Archives de catégorie : Vie de la recherche

Launching the New Timor-Leste Initiative at AAS

Launching the New Timor-Leste Initiative at AAS, 05/04/2017, Asia Now (blog de l’AAS)

The 2017 conference in Toronto marked the beginning of an ambitious two-year initiative devoted to raising the profile of Timor-Leste studies—both at AAS and in the wider North American academy. With generous support from the Henry Luce Foundation, the Southeast Asia Council’s (SEAC) Indonesia and Timor-Leste Studies Committee (ITLSC) hosted a series of special events, including an all-day pre-conference workshop attended by senior scholars, students and public intellectuals from Timor-Leste as well as North America, Australia, Europe and other parts of Asia.

Highlights from Toronto

Among the many exciting developments at this year’s conference was the launch of a North American chapter of the Timor-Leste Studies Association (TLSA), which also has chapters in Melbourne (Australia) and the capital city of Dili in Timor-Leste. The ITLSC is looking forward to working closely with the TLSA to help develop and support TL studies at AAS and beyond.

The pre-conference workshop was an important first step in this direction.

Highlights from the workshop included an outstanding series of photographic and ethnomusicological exhibits, alongside a series of well-attended panels and roundtables. A detailed program of events can be downloaded here.

The first photographic exhibit was entitled The 30th Anniversary of East Timor Activism in Toronto, and was organized by David Webster. Through an evocative sequence of photos and related images, local activism in Canada was linked up with more global developments in the struggle for Timorese independence. Photographs and other materials from the exhibit can be accessed online.

Rui Graça Feijó and Susana de Matos Viegas organized a second exhibit, called Fataluku Death and Life. Accompanied by an essay prepared by David Hicks (which we hope to make available online soon), the photographs presented in Rui and Susana’s exhibit were divided into two parts—the first examining Fataluku tombs, with a primary focus on the juxtaposition of traditional funerary posts and Christian crosses; the second exploring the iconographic practices associated with graves and memorials dedicated to the martyrs of the Timorese struggle for independence.

Accompanying the photographic exhibits, Aaron Pettigrew and Philip Yampolsky set up an array of iPads and headphones to provide workshop participants with access to an innovative online exhibit surveying scholarship on Timorese musical traditions. Although some of the material was only accessible on the day of the workshop, Aaron and Philip are continuing to develop the online component of their exhibit for use as an Open Access research and teaching resource.

 The more discursive component of the workshop centered on a pair of panels focusing respectively on issues of (i) Religion, Culture & Tradition and (ii) Polity, Economy & Society. This was followed by a roundtable discussion of priorities for the future of Timor-Leste studies—with Lisa Palmer, Fidelis Manuel Leite Magalhaes, and Susana de Matos Viegas, and chaired by Elizabeth Drexler. Input from participants in the roundtable will figure centrally in the planning for TL events at next year’s AAS conference in Washington, D.C.

Additional events in Toronto included a book launch for Michael Leach’s new volume on Nation-Building and National Identity in Timor Leste (Routledge 2016), and a SEAC-sponsored panel on the Transformation of Religion, Culture and Society in Timor-Leste.

Looking to the Future

The two-year initiative at AAS will serve as the foundation for the future development of a wider-reaching program directed to developing and supporting TL studies at all levels of the academy—from liberal arts to graduate education, and more advanced research. In addition to building up a scholarly network here in North America, this will require strong and sustainable relationships with institutions of higher learning in Timor-Leste. Among other organizational activities, our plans for the future include running competence-building workshops at the National University of Timor-Leste (UNTL, Universidade Nacional Timor Lorosa’e) and the National Center for Scientific Investigation in the capital city of Dili. These workshops will focus on the preparation of academic grant applications and conference panel proposals. The immediate aim of the latter is to facilitate Timorese involvement as conference participants, and especially as organizers of their own panels and related scholarly endeavors. But, taking the longer view, this is also meant to establish a more participatory and collaborative approach to the study of this important Southeast Asian nation.

Get Involved!

The Timor-Leste studies initiative is just getting underway, and we’ve now begun planning for next year’s AAS conference in Washington, D.C. If you would like to get involved, or simply learn more, please contact the Chair of the ITLSC, Richard Fox, at rfox@eth.uni-heidelberg.de

Voir : http://www.asian-studies.org/asia-now/entryid/40/launching-the-new-timor-leste-initiative-at-aas

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art: a Research Workshop with Tran Ky Phuong and Soumya James, 16/05/2017, CSEAS, SOAS.

Scholarship on ancient Khmer and Cham art evolved concomitantly with the French colonial project, and has long been grounded in archaeological and epigraphic study. This workshop presents new currents of research expanding the field. Tran Ky Phuong is the leading scholar of Cham art. After a first curatorial career at the Danang Museum of Cham Sculpture, he joined the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts, where he has launched research combining ethnographic and art historical methods. Soumya James represents a new generation of Southeast Asia art historians. Her work examines the representation of the divine feminine in cultural and eco-political landscape of Angkor.

Tran Ky Phuong is a former curator of the Museum of Cham Sculpture in Da Nang (1978-98); currently he is a senior research fellow with the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts; and is a researcher of the Center for Cultural Relationship Studies in Mainland Southeast Asia (CRMA Center) of Chulachomklao Royal Military Academic, Thailand and at APSARA Authority, Siem Reap, Cambodia; from 2012 until the present he has been a consultant of UNESCO World Cultural Heritages at My Son Sanctuary. He has awarded several research fellowships to study at International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden; Asia Research Institute (ARI) of National University of Singapore; Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts (CASVA), National Gallery of Arts, Washington DC.

He has published several books and articles in Vietnamese, English and Japanese, including: My Son in the History of Cham Art (1988); Vestiges of Champa Civilization (2008); Champa Iseki/Champa Ruins (co-author with Shige-eda Yutaku, 1997); The Cham of Vietnam: History, Society and Art (co-editor with Bruce Lockhart), NUS Press (2011); “The Architecture of Temple-Towers of Ancient Champa (Central Vietnam)” in Champa and the Archaeology of My Son, Vietnam (2009); “The Preservation and Management of the Monuments of Champa in Central Vietnam: The Example of My Son Sanctuary, a World Cultural Heritage Site”, in Rethinking Cultural Resource Management in Southeast Asia: Preservation, Development and Neglect (2011);“The new archaeological finds in Northeast Cambodia, Southern Laos and Central Highland of Vietnam: Considering on the significance of overland trading route and cultural interactions of the ancient kingdoms of Champa and Cambodia”, in Advancing Southeast Asian Archaeology 2013, SEAMEO SPAFA Regional Center for Archaeology and Fine Arts, Bangkok, Thailand (2015).

Soumya James is an independent Art Historian who studies premodern South and Southeast Asian art. She received her PhD in Art History from Cornell University. Her dissertation focused on the cultural and eco-political significance of the divine feminine at three Angkor period sites. Her research investigates the relationship between landscape and built form, gender and sexuality, and the art historical links between premodern South and Southeast Asia. Following her graduation, she continued her research while working as the coordinator for the Science and Society Programme at the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, India. She was a Postdoctoral Associate at the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities and a Fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center, both at Yale University. She is currently working on a book manuscript and planning her next fieldtrip to Cambodia.

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/16may2017-approaches-to-the-study-of-khmer-and-cham-art-a-research-workshop-with-tran-ky-phuong-and-.html

The Sixth International Symposium On The Languages Of Java

The Sixth International Symposium on the Languages of Java, 18-19/05/2017, Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia

Keynote Speakers:
Zane Goebel (La Trobe University)
Hartono Samidjan (Suara Merdeka)

Co-sponsors:
Universitas Dian Nuswantoro
University of Maryland
University of Iowa
University of British Columbia

Co-organizers:
Thomas Conners, University of Maryland
William Davies, University of Iowa
Jozina Vander Klok, University of British Columbia

Programme :

Web of relations in the Moken’s world

Web of relations: the way of giving, taking and reciprocating in the Moken’s world by Narumon Arunotai, 28/04/2017, Chulalongkorn University

This talk reflects diverse worldviews of different groups towards a cluster of islands in southwestern Thailand, namely Surin Islands in Phang-nga Province.  It also reflects how government policies are based on certain set of worldviews about “nature”.  Surin Islands have been a home, stopover point, foraging ground and burial site for the Moken indigenous people for centuries.  The Moken have mobile homes and their residence are on different islands in the Mergui archipelago, from the present day southern Myanmar to southern Thailand.   At the start of Thai state dominant power on the Surin Islands, the surrounding waters fell into a concession of petroleum exploration issued to a private foreign company.  Later it was proposed as a site for Indochina refugee camp, but the proposal was rejected by the Royal Forestry Department.   In 1984, state power is more apparent as the Islands have been declared a Marine National Park with supporting budget and resources.  Later a unit under the Department of Fisheries and another under Royal Thai Navy have been established.  Though all of these groups share their lives (or part of their lives) on Surin Islands, their worldviews and their missions/mandates towards “nature” on the Islands are quite different.  Through looking at the web of relations, especially the way of giving, taking and reciprocating in the Moken’s world, we can understand the mode of thinking, practicing, and policying of other units and groups undertaking their “duties” on the Islands as well.

« Still in the Game »: The State of Indonesian Art History in the 21st Century

« Still in the Game »: The State of Indonesian Art History in the 21st Century : 3rd Cornell Modern Indonesia Project (CMIP) Conference

Cornell Southeast Asia Program with Cornell Modern Indonesia Project and the Herbert F Johnson Museum present the 3rd Cornell Modern Indonesia Project (CMIP) Conference.

18 renowned scholars from Indonesia, Australia, Europe, and America will gather in honor of the 50th anniversary of Claire Holt’s magnum opus, Art in Indonesia: Continuities and Change (Cornell University Press, 1967). The conference will be organized around the chapters of her classic text, as follows:

Friday, April 21, 2017 | Kahin Center

4:30pm  Opening Remarks by Professor Kaja McGowan, Director of Southeast Asia Program, Professor of History of Art, Cornell University

5:00 pm  The Great Debate Revisited

Saturday, April 22, 2017 | Kahin Center

10:00 am  Exploring Some Prehistoric Roots

2:00 pm  Impact of Indian Influences & Emergence of New Styles 4:00 pm  The Dance & Dance Drama

Sunday, April 23, 2017 | Johnson Museum

9:00 am  The Wayang World
11:00 am  Photography & New Media

2:00 pm  Wayang Performance of Dewaruci/ Bimasuci

A traveling exhibition of contemporary Indonesian photography at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum, curated by Brian Arnold, will further enhance the programming. Also, in honor of Benedict Anderson, an exhibition of his gifts to the museum, particularly his masks, will be on display on the 5th floor.

Details of speakers, titles of talks to follow.

Voir : https://seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/still-game-state-indonesian-art-history-21st-century

Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago

Leiden Asia Year : Symposium Stories and Storytelling in the Indonesian Archipelago, 13 May 2017, Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden

KITLV in collaboration with Wacana, Journal of the Humanities of Universitas Indonesia, will organize a symposium on the importance of storytelling in Indonesia on 13 May 2017 in Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden, 10.30 – 17.00 hrs.

Indonesia’s oft-overlooked repertoire of storytelling traditions continues to inspire the nation’s arts, cultures and social practices. Inspired by a special edition of the journal Wacana, we investigate some of the archipelago’s diverse story-texts and performance practices.

This broad-scope symposium centers on the characteristics of Indonesian stories, their embedding in storytelling traditions, and the (ritual) contexts in which these are performed. Several presentations explore how stories were – and are – composed and disseminated. Other participants bring to the fore Indonesian perspectives on storytelling beyond the boundaries of the written word, including solo- and group-performances accompanied by music, singing and dance.

We hope that this event will contribute to a renewed attention to the storytelling practices of Indonesia, fostering a more nuanced understanding of “text” in all its forms, the relevance of traditional stories in a rapidly changing society, and ongoing developments in Indonesian literature and popular culture.

Among the presenters are Aone van Engelenhove and Nazarudin (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) who will analyze [hi]stories and storytelling on the island of Kisar, Southwest Maluku, Els Bogaerts (Leiden Institute of Area Studies) with a fresh view on the well-known historical figure of Arya Penangsang in a recent theatre-play from Yogyakarta, Joachim Niess (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Südostasienwissenschaften) with a discussion of fiction in early Indonesian newspapers, and Clara Brakel-Papenhuyzen presenting recordings of Malay storytellers in North Sumatra that reflect the relationship between the interior and the coastal areas on that island. The programme also features performances of music and dance by Sundanese ensemble Dangiang Parahiangan and West Sumatran ensemble Archipelago.

Please register if you wish to attend: ln.vltik@vltik

Voir le programme complet sur : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/symposium-stories-storytelling-indonesian-archipelago-leiden-asia-year/

 

Communal Violence in Myanmar

CSEAS Lecture. Communal Violence in Myanmar: Roundtable Discussion, 27/03/2017, University of Michigan

Since 2012, Myanmar has experienced recurrent, sporadic, collective acts of lethal violence, realized through repeated public expressions that Muslims constitute an existential threat to Buddhists. Much of this has been directed at those who identify as Rohingya, but it has not been limited to this category. The panelists discuss the narratives, genealogies and typologies of this violence, drawing on scholarship from South and Southeast Asia.

Panelists:

Nick Cheesman, Fellow, Department of Political & Social Change Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, Australian National University, 2016-17 Member of Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study

Mike McGovern, Associate Professor, Anthropology & Director of Undergraduate Studies, University of Michigan

Matt Schissler, Doctoral Student in Anthropology, University of Michigan

Moderated by Allen Hicken, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan

Voir : https://www.ii.umich.edu/cseas/news-events/events.detail.html/39698-8241180.html

 

Malaysia and the world : cross-regional perspective on race, religion and ethnic identity

Malaysia and the world : cross-regional perspective on race, religion and ethnic identity, International Conference at Ohio University, 24-26/03/2017, Athens, Ohio

The conference aims to highlight Malaysia’s profile and role on the world stage by bringing together leading scholars from Malaysia, Europe, and North America. The intellectual academic exchange will provide a venue for competing comparative perspectives on Malaysia and other countries. It is the broader intention that this academic activism will benefit and enrich Malaysian studies.

The highlights of the International Conference will include keynote addresses by:

  • Malaysia’s Distinguished Professor Datuk Shamsul Amri Baharuddin of UKM and the National Council of Professors, who will speak on “The Making of Malaysia’s National Unity Blueprint: Redefining Unity in Malaysia”
  • UPM VC, Prof Datin Paduka Aini Ideris, who will speak on the role of research universities in nation building.

The conference will also feature talks by leading American scholars who have done extensive work on Malaysia such as:

  • Donald L. Horowitz, the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science Emeritus of Duke University
  • Professor Meredith Weiss of the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs, State University of NY at Albany.

Other distinguished and notable speakers from Malaysia will include:

  • The well-known former Imam of Perlis, the Honorable Dato Dr Juanda Jaya, who is a member of Sarawak Legislative Assembly and will speak on a subject that addresses the themes “Islam, the state and law”
  • UPM’s Visiting Professor at Wailalak University, Thailand, Professor Ahmad Tarmizi Talib, who will speak on “Muslim – Non-Muslim Relations in Malaysia »
  • UNIMAS Professor Stanley Bye Kadam Kiai, who will speak on “the Politics of Federalism: reflecting on the role Sarawak and Sabah played in the formation of Malaysia »
  • Tun Abdul Razak Chair Professor Jayum Jawan, who is from UPM, will speak on “Race & Ethnic Relations: What can Malaysia and the US learn from each other?”

The three day conference will have speakers addressing four major themes:

  1. Post-Colonial Legacies and Its Impact
  2. Majority-Minority Relations
  3. Electoral Politics
  4. Islam, the State and Law

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.ohio.edu/global/cis/activities-events.cfm

Buddhist Sectarianism in Burma’s Last Kingdom

Buddhist Sectarianism in Burma’s Last Kingdom by Alexandra Kolayanides (Stanford), 02/05/2017, UC Berkeley Centre for Southeast Asia Studies

The collapse of Burma’s final kingdom was devastating for the Buddhist organizations that depended on its royal sponsorship. The nineteenth-century encroachment of the British Raj crippled both the Konbaung Dynasty and its once-powerful monastic establishment, but it also created opportunities for opposition parties. One adversarial Buddhist sect, the Paramats, was particularly active between the Second Anglo-Burmese War in 1852 and the total colonization of the country in 1886. This reformist sect has been something of a mystery in the study of Burmese Buddhism because of minimal references to them in official Burmese materials. This paper examines a previously unstudied collection of documents dating from 1830–1880 found in an American missionary archive to argue that the Paramats were not a kind of Mahayanist group dedicated to propounding emptiness teachings, as scholars have argued, but rather, they were a Burmese Buddhist organization concerned with protesting laxity within mainstream monasteries and excess at royally-sponsored shrines. These archival documents suggest that scholars should attend to politics, as well as philosophy, to understand this particular sectarian development and similar religious reform movements at the end of the Konbaung Dynasty.

Alexandra Kaloyanides is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford University. She researches Burmese religions and American religious history. Her book manuscript, “Objects of Conversion, Relics of Resistance,” examines the religious contestations, conversions, and transformations during the nineteenth-century American Baptist mission to Burma.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/1771316929755778/

Colloque CAMNAM « Temps-temporalité en Asie du Sud-est », INALCO, 29 novembre au 2 décembre 2017

Colloque international
Temps et temporalité en Asie du Sud-EstInstitut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales
29 novembre au 2 décembre 2017

En Asie du Sud-Est comme ailleurs, les modalités de la co-présence du passé, du présent et du futur donnent lieu à diverses formes d’organisations conceptuelles et pratiques. Un large éventail de dispositifs s’offre ainsi à l’observation, entre une représentation de l’immutabilité des choses – lorsque par-delà l’agitation continue des êtres tout se répète et rien ne change vraiment – et une affirmation de l’irréversibilité de l’altération graduelle et permanente de toutes choses – car si rien ne change rien ne dure non plus. Placés devant ce dilemme, les acteurs s’en accommodent, selon des stratégies elles-mêmes diverses allant de la résignation à la recherche plus ou moins confiante d’une maîtrise de la temporalité – entendue ici comme la perception, à chaque fois particulière, de la durée, cette universelle condition que l’homme ressent par nécessité, où qu’il vive.

Continuer la lecture de Colloque CAMNAM « Temps-temporalité en Asie du Sud-est », INALCO, 29 novembre au 2 décembre 2017

Duterte’s War on Drugs and His Continuing Popularity

Duterte’s War on Drugs and His Continuing Popularity, 16/02/2017, Institute for Asian and African Studies, Humboldt University, Berlin

The Philippine Studies Series Berlin would like to invite you to the lecture/discussion « Duterte’s War on Drugs and His Continuing Popularity », featuring documentary filmmaker Alyx Arumpac who has been video documenting the killings and political analyst Cleve Arguelles.

Abstract

In the past seven months since Rodrigo Duterte came to power and declared his war on drugs, 7,028 people have been killed in police operations and vigilante-style killings. Despite the rising body count, Duterte remains popular among Filipinos. Aiming to shed light on his controversial policy and why he continues to be popular, the Philippine Studies Series Berlin brings together documentary filmmaker Alyx Ayn Arumpac and political analyst Cleve Kevin Robert Arguelles. Alyx Arumpac who has documented the killings in Manila, will present “Stories from the Night Beat.” Showing excerpts from her ongoing documentary project “Aswang,” she will discuss how the drug war is being carried out – who are the targets, the methods, and the communities most affected, among others – and provide specific stories of victims.

Meanwhile, Cleve Arguelles’ talk “Post-EDSA democracy in between crisis and transformation: The rise of Duterte” aims to make sense of the big question/s of Duterte’s rise to power, especially in light of the violence of his war on drugs. Arguelles situates the Duterte phenomenon in the context of the country’s longstanding democratic deficit and underdevelopment and argue that the crisis of post-EDSA democracy made his rise possible both in politics and the social imaginary. He asks, what kind of a society makes this kind of politics possible?

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/260887047667620/

 

Shaming the State: Piety, Pornography, and Celebrity Preachers in Indonesia

sabili-banner-website

Seminar : « Shaming the State: Piety, Pornography, and Celebrity Preachers in Indonesia » by James B. Hoesterey, 23 February 2017, KITLV, Leiden

This paper examines the role of visual culture in the constitution – and contestation – of public piety during Indonesia’s controversial anti-pornography campaign. Building on Hirschkind’s concept of the “pious sensorium,” the paper describes how looking itself can be an ethical and political act. Inspired by al-Ghazzali’s notion of the “fornication of the eye,” celebrity televangelist Abdullah Gymnastiar preached that those who cannot control their sexual gaze eventually tarnish their hearts and lose their sense of shame. Bridging Althusser’s notion of interpellation with Aretxaga’s attention to the “subjectivity of the state,” this paper examines how Gymnastiar turned his ethical gaze towards the state, parlayed his public pulpit into political voice, and summoned state officials to take a moral stand against pornography. This focus on a celebrity preacher’s strategy of “shaming of the state” provides unique insights into political Islam that enrich, nuance, and at times contradict the current scholarly focus on electoral politics, political economy, and traditional Islamic organizations.

James Hoesterey is Assistant Professor at the Department of Religion of the Emory University. His research and teaching interests include Islam, popular culture, new media, moral subjectivity, religious biography and religious authority.

Voir : http://www.kitlv.nl/event/shaming-state-piety-pornography-celebrity-preachers-indonesia/

Revisiting the position of Philippine languages in the Austronesian family

16298732_10209936904033594_853824880347073674_n

« Revisiting the position of Philippine languages in the Austronesian family » by Lawrence Reid, 18/02/2017, De La Salle University

Lecture organized by the Linguistic Society of the Philippines (LSP) and the Dept of English & Applied Linguistics (DEAL) of Br Andrew Gonzalez FSC College of Education (BAGCED), De La Salle University.

With recent claims by non-linguists that there is no such thing as an Austronesian language family, and that Philippine languages could have a different origin from one that all comparative linguists claim, it is appropriate to revisit the claims that have been made over the last few hundred years. Each has been popular in his day, and each has been based on evidence that under scrutiny has been shown to have problems, leading to new claims. This presentation will examine the range of views from early Spanish ideas about the relationships of Philippine languages, to modern Bayesian phylogenetic views, outlining the data upon which the claims have been made and pointing out the problem that each has.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/Linguistic-Society-of-the-Philippines-LSP-120107868009881/

 

séminaire sur les villes vietnamiennes (janvier-mai 2017), Université Paris Diderot, LCAO

« Produire et vivre la ville au Vietnam d’hier à aujourd’hui »

Vendredi de 10 h à 12 h – Bât. Halle aux farines – salle 377 F – (12 séances réparties du 27/01 au 05/05).
Ce nouveau séminaire de recherche interdisciplinaire de l’UFR LCAO, dont la thématique est inédite, rend compte de la riche actualité des études urbaines en lien avec le terrain vietnamien, et plus largement d’Asie orientale. Ce séminaire s’adresse donc aux étudiants s’intéressant aux mutations des villes vietnamiennes, mais aussi à la compréhension du développement des villes asiatiques de manière plus générale. Il offre un panorama bibliographique et épistémologique critique sur les enjeux urbains dans la région, par l’analyse d’articles scientifiques dans un champ de recherche en pleine expansion. Il propose également une approche plus théorique des études urbaines et de leurs outils, toujours dans une perspective pluridisciplinaire.
Chaque séance thématique s’accompagne de la mise à disposition et de la discussion de ressources bibliographiques récentes et multilingues, permettant de se familiariser avec la variété croissante des problématiques contemporaines de recherche sur les villes vietnamiennes, mais aussi de mises au point sur des notions théoriques, permettant de (re)penser les villes et leurs mutations contemporaines de manière critique. La ville y est abordée dans ses composantes morphologiques, mais également sociales et politiques.
Ce séminaire est ouvert à tous (dans la limite des places disponibles) et ne requiert pas de connaissances spécifiques en langue vietnamienne.