Archives de catégorie : ACTUALITES

Call for papers : Writing Malaysia and Singapore: Shared Pasts, Global Futures

Call for papers : Writing Malaysia and Singapore: Shared Pasts, Global Futures, 20/10/2017, The Open University, Camden, London

Convenors : Dr Alex Tickell, The Open University; Dr Florian Stadtler, University of Exeter; Kelly Tse, University of Oxford.

Deadline for submissions : 30 July 2017

In the last decade an emerging generation of writers from Malaysia and Singapore has achieved international recognition, pioneering new global English fiction and embarking on more confident imaginative journeys across South East Asia. This one-day symposium, a collaboration between the Open University and the University of Exeter, seeks to remap global English fiction (dominated by neighbouring South Asia) and draw fresh attention to the dynamic colonial literary cultures and postcolonial, globalising futures of Malaysian and Singaporean Anglophone writing.

The shared past of Singapore and Malaysia, until the former’s secession from Malaysia in 1965, and the comparable post/colonial trajectories and contexts of English fiction in the region, form the geographical rationale for the symposium’s two-country approach. Consequently, colonial fiction, new forms of historical writing and the narrative potential of the region’s wartime history, and conflicts such as the ‘Emergency’ will be a focal point. Another significant, shared literary concern is the position of the creative writer in relation to the colonial and postcolonial legacies and the ambiguous place of English in the postcolonial cultural politics of both countries. Papers are also welcome on ethnicity, diaspora and English, publishing and book history, significant writers, and on the development of local forms of Anglophone genre fiction.

Keynote Speakers: Philip Holden, National University of Singapore; Angelia Poon Mui Cheng, National Institute of Education, Singapore.

Plus d’informations sur : https://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2017/06/25/writing-malaysia-singapore-shared-pasts-global-futures

 

Thailand’s triple threat: culture, politics, and security

Podcast : Panel on Nicholas Farrelly’s « Thailand’s triple threat: culture, politics, and security », 30/06/2017, New Mandala

New Mandala co-founder Nicholas Farrelly joined an expert panel comprising Tyrell Haberkorn (ANU), Sunai Phasuk (Human Rights Watch), and John Blaxland (ANU) to discuss his paper, Thailand’s triple threat: culture, politics, and securityto be published by the Lowy Institute for International Affairs. The event was hosted by the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia, and was moderated by the Lowy Institute’s Matthew Busch.

The Lowy Institute have made audio available via SoundCloud, which can be played below.

A écouter sur : http://www.newmandala.org/panel-discussion-thailands-triple-threat-culture-politics-security/

Call for papers : Postgraduate Conference « Movement: Southeast Asia »

Call for papers : Postgraduate Conference « Movement: Southeast Asia », 22/09/2017, SOAS

Summary

With evolving political, social, and cultural currents in Southeast Asia, movement is an important discursive lens to understand the dynamism of the region. Reflecting on movements, and change—from prehistory to the contemporary period—can improve our understanding of Southeast Asia, in terms of its constituent nation-states, peoples, and cultures, and as a region as well as an area of study.

For this first postgraduate conference on Southeast Asia at SOAS, we invite papers that consider “movement.” For example, how can we critically investigate migration? Conflict and forced displacement? Diaspora and transnationalism? Trade and the transfer of capital or goods? The movement of objects in and out of the region? Political movements? Social movements? Artistic movements? The movement of bodies in performance? Exchanges of ideas? Musical, visual, or filmic influences? Translation? Changes in the natural or architectural landscape? Climate change, resources, and resilience? Or indeed rethinking the delimitations of Southeast Asia as a region—and as an object of “area studies”?

The conference is open to Masters and PhD students and recent graduates, and aims to provide a collegiate setting for early researchers to discuss their work. Selected presenters are encouraged to seek their own financial support for travel expenses, although we may be able to provide limited funding for those who can demonstrate need. We will also welcome tele-conference presentations for selected speakers who are not able to travel to London.

Please send your title, abstract (250 words), and short biography (100 words)  by 28 July 2017. Selected abstracts will be notified by 7 August 2017.

Pour plus d’informations voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/22sep2017-postgraduate-conference-movement-southeast-asia-.html

The literary advancement before the 1932 Revolution

The first volume of Suphapburut magazine (photo from: Museum Thailand)

The literary advancement before the 1932 Revolution by Kittinun Klongyai, 04/07/2017, Prachatai

The 1932 Siamese Revolution was heralded in part by stories, novels and writing groups. The ideals of the People’s Party were nothing new, compared to movements that had already taken place in the literary field.

The 1930s in Thailand have been recognised as a time of change marking the transition from absolute monarchy to democracy, as well as the birth of the first constitution. But the power of writing was given to the people earlier than the power of self-rule. Works from the period are now, in some ways, memorial plaques of the literary revolution that contributed in turn to political revolt.

Revolutionary literature

Preedee Hongsaton, a historian teaching at Thammasat University, told Prachatai that literature must not only entertain, but also reflect the intellect, values, and perspectives of society, conveying efforts to strive towards progress and equality.

During the 1930s, a number of writing groups such as « The Gentleman » or Khana Suphapburut rooted their works in the ideal of equality, just as the People’s Party or Khana Ratsadon stated in their manifesto that, “Everyone will have work to do. Everyone will have equal rights and be free from the slavery of the aristocrats”.

The works of Kularb Saipradit Sri Burapha, the head of Khana Suphapburut, for instance, center around love between classes. “A Real Man” or Luk Phu Chai (1928) stood out in particular as a novel preaching that people should be judged by their own deeds, rather than their family’s fame.

The writer Sri Burapha, a pen-name, deconstructed Thailand’s class system by depicting villains from noble families, showing a disjuncture between class and virtue. Sri Burapha, however, was also skeptical of trends from the Western world, and played with them critically.

Lire la suite sur : http://prachatai.org/english/node/7248

Call for papers : ASEAS 11 (2) : Forced Migration in Southeast Asia

Call for papers : ASEAS 11 (2) : Forced Migration in Southeast Asia

Deadline for submission : 31 december 2017

Issue 11(2) of the Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies (ASEAS), to be published in December 2018, features a focus on forced migration in Southeast Asia, assessing past, current, and future trends, reasons, and drivers as well as the cultural, social, economic, ecological, and legal dimensions of forced migration in the region.

Recently, movements of forced mass migration have mainly been associated with war torn countries such as Syria and Iraq. However, Southeast Asian countries are not only hosting a significant number of international refugees and asylum seekers but have also been witnessing regional crises of transnational and domestic mass displacement due to armed conflicts, cultural, ethnic, and religious prosecution, or environmental degradation and natural disasters. Two most recent cases include the so-called Rohingya crisis of 2016 and the conflict in Marawi, Philippines, where most of its 200,000 inhabitants fled the city after it had been overrun by a local offshoot of the Islamic State. From an area studies perspective, these and many more examples raise the question of how the issue of domestic and transnational forced migration is being addressed at domestic as well as bi- and multilateral levels within the region.

Thus far, little do we know about the current state of refugees and internally displaced persons in Southeast Asia. There are only rough estimates available on the actual number of people that migrate involuntarily to or within the region. However, according to UNHCR, 14% of the 65.3 million forced migrant population worldwide are currently hosted by countries in the Asia-Pacific Region. Regarding refugees and asylum seekers in Southeast Asian countries, official numbers only exist for Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Philippines which, according to UNHCR, hosted close to 285,000 in 2015 (UNHCR, 2016, Global Trends Forced Displacement in 2015). In Southeast Asia, only Cambodia, the Philippines, and Timor-Leste have ratified the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 protocol. Although the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration mentions ASEAN’s and its member states’ commitment to guarantee the right to seek asylum, thus far, member states’ way to address the issue of forced migration has been rather individualist.

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.seas.at/our-journal-aseas/call-for-papers-aseas-112-forced-migration-in-southeast-asia/

With Social Media, Vietnam’s Dissidents Grow Bolder Despite Crackdown

Nguyen Anh Tuan, a human rights activist, said that when police interrogated him in 2011, he had no one to turn to. But now with supporters on Facebook, “I cannot feel lonely anymore,” he said.

« With Social Media, Vietnam’s Dissidents Grow Bolder Despite Crackdown » by Julia Wallace, 02/07/2017, The New York Times

HANOI, Vietnam — A prominent blogger and environmental activist in Vietnam was sentenced last week to 10 years in prison on charges of national security offenses, including sharing anti-state propaganda on social media.

Nguyen Ngoc Nhu Quynh, better known by her online handle Mother Mushroom, had been held incommunicado since she was arrested in October, and attendance at her trial was strictly controlled.

But barely one hour after the verdict was handed down on Thursday, one of Ms. Quynh’s lawyers summarized his arguments and posted her final statement at the trial to his 61,000 Facebook followers.

“I hope that everyone will speak up and fight, overcome their own fears to build a better country,” she said, according to the lawyer. The statement was reposted thousands of times.

 In authoritarian Vietnam, the internet has become the de facto forum for the country’s growing number of dissenting voices. Facebook connections in particular have mobilized opposition to government policies; they played a key role in mass protests against the state’s handling of an environmental disaster last year. Now, the government is tightening its grip on the internet, arresting and threatening bloggers, and pressing Facebook and YouTube to censor what appears on their sites.

“Facebook is being used as an organizing tool, as a self-publishing platform, as a monitoring device for people when they are being detained and when they get released,” said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch.

Lire la suite sur : https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/07/02/world/asia/vietnam-mother-mushroom-social-media-dissidents.html?

Photographing the Soul of Cambodia: Interview with Sophal Neak

Photographing the Soul of Cambodia: Interview with Sophal Neak by Francesca Masoero, 04/07/2017 in ArtAsiaPacific

Sophal Neak was born in Takeo, a province in southern Cambodia, in 1989. Since 2011, her works—in particular her photographs—have been showcased across Asia, Europe and Australia. Her unique and uncompromising take on history and people, as well as her distinctive and powerful vision, has played an important role in contributing to the cultural re-awakening of her country. In an interview with ArtAsiaPacific, the photographer discusses her art and creative processes, her take on gender in Cambodia and more.

“Flowers,” your most recent exhibition, is currently being showcased in Phnom Penh, but your work has travelled quite a bit across the globe. How do you feel about the fact that your photographs are allowing more people to get to know Cambodia?

Allowing people outside Cambodia to understand the complexity of my country is really important, but I’d actually like my work to serve as a certain reminder for the Khmer people as well. Most Cambodians tend to stick with the traditional culture and perceptions. This includes, for example, that women have to be young and beautiful, or that they have to cook and have children. By drawing attention to these concepts in my work, I try to raise the awareness of viewers and invite them to move forward from these ideas.

Lire la suite sur : http://artasiapacific.com/Blog/PhotographingTheSoulOfCambodiaInterviewWithSophalNeak

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: Research among the Karen, Past and Present [Part 2]

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: « Research among the Karen, Past and Present » [Part 2]

Pia Jolliffe interviews anthropologist Mikael Gravers.

This week on Tea Circle, we’re pleased to feature a two-part interview with anthropologist Mikael Gravers, an expert on nationalism, ethnic conflict, and peace and reconciliation, with extensive experience working among Karen communities in Thailand and Myanmar. He is the author of a number of books on Burma/Myanmar, including Burma/Myanmar— Where Now?, Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Burma, and Nationalism as Political Paranoia in Burma. He is also a researcher on the project “Everyday Justice and Security in the Myanmar Transition”.

Lire l’article sur : https://teacircleoxford.com/2017/07/06/a-conversation-with-mikael-gravers-research-among-the-karen-past-and-present-part-2/

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: Research among the Karen, Past and Present [Part 1]

A Conversation with Mikael Gravers: « Research among the Karen, Past and Present » [Part 1]

Pia Jolliffe interviews anthropologist Mikael Gravers.

This week on Tea Circle, we’re pleased to feature a two-part interview with anthropologist Mikael Gravers, an expert on nationalism, ethnic conflict, and peace and reconciliation, with extensive experience working among Karen communities in Thailand and Myanmar. He is the author of a number of books on Burma/Myanmar, including Burma/Myanmar— Where Now?, Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Burma, and Nationalism as Political Paranoia in Burma. He is also a researcher on the project “Everyday Justice and Security in the Myanmar Transition”.

Lire https://teacircleoxford.com/2017/07/05/a-conversation-with-mikael-gravers-research-among-the-karen-past-and-present-part-1/

 

Murder and black magic: Cambodia’s modern-day witch-hunts

« Murder and black magic: Cambodia’s modern-day witch-hunts » by Paul Millar, 06/07/2017, Southeast Asia Globe

A single word from one of Cambodia’s traditional healers can turn a whole community against outsiders in their ranks – often with fatal results.

… With the country’s feeble healthcare system struggling to keep up with the undiagnosed death and disease plaguing rural Cambodians, kru khmer or lou kru – wide-reaching terms describing traditional healers ranging from fortune tellers to spirit mediums – continue to play a central role across the country. Men and women, monks and laity, these healers call spirits into their bodies, ink protection spells onto their patients’ skin and root out black magic within the community – sometimes to devastating effect. In Kong Pisei alone, which has a population of just under 113,000 as of the 2008 census, two other alleged sorcerers have been beheaded in the past two years. Others accused of witchcraft have barely managed to escape with their lives.

On the second day of Khmer New Year in April, Prak Kong and his wife were forced to flee their home in Kong Pisei’s Prey Vihear commune just hours before a mob of villagers tore their house apart with hammers and rocks. As the crowd swelled to more than 600, the most violent attackers splintered the family’s spirit house and splashed petrol around the inside of the house, hoping to set it ablaze. According to Kong’s brother-in-law, who now lives there, the violence was unleashed by a local kru khmer who had accused the man of using sorcery to murder his newborn nephew-in-law.

“The problem started before the water festival [last year],” he said. “[His relative’s] child died after surgery. They wanted to find out why their child died so they went to see a lou kru. The lou kru gave him Kong’s name. They said he was responsible for the child’s death.”

Fabienne Luco, a social anthropologist in Cambodia who has done extensive research on the killing of people accused of being sorcerers, said that kru khmer often used accusations of witchcraft to provide a scapegoat for suffering or chronic disease within the community.

Lire la suite sur : http://sea-globe.com/cambodia-witch-hunts/

 

Space, Social Conflict, and the Future of Urban Society: a comparative view

Space, Social Conflict, and the Future of Urban Society: a comparative view

Professor Michael Herzfeld, Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

Co-presented with the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre, the China Studies Centre, the Department of Anthropology, and the School of Architecture, Design and Planning

For many years now, anthropologists and urban scholars alike have identified ‘gentrification’ as a process of class conflict in which poorer people get pushed to the margins of urban life in the name of ‘urban renewal.’

Professor Michael Herzfeld will argue that gentrification is the tip of a much larger iceberg, called ‘development’ – a grandiloquent idea that is often coupled with socially and culturally destructive policies and that easily promotes insidious (because unstated) forms of social Darwinism (‘the survival of the fittest’) and paternalism.

Using examples from Thailand, China, Greece, and Italy, he will argue that these short-sighted policies are creating an increasingly disenfranchised and resentful under-class. While reactions in these and other countries will vary with cultural conventions, economic dynamics, and the extent to which development evades socially responsible control, the impact on ordinary people is likely to be devastating, while it will also entail the obliteration of socially viable arrangements that have worked well for centuries or even millennia.

Michael suggests that currently emergent forms of urban protest may not be sufficient to stem the tide, but that more concerted engagement by academics and professionals could and must make a significant difference. He will also briefly address some relatively unusual situations where gentrification has had benign effects and will propose that these could provide models for socially responsible planning in the future.

Professor Michael Herzfeld is Ernest E. Monrad Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University, where has taught since 1991, and where he serves as Director of the Asia Center’s Thai Studies Program. He is also IIAS Visiting Professor of Critical Heritage Studies at the University of Leiden (and Senior Advisor to the Critical Heritage Studies Initiative of the International Institute for Asian Studies, Leiden); Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne; and Visiting Professor and Chang Jiang (Yangtze River) Scholar at Shanghai International Studies University (2015-17). The author of eleven books – including Cultural Intimacy: Social Poetics in the Nation-State (1997; 3rd edition, 2016), The Body Impolitic: Artisans and Artifice in the Global Hierarchy of Value (2004), Evicted from Eternity: The Restructuring of Modern Rome (2009), and Siege of the Spirits: Community and Polity in Bangkok (2016) – and numerous articles and reviews, he has also produced two ethnographic films (Monti Moments [2007] and Roman Restaurant Rhythms [2011]). He has served as editor of American Ethnologist (1995-98) and is currently editor-at-large (responsible for “Polyglot Perspectives”) at Anthropological Quarterly. He is also a member of the editorial boards of several journals, including American Ethnologist, Anthropology Today, International Journal of Heritage Studies, Journal of Anthropological Research, and South East Asia Research. An advocate for “engaged anthropology,” he has conducted research in Greece, Italy, and Thailand on, inter alia, the social and political impact of historic conservation and gentrification, the social effects of urban policy, the discourses and practices of crypto-colonialism, social poetics, the dynamics of nationalism and bureaucracy, and the ethnography of knowledge among artisans and intellectuals.

Voir : http://sydney.edu.au/sydney_ideas/lectures/2017/professor_michael_herzfeld.shtml

Mounting threats to Thailand’s order

Thailand’s King Maha Vajiralongkorn watches the annual Royal Ploughing Ceremony in central Bangkok on May 12. © Reuters

Mounting threats to Thailand’s order by Nicholas Farrelly, 11/07/2017, Nikkei Asian Review

A new king, old generals and southern conflict play on country’s anxieties.

These are nervous times for Thailand. After the death in October of King Bhumibol Adyulyadej, and with his son King Maha Vajiralongkorn on the Chakri throne, anxiety about the country’s long-term direction is building among those who wonder whether the current crop of military rulers has any real appetite for surrendering control.

Since seizing power in May 2014, the generals have sought to stamp out dissent from groups aggrieved at the abandonment of democratic principles. The strongman Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha and his team worry that forces allied to deposed former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra still wait in the shadows for their chance to re-take power.

 For Prayuth, in his preferred role as guardian of the realm, this prospect encourages a blunt approach to opposing views. The defense of the new king — a man with a reputation for erratic behavior — has been steadfast. The country’s strict lese-majeste law is used to tackle critics and threaten those who question the orthodoxy of royalist-military dominance.

Prayuth’s alternative to free-flowing debate is a narrow vision of Thai values, ordained from on high and proliferated through a propaganda apparatus well-honed in the grim arts of manipulating public opinion. While much of the military’s attention focuses on what happens in Bangkok, there is no hiding from the darkest shadow hanging over the kingdom.

In the southernmost provinces of Yala, Pattani and Narathiwat a long-running conflict between local Malay-Muslims and the central government has seen over 6,500 deaths. In this war of attrition, the insurgency shows no signs of losing momentum: It has been regularly attacking symbols of Thai state authority since 2004. Attacks outside the Muslim rebellion’s usual zones of operation are a significant new development.

Lire la suite sur : http://asia.nikkei.com/Viewpoints/Nicholas-Farrelly/Mounting-threats-to-Thailand-s-order

Why Singapore is struggling to reinvent itself

A general view of the Central Business District of Singapore and the Merlion, illuminated with a projection during the iLight Marina Bay on March 23. © Getty Images

« Why Singapore is struggling to reinvent itself » by William Pesek, 11/07/2017, Nikkei Asian Review

Roots of today`s problems were visible in the city-state over 20 years ago.

There is a hot new industry in Singapore: Kremlinology.

Paul Krugman once compared the city-state to the Soviet Union under Stalin, and the Nobel laureate had a point. He was not referring to communism or to mass killings, of course — but the art of observing, deducing and obsessing over a secretive organization is again consuming the nation of 5.5 million people. The subject of the latest intrigue is a bizarre spat within the family at the core of Singapore’s astounding success and the row is fueling an unprecedented scandal that Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong says could dent the nation’s squeaky-clean image.

 As far as Singapore’s budding Kremlinologists can tell, the tiff concerns the estate of Lee Kuan Yew, who died in 2015. Some of Lee’s children accuse their brother, the current prime minister, of preserving a family home that Singapore’s founding father wanted demolished. They took to social media to air the dirty laundry of a family that long maintained a facade of having none. Many are asking what is really going on and what the first family brawling means for the trajectory of Singapore’s top-down political and economic system.

The echoes of Krugman’s 1994 critique are impossible to miss. His over-the-top comparison was this: Lee Kuan Yew’s model of appropriating domestic savings, championing state-linked companies and steering the workforce into moderate-paying jobs « would have done Stalin proud, » but would ultimately prove unsustainable. The fallout from that unsustainability is now the biggest challenge facing the younger Lee. Efforts to recalibrate the engines of growth away from demographics to greater productivity and innovation are not doing Singaporeans proud.

Lire la suite sur : http://asia.nikkei.com/Viewpoints/William-Pesek/Why-Singapore-is-struggling-to-reinvent-itself?page=1

 

Not Just ‘Pots’: Understanding Social Complexity through Ceramics in Prehistoric Mainland Southeast Asia

Tse Liang Lim, « Not Just ‘Pots’: Understanding Social Complexity through Ceramics in Prehistoric Mainland Southeast Asia », NSC Highlights # 4 (Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre)

The number and quality of artefacts found in burial sites (mortuary goods) are good indicators of ancient social complexity. Social complexity was fairly low during the Neolithic age, suggesting a period of comparatively equal wealth distribution (Higham 2014:183-195; O’Reilly 2014b:478). Social complexity rose during the later Bronze Age in prehistoric Mainland Southeast Asia, intensified during the Iron Age, and culminated in the emergence of intricate prehistoric chiefdoms. This emergence coincided with the expansion of Chinese influence into north Vietnam, as well as the development of a maritime trading network between China and the Mediterranean world via Southeast Asia and India (Higham 2014:196-269; O’Reilly 2014a:485-490).

Understanding the evolution of social complexity is important for the region because the Iron Age’s social complexity paved the way for the rise of Funan, the earliest documented Southeast Asian polity (Higham 2014:278-286; Stark 2006a).

Lire la suite sur : https://www.facebook.com/notes/nalanda-sriwijaya-centre/not-just-pots-understanding-social-complexity-through-ceramics-in-prehistoric-ma/1460864773991901/

 

 

 

[Talk] Photography and Cold War in Southeast Asia

This is a preliminary presentation, a kind of show-and-tell, based on writer, curator and artist Zhuang Wubin’s recent book, Photography in Southeast Asia: A Survey (NUS Press, 2016). Zhuang’s primary intention is to share with the audience some of the materials that he has accumulated during his decade-long fieldwork relating, directly or indirectly, to the different facets of photographic production during the Cold War period. The aim is to unpack the varying ways in which photography was being mobilised, subject to personal and institutional desires.

This talk is organised in conjunction with the exhibitions “Who wants to remember a war?” and LINES: War Drawings and Posters from the Ambassador Dato’ N. Parameswaran Collection, which features posters, woodcuts and drawings from the French phase of the Indochina war of resistance against the Americans, and drawings and sketches of life and people at the frontlines.

About the speaker
As a writer/curator, Zhuang Wubin focuses on the photographic practices in Southeast Asia. A 2010 recipient of the research grant from Prince Claus Fund (Amsterdam), Zhuang is an editorial board member of Trans-Asia Photography Review, a journal published by the Hampshire College and the University of Michigan Scholarly Publication Office. He has been invited to research residency programmes at Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong (2015) and Institute Technology of Bandung (2013). He is the contributing curator of the biennial Chiang Mai Photo Festival (2015, 2017). Published by NUS Press, Photography in Southeast Asia: A Survey (2016) is his fourth book.

As an artist, Zhuang uses photography and text to visualise the Sinophone communities in Southeast Asia.