Archives de catégorie : ACTUALITES

“Learning it the Hard Way”: Social safeguards norms in Chinese-led dam projects in Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia

Julian Kirchherr, Nathanial Matthews, Katrina J. Charles, Matthew J. Walton, “Learning it the Hard Way”: Social safeguards norms in Chinese-led dam projects in Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia, Energy Policy, vol. 102, March 2017

Highlights

  • Very first regional case study on social safeguard norms in Chinese-led dam projects in Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia.
  • Found that Chinese dam developers increasingly take into account international social safeguards norms.
  • Root cause is social mobilization, with the suspension of the Myitsone Dam in 2011 as a particular game changer.
Abstract
Chinese dam developers claim to construct at least every second dam worldwide. However, scholarly literature comprehensively investigating the social safeguard norms in these projects is rare. This paper analyses social safeguard norms in Chinese-led dam projects in Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia, hotspots of Chinese-led dam construction. We find that social safeguard norms adopted have significantly changed in the past 15 years. While Chinese dam developers claimed to adopt standards of the host countries upon the launch of China’s Going Out Policy in 2001, with occasional adoption of more demanding Chinese standards, they did not adopt international norms. In recent years, however, they increasingly take into account international norms. We argue that the root cause for this change is social mobilization, with the suspension of the Myitsone Dam in 2011 as a particular game changer. Enhanced social safeguard legislation in host countries and China, stricter rules of Chinese funders and cooperation of Chinese dam developers with international players have also facilitated this change.
Voir : http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421516307212

Launching the New Timor-Leste Initiative at AAS

Launching the New Timor-Leste Initiative at AAS, 05/04/2017, Asia Now (blog de l’AAS)

The 2017 conference in Toronto marked the beginning of an ambitious two-year initiative devoted to raising the profile of Timor-Leste studies—both at AAS and in the wider North American academy. With generous support from the Henry Luce Foundation, the Southeast Asia Council’s (SEAC) Indonesia and Timor-Leste Studies Committee (ITLSC) hosted a series of special events, including an all-day pre-conference workshop attended by senior scholars, students and public intellectuals from Timor-Leste as well as North America, Australia, Europe and other parts of Asia.

Highlights from Toronto

Among the many exciting developments at this year’s conference was the launch of a North American chapter of the Timor-Leste Studies Association (TLSA), which also has chapters in Melbourne (Australia) and the capital city of Dili in Timor-Leste. The ITLSC is looking forward to working closely with the TLSA to help develop and support TL studies at AAS and beyond.

The pre-conference workshop was an important first step in this direction.

Highlights from the workshop included an outstanding series of photographic and ethnomusicological exhibits, alongside a series of well-attended panels and roundtables. A detailed program of events can be downloaded here.

The first photographic exhibit was entitled The 30th Anniversary of East Timor Activism in Toronto, and was organized by David Webster. Through an evocative sequence of photos and related images, local activism in Canada was linked up with more global developments in the struggle for Timorese independence. Photographs and other materials from the exhibit can be accessed online.

Rui Graça Feijó and Susana de Matos Viegas organized a second exhibit, called Fataluku Death and Life. Accompanied by an essay prepared by David Hicks (which we hope to make available online soon), the photographs presented in Rui and Susana’s exhibit were divided into two parts—the first examining Fataluku tombs, with a primary focus on the juxtaposition of traditional funerary posts and Christian crosses; the second exploring the iconographic practices associated with graves and memorials dedicated to the martyrs of the Timorese struggle for independence.

Accompanying the photographic exhibits, Aaron Pettigrew and Philip Yampolsky set up an array of iPads and headphones to provide workshop participants with access to an innovative online exhibit surveying scholarship on Timorese musical traditions. Although some of the material was only accessible on the day of the workshop, Aaron and Philip are continuing to develop the online component of their exhibit for use as an Open Access research and teaching resource.

 The more discursive component of the workshop centered on a pair of panels focusing respectively on issues of (i) Religion, Culture & Tradition and (ii) Polity, Economy & Society. This was followed by a roundtable discussion of priorities for the future of Timor-Leste studies—with Lisa Palmer, Fidelis Manuel Leite Magalhaes, and Susana de Matos Viegas, and chaired by Elizabeth Drexler. Input from participants in the roundtable will figure centrally in the planning for TL events at next year’s AAS conference in Washington, D.C.

Additional events in Toronto included a book launch for Michael Leach’s new volume on Nation-Building and National Identity in Timor Leste (Routledge 2016), and a SEAC-sponsored panel on the Transformation of Religion, Culture and Society in Timor-Leste.

Looking to the Future

The two-year initiative at AAS will serve as the foundation for the future development of a wider-reaching program directed to developing and supporting TL studies at all levels of the academy—from liberal arts to graduate education, and more advanced research. In addition to building up a scholarly network here in North America, this will require strong and sustainable relationships with institutions of higher learning in Timor-Leste. Among other organizational activities, our plans for the future include running competence-building workshops at the National University of Timor-Leste (UNTL, Universidade Nacional Timor Lorosa’e) and the National Center for Scientific Investigation in the capital city of Dili. These workshops will focus on the preparation of academic grant applications and conference panel proposals. The immediate aim of the latter is to facilitate Timorese involvement as conference participants, and especially as organizers of their own panels and related scholarly endeavors. But, taking the longer view, this is also meant to establish a more participatory and collaborative approach to the study of this important Southeast Asian nation.

Get Involved!

The Timor-Leste studies initiative is just getting underway, and we’ve now begun planning for next year’s AAS conference in Washington, D.C. If you would like to get involved, or simply learn more, please contact the Chair of the ITLSC, Richard Fox, at rfox@eth.uni-heidelberg.de

Voir : http://www.asian-studies.org/asia-now/entryid/40/launching-the-new-timor-leste-initiative-at-aas

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS : RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP GRANT 2017-2018, ASIAN CIVILISATIONS MUSEUM SINGAPORE

Call for applications : research fellowship grant 2017-2018, Asian Civilisations Museum Singapore

The Asian Civilisations Museum (ACM) invites scholars to apply for fellowships in:
1. Southeast Asian jewellery;
2. Southeast Asian Islamic art;
3. Austronesian art;
4. Peranakan art;
5. Research relating to Asian port cities

Applications close on 30 April 2017.

The ACM prizes multi-disciplinary work, cross-cultural studies, and research on ongoing projects at the museum. Research related to the collections at the ACM would be an advantage.

The research fellowship supports in-depth original study and writing on specialised aspects of Asian culture. Applications will be screened by a committee of curators and scholars.

Plus d’informations sur : http://acm.org.sg/collections/research/fellowship

Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology : Openings for PhD students

Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology : Openings for PhD students

The International Max Planck Research School for the Anthropology, Archaeology and History of Eurasia (IMPRS ANARCHIE), a cooperation between the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, offers Openings for PhD students starting 1st of October 2017.

The projects of the fourth cohort of the IMPRS ANARCHIE will be devoted to the topic of Representing Domination.

Deadline for Applications : 30 avril 2017

Doctoral students shall investigate how various modes and processes of communication and contestation with regard to (legitimate) domination are determined by practices of representation and by the (usually heterogeneous and often conflictual) dynamics that have shaped these practices of representation through space and time. Students will tackle varying forms of representation, approached as a basic form of human social interaction, by examining and comparing their spatio-temporal variability in past and present Eurasia. We especially invite projects which are dealing with the following topics and their relation to the issue of domination:

  • Representation of power
  • Representation of space and collective identities
  • Representation of status, rank, prestige
  • Representation through roles
  • Representing the past
  • Representing the dea

The aim of ANARCHIE is to renew transdisciplinary agendas in fields where social and cultural anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians have much to gain from cross-fertilisation. For the purposes of ANARCHIE, Eurasia is defined as the super-continent which comprises the whole of Asia and the whole of Europe and the Mediterranean. Previous projects have ranged from Britain and Spain to Mongolia and Vietnam. The IMPRS ANARCHIE is open to students from all countries and offers an international three-year (with the possibility of extension) PhD program in a stimulating research environment. Highly motivated students possessing a Masters degree in Socio-Cultural Anthropology, Archaeology, History or a related discipline are encouraged to apply.

Plus d’informations sur : https://recruitingapp-5034.de.umantis.com/Vacancies/308/Description/1

Call for proposals : The 9th « Engaging with Vietnam : An Interdisciplinary Dialogue » Conference

Call for proposals : The 9th « Engaging with Vietnam : An Interdisciplinary Dialogue » Conference, Touring Vietnam: Exploring “Development”, “Tourism” and “Sustainability” in Vietnam from Multi-disciplinary and Multi-directional Perspectives, Part IDecember 28-31, 2017: Ho Chi Minh City,Part IIDecember 31, 2017: Train from HCMC to Tuy Hoa, Phu Yen, Part III: January 1-4, 2018: Tuy Hoa, Phu Yen

Co-hosting organizations: University of Social Science and Humanities – Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City and University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Conference Co-Chairs and Co-Convenors : Prof. Dr. Phan Lê Hà (University of Hawai’i at Manoa), Associate Prof. Dr. Liam C. Kelley (University of Hawai’i at Manoa), Associate Prof. Dr. Võ Văn Sen (President, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City), Assistant Prof. Dr. Jamie Gillen (National University of Singapore)

Deadline for proposal submission: 31 August 2017

The 9th Engaging with Vietnam conference with three joined parts will bring about a completely new experience to those who have so far participated and will participate in our conference series. With the theme of exploring “development,” “tourism,” and “sustainability” in/of Vietnam from multi-disciplinary and multi-directional perspectives, the 9th EWV conference will introduce various activities, ranging from keynote sessions and academic presentations to exhibitions, idea contests, a policy forum, Q&A sessions, curriculum development, sightseeing, field observations, and music performances that are all integrated to offer participants opportunities to feel, think, engage, try out and live the conference theme.

Other distinctive features of EWV9 are its length and location. Its length is innovative, as the complete experience will take place over a period of almost 10 days, from December 27 2017 to January 4 2018. Its location is also innovative, as the conference will be held at two places and participants will “tour” from South (Ho Chi Minh City) to Central Vietnam (Tuy Hoa, Phu Yen), a connection that will entail an enjoyable evening tour on the Thống Nhất (Reunification) express train. Participants will celebrate together New Year’s Eve and welcome 2018 on “tàu Thống Nhất,” whereby their explorations of and engagement with Vietnam’s “development,” “tourism” and “sustainability” will continue.

As usual, our keynote sessions and featured panels with speakers from several disciplines will lay out larger (re)conceptualisations, interdisciplinary bodies of scholarship, contradicting arguments, methodologies, and questions that invite everyone to (re)think about “development,” “tourism,” and “sustainability.” Examples include:

  1. How has the past been packaged in terms of history, heritage, and memory?
  2. In what ways have tourism and development always been tied up with the past?
  3. What is the relationship between education, development, and sustainability?
  4. How and to what extent do the globalisation, regionalisation, internationalisation and nationalisation of “development,” “tourism,” and “sustainability” pose challenges and create new knowledge(s) and discourses for academic disciplines, legal practices, and policy making?
  5. Why and in what ways have (foreign) language policies and educational reforms been used to justify development?
  6. What are some major responses from schools, higher education institutions, think tanks, and relevant organisations to such challenges, discourses, policies and reforms raised in the above questions?

We expect to showcase several featured exhibitions highlighting community-engaged projects dedicated to well-rounded “development,” “tourism” and “sustainability” values and practices. We also envision another joint exhibition from artists, students and academics that showcases the various stages of modern Vietnam’s heritage and traditional festival making processes. All of this is really exciting, isn’t it?

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.engagingwithvietnam.net/home

 

2016 Wang Gungwu Prize

2016 Wang Gungwu Prize : Burma–Bengal Crossings: Intercolonial Connections in Pre-Independence India by Devleena Ghosh in Asian Studies Review, vol. 40, no. 2

Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA) president Professor Kent Anderson announced that Devleena Ghosh, an associate professor at the University of Technology Sydney, had been awarded the prestigious annual award for the best article in Asian Studies Review in 2016.

The article explores cultural and personal flows across the Bay of Bengal and the modern states of Burma, West Bengal and Bangladesh.

Abstract :

The large-scale movement of people between Burma and Bengal in the early twentieth century has been explored recently by authors such as Sugata Bose and Sunil Amrith who locate Burma within the wider migratory culture of the Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal and Southeast Asia. This article argues that the long and historical connections between Bengalis and Burmese were transformed by the British colonisation of the region. Through an analysis of selected literary texts in Bengali, some by well-known and others by obscure writers, this article shows that, for Indians, Burma constituted an elsewhere where the fantastic and superhuman were within reach, and caste and religious constraints could be circumvented and radical possibilities enabled by masquerade and disguise.

Cet article est disponible sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10357823.2016.1158237

Call for papers : Southeast Asian Islam : Religious Radicalism, Democracy, and Global Trends

Call for Papers : The 2nd Studia Islamika International conference 2017 :  Southeast Asian Islam : Religious Radicalism, Democracy, and Global Trends, 8-10/08/2017, Jakarta

Deadline for abstract submission : 15/05/2017

The Center for the Study of Islam and Society (PPIM) of Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University (UIN) Jakarta will carry out an international conference in August this year. This conference is dedicated to promoting Studia Islamika, an international journal published by the Center. This is the second Studia Islamika conference, and this event is expected to be held regularly in the future. In the coming conference, scholars and students on Southeast Asian Islam are invited to present their papers, research and posters. Relevant themes and topics have been selected to accommodate different research interests of the participants.

The 2nd Studia Islamika International Conference 2017 will be held as a reflection on many different aspects related to Southeast Asia. It is to look at current political trends, religious radicalism, the development of democracy, and global trends. Southeast Asia has experienced tremendous changes since its formation until today. It achieved one of the highest economic developments in the world while faith and ethnicity still play an important role in the political field. This conference will explore these various developments in the context of globalization and democratization. Theories and new research findings on Southeast Asia will be explored and discussed during the conference. The conference features research addressing the following topics:

  • Religious Radicalism: Approaches, Trends and Methods
  • Democracy, Citizenship and Identity
  • Religious Radicalism and Education
  • Globalization and Transnational Movements: Southeast Asian Islam and ISIS
  • Contemporary Islamic Economics and Tourism
  • Philanthropy and Civil Society
  • Women, Society and Representation
  • Social Media and the Contestation of the Public Sphere
  • Challenges of Urban Life: Food, Culture and Life Style
  • The Rise of Islamic Populism? Sectarian Politics in Contemporary Indonesia

Plus d’informations sur : http://conference.ppim.uinjkt.ac.id/

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art

Approaches to the Study of Khmer and Cham Art: a Research Workshop with Tran Ky Phuong and Soumya James, 16/05/2017, CSEAS, SOAS.

Scholarship on ancient Khmer and Cham art evolved concomitantly with the French colonial project, and has long been grounded in archaeological and epigraphic study. This workshop presents new currents of research expanding the field. Tran Ky Phuong is the leading scholar of Cham art. After a first curatorial career at the Danang Museum of Cham Sculpture, he joined the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts, where he has launched research combining ethnographic and art historical methods. Soumya James represents a new generation of Southeast Asia art historians. Her work examines the representation of the divine feminine in cultural and eco-political landscape of Angkor.

Tran Ky Phuong is a former curator of the Museum of Cham Sculpture in Da Nang (1978-98); currently he is a senior research fellow with the Vietnam Association of Ethnic Minorities’ Culture and Arts; and is a researcher of the Center for Cultural Relationship Studies in Mainland Southeast Asia (CRMA Center) of Chulachomklao Royal Military Academic, Thailand and at APSARA Authority, Siem Reap, Cambodia; from 2012 until the present he has been a consultant of UNESCO World Cultural Heritages at My Son Sanctuary. He has awarded several research fellowships to study at International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden; Asia Research Institute (ARI) of National University of Singapore; Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts (CASVA), National Gallery of Arts, Washington DC.

He has published several books and articles in Vietnamese, English and Japanese, including: My Son in the History of Cham Art (1988); Vestiges of Champa Civilization (2008); Champa Iseki/Champa Ruins (co-author with Shige-eda Yutaku, 1997); The Cham of Vietnam: History, Society and Art (co-editor with Bruce Lockhart), NUS Press (2011); “The Architecture of Temple-Towers of Ancient Champa (Central Vietnam)” in Champa and the Archaeology of My Son, Vietnam (2009); “The Preservation and Management of the Monuments of Champa in Central Vietnam: The Example of My Son Sanctuary, a World Cultural Heritage Site”, in Rethinking Cultural Resource Management in Southeast Asia: Preservation, Development and Neglect (2011);“The new archaeological finds in Northeast Cambodia, Southern Laos and Central Highland of Vietnam: Considering on the significance of overland trading route and cultural interactions of the ancient kingdoms of Champa and Cambodia”, in Advancing Southeast Asian Archaeology 2013, SEAMEO SPAFA Regional Center for Archaeology and Fine Arts, Bangkok, Thailand (2015).

Soumya James is an independent Art Historian who studies premodern South and Southeast Asian art. She received her PhD in Art History from Cornell University. Her dissertation focused on the cultural and eco-political significance of the divine feminine at three Angkor period sites. Her research investigates the relationship between landscape and built form, gender and sexuality, and the art historical links between premodern South and Southeast Asia. Following her graduation, she continued her research while working as the coordinator for the Science and Society Programme at the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, India. She was a Postdoctoral Associate at the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities and a Fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center, both at Yale University. She is currently working on a book manuscript and planning her next fieldtrip to Cambodia.

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/cseas/events/16may2017-approaches-to-the-study-of-khmer-and-cham-art-a-research-workshop-with-tran-ky-phuong-and-.html

River Cities: Water Space in Urban Development and History

River Cities: Water Space in Urban Development and History, 11-12/12/2017, Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia

Supported by the Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA), Airlangga University, and the International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), Leiden, the Netherlands

Conveners: Dr Paul Rabé, Adrian Perkasa (M.A.) and Dr Rita Padawangi

Deadline: 1 May 2017

Introduction

Cities and water can be said to have a love-hate relationship (1), and this is especially true of rivers in cities in Asia. Many Asian cities, like their cousins in the rest of the world, owe their locations to rivers and the trading opportunities and water sources these rivers provided.  In recent years, cities across China are beautifying their water fronts, and cities as diverse as Singapore and Seoul are turning their rivers into assets as part of urban redevelopment schemes or restoring them in an effort to bring nature back to the city. But many other cities in Asia have their backs turned to their rivers. Where rivers were once trading and transport arteries, nowadays many of them have suffered neglect as roads and evolving trading patterns have supplanted the rivers’ economic and social functions. Their decline has been accompanied by environmental destruction, as their waters have become polluted and serve as the dumping ground for solid waste. Moreover, riverbank settlements evolved into legally ambiguous spaces, as old settlements were detached from land formalization regimes and were subjected to environmental deterioration from the rivers. Far from being an asset, these rivers have become an eyesore—and occasionally also a threat, owing to flooding exacerbated by poor planning and a poor understanding of the place of these water bodies in the wider regional eco-system.

Symposium objectives

This symposium seeks to uncover the relationship between rivers and cities from a multi-disciplinary perspective in the humanities and the social sciences. The symposium welcomes both scholars and practitioners. It aims to contribute innovative ways of thinking about how to better integrate rivers, creeks and canals—including their environmental, historical, social, political, cultural and economic dimensions—into the fabric of contemporary cities.  The focus is on cities in Asia, but papers on other parts of the world will also be considered if they make explicit their relevance to Asian cities.

Papers are welcomed in four categories of investigation:

  1. Rivers and cities in historical perspective (history, heritage, culture, and geography)
  2. Neighborhoods and social life of riverine communities
  3. Evaluating experiences with riverfront and riverbank settlement and design interventions in Asia
  4. Urban policy perspectives and innovations

Plus d’informations sur : http://iias.asia/event/river-cities-water-space-urban-development-history

The Sixth International Symposium On The Languages Of Java

The Sixth International Symposium on the Languages of Java, 18-19/05/2017, Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia

Keynote Speakers:
Zane Goebel (La Trobe University)
Hartono Samidjan (Suara Merdeka)

Co-sponsors:
Universitas Dian Nuswantoro
University of Maryland
University of Iowa
University of British Columbia

Co-organizers:
Thomas Conners, University of Maryland
William Davies, University of Iowa
Jozina Vander Klok, University of British Columbia

Programme :

Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia

Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia, an international conference at Binghamton University, November 10-11, 2017

Submit your panel or paper proposal by May 1, 2017

Recent global upheavals have turned world attention to the plight of refugees, such as Syrians and the Rohingya of Myanmar who have chosen dangerous sea voyages to escape conflict and persecution. These dramatic images raise larger questions about the control over mobile bodies in the broader context of maritime Asia, pointing to phenomena that are by no means limited to our contemporary moment. For centuries, people have moved in and across the maritime world that stretches from the Indian Ocean to the western Pacific as refugees, slaves, and under other involuntary circumstances, as well as in the pursuit of trade, war, and religion. But this mobility has always been historically controlled, driven and regulated by larger forces. Religion, ecology, state power, and social hierarchies constrain and inform individual choices.

With a keynote lecture delivered by Amitav Ghosh, this interdisciplinary conference will explore the mobility of individuals across maritime Asia with an interest in disaggregating different types of bodies and different types of travel. What sorts of bodies endeavored to cross the water between and along the coasts of Asia in the past and more recently? What does a 20th century Somali pirate have in common with a 16th century Javanese pilgrim heading to Mecca, or the Chinese residents of Dutch Batavia with the Filipino domestic workers in Dubai? What is the role of cooperation, violence and control in historical and contemporary Asian maritime travel? How has biopolitical control over travel been effected in the past and through modern technocratic interventions? How are the material findings of nautical archaeology changing our understanding of the movements of goods and people in maritime Asia? The goal of this conference is to pair contemporary and historical experiences of travel and mobility to understand continuities and changes experienced and brought about by traveling bodies in and across maritime Asia.

We welcome papers that address a broad range of themes, with particular interest in the following topics:
*Labor flows and recruitment
*Voluntary and involuntary movement, including slave and refugee communities
*Cultural meanings and representations of maritime travel and pilgrimage
*How travelers have mobilized nautical technologies and knowledge transfer across oceans
*Uses of force across maritime Asia
*Uncertainties and vagaries of sea travel
*Shifting contours of of trade diasporas
*Identity and community formation among seafaring groups
*Geopolitics of the ocean and its frontiers

Plus d’informations sur : https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdDko81MfjecqvGgElqO8YK7nDD1YH2lLpmEvqIXizilZFzw/viewform

Sinitic Trends in Early Islamic Java (15th to 17th century)

Seated feline figures. Truc Phuong commune, Truc Ninh district. c. L 8 x H 15 cm, Nam Dinh museum, Nam Dinh Province. Late Lê dynasty. (Credit: H. Njoto)

Sinitic Trends in Early Islamic Java (15th to 17th century) by Hélène Njoto (Nalanda-Sriwijaya Center)

Note: This article is reproduced from the latest issue of NSC Highlights. For more, please see : https://goo.gl/XoyXfM

Java’s north coast is known to have had cosmopolitan and multi-religious towns where Muslim travellers and traders settled since the early 15th century. While there is scarce evidence of the presence of Muslims and foreigners in the early Islamic period, the accounts of past Muslim ruling figures, revered as holy men (wali), have persisted. These accounts have survived thanks to the fairly good conservation of the mausolea of these holy men, many of which are five to six centuries old. These mausolea, considered sacred (kramat), are visited every year by thousands of pilgrims from Java and other parts of the Malay world.

 These mausolea contain elements of a Sinitic (relating to Chinese culture) trend in early Islamic Java. Historical sources note the presence of ‘Chinese’ among the Muslims present on Java’s north coast in the 15th and 16th centuries. Local Javanese traditions and hagiographies also suggest that some of the most prominent holy men were of Chinese descent. Some are said to have come from Champa, the former Hindu-Buddhist kingdom of present-day coastal Vietnam (Manguin 2001).

 Nevertheless, the ‘sinitic’ origin of some of these holy men on the Javanese coast remains enigmatic since there is little material evidence apart from these mausolea remains. The richly decorated wooden panels that enclose these tombs on four sides, delicately sculpted, some in openwork or painted in red, are indeed vaguely reminiscent of a Sinitic culture. However, most motifs and stylisation, such as the lotus leaves in a pond, represented in a naturalistic way, had in fact already appeared during the Hindu-Buddhist period, possibly as the consequence of earlier Sinitic borrowings.

 However, the motif of the seated feline figure stands out. These feline figures, sculpted in wood or stone, were found in four religious sanctuaries such as in the mausolea of Sunan Drajat and Sunan Sendang Duwur. In these mausolea, they are represented in-the-round, in a seated hieratic position, bearded, with their maw wide open and their tongues pulled out (in Sunan Drajat). They have volutes motifs on the legs and a necklace or winged-like motif spreading from the scapula backwards. These feline figures suggest that these holy men had developed a taste for decorative features found in China and the Indo-Chinese peninsula of the same period.

Lire la suite sur : https://www.facebook.com/notes/nalanda-sriwijaya-centre/sinitic-trends-in-early-islamic-java-15th-to-17th-century-by-hélène-njoto/1368801939864852

Pacific Affairs : 2016 winner of the Holland Prize

2016 winner of the Holland Prize :

Perilous Waters: People Smuggling, Fishermen, and Hyper-precarious Livelihoods on Rote Island, Eastern Indonesia by Antje Missbach, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Pacific Affairs is pleased to announce that the fifteenth William L. Holland Prize for the best article published in Volume 89 (2016) of Pacific Affairs  has been awarded to Antje Missbach for her article published in Volume 89, No. 4 (December 2016).

An epitome of in-depth fieldwork, thorough contextual research, and clear writing, this year’s Holland Prize winning article by Antje Missbach addresses issues of trafficking, asylum-seeking, and migration through the question of why a disproportionate number of Indonesian offenders sentenced to jail for people smuggling, both in Indonesia and Australia, are fishermen from Eastern Indonesia, the poorest part of the country. Her answers guide readers from specific shores of local sites and practices via extended fieldwork on Rote Island (a frequent departure point for asylum seekers to Australia) and prisons, into broader streams of transnational people-smuggling networks and the effects of Australia’s policies, eventually navigating the broad and salient oceans of pollution and overfishing. In lieu of the superficial resort to moralistic labeling of smugglers as ‘bad’ people, Missbach’s article shows how complex imbrications of climatic, international, institutional, and social conditions render individual smugglers themselves captive in nets of hyper-precarity.

A télécharger sur : http://www.pacificaffairs.ubc.ca/announcements/holland-prize/

 

Web of relations in the Moken’s world

Web of relations: the way of giving, taking and reciprocating in the Moken’s world by Narumon Arunotai, 28/04/2017, Chulalongkorn University

This talk reflects diverse worldviews of different groups towards a cluster of islands in southwestern Thailand, namely Surin Islands in Phang-nga Province.  It also reflects how government policies are based on certain set of worldviews about “nature”.  Surin Islands have been a home, stopover point, foraging ground and burial site for the Moken indigenous people for centuries.  The Moken have mobile homes and their residence are on different islands in the Mergui archipelago, from the present day southern Myanmar to southern Thailand.   At the start of Thai state dominant power on the Surin Islands, the surrounding waters fell into a concession of petroleum exploration issued to a private foreign company.  Later it was proposed as a site for Indochina refugee camp, but the proposal was rejected by the Royal Forestry Department.   In 1984, state power is more apparent as the Islands have been declared a Marine National Park with supporting budget and resources.  Later a unit under the Department of Fisheries and another under Royal Thai Navy have been established.  Though all of these groups share their lives (or part of their lives) on Surin Islands, their worldviews and their missions/mandates towards “nature” on the Islands are quite different.  Through looking at the web of relations, especially the way of giving, taking and reciprocating in the Moken’s world, we can understand the mode of thinking, practicing, and policying of other units and groups undertaking their “duties” on the Islands as well.

SPAFA Journal en ligne et en libre accès à partir de 2017

Appel à contributions : SPAFA Journal, vol. 1, no. 1 (January-December 2017)

The SPAFA Journal is the annual publication of the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) Regional Centre for Archaeology and Fine Arts (SPAFA) in Bangkok, Thailand. It carries original research papers and multimedia articles on the archaeology, visual arts, performing arts, traditional arts, heritage conservation and cultural heritage of Southeast Asia. Submissions are currently accepted for the 2017 issue.

Voir : http://www.spafajournal.org/index.php/spafajournal/index

La nouvelle version, en ligne, du SPAFA Journal comportera dans chaque livraison des résumés de thèse avec parfois des accès à l’intégralité du texte :

Pour cette édition :

  • Local supremacy in ancient Javanese cultural development : reassessment of the ‘Indianisation’ concept using Dieng plateau as a case study by Rizki Putri Rezna Hassan (Anthropology, Durham), septembre 2016
  • The Plain of Jars of North Laos – Beyond Madeleine Colani by Lia Genovese (History of Art and Archaeology, SOAS University of London), April 2014 – Full Text

Vous trouverez l’ensemble des archives du SPAFA Journal disponibles en accès libre sur le site du SEAMEO-SPAFA : http://www.spafajournal.org/index.php/spafadigest/issue/archive