Filipino author based in the United Kingdom. Her debut novel Tall Story (2010) won the National Children’s Book Award of the Philippines in 2012 and the Crystal Kite Award for Europe in 2011. Tall Story was shortlisted for 13 prizes, notably: the Waterstone’s Children’s Book Prize and the Branford Boase Award. Her second novel Shine (2013) was long-listed for the Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize. It won the Crystal Kite Award for the British Isles and Ireland in 2014. Candy was born and raised in the Philippines. From 1984 to 1989, she worked as a journalist in the Philippines, notably as a staff-writer and later associate editor of the weekly opposition tabloid Mr & Ms Special Edition, which played a significant role in the overthrow of the 21 year regime of Filipino dictator Ferdinand Marcos

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/05jun2017-truth-and-fiction-in-the-age-of-the-strongman-filipino-writers-on-rodrigo-dutertes-philipp.html

Current Anthropology is looking for a new Editor

Current Anthropology is looking for a new Editor

 

The Wenner-Gren Foundation in partnership with the University of Chicago Press is seeking applications for the position of Editor of Current Anthropology. The new Editor will begin to receive submissions on September 1, 2018 and take full responsibility for the journal on January 1, 2019. The Editor’s term is six years from January 1, 2019, with a possibility of renewal for an addition partial or complete term.

The Foundation and Press are open to the possibility of alternative editorship arrangements such as co-Editors and/or the use of an active editorial board to handle manuscripts. The applicant should clearly outline her/his ideas for the editorship in their letter of intent and if a co-editorship is proposed the application should come jointly from both potential editors.

Continuer la lecture de Current Anthropology is looking for a new Editor

5th Borneo International Beads Conference | Malaysia

The 5th Borneo International Beads Conference (BIBCo), entitled ‘Our Universal Beads’, will take place in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia, on 13-15 October 2017. The conference takes place in the context of the What About Kuching Festival 2017, a month-long celebration of local arts, culture and lifestyle.

The conference celebrates the bead culture of Sarawak, part of a greater Malaysian heritage, rooted in centuries of tradition.  An ancient maritime trading network linked Sarawak to the world; the beads most treasured today came from production centres on the Malay Peninsula, India, China and even further afield.

In the hands of Sarawak’s craftswomen and collectors, these masterpieces of the glassmaker’s art became intrinsically ‘Borneo Beads.’

Continuer la lecture de 5th Borneo International Beads Conference | Malaysia

Call for papers « Care in Asia: beyond and across a clinic » Workshop

Call for papers « Care in Asia: beyond and across a clinic » Workshop

Date:
Monday, July 3, 2017
Call for papers « Care in Asia: beyond and across a clinic » Workshop
While care is widely discussed across feminist studies and anthropology, it remains still undertheorized and subject to western-centric conceptualizations, as some recent studies point out (Aulino 2016). Frequently, explorations of care practices are limited to specific sites of inquiry – medical institutions or domestic space. For instance, scholars explore how care occurs at the clinics, and how it intertwines with knowledge production, governance of bodies and subject formation. However, in Asia (but to a large extent elsewhere as well), care is dispersed across a complex terrain of healthcare ecologies. Firstly, anthropologists have since long also been interested in care generated by relations, such as kin. Secondly, numerous studies show that healing (and thus care) takes place in and across diverse biomedical and ‘traditional’ medical institutions. Still, in attempts to conceptualize it, care is often designated as ‘self-care’; and familial or ‘traditional’ forms of care often remain to be viewed as hindrances for hegemonic biomedical care.

Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia

Arahmaiani Feisal (1961- ), No More Shadow Play ;Courtesy of the artist.

Thomas J. Berghuis, Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia, 25/05/2017, SOAS

Description

This seminar introduces the development of performance art in Indonesia, from the 1980s until the present day. It considers ways in which performance art in Indonesia has its art historical origins in the conceptual art movement of the 1970s, when artists across Southeast Asia began to consider new social and artistic realities in their artworks. But the the seminar will also draw on the multiple interwoven strands of performance practices and performance traditions that connect the development of contemporary performance art in Indonesia.

The seminar will examine the role of performance art in Indonesia in relation to place, time and media. Artists whose works will be examined include Arahmaiani, Heri Dono, FX Harsono, Mella Jaarsma, Tisna Sanjaya, Melati, Iwan Wijono, W. Christiawan, Mimi Fadmi, Redza Afisina, and Performance Club 69 — a recently established platform for study and practices of performance art initiated by Forum Lenteng in Jakarta, starting in 2016.

About the speaker

Dr. Thomas J. Berghuis is currently a Visiting Fellow at Tate Research Centre: Asia. He is Principal Fellow (Honorary) with the School of Culture and Communication at The University of Melbourne in Australia and is currently based in Leiden, the Netherlands. An art historian and curator of contemporary Asian art, with focus on contemporary art in China and Indonesia, Berghuis previously worked as Lecturer in Asian Art History at the University of Sydney (2008-2013); The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Curator of Chinese Art (2013-2015) at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York; and Director of the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara (Museum MACAN) in Jakarta, Indonesia (2015-2016). Berghuis’ writings have been published in prominent journals and art magazines. He is the author of Performance Art in China (Hong Kong: Timezone 8, 2006).

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/art/events/contemporary-arts-research-seminar/25may2017-place-time-and-media-in-performance-art-in-indonesia.html

Careful What You Wish For: Salafi Islamisation and the Shifting Structures of the Malaysian State

Lily Zubaidah Rahim, « Careful What You Wish For: Salafi Islamisation and the Shifting Structures of the Malaysian State », 31/05/2017, ANU Malaysia Institute

Abstract

Malaysia appears to be fragmenting under the weight of salafiIslamisation – threatening the country’s secular and democratic constitutional foundations. Initially instigated by state-led Islamisation initiatives under the Mahathir administration, the promotion of salafi Islam has become increasing assertive, particularly since the 2013 general elections. In this election, the UMNO-led Barisan Nasional (BN) government lost the popular vote. More recently, UMNO and the conservative opposition Islamist party PAS have attempted to introduce hudud (sharia penal code) legislation through the Federal parliament – further reconstructing the character of the post-colonial state. The lecture examines Malaysia’s salafiIslamisation in conjunction with the broader socio-political and economic pressures confronting the ruling BN government. The ambiguous and fragmented responses of the predominantly Muslim-led opposition parties (Amanah, Parti Keadilan Rakyat and Bersatu) towards salafi Islamisation will also be considered. After sixty years of independence, Malaysians continue to be challenged by the following questions: What is the constitutional status of sharia law?; How should the dual legal jurisdictions (civil and codified sharia) be managed?; Can traditional interpretations of sharia genuinely accommodate principles such as citizenship rights, gender equality and democratic constitutionalism?

Bio-profile

Lily Zubaidah Rahim is an Assoc Professor at the Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney. She is a specialist in authoritarian governance, ethnic politics and democratisation in Southeast Asia and political Islam in Muslim-majority states. Her publications include The Singapore Dilemma: The Political and Educational Marginality of the Malay Community, (Oxford University Press 1998/2001; translated to Malay by the Malaysian National Institute for Translation); Singapore in the Malay World: Building and Breaching Regional Bridges (Routledge, 2009); Muslim Secular Democracy (PalgraveMacmillan, 2013) and The Politics of Islamism: Diverging Visions and Trajectories(PalgraveMacmillan, 2017, Forthcoming). Lily is completing her fifth book on governance reform in Singapore. She has published in international journals such as Democratization,Contemporary Politics, Journal of Contemporary Asia andAustralian Journal of International Affairs. Her sole-authored journal article ‘Governing Muslims in Singapore’s Secular Authoritarian State’ was short-listed for the Boyer Prize by the Australian Journal of International Affairs (AJIA) in 2011.

Voir : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/cap-events/2017-05-31/careful-what-you-wish-salafi-islamisation-and-shifting-structures-malaysian

Launching the New Timor-Leste Initiative at AAS

Launching the New Timor-Leste Initiative at AAS, 05/04/2017, Asia Now (blog de l’AAS)

The 2017 conference in Toronto marked the beginning of an ambitious two-year initiative devoted to raising the profile of Timor-Leste studies—both at AAS and in the wider North American academy. With generous support from the Henry Luce Foundation, the Southeast Asia Council’s (SEAC) Indonesia and Timor-Leste Studies Committee (ITLSC) hosted a series of special events, including an all-day pre-conference workshop attended by senior scholars, students and public intellectuals from Timor-Leste as well as North America, Australia, Europe and other parts of Asia.

Highlights from Toronto

Among the many exciting developments at this year’s conference was the launch of a North American chapter of the Timor-Leste Studies Association (TLSA), which also has chapters in Melbourne (Australia) and the capital city of Dili in Timor-Leste. The ITLSC is looking forward to working closely with the TLSA to help develop and support TL studies at AAS and beyond.

The pre-conference workshop was an important first step in this direction.

Highlights from the workshop included an outstanding series of photographic and ethnomusicological exhibits, alongside a series of well-attended panels and roundtables. A detailed program of events can be downloaded here.

The first photographic exhibit was entitled The 30th Anniversary of East Timor Activism in Toronto, and was organized by David Webster. Through an evocative sequence of photos and related images, local activism in Canada was linked up with more global developments in the struggle for Timorese independence. Photographs and other materials from the exhibit can be accessed online.

Rui Graça Feijó and Susana de Matos Viegas organized a second exhibit, called Fataluku Death and Life. Accompanied by an essay prepared by David Hicks (which we hope to make available online soon), the photographs presented in Rui and Susana’s exhibit were divided into two parts—the first examining Fataluku tombs, with a primary focus on the juxtaposition of traditional funerary posts and Christian crosses; the second exploring the iconographic practices associated with graves and memorials dedicated to the martyrs of the Timorese struggle for independence.

Accompanying the photographic exhibits, Aaron Pettigrew and Philip Yampolsky set up an array of iPads and headphones to provide workshop participants with access to an innovative online exhibit surveying scholarship on Timorese musical traditions. Although some of the material was only accessible on the day of the workshop, Aaron and Philip are continuing to develop the online component of their exhibit for use as an Open Access research and teaching resource.

 The more discursive component of the workshop centered on a pair of panels focusing respectively on issues of (i) Religion, Culture & Tradition and (ii) Polity, Economy & Society. This was followed by a roundtable discussion of priorities for the future of Timor-Leste studies—with Lisa Palmer, Fidelis Manuel Leite Magalhaes, and Susana de Matos Viegas, and chaired by Elizabeth Drexler. Input from participants in the roundtable will figure centrally in the planning for TL events at next year’s AAS conference in Washington, D.C.

Additional events in Toronto included a book launch for Michael Leach’s new volume on Nation-Building and National Identity in Timor Leste (Routledge 2016), and a SEAC-sponsored panel on the Transformation of Religion, Culture and Society in Timor-Leste.

Looking to the Future

The two-year initiative at AAS will serve as the foundation for the future development of a wider-reaching program directed to developing and supporting TL studies at all levels of the academy—from liberal arts to graduate education, and more advanced research. In addition to building up a scholarly network here in North America, this will require strong and sustainable relationships with institutions of higher learning in Timor-Leste. Among other organizational activities, our plans for the future include running competence-building workshops at the National University of Timor-Leste (UNTL, Universidade Nacional Timor Lorosa’e) and the National Center for Scientific Investigation in the capital city of Dili. These workshops will focus on the preparation of academic grant applications and conference panel proposals. The immediate aim of the latter is to facilitate Timorese involvement as conference participants, and especially as organizers of their own panels and related scholarly endeavors. But, taking the longer view, this is also meant to establish a more participatory and collaborative approach to the study of this important Southeast Asian nation.

Get Involved!

The Timor-Leste studies initiative is just getting underway, and we’ve now begun planning for next year’s AAS conference in Washington, D.C. If you would like to get involved, or simply learn more, please contact the Chair of the ITLSC, Richard Fox, at rfox@eth.uni-heidelberg.de

Voir : http://www.asian-studies.org/asia-now/entryid/40/launching-the-new-timor-leste-initiative-at-aas

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art: a Research Workshop with Tran Ky Phuong and Soumya James, 16/05/2017, CSEAS, SOAS.

Scholarship on ancient Khmer and Cham art evolved concomitantly with the French colonial project, and has long been grounded in archaeological and epigraphic study. This workshop presents new currents of research expanding the field. Tran Ky Phuong is the leading scholar of Cham art. After a first curatorial career at the Danang Museum of Cham Sculpture, he joined the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts, where he has launched research combining ethnographic and art historical methods. Soumya James represents a new generation of Southeast Asia art historians. Her work examines the representation of the divine feminine in cultural and eco-political landscape of Angkor.

Tran Ky Phuong is a former curator of the Museum of Cham Sculpture in Da Nang (1978-98); currently he is a senior research fellow with the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts; and is a researcher of the Center for Cultural Relationship Studies in Mainland Southeast Asia (CRMA Center) of Chulachomklao Royal Military Academic, Thailand and at APSARA Authority, Siem Reap, Cambodia; from 2012 until the present he has been a consultant of UNESCO World Cultural Heritages at My Son Sanctuary. He has awarded several research fellowships to study at International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden; Asia Research Institute (ARI) of National University of Singapore; Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts (CASVA), National Gallery of Arts, Washington DC.

He has published several books and articles in Vietnamese, English and Japanese, including: My Son in the History of Cham Art (1988); Vestiges of Champa Civilization (2008); Champa Iseki/Champa Ruins (co-author with Shige-eda Yutaku, 1997); The Cham of Vietnam: History, Society and Art (co-editor with Bruce Lockhart), NUS Press (2011); “The Architecture of Temple-Towers of Ancient Champa (Central Vietnam)” in Champa and the Archaeology of My Son, Vietnam (2009); “The Preservation and Management of the Monuments of Champa in Central Vietnam: The Example of My Son Sanctuary, a World Cultural Heritage Site”, in Rethinking Cultural Resource Management in Southeast Asia: Preservation, Development and Neglect (2011);“The new archaeological finds in Northeast Cambodia, Southern Laos and Central Highland of Vietnam: Considering on the significance of overland trading route and cultural interactions of the ancient kingdoms of Champa and Cambodia”, in Advancing Southeast Asian Archaeology 2013, SEAMEO SPAFA Regional Center for Archaeology and Fine Arts, Bangkok, Thailand (2015).

Soumya James is an independent Art Historian who studies premodern South and Southeast Asian art. She received her PhD in Art History from Cornell University. Her dissertation focused on the cultural and eco-political significance of the divine feminine at three Angkor period sites. Her research investigates the relationship between landscape and built form, gender and sexuality, and the art historical links between premodern South and Southeast Asia. Following her graduation, she continued her research while working as the coordinator for the Science and Society Programme at the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, India. She was a Postdoctoral Associate at the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities and a Fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center, both at Yale University. She is currently working on a book manuscript and planning her next fieldtrip to Cambodia.

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/16may2017-approaches-to-the-study-of-khmer-and-cham-art-a-research-workshop-with-tran-ky-phuong-and-.html