Archives de catégorie : Appels à contribution

Appel à contributions : Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archive: An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares

Appel à contributions : Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archive: An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares, 30–31 July 2018, Quezon City, Philippines

Organized jointly by Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Perspectives, School of Social Sciences, Loyola Schools, Ateneo de Manila University and Southeast Asian Studies, Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University

Deadline for abstracts and panels proposals submission : 01 October 2017

In a prolific career spanning five decades, Resil B. Mojares has produced a remarkable body of work that combines meticulous research, incisive analysis, and elegant, lyrical writing.

An exemplary home-grown and -educated activist, intellectual, institution-builder, and man of letters, Mojares has made important, often pioneering, contributions to diverse fields and subjects, ranging from Philippine literature (Origins and Rise of the Filipino Novel: A Generic Study of the Novel until 1940; [co-ed.] the two-volume Sugilanong Sugboanon), architecture (Casa Gorordo in Cebu: Urban Residence in a Philippine Province, 1860–1920), theater and social history (Theater in Society, Society in Theater: Social History of a Cebuano Village, 1840–1940), to intellectual history (Brains of the Nation: Pedro Paterno, T. H. Pardo de Tavera, Isabelo de los Reyes, and the Production of Modern Knowledge), biography (Vicente Sotto: Maverick Senator; The Man Who Would be President: Serging Osmeña and Philippine Politics; Aboitiz: Family and Firm in the Philippines), history and politics (The War Against the Americans: Resistance and Collaboration in Cebu, 1899–1906; [co-ed.] From Marcos to Aquino: Local Perspectives on the Political Transition in the Philippines).

Scholars and academics with papers and panels related, but not limited, to the following topics are invited to participate in this conference:

  1. Historiography and the Archive: Issues and Debates
  2. Precolonial, Colonial, Imperial, and Postcolonial Histories
  3. Biography
  4. Intellectuals, Intellectual Histories, and Philippine Studies
  5. Philippine Languages and Literatures
  6. Philippine Architecture, Theater, and the Arts
  7. Nation-Making, Nationness, and Nationalism
  8. Politics, Politicians, and State Building
  9. Social Histories
  10. “What is Obscure, Hidden, and Marginal” in Philippine History and Current Affairs
  11. Local and Regional Histories
  12. Cultural Studies
  13. The Philippines in Asia and the World

Selected papers that pass the refereeing process will be included in a special issue of Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints, the quarterly published by the Ateneo de Manila University since 1953.

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.facebook.com/PhilippineStudies/posts/10154264194466017

Appel à contributions : Verge : Studies in global Asias, vol. 4, n° 2 : Indigeneity

Appel à contributions : Verge : Studies in global Asias, vol. 4, n° 2 : Indigeneity

Edited by Charlotte Eubanks (Penn State University) and Pasang Yangjee Sherpa (The New School)

Submission deadline: June 15, 2017

If “Asia” is a place, notional or otherwise, then to be “Asian” is to have some particular relation to that place, but the exact quality and texture of that relation, its historical depth and identitarian legacy, can be difficult to plumb, even when the ties between people, land, and identity may be especially snug.

In this special issue, we are interested in charting the interactions between notions of indigeneity and Asian-ness. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: conversations between Asian American and First Nations peoples, and tensions between identity, land, and language; indigenous activism in response to climate change and international development (whether in the Himalayan region, the Gobi desert, or the littoral zones of Pacific islands); the place of indigenous cultural production vis-a-vis the/a State (e.g. the circulation or suppression of Chukchee literature in Eastern Siberia, the questions of ownership over cultural property in Vanuatu, the display of native artifacts in national museums, and so on); practices of resistance and policies of assimilation, both historical and contemporary (Ainu in Japan and Eastern Russia, aboriginal groups in Taiwan, the Orang Asli in peninsular Malaysia, designated ‘national minorities’ in the PRC, the Dravidian/Aryan divide in South Asia, etc); historical encounters of indigenous groups with expanding states and empires; the many problematics, demographic and otherwise, of categorizing Pacific Islanders with Asian Americans; practices of indigenous knowledge in Asia and Asian America; the human geography of settler and indigenous communities (i.e. the displacement of Hawaiians by Asian settlers, the legal rubric and social position of ‘Asians’ in East Africa and ‘overseas Chinese’ in South-East Asia vis-a-vis ‘local’ communities, claims to biculturalism in Aotearoa New Zealand); the creation of land reservations for indigenous peoples (in the Philippines, for instance); the international politics of indigenous rights; archeology and the deep histories of indigenous artwork and artefacts; the digitalization of indigenous ‘ways of knowing’; and so forth.

We welcome approaches from across the qualitative social sciences and the humanities and especially encourage papers grounded in a particular discipline, time, and place but which speak to questions, concerns, and topics of debate that are of relevance to a wide range of scholars.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/journal.verge?fref=ts

Call for proposals : The 9th « Engaging with Vietnam : An Interdisciplinary Dialogue » Conference

Call for proposals : The 9th « Engaging with Vietnam : An Interdisciplinary Dialogue » Conference, Touring Vietnam: Exploring “Development”, “Tourism” and “Sustainability” in Vietnam from Multi-disciplinary and Multi-directional Perspectives, Part IDecember 28-31, 2017: Ho Chi Minh City,Part IIDecember 31, 2017: Train from HCMC to Tuy Hoa, Phu Yen, Part III: January 1-4, 2018: Tuy Hoa, Phu Yen

Co-hosting organizations: University of Social Science and Humanities – Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City and University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Conference Co-Chairs and Co-Convenors : Prof. Dr. Phan Lê Hà (University of Hawai’i at Manoa), Associate Prof. Dr. Liam C. Kelley (University of Hawai’i at Manoa), Associate Prof. Dr. Võ Văn Sen (President, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City), Assistant Prof. Dr. Jamie Gillen (National University of Singapore)

Deadline for proposal submission: 31 August 2017

The 9th Engaging with Vietnam conference with three joined parts will bring about a completely new experience to those who have so far participated and will participate in our conference series. With the theme of exploring “development,” “tourism,” and “sustainability” in/of Vietnam from multi-disciplinary and multi-directional perspectives, the 9th EWV conference will introduce various activities, ranging from keynote sessions and academic presentations to exhibitions, idea contests, a policy forum, Q&A sessions, curriculum development, sightseeing, field observations, and music performances that are all integrated to offer participants opportunities to feel, think, engage, try out and live the conference theme.

Other distinctive features of EWV9 are its length and location. Its length is innovative, as the complete experience will take place over a period of almost 10 days, from December 27 2017 to January 4 2018. Its location is also innovative, as the conference will be held at two places and participants will “tour” from South (Ho Chi Minh City) to Central Vietnam (Tuy Hoa, Phu Yen), a connection that will entail an enjoyable evening tour on the Thống Nhất (Reunification) express train. Participants will celebrate together New Year’s Eve and welcome 2018 on “tàu Thống Nhất,” whereby their explorations of and engagement with Vietnam’s “development,” “tourism” and “sustainability” will continue.

As usual, our keynote sessions and featured panels with speakers from several disciplines will lay out larger (re)conceptualisations, interdisciplinary bodies of scholarship, contradicting arguments, methodologies, and questions that invite everyone to (re)think about “development,” “tourism,” and “sustainability.” Examples include:

  1. How has the past been packaged in terms of history, heritage, and memory?
  2. In what ways have tourism and development always been tied up with the past?
  3. What is the relationship between education, development, and sustainability?
  4. How and to what extent do the globalisation, regionalisation, internationalisation and nationalisation of “development,” “tourism,” and “sustainability” pose challenges and create new knowledge(s) and discourses for academic disciplines, legal practices, and policy making?
  5. Why and in what ways have (foreign) language policies and educational reforms been used to justify development?
  6. What are some major responses from schools, higher education institutions, think tanks, and relevant organisations to such challenges, discourses, policies and reforms raised in the above questions?

We expect to showcase several featured exhibitions highlighting community-engaged projects dedicated to well-rounded “development,” “tourism” and “sustainability” values and practices. We also envision another joint exhibition from artists, students and academics that showcases the various stages of modern Vietnam’s heritage and traditional festival making processes. All of this is really exciting, isn’t it?

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.engagingwithvietnam.net/home

 

Call for papers : Southeast Asian Islam : Religious Radicalism, Democracy, and Global Trends

Call for Papers : The 2nd Studia Islamika International conference 2017 :  Southeast Asian Islam : Religious Radicalism, Democracy, and Global Trends, 8-10/08/2017, Jakarta

Deadline for abstract submission : 15/05/2017

The Center for the Study of Islam and Society (PPIM) of Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University (UIN) Jakarta will carry out an international conference in August this year. This conference is dedicated to promoting Studia Islamika, an international journal published by the Center. This is the second Studia Islamika conference, and this event is expected to be held regularly in the future. In the coming conference, scholars and students on Southeast Asian Islam are invited to present their papers, research and posters. Relevant themes and topics have been selected to accommodate different research interests of the participants.

The 2nd Studia Islamika International Conference 2017 will be held as a reflection on many different aspects related to Southeast Asia. It is to look at current political trends, religious radicalism, the development of democracy, and global trends. Southeast Asia has experienced tremendous changes since its formation until today. It achieved one of the highest economic developments in the world while faith and ethnicity still play an important role in the political field. This conference will explore these various developments in the context of globalization and democratization. Theories and new research findings on Southeast Asia will be explored and discussed during the conference. The conference features research addressing the following topics:

  • Religious Radicalism: Approaches, Trends and Methods
  • Democracy, Citizenship and Identity
  • Religious Radicalism and Education
  • Globalization and Transnational Movements: Southeast Asian Islam and ISIS
  • Contemporary Islamic Economics and Tourism
  • Philanthropy and Civil Society
  • Women, Society and Representation
  • Social Media and the Contestation of the Public Sphere
  • Challenges of Urban Life: Food, Culture and Life Style
  • The Rise of Islamic Populism? Sectarian Politics in Contemporary Indonesia

Plus d’informations sur : http://conference.ppim.uinjkt.ac.id/

River Cities: Water Space in Urban Development and History

River Cities: Water Space in Urban Development and History, 11-12/12/2017, Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia

Supported by the Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA), Airlangga University, and the International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden, the Netherlands

Conveners: Dr Paul Rabé, Adrian Perkasa (M.A.) and Dr Rita Padawangi

Deadline: 1 May 2017

Introduction

Cities and water can be said to have a love-hate relationship (1), and this is especially true of rivers in cities in Asia. Many Asian cities, like their cousins in the rest of the world, owe their locations to rivers and the trading opportunities and water sources these rivers provided.  In recent years, cities across China are beautifying their water fronts, and cities as diverse as Singapore and Seoul are turning their rivers into assets as part of urban redevelopment schemes or restoring them in an effort to bring nature back to the city. But many other cities in Asia have their backs turned to their rivers. Where rivers were once trading and transport arteries, nowadays many of them have suffered neglect as roads and evolving trading patterns have supplanted the rivers’ economic and social functions. Their decline has been accompanied by environmental destruction, as their waters have become polluted and serve as the dumping ground for solid waste. Moreover, riverbank settlements evolved into legally ambiguous spaces, as old settlements were detached from land formalization regimes and were subjected to environmental deterioration from the rivers. Far from being an asset, these rivers have become an eyesore—and occasionally also a threat, owing to flooding exacerbated by poor planning and a poor understanding of the place of these water bodies in the wider regional eco-system.

Symposium objectives

This symposium seeks to uncover the relationship between rivers and cities from a multi-disciplinary perspective in the humanities and the social sciences. The symposium welcomes both scholars and practitioners. It aims to contribute innovative ways of thinking about how to better integrate rivers, creeks and canals—including their environmental, historical, social, political, cultural and economic dimensions—into the fabric of contemporary cities.  The focus is on cities in Asia, but papers on other parts of the world will also be considered if they make explicit their relevance to Asian cities.

Papers are welcomed in four categories of investigation:

  1. Rivers and cities in historical perspective (history, heritage, culture, and geography)
  2. Neighborhoods and social life of riverine communities
  3. Evaluating experiences with riverfront and riverbank settlement and design interventions in Asia
  4. Urban policy perspectives and innovations

Plus d’informations sur : http://iias.asia/event/river-cities-water-space-urban-development-history

Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia

Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia, an international conference at Binghamton University, November 10-11, 2017

Submit your panel or paper proposal by May 1, 2017

Recent global upheavals have turned world attention to the plight of refugees, such as Syrians and the Rohingya of Myanmar who have chosen dangerous sea voyages to escape conflict and persecution. These dramatic images raise larger questions about the control over mobile bodies in the broader context of maritime Asia, pointing to phenomena that are by no means limited to our contemporary moment. For centuries, people have moved in and across the maritime world that stretches from the Indian Ocean to the western Pacific as refugees, slaves, and under other involuntary circumstances, as well as in the pursuit of trade, war, and religion. But this mobility has always been historically controlled, driven and regulated by larger forces. Religion, ecology, state power, and social hierarchies constrain and inform individual choices.

With a keynote lecture delivered by Amitav Ghosh, this interdisciplinary conference will explore the mobility of individuals across maritime Asia with an interest in disaggregating different types of bodies and different types of travel. What sorts of bodies endeavored to cross the water between and along the coasts of Asia in the past and more recently? What does a 20th century Somali pirate have in common with a 16th century Javanese pilgrim heading to Mecca, or the Chinese residents of Dutch Batavia with the Filipino domestic workers in Dubai? What is the role of cooperation, violence and control in historical and contemporary Asian maritime travel? How has biopolitical control over travel been effected in the past and through modern technocratic interventions? How are the material findings of nautical archaeology changing our understanding of the movements of goods and people in maritime Asia? The goal of this conference is to pair contemporary and historical experiences of travel and mobility to understand continuities and changes experienced and brought about by traveling bodies in and across maritime Asia.

We welcome papers that address a broad range of themes, with particular interest in the following topics:
*Labor flows and recruitment
*Voluntary and involuntary movement, including slave and refugee communities
*Cultural meanings and representations of maritime travel and pilgrimage
*How travelers have mobilized nautical technologies and knowledge transfer across oceans
*Uses of force across maritime Asia
*Uncertainties and vagaries of sea travel
*Shifting contours of of trade diasporas
*Identity and community formation among seafaring groups
*Geopolitics of the ocean and its frontiers

Plus d’informations sur : https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdDko81MfjecqvGgElqO8YK7nDD1YH2lLpmEvqIXizilZFzw/viewform

SPAFA Journal en ligne et en libre accès à partir de 2017

Appel à contributions : SPAFA Journal, vol. 1, no. 1 (January-December 2017)

The SPAFA Journal is the annual publication of the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) Regional Centre for Archaeology and Fine Arts (SPAFA) in Bangkok, Thailand. It carries original research papers and multimedia articles on the archaeology, visual arts, performing arts, traditional arts, heritage conservation and cultural heritage of Southeast Asia. Submissions are currently accepted for the 2017 issue.

Voir : http://www.spafajournal.org/index.php/spafajournal/index

La nouvelle version, en ligne, du SPAFA Journal comportera dans chaque livraison des résumés de thèse avec parfois des accès à l’intégralité du texte :

Pour cette édition :

  • Local supremacy in ancient Javanese cultural development : reassessment of the ‘Indianisation’ concept using Dieng plateau as a case study by Rizki Putri Rezna Hassan (Anthropology, Durham), septembre 2016
  • The Plain of Jars of North Laos – Beyond Madeleine Colani by Lia Genovese (History of Art and Archaeology, SOAS University of London), April 2014 – Full Text

Vous trouverez l’ensemble des archives du SPAFA Journal disponibles en accès libre sur le site du SEAMEO-SPAFA : http://www.spafajournal.org/index.php/spafadigest/issue/archive

CALL FOR PAPERS : The Politics of Distribution: Migrant Labour, Development and Religious Aid in Asia

Call for papers : The Politics of Distribution: Migrant Labour, Development and Religious Aid in Asia, 16-17 /11 /2017, Asian Research Institute, National University of Singapore

Deadline : 2 june 2017

Migrant labour has been viewed as an important factor in growth, productivity and poverty reduction in Asia where rapid economic development has raised many to middle income countries. However, parallel to the growth of these economies has arisen new challenges and tensions as well as continuing underdevelopment (Rigg 2015). This includes what some scholars have identified as the formation of a labour surplus population in many parts of the world, where a decline in small agriculture and new industries generating less employment has resulted in a labour over supply that has made many “redundant” in the global production system (Ferguson 2015, Li 2010). Instead, distributive practices and “relations of dependence” (Ferguson 2015) have increased in the context of not only diminishing employment opportunities but also in uncertain and precarious employment, as is in the case of migrant labour which has often been linked to abuses over working conditions and wages.

In this sense, religious aid is one significant and diverse form of distributive practice. This is particularly the case where the rise in global civil society and non-state actors make up for many of the “structural holes” (Faist 2009) in social services neglected by the State. The absence of the State in this area, particularly in the global South, has led to an opening up of a space for alternative actors to ‘fill in the gap’, including faith-based actors where religious spaces have become simultaneously humanitarian and development spaces. This is particularly the case for migrants, refugees and asylum seekers, who as ‘non-citizens’ are often marginalised in their access to formal work and social services.

The conference will engage with Ferguson’s concept of distributive practices (Ferguson 2015) to interrogate whether it is applicable to religious aid in the Asian context as a significant form of contemporary labour. This is in recognition of the fact that cultivating the social relationships which make distributive flows possible is not a passive condition, but rather the outcome of a particular type of labour (Ferguson 2015, 97). Although having always existed in the form of remittances, kin-based sharing, patronage, “corruption” and relations of dependence on others such as NGOs and corporations, distributive practices have taken on a new amplitude with the decrease in the availability and increasing precariousness of waged labour.

Lire la suite sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Event/Detail/f3f0722f-8b9f-4bd6-9414-57662eb74901

Call for abstracts : 2017 Canadian Council for Southeast Asian Studies Conference

Call for abstracts : 2017 Canadian Council for Southeast Asian Studies Conference, 26-27 october 2017, York University, Toronto, Canada

Theme of the conference : People in and out of place

Abstract / proposal submission: 30 April 2017

The 33rd Biennial Canadian Council for Southeast Asian Studies (CCSEAS) conference theme, “People In and Out of Place,” represents a long standing and yet often forgotten dynamic of a region known as the crossroads of different peoples, histories, cultures, and politics.

We welcome panels or roundtables to discuss the meaning of this condition by exploring the conflicting formation and transformation of institutions, knowledge, ideologies, identities, places, and practices in the rural, urban, and peri-urban spaces of the region, and in diasporic Southeast Asian communities. We also welcome submission of fiction and documentary films for consideration for screening.

Click here to submit an abstract: http://laps.apps01.yorku.ca/machform/view.php?id=220691

Plus d’informations sur : https://ccseas.ca/

Call for papers : New York Conference on Asian Studies (NYCAS) 2017

Call for papers : New York Conference on Asian Studies (NYCAS) 2017

Conference theme : Consuming Asia

Scholars in New York, neighboring states, Canada, and elsewhere are cordially invited to submit proposals for individual papers, panels, and roundtables. Panels, papers, and roundtables may focus on the conference theme “Consuming Asia” or other aspects of East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, or Asian American Studies. Submissions within the conference theme might focus on how “Asia” is both the object of consumption and the consumer.

Paper and panel proposals from graduate students and established scholars are equally welcome. We will make every effort to assemble a program that represents Asia and Asia scholars in all of their diversity.

Paper and panel proposals may be submitted via the online form between January 15, 2017 and May 1, 2017 (DEADLINE EXTENDED!).

Voir : https://nycas2017.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/

CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities

CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities, 16-17 August 2017, Asia Research Institute, NUS

Deadline : 30 April 2017

For Zukin (1982, 1987, 1995) culture has been central to the development of the new ‘symbolic’ or ‘creative’ economy, but she also cautions against its appropriation for urban redevelopment that can lead displacement of local communities. Castells (2010), on the other hand, suggests that cultural materials, including digital media, facilitate social change, especially in relation to social movements, because they enable social actors to redefine their subjectivities and transform the social structure. While local and regional governments are striving towards the ‘rejuvenation’ of urban spaces as a form of city branding, citizens and artists alike are seeking ways to maintain the viability of local arts and culture along with (in)tangible heritage. In many Asian cities, heritage preservation has played an important role in the democratisation of urban spaces and community building. Tensions between different interest groups have been unavoidable but mutual ground is needed for feasible policies and practices to construct inclusive and socially just urban spaces.

With the rise of local governance, and changing state-society relationships, we believe that the full potential of arts, heritage, and cultural production in the social transformation and civic participation has not yet been fully acknowledged. Given differences in urban governance, planning and civic participation in East and Southeast Asia, more nuanced research is needed to identify what kind of cultural policies and creative practices could be developed and how they might provide innovative approaches beyond the Western paradigms of ‘creative’ or ‘cultural’ cities, and gentrification. Similarly, Douglass (2015) has raised policy questions about how to strengthen civic engagement, belonging and community building in cities through the cultivation of civic participation. Innovative forms of civic participation resonate with the ‘worlding practices’ defined by Ong (2011:4) as ‘projects that attempt to establish or break established horizons of urban standards in and beyond a particular city’. The purpose of this multidisciplinary conference is thus to explore both government-led cultural policies and the organically emerging artistic and creative practices aimed at the empowerment of local communities and neighborhoods in contemporary East and Southeast Asian cities.

We invite the submission of papers from early career and established scholars, policy makers, activists, and creative practitioners to explore the role of arts, culture, and heritage in developing more progressive urban societies in East and Southeast Asia cities. We encourage applicants to consider empirical case studies and theories within comparative contexts and to extrapolate policy options for other regions apart from the East and Southeast Asia that explore innovative ways to build co-operation between varied social groups, institutions, and local governance. Questions that will guide the conference proceedings speak to integrated themes across disciplinary and geographical boundaries and include:

  • How do arts, heritage, and creative practices provide opportunities for ‘creative communities’ to resist the encroachment of the corporate economy (Douglass 2015)? What challenges do they face in asserting their right to urban space?
  • How and to what extent could ‘gentrification aesthetics’ (Chang 2014) open up new approaches for analysing both positive and negative impact of urban redevelopment?
  • What kind of innovations in governance are needed to support art communities, heritage preservation, and cultural and creative industries in ways that are socially inclusive, viable, and enhance civil participation? Can an approach based on the interconnectedness of cultural and social sustainability (Kong 2009) benefit the understanding of the collective processes emerging in cities today?
  • How does public art reflect the ways in which forms of vernacular heritage, culture, and socio-spatial identity are bound up with the representation and (re)shaping of place and landscape in cities? What controversies and political fault lines might emerge through these processes?
  • What kind of novel forms of ‘art activism’ or ‘cultural activism’ are emerging, and how do they benefit, interact, or hinder the aims of social transformations?
  • To what extent are arts, heritage, and cultural productions contributing to the development of ‘tourist cities’? How is this being resisted or embraced by local populations?
  • What new approaches are emerging that transcend purely physical space? Can intangible forms, such as digital networks, forums and sites, benefit the survival of local communities?

Plus d’informations sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Event/Detail/f767b24e-9d53-4d4b-9f72-0ec54a53689b

Appel à contributions : Transnational Asia : an online interdisciplinary journal

Transnational Asia : an online interdisciplinary journal est une nouvelle revue éditée par le Chao Center for Asian Studies de l’université de Rice.

Transnational Asia envisions Asia in transnational time and space. Interdisciplinary, transhistorical, and trans-spatial in approach, Transnational Asia publishes scholarship that challenges traditional understandings of Asia, moving beyond the confines of area studies and nation-state focus and capturing the emergent forms of Asia-related, Asia-inspired, and Asia-driven themes and sites of inquiry in the world today.

Transnational Asia stands on a multidisciplinary premise, encouraging scholars in broad humanistic and social scientific disciplines to submit their work. Being a web-only journal, our goal is to turn our journal into a space where highly engaging scholarly discussions on transnational Asian themes are posted in a timely manner free from the constraints of traditional journal publication. At the same time, we uphold scholarly rigor and, therefore, all main articles will be peer-reviewed. Additionally, each issue will have a specials section with two or more articles discussing an overlapping theme and review articles whereby authors present their views on the basis of two or more books recently published.

Plus d’informations sur : https://transnationalasia.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=37

Le premier numéro, paru à l’automne 2016, propose un article sur l’Indonésie :

  • Epistemological Considerations of Studying History Through Film with Reference to Indonesia by Sandeep Ray

Lire l’article sur : https://transnationalasia.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=116

 

Appel à contributions : Global Southeast Asian Diasporas (Brill)

L’éditeur Brill vient de fonder une nouvelle collection, Global Southeast Asian Diasporas: Memory, Movement, and Modernities across Hemispheres, dirigée par Richard T. Chu ( University of Massachusetts), Augusto F. Espiritu (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) et Mariam Lam (University of California, Riverside) et lance un appel à contributions pour l’alimenter.

Attendant to the rise of the Southeast Asian diasporas, Global Southeast Asian Diasporas (SEAD) provides a peer-reviewed forum for studies that specifically investigate the histories and experiences of Southeast Asian diasporic subjects across hemispheres. We especially invite studies that critically focus on the Southeast Asian experience from a transnational, comparative, and international perspective. SEAD welcomes submissions from a wide array of disciplinary fields (including history, sociology, political science, cultural studies, literary studies, and anthropology, among others) that innovatively interrogate themes such as refugees, political asylum, gender/sexuality, colonialism, globalization, empire, nation/nationalism, ethnicity, and transnationalism.

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.brill.com/global-southeast-asian-diasporas-memory-movement-and-modernities-across-hemispheres

The 2nd Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History with a focus on Hindu and Buddhist art and archaeology of central Java (8-9th Century CE)

Pour en savoir plus

The 2nd Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History with a focus on Hindu and Buddhist art and archaeology of central Java (8-9th Century CE) will be taking place in Yogyakarta, Central Java, July 27–2 August 2017. It is jointly run by SOAS University of London and Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM).

Programme Overview

In 2016, a pioneering Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History and Conservation focusing on premodern Javanese Art was held in Trawas (East Java). In 2017, the second edition of the Programme will be held in Yogyakarta, the iconic royal city of Central Java. It will focus on Central Javanese Hindu and Buddhist Art History in both its local and translocal dimensions. The period covered is from the early 8th to the late 9th century—the heyday of the Central Javanese civilisation.

Continuer la lecture de The 2nd Summer Programme in Southeast Asian Art History with a focus on Hindu and Buddhist art and archaeology of central Java (8-9th Century CE)

Call for papers, Religion in Southeast Asia, American Academy of Religion

Statement of Purpose:

Situated at the nexus of several civilizational influences — including Indian, Chinese, and Middle Eastern — Southeast Asia, as a region, remains understudied in terms of its relevance to the theoretical and methodological study of religion. This neglect is in part due to the tendency to reduce Southeast Asian religious systems to the named “world religions” often identified with other regions. As a result, indigenous practices are not viewed in terms of their conceptual and other linkages — and in some cases the dynamic interactions between those practices and the religious practices brought over by different classes of immigrants are frequently overlooked. However, and especially in the last fifteen years, exciting materials addressing different religious cultures in Southeast Asia have emerged. Hitherto, there has been little scholarly conversation at the AAR on Southeast Asia. And, perhaps even less commonly, are Southeast Asian religious cultures (e.g., Buddhist, Islamic, Christian, Hindu, “animist,” Chinese, and Pacific) put into conversation with one another. In light of this need in the field, we strive to provide a context for this conversation as well as to foster critical thinking about Southeast Asia as a region.

Continuer la lecture de Call for papers, Religion in Southeast Asia, American Academy of Religion