Archives de catégorie : ACTUALITES

Workshop : Rice in Southeast Asia – past and present

Early Rice Workshop : Rice in Southeast Asia – Past and Present, 4-6 January 2018, Sirindhorn Anthropology Centre

Archaeobotanists! A three-day workshop on human-plant relations has been organized by UCL’s Institute of Archaeology and Silpakorn University. The workshop aims to disseminate information on the Early Rice Project, but also research from scientists and archaeologists working in Southeast Asia. Topics include climate change, human-plant interactions, ethnobotany, and agricultural systems. A one-day practical session on archaeobotanical techniques will take place on the 6th of January for field archaeologists and students who wish to learn the basics of archaeobotanical sampling. Please email sirilucky.k@gmail.com (Sililuck Kantrasri) or criscastillo7@yahoo.com (Cristina Castillo) before the 15th of December if you are interested in attending either the seminar series or the practicals. Places are limited.

Speakers include Jane Carlos (UP Diliman), Cristina Castillo (UCL, Institute of Archaeology, London; Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, Kobe), Akkaneewut Chabangborn (Department of Geology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok), Nigel Chang (College of Arts, Society & Education, James Cook University, Queensland), Michelle S. Eusebio (Archaeological Studies Program, University of the Philippines, Manila; Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Florida), Dorian Fuller (UCL, Institute of Archaeology, London), Thanik Lertcharnrit (Department of Archaeology, Silpakorn University, Bangkok), Nguyen Mai Huong (Institute of Archaeology, Hanoi), Nguyen Thuy Duong (Historical Geology Department, Faculty of Geology, VNU University of Science, Hanoi), Nathsuda Pumijumnong (Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University), Paramita Punwong (Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom; York Institute of Tropical Ecosystems, Environment Department, University of York, York), Rasmi Shoocongdej (Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University, Bangkok), Sasivimon Swangpol (Department of Plant Science, Faculty of Science Mahidol University, Bangkok), Joyce White (Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology, Philadelphia).

Voir: https://www.facebook.com/ISEAArchaeology/photos/a.257018854458060.1073741830.233573613469251/848954788597794/?type=3&theater

Franklin and Marshall College, History Visiting Assistant Professor, Southeast Asian/South Asian/Chinese Studies – Department of History at Franklin & Marshall College

Site WEB

Franklin and Marshall College: History
Visiting Assistant Professor – Southeast Asian/South Asian/Chinese History (one-year)

 

Location: Lancaster, PA

Closes: Feb 15, 2018 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time


The Department of History at Franklin & Marshall College invites applications for a one-year visiting position in Southeast Asian, South Asian, or Chinese history, beginning Fall semester 2018. The rank will be Visiting Assistant Professor or Visiting Instructor depending on qualifications. Candidates should have or be close to completing the Ph.D. Teaching experience is required. Teaching load is 3/2. The successful candidate will teach two surveys of Asian history (pre-modern and modern), as well as topics courses in areas of expertise, and contribute to the College’s general education curriculum, « Connections. »

Pursuant to cultivating an inclusive college community, the search committee will holistically assess the qualifications of each applicant. We will consider an individual’s record working with students and colleagues with diverse perspectives, experiences, and backgrounds. We will also consider experience overcoming or helping others to overcome barriers to academic success.

Qualifications

Candidates should have or be close to completing the Ph.D. Teaching experience is required.

Application Instructions

Candidates should submit the following materials electronically via Interfolio https://apply.interfolio.com/47457: letter of application, curriculum vitae, graduate transcript, three letters of recommendation, teaching statement, and teaching evaluation forms. Deadline for applications is February 15, 2018, or until the position is filled. Queries may be addressed to the Chair of the Search Committee, Richard Reitan, at richard.reitan@fandm.edu.

Call for Abstracts: The 22nd International Symposium for Malay/Indonesian Linguistics

Deadline: February 15, 2018
UCLA
May 10-12, 2018

ISMIL is an annual event whose goal is the advancement of scholarship in Malay/Indonesian Linguistics, through the bringing together of linguists from Malay and Indonesian speaking countries and their colleagues in other parts of the world.

Papers presented at ISMIL are concerned with the Malay/Indonesian language in any of its varieties. In addition to the standardized versions of Bahasa Melayu and Bahasa Indonesia, papers are particularly welcome dealing with non-canonical isolects such as regional dialects of Malay and Indonesian, contact varieties, and other closely related Malayic languages. Papers may be in any of the subfields of linguistics, and may represent variegated approaches and diverse theoretical persuasions. Presentations at ISMIL are delivered in English, as is befitting an international symposium.

Persons wishing to present a paper at the symposium are invited to upload a one-page abstract in electronic form (preferably pdf, but MsWord also acceptable). Potential participants who need more time for travel arrangements and visa applications may submit their abstracts at any time, and will receive early notification of acceptance/rejection. Limited funds are available for partial support of travel expenses for worthy applicants. If you wish to apply for such support, please check the appropriate box in the abstract upload application form online.

Forest and Society, vol. 1, n° 2 (2017)

Forest and Society, vol. 1, n° 2 (2017)

Available online since November 28, 2017

 Le site de la revue

Table of Contents

Regular Research Articles

Moira Moeliono, Pham Thu Thuy, Indah Waty Bong, Grace Yee Wong, Maria Brockhaus
1-20
Bobby Anderson, Patamawadee Jongruck
21-32
Sitti Nuraeni
33-43
Ahmad Dhiaulhaq, Kanchana Wiset, Rawee Thaworn, Seth Kane, David Gritten
44-59
Messalina Lovenia Salampessy, Indra Gumay Febryano, Dini Zulfiani
60-66
Sukanlaya Choenkwan
67-76
Dewi Nur Asih, Stephan Klasen
77-84

412 Historic Artefacts to Return Home to Sarawak, Malaysia

412 Historic Artefacts to Return Home to Sarawak, Malaysia

 

On 22 November, in the historic surroundings of Museum Prinsenhof in Delft, the Netherlands, YB Datuk Haji Abdul Karim Rahman Hamzah, Minister of Tourism, Arts, Culture, Youth and Sports of the Sarawak State Government, Malaysia, received one of the 412 historic artefacts which have been donated by the City of Delft to the Sarawak Museum to be displayed in the exhibition galleries of the new Sarawak Museum Campus.

A delegation from Sarawak, led by YB Datuk Karim, brought an appreciation visit to the city of Delft to convey the gratitude of the Sarawak State Government. The Deputy Mayor of Delft, Mr. Ferrie Forster, and the Director of Heritage Delft, Mrs. Janelle Moerman, ceremonially handed over the collection to the Minister and Mr. Ipoi Datan, director of the Sarawak Museum.

In his speech, YB Datuk Karim conveyed the gratitude of the Sarawak State Government on the generous donation of the highly unique 412 Bornean ethnographic items to the Sarawak Museum. He added that: ‘The donation greatly complements the Sarawak Museum’s own collection and augurs well to assist in achieving its Vision of becoming the “Global Centre for Bornean Heritage by 2030.” The Sarawak government is ever keen to ensure that such artefacts that originated from Borneo, the world’s third largest island, would be returned to its original abode.’ Datuk Karim, in his speech, acknowledged the role that Mr. Hans van de Bunte, the Senior Project Director of the Sarawak Museum Campus, had played in this matter.

In early 2018, after the artefacts have arrived in Sarawak, an exhibition will be set up at the Textile Museum in Kuching to show a selection of the Nusantara artefacts to the public. A special edition of the booklets on the Sarawak Museum’s collections will be published alongside the exhibition. For both the exhibition and booklet YB Datuk Karim extended his gratitude to the Dutch Embassy in Malaysia for their kind support and very helpful sponsorship.

Museum Nusantara, in the city of Delft, The Netherlands, closed its doors to the public in 2013 and the city government with Heritage Delft started a project to find new museum owners for the collection of artefacts. The possibility to acquire a selection of historic artefacts from Borneo came under the attention of the Sarawak Museum Campus’ Senior Project Leader. The Sarawak Museum, a member of ASEMUS, was seen as the appropriate location for this collection. A formal request was prepared and initiated the successful donation by the Dutch institute to the Sarawak Museum.

YB Datuk Karim extended an invitation to the city of Delft to attend the opening of the exhibition in Sarawak in early 2018. He offered the city of Delft the opportunity to collaborate with the Sarawak Museum to co-organise any events or activities, like seminars or exhibitions, for their mutual benefit, to be held in Sarawak in 2019, which happens to be Visit Sarawak Year.

The Sarawak Museum Campus and Heritage Trail

The Sarawak Museum Campus is a State-funded project to revive the international status of the Sarawak Museum and to build a new museum to showcase Sarawak’s rich cultural and historical heritage which will incorporate education and public outreach programmes. Its main goal is to establish a world-class museum campus and become one of the best museums in the region.

The objectives of the Sarawak Museum Campus include:

  • Establishing a world-class museum campus and restoring its status as one of the best museums in the region
  • Developing a new main museum building to showcase Sarawak’s rich cultural and historical heritage and provide visitor facilities for all.
  • Setting up an internationally recognized Sarawak Heritage Conservation Centre for research into Sarawak’s Heritage with conservation laboratories, collection storage facilities, research and museum staff offices, a library and the museum archive.
  • Ensuring conservation of the historic Sarawak Museum building and exhibitions to its former glory in an early 20th-century style museology and conservation of the ancillary buildings and gardens.
  • Harnessing the potential for education and public outreach through educational programmes for all, especially to younger generations.
  • Strengthening cultural tourism to Kuching and Sarawak.

The permanent exhibition galleries at the new museum span 6,000 sq. meters and research on the collections is being done by academic specialists to give depth to the exhibition storyline and provide new academic insights. The exhibition storyline is developed with a strong research background, and will be presented in an accessible format so that it engages with a local and broad audience. Especially as it will be presenting exciting knowledge about the local communities, culture, history and archeology of Sarawak and Borneo at large.

For  about the activities of the Sarawak Museum Department, please visit http://www.museum.sarawak.gov.my/

 

Pictured above: delegations of Sarawak and Delft, 22 November 2017; box, bamboo, early 20th century; jacket, bark, early 20th century

CALL FOR PAPERS  for a joint meeting of The Asian Society of the History of Médicine (9th meeting) and HOMSEA (History of Medicine in Southeast Asia) to be held in Jakarta, Indonesia, June 27-30, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS 

for a joint meeting of The Asian Society of the History of Médicine (9th meeting) and HOMSEA (History of Medicine in Southeast Asia)

to be held in Jakarta, Indonesia, June 27-30, 2018

Theme: Colonial Medicine after Decolonisation: Continuity, Transition, and Change

Deadline for submission: 1 February 2018

Notification of acceptance will be given by 1 March 2018.

 Guidelines for Submission: Submissions on all topics related to the history of medicine in Asia are welcome; submissions related to the conference theme are especially encouraged. Participants can submit full panels (2, 3, or 4 papers) as well as individual papers. Paper proposals (title, author, and an abstract in English of no more than 200 words) and a1-page curriculum vitae or panel proposals (a panel proposing of no more than 200 words with abstracts and 1-page CVs of all participants) should be sent by electronic mail to James Dunk (james.dunk@sydney.edu.au). The program committee reserves the right to suggest changes and revisions to abstracts and panel proposals.

 

Program committee: Dr Harry Yi-Jui Wu (Hong Kong); Dr. Ning Jennifer Chang (Taipei); Prof Laurence Monnais (Montreal); A/Prof Hans Pols (Sydney); Dr. Yu-Chuan Wu (Taipei); Dr. Por Heong Hong (Kuala Lumpur); and members of the Local Arrangements Committee.

 

Unfortunately, the ASHM cannot offer funds to defray travel expenses due to budget constraints. There is a range of affordable accommodation available near the conference venue. Participants are encouraged to apply for support from their home departments or institutions.

The conference will be hosted by the Indonesian Academy of Sciences, which is located in the new buildings of the Indonesian National Library in the centre of Jakarta.

Laurence Monnais

Professeur titulaire – Département d’histoire

Directrice – Centre d’Etudes de l’Asie de l’Est (CETASE)

Directrice scientifique – Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal (PUM) http://www.pum.umontreal.ca/

Chercheur – Equipe MEOS http://www.meos.qc.ca/ – Institut de recherche en santé publique de l’Université de Montréal (IRSPUM) http://www.irspum.umontreal.ca/

Call for papers ASHM HOMSEAUniversité de Montréal

C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville

MONTREAL, QC, CANADA H3C 3J7

Tél : 514-343-6544

Panji tales awarded the status of world heritage by UNESCO

Panji tales awarded the status of world heritage by UNESCO

31 October 2017

The unique collection of more than 250 ancient tales revolving around the mythical Javanese Prince Panji, which is curated by Leiden University Libraries (UBL), has been acknowledged as world heritage by UNESCO. The UBL is grateful to UNESCO for this exceptionally prestigious award.

The Leiden collection of Panji tales is included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register, together with similar collections held by the national libraries of Indonesia, Malaysia and Cambodia. The Register contains documentary heritage of outstanding value to the world. UBL already holds two documents included in the UNESCO Register: La Galigo (2011) and Babad Diponegoro (2013). By digitising the Panji tales, they can be made available worldwide via free via open access for research and education. UBL has started a crowdfunding campaign to help digitise the Panji tales.

Mythical prince

Prince Panji is the title character in the popular Panji tales from Java. These stories arem always about a prince and a princess, about love and adventure. They can be rather complex, featuring name changes, masquerades, incarnations and transformations, and may take the form of text or theatre. There are dozens of known Panji tales, written in different languages, such as Javanese-Balinese, Javanese, Malaysian, Balinese, Sasak, Sundanese, Acehnese and Buginese. They originate from Eastern Java and have spread across a large area from Indonesia to Malaysia and from Cambodia to Thailand. They owe their popularity to the flexibility of the story which can be easily adjusted to fit local traditions.

From reading room to online at home

The unique manuscripts come in many different shapes and sizes and are handwritten in several different languages. At the moment, they can only be consulted in the library’s Special Collections reading room. By digitising the Panji tales, we will be able to provide worldwide open access for research and educational purposes. The study of these texts has led to many new insights about Southeast Asian history, literature and culture.

Crowdfunding

Digitising ancient manuscripts is expensive and time-consuming. With financial support from the public, these Panji tales can now be made accessible. A special Panji-website has been set up for the crowdfunding campaign. The website provides background information, including a film by Panji expert Dr Roger Tol, and offers the possibility to make donations to help digitise these manuscripts.

Panji Tales – Make Prince Panji digital!

8th LUCIS Annual Conference | Islamic Visualities and In/Visibilities: Reimagining Public Citizenship?

8th LUCIS Annual Conference | Islamic Visualities and In/Visibilities: Reimagining Public Citizenship?

Date
13 December 2017 – 15 December 2017
Address
Gravensteen Building
Pieterskerkhof 6
2311 SR Leiden

From Wednesday 13 until Friday 15 December 2017, the 8th annual conference of LUCIS will take place in Leiden. This year’s theme is Islamic Visualities and In/Visibilities: Reimagining Public Citizenship? Our keynote speaker is James Hoesterey from Emory University. The conference will take place in multiple locations of the Gravensteen Building. For more information, please consult the programme.

About the conference

This conference invites speakers from different disciplines to reflect on images as sites of religious inspiration, contestation, and imagination among Muslims in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The conference brings into conversation different aspects of the relationship between Islam and (ideas about) visuality.

What is the impact of images, visual communication, and the emergence of (new) visual cultures on the ways in which Islam is practiced, experienced, and interpreted? How do processes of religious change, such as the so-called Islamic revival, affect ways of seeing and ideas about what may and what may not be seen, and by whom?

These questions are increasingly urgent in an era of visual excess, in which the questioning and fragmentation of traditional religious authority goes hand in hand with the emergence of new Islamic visualities, and in which images of Islam are increasingly prolific in public spaces in both Muslim-majority and minority settings, drawing a variety of responses.

At the same time, we see this conference as an opportunity to discuss and evaluate much needed methodological and conceptual innovation in the study of Islam, which remains until this day dominated by an emphasis on oral and textual traditions and often passes over the everyday visual practices that are equally part of the religious lives of Muslims. How might the study of Islam benefit (more) from the turn to the visual in the humanities and the social sciences? What possibilities, practices, problems, questions, techniques, and agendas have arisen from this turn, and how can they help advance the study of Islam?

We approach these questions by focusing on practices of image-making. Islamic visualities, in our approach, comprise images and ways of seeing that are charged with religious meaning, as well as images and ways of seeing that bear on the image of the Islamic religion or culture as a whole. The concept of image-making – referring to the creativity and agency vested in the creation of images as well as the practices, relationships, and politics that inform the way in which “Islam” is seen – provides a fruitful starting point for the study of Islamic visualities and their impact on people and societies throughout the world.

Our goal is not to replace a “textual” approach by one that is “visual” in orientation. Instead, speakers are encouraged to take into account the mutuality of visual and verbal/textual traditions and its analysis. The setup of this conference thus serves to address a broad range of possibilities, creativities, contradictions, and tensions associated with Islamic visualities.

Keynote speaker

James Hoesterey (Emory University) on Digital Duplicity: Piety, Scandal, and the (Un)making of Islamism in Indonesia.

le site de la conférence

Religion and Violence in Myanmar: Sitagu Sayadaw’s Case for Mass Killing

Religion and Violence in Myanmar: Sitagu Sayadaw’s Case for Mass Killing by Matthew J. Walton, 06/11/2017, Foreign Affairs

The most common explanation given for the persecution of the Rohingya revolves around their nationality. Government officials, media commentators, and religious leaders have claimed that the Rohingya are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh. Ethnicity plays a role, as well. The government officially recognizes 135 indigenous ethnic groups, and Myanmar’s 2008 Constitution grants those groups certain rights. The Rohingya are not among them. More broadly, people in Myanmar insist that the Rohingya are not a real ethnic group because they worry about the unlikely possibility that the Rohingya will seek to secede, threatening the country’s territorial sovereignty.

Sitagu’s words could provide the final cover for Myanmar’s Buddhists to ignore international criticism and cloak themselves in the righteousness of holy war.

National identity in Myanmar has long been intertwined with Buddhist religious identity. But religion has had a particular effect in the case of the Rohingya. The so-called War on Terror—waged primarily against Muslims around the world—has made it easier for Myanmar’s elites to label the Rohingya as terrorists and for government officials to defend the violence against them as a legitimate response to extremism. The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army’s attacks on government targets in October 2016 and August 2017, meanwhile, have validated many citizens’ belief that Islam is inherently violent and poses an existential threat to Buddhism, Myanmar’s majority religion. It has also allowed political and religious elites to unfairly and inaccurately associate all Rohingya with terrorism. Thanks to anti-Muslim ideas spread through social media sites, the popular press, and the writings and sermons of influential laypeople and monks, Myanmar’s citizens have come to see the Rohingya as doubly unwanted—as both national and religious “others.”

Lire la suite sur : https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/burma-myanmar/2017-11-06/religion-and-violence-myanmar

Appel à contributions : CFP Harvard Asia Review : Transmission of Knowledge in the Oceanic Asia

 

Harvard Asia Review is now accepting submissions for its 2018 issue on the theme ofTransmission of Knowledge in the Oceanic Asia.” As one of the oldest professional academic journals of Asian studies based out of Harvard University, Harvard Asia Review publishes works on multidisciplinary topics related to issues in East, South, Central, and Southeast Asia. Submission Deadline: January 15th, 2018.

link: https://www.facebook.com/Harvard-Asia-Review-2917394213187…/

#CfP #SSEAsia

Harvard Asia review accepte maintenant des communications pour son numéro de 2018 sur le thème  » transmission des connaissances en Asie de l’océan. » comme l’une des plus anciennes revues universitaires professionnelles d’études asiatiques basées à L’Université Harvard, Harvard Asia review publie des travaux Sur des sujets multidisciplinaires liés à des questions en Asie de l’est, du sud, du centre et du Sud-est. Date limite de soumission : 15 janvier 2018.

Lien : https://www.facebook.com/Harvard-Asia-Review-291739421318716/

Changing political landscape allowing for greater public criticism in Vietnam

Changing political landscape allowing for greater public criticism in Vietnam

07
By student correspondent Diana Tung

 

Public criticism of the Vietnamese government has become commonplace in a nation previously known for strict political censorship, according to Emeritus Professor Ben Kerkvliet.
Professor Kerkvliet’s research focuses on data collection from the early 1990s through to 2015 to trace the emergence of increasingly vocal and public political complaints.  He presented his findings at a recent talk on political criticism in Vietnam at the Department of Political and Social Change.
“Prior to the 1990s, there was certainly a lot of criticism among citizens in Vietnam, but it was very low key. Since the mid-1990s political criticism in Vietnam has become very, very common,” said Professor Kerkvliet.
In contrast to foreign depictions of Vietnam as totalitarian and authoritarian, Professor Kerkvliet found ample evidence that challenged this simplistic view.
“Some scholars have written that the government tolerates no criticism. Other scholars though, have pointed out that’s really not the case. It’s much more nuanced and much more diverse by way of government reactions” added Professor Kerkvliet.
During the course of his research, Professor Kerkvliet and his assistant Pham Thu Thuy amassed hundreds of news articles, books, essays, blogs, and reports of political criticism. He also identified several themes and decided to explore four: labour, land, nation, and democratisation.
To vent their frustrations, Vietnamese citizens turned to various methods such as protests, petitions, and strikes. Meanwhile, government officials have been trying to navigate a fine line in responding to citizens’ public actions.
“To a considerable degree, authorities either let citizens speak or could not stop them. Moreover, authorities took rather seriously the idea that the government was ‘of the people, for the people, and by the people”, said Professor Kerkvliet.
Still, there have been limits to what the government has tolerated, with authorities resorting to evictions, intimidation and imprisonment.
To date, there has been insufficient attention paid to the changing nature of public political criticism in Vietnam. As Professor Kerkvliet said, “nobody has put it all together and done an analysis of some depth across the different topics.”
Professor Kerkvliet’s upcoming book will address this gap in scholarship and provide an in-depth understanding of contemporary public criticism in Vietnam.

 

http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/news-events/all-stories/changing-political-landscape-allowing-greater-public-criticism-vietnam

Youth and a culture of protest in Southeast Asia

Bersih-2012-Sham-Hardy

Youth and a culture of protest in Southeast Asia by Julian CH Lee, 08/11/2017, Regional Learning Hub, New Mandala

Shortly before Malaysia’s general elections in 2008, I sat on a cool floor with blank placards and marker pens, beneath a whirring ceiling fan in a bungalow house in Kuala Lumpur. I sat there with friends, some younger, some older than my 31 year old self, thinking of slogans for our campaign to educate voters about the representation of women in Parliament and the hurdles that women face in having their voices heard and issues addressed…

The particular energy that these young people brought to our campaign is worth drawing attention to. Malaysians, and especially young Malaysians, have often been characterised as being averse to political activism. But the work of scholars like Meredith Weiss has persuasively demonstrated that Malaysia has a rich history of student activism, one which has been actively suppressed and obscured such that many young people today have little idea of it. In this context, work such as Weiss’s book, activist Fahmi Reza’s documentary Sepuluh Tahun Sebelum Merdeka, and discussions such as this on New Mandala, have a potentially important role in reconnecting people with lost histories and stories.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/youth-culture-protest-southeast-asia/

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive, Sejarah Nusantara, Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia

The paper archives created by the Dutch East India Company (VOC, 1602-1799) and dealing with its commercial operations in Asian waters are preserved in the national archives of Indonesia, the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, South Africa and India. In particular, the archives in Jakarta contain thousands of documents originating from Asian persons, including many local rulers from around the Indonesian archipelago. The most voluminous collections spanning 2,000 metres are in the Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia (ANRI). On 9 March 2004, the archives of the VOC were included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.

The 2.000 metres of archives in ANRI can be roughly divided into two sections:
1) The archives created in and formerly kept at Batavia Castle, the former headquarters of the VOC in Asia. This is the archive of the Supreme Government (the Governor-General and the ordinary Councillors of Dutch Asia).
2) The archives of local private and public institutions in Batavia.

For this digitalization and public access project, a selection had to be made. The Daily Journals of Batavia Castle which can be found in the archives of the Supreme Government were digitalized and published first. This series reflects the principle concerns of the Supreme Government.  Prominent here were internal Company affairs in matters as diverse as the general management of trade, personnel and financial affairs, shipping and logistics. The Supreme Government also dealt with all political and diplomatic affairs, the administration of justice and correspondence with other VOC factories in Asia as well as the VOC Chambers and their Governing Board, theso-called Gentlemen Seventeen (Heren XVII) or Directors of the VOC  in the Dutch Republic. The Daily Journals were created to maintain an ongoing overview of such activities.

During the course of the eighteenth century, the Resolution Books of the Supreme Government became more and more important and voluminous while the registration of correspondence in the Daily Journals gradually declined. In particular, the handling of all matters to do with the regional establishments of the Company were included in the General Resolution Books. In 1743, such matters were recorded in a separate yearbook, giving birth to a separate series: the General (Foreign) Affairs Books (Net-Generale Besogneboeken).

Another, hitherto unresearched and historically unique series are the Appendices to the General Resolution Books. These total together some 742 volumes numbering some 550,000 folio pages. This series contain a variety of documents which may gradually become accessible via a special database. The first document descriptions for this database were started in 2013 by ANRI’s Content Team (see organisation).

Liste des archives consultables moyennant une inscription sur le site:

  • General Resolutions of Batavia Castle 1613-1810
  • Realia 1610-1808
  • Appendices to General Resolutions 1686-1811
  • The Placards of Batavia Castle 1602-1808
  • Daily Journals of Batavia Castle 1624-1806
  • Marginalia to the Daily Journals 1659-1807
  • Diplomatic Letters 1625-1812
  • Corpus Diplomaticum 1595-1799

Plus d’informations sur : https://sejarah-nusantara.anri.go.id/archive/