Archives de catégorie : ACTUALITES

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive

Treasures from the the 17th and 18th VOC archive, Sejarah Nusantara, Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia

The paper archives created by the Dutch East India Company (VOC, 1602-1799) and dealing with its commercial operations in Asian waters are preserved in the national archives of Indonesia, the Netherlands, Sri Lanka, South Africa and India. In particular, the archives in Jakarta contain thousands of documents originating from Asian persons, including many local rulers from around the Indonesian archipelago. The most voluminous collections spanning 2,000 metres are in the Arsip Nasional Republik Indonesia (ANRI). On 9 March 2004, the archives of the VOC were included in the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.

The 2.000 metres of archives in ANRI can be roughly divided into two sections:
1) The archives created in and formerly kept at Batavia Castle, the former headquarters of the VOC in Asia. This is the archive of the Supreme Government (the Governor-General and the ordinary Councillors of Dutch Asia).
2) The archives of local private and public institutions in Batavia.

For this digitalization and public access project, a selection had to be made. The Daily Journals of Batavia Castle which can be found in the archives of the Supreme Government were digitalized and published first. This series reflects the principle concerns of the Supreme Government.  Prominent here were internal Company affairs in matters as diverse as the general management of trade, personnel and financial affairs, shipping and logistics. The Supreme Government also dealt with all political and diplomatic affairs, the administration of justice and correspondence with other VOC factories in Asia as well as the VOC Chambers and their Governing Board, theso-called Gentlemen Seventeen (Heren XVII) or Directors of the VOC  in the Dutch Republic. The Daily Journals were created to maintain an ongoing overview of such activities.

During the course of the eighteenth century, the Resolution Books of the Supreme Government became more and more important and voluminous while the registration of correspondence in the Daily Journals gradually declined. In particular, the handling of all matters to do with the regional establishments of the Company were included in the General Resolution Books. In 1743, such matters were recorded in a separate yearbook, giving birth to a separate series: the General (Foreign) Affairs Books (Net-Generale Besogneboeken).

Another, hitherto unresearched and historically unique series are the Appendices to the General Resolution Books. These total together some 742 volumes numbering some 550,000 folio pages. This series contain a variety of documents which may gradually become accessible via a special database. The first document descriptions for this database were started in 2013 by ANRI’s Content Team (see organisation).

Liste des archives consultables moyennant une inscription sur le site:

  • General Resolutions of Batavia Castle 1613-1810
  • Realia 1610-1808
  • Appendices to General Resolutions 1686-1811
  • The Placards of Batavia Castle 1602-1808
  • Daily Journals of Batavia Castle 1624-1806
  • Marginalia to the Daily Journals 1659-1807
  • Diplomatic Letters 1625-1812
  • Corpus Diplomaticum 1595-1799

Plus d’informations sur : https://sejarah-nusantara.anri.go.id/archive/

 

Symposium: Tradition and Contemporaneity in the Arts of Asia

Symposium: Tradition and Contemporaneity in the Arts of Asia, 09/11/2017, Department of Art & Art History, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

About the Talk

Modern and contemporary artists in Asia have had to cope with many challenges, from the influx of Western artistic priorities often intent on redefining or even erasing local artistic traditions, to the wholesale destruction of national infrastructure through unstable political systems and devastating wars. That artists have successfully risen to these challenges, as well as the resilience of local artistic systems and values, is eminently manifest in the vibrant contemporary arts of Asia today.

This symposium will explore the inspirational potential of traditional materials, methods, and styles of art making among modern and contemporary artists of India, China, Korea, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Thailand. It will feature illustrated presentations by three eminent scholars of modern and contemporary Asian art, followed by a moderated discussion, all focusing on the various ways regional “traditions” of art and culture function as inspiration, catalyst, or foil, some times honoring them, other times contrasting and even undermining them, often with humorous or ironic intent.

Speakers & Presentation Titles

headshot of Joan Kee

Joan Kee, “Tradition as ‘Contemporaneity’s Raw Materials’: Korea, China, and the Philippines”
Kee is an art historian specializing in art and law, with special research focus on modern and contemporary East and Southeast Asian art. She teaches at the University of Michigan, where she is Associate Professor in the History of Art. She is author of Contemporary Korean Art: Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method (2013), curated the exhibition From All Sides: Tansaekhwa and the Urgency of Method (2014), and serves as contributing editor to Artforum.

headshot of Sonal Khullar

Sonal Khullar, “The Pearl Divers and Shipwrecks of Marine Drive: History, Tradition, and Modernism in India.” Khullar is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Washington. Her research focus is on Indian art of the eighteenth century to the present, with additional teaching and research interests in transnational histories of art, feminist theory, and postcolonial studies. Publications include the award-winning Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930-1990 (2015).

Headshot of Iola Lenzi

Iola Lenzi, ““Not Nostalgia: How Tradition is Critically Co-opted in Thai and Vietnamese Contemporary Art” Lenzi is a Singapore-based curator, lecturer, and critic specializing in contemporary arts of Southeast Asia. She has curated exhibitions in in Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta and Bangkok, serves as lecturer for the Asian Art Histories MA program at Lasalle College, Singapore, and as regional correspondent for Asian Art, London. She is author of Museums of Southeast Asia (2005).

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.cseashawaii.org/event/symposium-tradition-and-contemporaneity-in-the-arts-of-asia/

 

Behind Indonesia’s illiberal turn

Behind Indonesia’s illiberal turn by Vedi Hadiz, 20/10/2017, New Mandala

The past year or so has seen conspicuous setbacks to Indonesian democracy’s capacity to protect many social rights, including of some of the more vulnerable members of society—most notably women, religious and sexual minorities, and victims of the 1965–66 mass killings. Ironically, this has occurred under a government whose declared agenda of extending access to social services has been a celebrated and defining characteristic, not to mention the presumption that its establishment had deflected a prior possible reassertion of authoritarian-like politics.

By 2015, a wide-ranging survey had offered the proposition that Indonesia’s hard-won democracy had stagnated. However, many of the more sombre assessments of this condition were to come in the wake of the second round of the Jakarta gubernatorial election in April 2017, and the farcical blasphemy case that saw the defeated Basuki Tjahaja Purnama (“Ahok”) sentenced to jail. The mood of these analyses could not be more different from the upbeat tone that characterised those that immediately followed the victory of Ahok’s close ally Jokowi over Prabowo Subianto in the 2014 election. That result had spared most Australia-based analysts—and many of the people of Indonesia—from the pain of having to contend with what might have been an overwhelmingly clear signal of democratic regression.

But the manner of Ahok’s downfall is merely symptomatic of much deeper problems within Indonesia democracy, which have never been resolved since the fall of Soeharto. These problems are intertwined with continuing oligarchic dominance and the manner in which intra-oligarchic conflict now occurs. The mobilisation of identity politics has become a more salient feature of conflicts over power and resources. In fact, we may be entering a new phase in which conservative takes on Islamic morality, and the hyper-nationalism which is being positioned against them, become the most important cultural resource pools from which the ideational aspects of intra-oligarchic struggles are forged—thus accentuating the illiberalism of Indonesian democracy. Indeed, the relative absence of organised social forces that would drive an agenda of liberal political reform is more palpable than ever before.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/indonesia-illiberal/

Natures and Cultures in Southeast Asia

International Workshop : « Natures and Cultures in Southeast Asia », 7-8/11/2017, Chiang Mai University

With the participation of Philippe Descola
Professor at Collège de France, Chair in Anthropology of Nature

The Institute of Research on Contemporary Southeast Asia (IRASEC) and the Regional Center for Social Science and Sustainable Development (RCSD), Faculty of Social Science of Chiang Mai University

The objective of this international workshop is to explore the relations between societies and their environments in Southeast Asia. Following Philippe Descola’s proposition to overcome the western dualism that opposes nature and culture, we will revisit Southeast Asian ethnographic material concerning, in particular, the modes of being and engaging practically and conceptually to the world. In the presence of the French anthropologist, we will question the diversity of natures in the region through the study of the articulations between animisms, Hindu-Buddhist cosmologies and any other forms of connecting the social, ecological and cosmic orders.

Télécharger le programme sur : http://www.irasec.com/page234

 

Muharram practices and colonial histories at the cutting edge of a forgotten scroll

Muharram practices and colonial histories at the cutting edge of a forgotten scroll by Julia Byl and David Lunn, 16/11/2017, IIAS, Leiden

The lecture

The Syair Tabut, or ‘Poem of the tomb effigies’, is a recently rediscovered Malay-language, Jawi-script narrative poem on Muharram in 1864. In this talk, we explore the literary, linguistic, and performative aspects of the syair, focusing on what it reveals to us about cultural and religious linkages between and around South and Southeast Asia in the 19th century.

This hybrid lithograph/manuscript scroll offers a wealth of details on the practice of Muharram in the region, and contains in its stanzas direct evidence of linguistic and cultural exchange between the various communities that populated the region in that period.

We introduce the poem and its author, Encik Ali, using excerpts from our recent translation that range through colourful costumes and petty vandalism, fervent devotion and violinists intoxicated by their own music. Through this reading, we demonstrate how an engagement with the poem’s nuances opens up a window onto histories of performance, language, and inter-communal interactions in the context of colonial-era contestations over public religiosity.

The speakers

Julia Byl is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of Alberta. Her research interests have centered around musical performance in north Sumatra, and have recently spread to the broader Malay world and to East Timor, where she is beginning a study of music, the individual and the institution.

David Lunn is the Simon Digby Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. His research interests span the literary, cultural, and intellectual history of modern South and, increasingly, Southeast Asia, with a particular focus on the politics of language.

Voir : https://iias.asia/event/scroll

Between earth and water: Mainamati and Vikrampur in South and East Bengal

Masterclass : Between earth and water: Mainamati and Vikrampur in South and East Bengal by Claudine Bautze-Picron, 10/11/2017, Leiden University

Mainamati was the most important Buddhist settlement in Southeast Bengal from the eighth century onwards, being the gateway to the land of the Buddha for monks and merchants having navigated from insular Southeast Asia and for those who came on foot from various regions of nearby Burma.

Its position was inherited by Vikrampur, a vast area located South of Dhaka, which was a major political centre in South and Southeast Bengal from the eleventh up to the early thirteenth century. Although it was also located on the road followed by Buddhist monks and pilgrims when travelling from the region of Chittagong, with its port open on the Bay of Bengal, up to Bihar and thus partly inherited the position earlier held by Mainamati, Vikrampur  was a stronghold of Brahmanism, offering thus a radical departure with the religious situation encountered up to the 10th century.

The artistic production of this region between Vikrampur, Mainamati and Chittagong had a huge impact on the transfer of iconographic models towards Southeast Asia: Eleventh and twelfth-century murals in the temples of Bagan prove the existence of trade relations with Southeast Bengal, and cast images from the region of Mainamati were exported to Java in the eighth and ninth centuries, opening a way which was going to be followed up to the early thirteenth century with images found in Sumatra and Java that are clearly inspired from models created in Vikrampur.

A careful scrutiny of the artistic material found in continental and insular Southeast Asia proves the importance of the Mainamati-Vikrampur region as source of inspiration but also shows how these ‘imported’ models were assimilated before becoming part of the local culture. Moreover, these testimonies might help in trying to get a better understanding of how images were regarded in Bengal: besides the fact that they were worshipped, could they have had other functions? Could they inform about the way the Buddhist community perceived itself in the cultural landscape of the time?

Dr Claudine Bautze-Picron studied at the Universities of Brussels (MA), Lille, Jawaharlal Nehru in New Delhi (M.Phil. in Indian History) and Aix-en-Provence (“Thèse d’État” = Ph.D.). She was a research fellow at the National Centre of Scientific Research (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) in Paris, UMR 7528 (“Mondes Iranien et Indien”) and Lecturer at the Free University of Brussels (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

Research and publications:

Her research has focused for a long period on the art of Eastern India (Bihar/West Bengal/Bangladesh) from the 8th to the 12th c. and on various issues related to Buddhist iconography in India.  This work culminated also in the publication of the catalogue of the collection of eastern Indian sculpture in the Museum of Asian Art, Berlin (Eastern Indian Sculpture in the Museum of Indian Art, Berlin, Berlin, 1998) and of two books concerned with the image of the bejewelled or crowned Buddha in India and Burma (The Bejewelled Buddha from India to Burma, New Considerations, New Delhi, 2010) and with the Buddhist site of Kurkihar in Bihar (The forgotten Place, Stone Sculpture at Kurkihar, New Delhi: Archaeological Survey of India, 2014).

Since nearly 15 years, she has also been working on the murals of Pagan (Burma) from the 10th to the 13th c. (The Buddhist Murals of Pagan, Timeless vistas of the cosmos, Bangkok, 2003).

Voir : https://iias.asia/event/between-earth-water-mainamati-vikrampur-south-east-bengal

CFP : 5th SYMPOSIUM OF THE ICTM STUDY GROUP ON PERFORMING ARTS OF SOUTHEAST ASIA

CFP : 5th Symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Performing Arts of Southeast Asia (PASEA), 16-22/07/2018, Sabah Museum, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia

Deadline for the submission of abstracts : 01 December 2017

Thème I: Crossing Borders through Popular Performance Genres in Southeast Asia

Thème II:  Tourism and the Performing Arts in Southeast Asia

Thème III: New Research

Plus d’informations sur : https://sites.google.com/site/paseastudygroup/announcements/call-for-papers-2018-symposium

 

Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia

International Conference Mobile Bodies: A Long View of the Peoples and Communities of Maritime Asia, 10-11/11/2017, Binghamton University, The State University of New York

Plenary lectures by:

ERIC TAGLIACOZZO (Cornell University)
Ghosts in the Machine: Technology and Maritime Imperialism in Southeast Asia
ANAND YANG (University of Washington)
Empire of Labor: Indian Convict Workers in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Southeast Asia
ANGELA SCHOTTENHAMMER (University of Salzburg)
Surgeons and Physicians on the Move in the Indo-Pacific Waters (15th to 18th Centuries)
RANABIR SAMADDAR (Calcutta Research Group)
Rohingyas: The Emergence of a Stateless Population

The celebrated author AMITAV GHOSH will deliver the keynote address:
Embattled Earth: Commodities, Conflict and Climate Change in the Indian Ocean Region
5 pm, Friday, November 10, 2017
Chamber Hall, Anderson Center, main campus of Binghamton University

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.binghamton.edu/iaad/conference/index.html

 

 

 

CFP : Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia

CFP : UC Berkeley – UCLA Southeast Asian Studies Conference : Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia, 27-28/04/2018, UC Berkeley

Conference chair: Prof. Nancy Lee Peluso (Environmental Science, Policy & Management, UC Berkeley)

The aim of this conference, jointly sponsored by the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berkeley (Director: Prof. Pheng Cheah) and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at UCLA (Director: Prof. George Dutton), is to look anew at issues concerning migration and Southeast Asia.

Migrations have characterized Southeast Asian lives and livelihoods in different ways in different eras; they have affected work, settlement patterns, resource use, small and large investments, religion, and culture. Migrations have formed and changed the composition of Southeast Asian societies and given rise to complex cultural, social, environmental, and political problems and opportunities. Past and present, migrations have been both forced and voluntary: forced to make way for certain kinds of development; triggered by violence and war; but also intentional and, at times, pioneering: to change lives, secure new livelihoods, or explore new ecologies.

Contributors to this conference will discuss continuities and changes in migration practices, patterns, and personnel, addressing a wide range of historical periods, disciplines, and themes. For this conference, we solicit papers on such topics as:

  • labor migration and remittances;
  • resource extractions, claims, and trade;
  • shifting policies governing international movements of people, resources and capital; human rights issues raised by transnational migration;
  • transformations in urban and rural spaces brought by domestic and transnational migrants;
  • cultural changes and cultural productions associated with migrant, resource, and capital flows;
  • the ways that mobilities have changed or are changing gender, generational, racial, and cultural relations in families, communities, and across nations.

The two centers invite submissions for presentations from scholars and graduate students conducting original research in the social sciences and humanities that address the primary theme of the conference. Abstracts (up to 500 words) should be sent to CSEAS at UC Berkeley by Friday, January 19, 2018. Abstracts should include your name, affiliation and discipline and contact information (including e-mail address).

The conference is open to all. Some travel funding is available for faculty and graduate students at UC and CSU campuses.

Contact: CSEAS, 1995 University Ave., 520H MC 2318, Berkeley CA 94704, Tel: (510) 642-3609; Fax: (510) 643-7062; E-mail: cseas@berkeley.edu

Voir : https://networks.h-net.org/node/22055/discussions/640298/cfp-migrations-and-new-mobilities-southeast-asia-uc-berkeley-april

Advanced Associate Professor/Professor, East Asia and/or Southeast Asia before 1900

Advanced Associate Professor/Professor, East Asia and/or Southeast Asia before 1900, History departement, University of Texas – Austin

For full consideration, applications should be received by November 15, 2017.

As part of a major departmental initiative in transnational history, the History Department of the University of Texas at Austin invites applications for the position of advanced Associate Professor/Full Professor in East Asian and/or Southeast Asian history before 1900. The area of specialization is open.

Applicants should have an outstanding record of publication and an established international reputation in the field. The successful candidate will be expected to engage in high quality research/scholarly activities, demonstrate effective classroom teaching at the graduate and undergraduate levels, direct graduate research, and exhibit a commitment to service to the department, college, and university.

A PhD degree in History or related field is required. Applicants may currently hold the rank of either associate or full professor. Salary for this position will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Interested applicants are invited to submit a letter of interest, detailed curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation to Jacqueline Jones, Chair, Department of History. All materials should be submitted online via: https://dossier.interfolio.com/apply/44396.

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=55629

Lineage and Legitimacy: Exploring Royal-Familial Visual Configurations in Cambodia

Lineage and Legitimacy: Exploring Royal-Familial Visual Configurations in Cambodia by Joanna Wolfarth in Trans-Asia Photography Review, vol. 8, n° 1, Fall 2017 : Art and Vernacular Photographies in Asia

As with those of many other rulers, the portrait of Norodom Sihanouk (1922–2012), the former king of Cambodia, has been used at various times in order to convey his sovereign status. This was particularly true of his official portrait, which remains a common presence in both public and private spaces throughout Cambodia. This portrait and multiple versions of it were put to work with press photographs and newsreels of Sihanouk engaged with everyday life, along with the king’s own cinematic oeuvre, to create a visual landscape that reinforced his central presence in Cambodia’s spiritual, social, and political life. All versions of Sihanouk’s official portrait comprise a head and shoulder shot, with his face slightly angled to the side and his gaze focused on a space beyond the frame. He wears a suit and tie, although their colors vary. In some versions the digital manipulation is minimal and lines are visible on his face; in others, the portrait has been more obviously altered and his face becomes shadow-less and wrinkle-free, his hair a solid gray mass. The official portrait is often accompanied by those of his wife, Monineath, and his son, King Sihamoni, presenting a royal-familial triad expressing kingship, past and present.

This paper explores this royal-familial portrait-triad by probing how and why legitimacy and lineage are expressed through visual representations of family ties. Consideration will be given to examples of historical antecedents and the particulars of their resurrection in twentieth-century Cambodia. I suggest that there is a structural power inherent within triadic configurations and that such an arrangement reinforces dynamics of legitimacy. Indeed, longstanding notions of political order in Cambodia are grounded within the triune of Nation, Religion, and King.[1] Often more complex, multidirectional flows of power are expressed in these visual configurations, whereby the authority of the sovereign son strengthens that of his parents, which enables the son to retroactively inherit the power conferred upon his ancestors. Although the right to royal inheritance is “in the blood,” royal succession in Cambodia is not tied strictly to primogeniture and thus there are often competing heirs to the throne, meaning lineage and legitimacy must be more forcefully articulated. This paper will also consider the materiality of the images in question: how such portraits are replicated, disseminated, and displayed.

Lire la suite sur : https://quod.lib.umich.edu/t/tap/7977573.0008.104?view=text;rgn=main

Goods and ethnicity : Trade and Bazaars from a Gift Perspective

Heidelberg Ethnology : Occasional Paper N° 6 (2017) : Goods and Ethnicity : Trade and Bazaars from a Gift Perspective; A Discusssion

Guido Sprenger, with commentaries from Chris Gregory, Kostas Retsikas & Hans Peter Hahn

Drawing on ethnographic observations in Lao markets and bazaars, this article proposes a new and experimental framework for the analysis of multi-ethnic trading. It explores bazaars and trade as sites of the (re-)production of ethnicity through the perspective of gift exchange theory. On markets, transcultural differences can be identified and stabilized through the exchange of goods and money. This draws attention to the role of trade items as foci – and perhaps even as non-human agents – in the emergence of ethnicity and other forms of local identity. The value of items’ specific origins is thus linked to social structure. This helps us to see how the shaping of group identity can be better understood by considering how the goods they bring to market carry with them some features of the gift.

Occasional Paper N° 5 (2017) : Studying Sites of Buddhist Leisure : A Discussion of Justin Thomas McDaniel’s Architects of Buddhist Leisure

Thomas N. Patton, David Morgan, Anne Hansen, Thomas Borchert, Richard Fox & Justin Thomas McDaniel

Occasional Paper N° 4 (2016) : The Other Side of the Gift: Soliciting in Java – A Discussion

Konstantinos Retsikas, with commentaries from Carla Jones, Daromir Rudnyckyj and Guido Sprenger

Occasional Paper N° 3 (2015) : Islam and the Perception of Islam in Contemporary Indonesia

Vincent Houben

Occasional Paper N° 2 (2015) : Optical Allusions: Looking at Looking, in Balinese and Dutch Encounters

Margaret Wiener

Occasional Paper N° 1 (2015) : Beyond the Whorfs of Dover: A Study of Balinese Interpretive Practices

Mark Hobart

Télécharger les PDF sur : http://journals.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/index.php/hdethn

 

 

 

 

Book Review : Living with Myths in Singapore

Book Review : Loh Kah Seng, Pingtjin Thum & Jack Chia Meng-That (eds), Living with Myths in Singapore, Ethos Books, Singapore 2017 by Serina Rahman, 23/10/2017, New Mandala

Living with Myths in Singapore is an eye-opener for anyone who has grown up on the institutionalised Singapore stories.

From a young age, the average Singaporean is exposed to tales of the island’s catapulting itself from third world to first, and then fed a constant stream of pride-inducing narratives designed to demonstrate the nation’s success in overcoming abandonment by Malaysia, racial strife, economic struggles, and a constant siege by unfriendly neighbours. To be a citizen of Singapore was to delight in the tiny state’s ability to overtake others in the region in terms of development, economic progress, and “civilisation”. The larger and more unwieldy members of ASEAN were always depicted as those who were envious of Singapore’s progress, and constantly in need of assistance and advice from the island’s growing pool of local and resident international experts in countless fields.

Philip Holden (in Chapter 7) defines myths as “our way of telling a common sense story of the past”. The editors cite Roland Barthes as they point out that the distinguishing mark of myths are their “naturalness”—in other words, myths are stories that are taken as true and “historical”. But “history”, whether people realise it or not, is man-made. Singaporean stories taken as “history” seem to dangle off the edge of reality—and once unpacked, are revealed to be nothing more than myths created, embellished, and perpetuated for whichever use best suits national institutions, the state, and the media at the time.

I was born in Singapore but didn’t grow up there. Instead I travelled the world in a Singaporean bubble, perpetuating the national myths that engendered respect and awe. The occasional holiday in the homeland had the same impact on me as it did any foreigner. We were taken in by the sheen and shine; the spotlessness, safety and efficiency—and we all believed the myths. As an adult, spending my work hours in the “star” of Southeast Asia after decades abroad, the sparkle seems to dull a little. Murmurs on the ground help peel away the layers of flawless cling wrap to reveal the wrinkles and scars of those who lived all their lives in the Little Red Dot.

Living with Myths in Singapore cleared all the doubts that couldn’t be publicly proclaimed and confronted. The book unpacks the myths to reveal the reality hidden beyond the singular “history” that is perpetually propagated. It fills in the fissures of the fables that niggled because the “common sense” didn’t quite make sense—but couldn’t be questioned. The book’s use of researched, academic histories based on multiple sources, facts, and evidence counters the myths and provides previously obscured insight into the truth behind the tales.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/book-review/living-myths-singapore/

 

Indonesia for Sale

Indonesia for Sale: in-depth series on corruption, palm oil and rainforests launches, by Mongabay

  • The investigative series Indonesia for Sale, launching this week, shines new light on the corruption behind Indonesia’s deforestation and land rights crisis.
  • In-depth stories, to be released over the coming months, will expose the role of collusion between palm oil firms and politicians in subverting Indonesia’s democracy. They will be published in English and Indonesian.
  • The series is the product of nine months’ reporting across the country, interviewing fixers, middlemen, lawyers and companies involved in land deals, and those most affected by them.
  • Indonesia for Sale is a collaboration between Mongabay and The Gecko Project, an investigative reporting initiative established by UK-based nonprofit Earthsight. 

Lire la suite sur : https://news.mongabay.com/2017/10/indonesia-for-sale-in-depth-series-on-corruption-palm-oil-and-rainforests-starts-tomorrow/

Premier épisode de la série : The palm oil fiefdom

A politician in Borneo turned his district into a sea of oil palm. Did it benefit the people who elected him, or the members of his family?

A lire sur : https://news.mongabay.com/2017/10/the-palm-oil-fiefdom/

 

 

The legendary lives of Thai Buddha statues

Figure of the Buddha. Northern Thailand, 1540–1541.

The legendary lives of Thai Buddha statues, lecture by Angela Chiu, 06/11/2017, British Museum

In this talk, Angela Chiu, author of The Buddha in Lanna: Art, Lineage, Power and Place in Northern Thailand (2017), introduces the ancient Thai Buddha statues, some still enshrined today, whose miraculous origins and adventures promoted the growth of Buddhism in Southeast Asia. She considers what motivated the people of the past to create these statues, often at great expense and with significant effort, and reveals how each statue has its own unique ‘life’, initially as the creation of individuals whose hopes and values were embodied in these extraordinary pieces of art.

Voir : http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/events_calendar/event_detail.aspx?eventId=4050&title=The+legendary+lives+of+Thai+Buddha+statues&eventType=Lecture