Tous les articles par Hélène et Sophie

Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641−1699

Sher Banu A.L. Khan, Sovereign Women in a Muslim Kingdom: The Sultanahs of Aceh, 1641−1699, NUS Press, 2017

The Islamic kingdom of Aceh was ruled by queens for half of the 17th century. Was female rule an aberration? Unnatural? A violation of nature, comparable to hens instead of roosters crowing at dawn? Indigenous texts and European sources offer different evaluations. Drawing on both sets of sources, this book shows that female rule was legitimised both by Islam and adat (indigenous customary laws), and provides original insights on the Sultanah’s leadership, their relations with male elites, and their encounters with European envoys who visited their court. The book challenges received views on kingship in the Malay world and the response of indigenous polities to east-west encounters in Southeast Asia’s Age of Commerce.

« We have waited too long for a book such as this. It explores the extraordinary phenomenon of a preference for queens in the golden age of Islamic Aceh. Countering the dominant nationalist, feminist and Islamic scholarship, all of which find uncongenial the striking phenomenon of a preference for queens in early modern Asian Islam, Banu has utilized rich primary sources to reveal a queenship that was truly Islamic, effective and benign. This book is a revelation. Read it. »
Anthony Reid, The Australian National University

« Sher Banu’s superb study based on a host of newly discovered contemporary source materials throws new light on a hotly discussed topic among historians of Southeast Asian statecraft in Early Modern time. »
Leonard Blusse, Leiden University

« The author is to be congratulated on a book that makes a significant contribution both to the history of Southeast Asia and to comparative studies on women in early modern Asia. »
Barbara Watson Andaya and Leonard Y. Andaya, University of Hawai‘i 

Voir : https://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/products/sovereign-women-in-a-muslim-kingdom-the-sultanahs-of-aceh-1641-1699

Inside Indonesia 128, apr – jun 2017

Inside Indonesia 128 : april – june 2017 : New law, new villages ? Written by Ward Berenschot and Jacqueline Vel

The new Village Law could substantially change Indonesia’s villages. Not necessarily for the better.

Table of contents

  • Creating Indonesia’s Village Law by Jacqueline Vel, Yando Zakaria and Adriaan Bedner
  • The myth of the harmonious village by Ben White
  • New law, old bureaucracy by Yando Zakaria and Jacqueline Vel
  • The village head as patron by Ward Berenschot and Prio Sambodho
  • Participation in Ngada by Lily Hoo
  • When village development fails by Yulia Indri Sari
  • Traditional village institutions and the Village Law by Agung Wardana and Darmanto

A lire sur : http://www.insideindonesia.org/

Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia

Arahmaiani Feisal (1961- ), No More Shadow Play ;Courtesy of the artist.

Thomas J. Berghuis, Place, Time and Media in Performance Art in Indonesia, 25/05/2017, SOAS

Description

This seminar introduces the development of performance art in Indonesia, from the 1980s until the present day. It considers ways in which performance art in Indonesia has its art historical origins in the conceptual art movement of the 1970s, when artists across Southeast Asia began to consider new social and artistic realities in their artworks. But the the seminar will also draw on the multiple interwoven strands of performance practices and performance traditions that connect the development of contemporary performance art in Indonesia.

The seminar will examine the role of performance art in Indonesia in relation to place, time and media. Artists whose works will be examined include Arahmaiani, Heri Dono, FX Harsono, Mella Jaarsma, Tisna Sanjaya, Melati, Iwan Wijono, W. Christiawan, Mimi Fadmi, Redza Afisina, and Performance Club 69 — a recently established platform for study and practices of performance art initiated by Forum Lenteng in Jakarta, starting in 2016.

About the speaker

Dr. Thomas J. Berghuis is currently a Visiting Fellow at Tate Research Centre: Asia. He is Principal Fellow (Honorary) with the School of Culture and Communication at The University of Melbourne in Australia and is currently based in Leiden, the Netherlands. An art historian and curator of contemporary Asian art, with focus on contemporary art in China and Indonesia, Berghuis previously worked as Lecturer in Asian Art History at the University of Sydney (2008-2013); The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Curator of Chinese Art (2013-2015) at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York; and Director of the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nusantara (Museum MACAN) in Jakarta, Indonesia (2015-2016). Berghuis’ writings have been published in prominent journals and art magazines. He is the author of Performance Art in China (Hong Kong: Timezone 8, 2006).

Voir : https://www.soas.ac.uk/art/events/contemporary-arts-research-seminar/25may2017-place-time-and-media-in-performance-art-in-indonesia.html

Careful What You Wish For: Salafi Islamisation and the Shifting Structures of the Malaysian State

Lily Zubaidah Rahim, « Careful What You Wish For: Salafi Islamisation and the Shifting Structures of the Malaysian State », 31/05/2017, ANU Malaysia Institute

Abstract

Malaysia appears to be fragmenting under the weight of salafiIslamisation – threatening the country’s secular and democratic constitutional foundations. Initially instigated by state-led Islamisation initiatives under the Mahathir administration, the promotion of salafi Islam has become increasing assertive, particularly since the 2013 general elections. In this election, the UMNO-led Barisan Nasional (BN) government lost the popular vote. More recently, UMNO and the conservative opposition Islamist party PAS have attempted to introduce hudud (sharia penal code) legislation through the Federal parliament – further reconstructing the character of the post-colonial state. The lecture examines Malaysia’s salafiIslamisation in conjunction with the broader socio-political and economic pressures confronting the ruling BN government. The ambiguous and fragmented responses of the predominantly Muslim-led opposition parties (Amanah, Parti Keadilan Rakyat and Bersatu) towards salafi Islamisation will also be considered. After sixty years of independence, Malaysians continue to be challenged by the following questions: What is the constitutional status of sharia law?; How should the dual legal jurisdictions (civil and codified sharia) be managed?; Can traditional interpretations of sharia genuinely accommodate principles such as citizenship rights, gender equality and democratic constitutionalism?

Bio-profile

Lily Zubaidah Rahim is an Assoc Professor at the Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney. She is a specialist in authoritarian governance, ethnic politics and democratisation in Southeast Asia and political Islam in Muslim-majority states. Her publications include The Singapore Dilemma: The Political and Educational Marginality of the Malay Community, (Oxford University Press 1998/2001; translated to Malay by the Malaysian National Institute for Translation); Singapore in the Malay World: Building and Breaching Regional Bridges (Routledge, 2009); Muslim Secular Democracy (PalgraveMacmillan, 2013) and The Politics of Islamism: Diverging Visions and Trajectories(PalgraveMacmillan, 2017, Forthcoming). Lily is completing her fifth book on governance reform in Singapore. She has published in international journals such as Democratization,Contemporary Politics, Journal of Contemporary Asia andAustralian Journal of International Affairs. Her sole-authored journal article ‘Governing Muslims in Singapore’s Secular Authoritarian State’ was short-listed for the Boyer Prize by the Australian Journal of International Affairs (AJIA) in 2011.

Voir : http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/cap-events/2017-05-31/careful-what-you-wish-salafi-islamisation-and-shifting-structures-malaysian

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder

Cannes 2017 – « Le vénérable W. » de Barbet Schroeder, chronique édifiante du discours de la haine par Frédéric Strauss,  20/05/2017, Télérama

Dans un documentaire exemplaire car méthodique, présenté en séance spéciale à Cannes, le Suisse Barbet Schroeder part à la rencontre de Wirathu. Ce moine birman qui, par ses sermons extrémistes, a encouragé le massacre des musulmans dans son pays. Quand le bouddhisme confine au fascisme.

Le film sortira en France le 7 juin 2017.

Il a la haine. Les vieux arbres qui gardaient ses plus beaux souvenirs, à côté de chez lui, le voisin les a fait couper. Pour oublier ce crime, Barbet Schroeder part à Mandalay, en Birmanie, où il découvrit, à 20 ans, le bouddhisme. Une religion qui apprend à vivre sans haine. S’il n’a pas perdu la foi, le cinéaste ne croit cependant plus aux miracles. Le but de son voyage est de rencontrer un moine qui, tel un pompier pyromane, allume des incendies, attise les flammes d’un fanatisme meurtrier : le vénérable et pourtant détestable Wirathu.

Sous ses allures de bonze, c’est une sorte d’héritier d’Hitler qu’on découvre, tout entier voué à la persécution et à l’extermination d’une population : les musulmans de Birmanie, et particulièrement la minorité des Rohingyas. Wirathu les compare à des animaux sauvages qui se reproduisent comme des lapins, se dévorent entre eux et détruisent l’environnement. Monstrueux et glaçant, son discours veut faire naître chez les Birmans bouddhistes « la peur de la disparition de la race », titre d’un de ses livres. Il faut éliminer les musulmans, ou ils seront, eux, éliminés… Face à cet apôtre de la haine, Barbet Schroeder garde un étonnant sang-froid. Son regard droit, objectif, rend la confrontation impressionnante. Avec ce film, il clôt une « trilogie du Mal », commencée avec les documentaires Général Idi Amin Dada : autoportrait (1974) et L’Avocat de la terreur (2007), sur Jacques Vergès…

Lire la suite et voir la bande annonce sur : http://www.telerama.fr/festival-de-cannes/2017/cannes-2017-le-venerable-w-de-barbet-schroeder-chronique-edifiante-du-discours-de-la-haine,158235.php

Mekong Review n° 7 (2017)

A monk takes a selfie at MaBaTha’s third anniversary conference in Yangon, 2016, Photograph: Ann Wang

Mekong Review n° 7 (2017)

Site : https://mekongreview.com/

Table of contents

Peace matters by Christopher Goscha

A partisan of the peace movement explains how war could have been avoided in Vietnam.

Frontier flux by David Eimer

How Aung San Suu Syi has failed to deliver peace to the borderlands of Myanmar.

The humaniser by Tillman Miller

In the wake of Donald Trump, writing about refugees has become a political act, says Viet Thanh Nguyen.

Khmer ways  by Jack Weatherford

Who was Zhou Duguan – author of the only surviving written account of the Khmer Empire?

Monumental by Aedeen Cremin

The brilliant career of Pascal Royere, the archaeologist sent to restore the thousand-year-old Baphuon temple.

Narrative change by Michael Freeman

Can fiction help us come to terms with the pending problems of climate change?

MaBaTha by Matthew J. Walton, Ma Khin Mar Mar Kyi and Aye Thein

A detailed examination of the Buddhist nationalist group that is causing havoc in Myanmar.

Winter 1954 by Tran Dan

The late Tran Dan’s classic war novel, Crossroads and Lampposts, in English for the first time.

Now we’re 50 by Ooi Kee Beng

Is ASEAN a miracle? Or just a 50-year-old talkshop?

Intoxicated by Ross West

How France managed to take over the production of alcohol in Vietnam and extend its colonial power.

State rebels by Liam C. Kelley

The Chinese outlaws recruited by the Vietnamese Nguyen Dynasty to fight against the French.

Poetry by Soe Nay Lynn,  Amy Doffegnies

“Soe Nay Lynn”, “Vignette” “Pay Pay* at Phoe Htoo Teashop” & “The sky and its two stars”

Milieu by David Payne

Nineteen young Vietnamese writers are showcased in a new collection of short stories.

On the street by Neil Moody

What is more important in street food – the food or the street?

Dressing up stories by Max Crosbie-Jones

Thai artist Jakkai Siributr is not afraid to confront the big issues his country would like to forget.

Pinball wizardry by Rupert Winchester

Finally the multi-generational family saga comes of age in Asia, in this sensitive Korean novel.

Poetry by Ko Ko Thett, Maw Shein Win, Steve Gilmartin

“after the lie of art” & “i hate programming without free will”

Uncle Ho’s retreat by Michael Tatarski

This is the hallowed cave where Ho Chi Minh founded the Indochina Communist Party.

Death in Yangon by Sean Gleeson
A slow Sunday afternoon in Yangon is shattered by the sound of gunshots.

Peace Matters – Review of The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace, 1954-75

American Quakers with North Vietnamese soldiers shortly after the war ended in 1975; Quinn-Judge, far right. Photograph: Claudia Krich

Peace matters by Christopher Goscha in Mekong Review, n° 7

Review of Sophie Quinn-Judge, The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace, 1954-75, I. B. Tauris, 2017.

Article en accès libre pendant quelques jours sur : https://mekongreview.com/peace-matters/

Sophie Quinn-Judge landed in central Vietnam in 1973 as a member of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC). She served in the AFSC-run Rehabilitation Centre in Quang Ngai province until the end of the war in 1975, providing prosthetics and relief help to war-injured civilians coming from all sides of the conflict ripping Vietnam apart. Quinn-Judge grew up in Quaker country in the suburbs of Philadelphia. Although she was not initially a member of this breakaway Protestant faith, she took part in their youth camps as a youngster and felt at home working in the AFSC in France and Vietnam.

The Quakers established the AFSC upon the United States’ entry into the First World War in 1917. The Quakers refused to take part in war as an article of faith. So instead of sending their sons into the trenches of the Western Front, the AFSC mobilised their young people to help civilians hurt and displaced by the conflagration. The AFSC did more than provide humanitarian aid, however. Drawing on centuries of Quaker pacifism, the organisation actively promoted “lasting peace with justice, as a practical expression of faith in action”. Educational programs, youth camps and exchanges helped nurture “the seeds of change and respect for human life that transform social relations and systems”. In 1947, the AFSC received the Nobel Prize for Peace for its humanitarian relief efforts during and after the Second World War and its promotion of world peace. The Quakers continued their work during the Cold War, dispatching people to work in war-torn areas of the Afro-Asian world, including Vietnam.

“We were very sure at that time that there was one side that should win: the National Liberation Front. But in the spirit of the Paris Peace Agreement, signed in 1973 not long before we arrived in Vietnam, we hoped that peace would be established by means of a coalition government. Unfortunately, the provisions of the agreement were ignored in Saigon, so the war ended in 1975 with the communists’ military victory. Looking back, I believe more strongly than ever that [the] AFSC and the Quakers played an important role in trying to bring about a peaceful solution to the war. The war ended in tragedy for many people and a peaceful resolution would surely have been better for all of the Vietnamese”.[3]

Quinn-Judge makes this case forcefully and poignantly in The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace, 1954-75. Hers is not an autobiography, but her activism for peace in Vietnam influenced how she wrote this book on that subject. From start to finish, she argues that things could have been different had the main belligerents just given peace a chance. A third way existed during the period between 1954 and 1973. A different outcome than the communist takeover of the south and exclusion of the peace-minded “third force” could have emerged in 1975 had neutralist, human-rights respecting and democratically committed Vietnamese been allowed to form the promised coalition government and negotiate with the communist north.

Lire la suite sur : https://mekongreview.com/peace-matters/

Journal of southeast asian studies, vol. 48, n° 2, june 2017

Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, vol. 48, n° 2, june 2017

Table of contents

Editorial Foreword

Editorial Foreword by Maitrii Aung-Thwin

Research Articles

The two Kronik Tionghua of Semarang and Cirebon: A note on provenance and reliability by Alexander Wain

Mediating the local: Representing Javanese cultures on local television in Indonesia by Els Bogaerts

Ethnicity and social relations in Indonesian television production houses by Maria Myutel

Colonial sugar production in the Spanish Philippines: Calamba and Negros compared by Filomeno V. Aguilar

Mae Fah Luang: Thailand’s Princess Mother and the Border Patrol Police during the Cold War by Sinae Hyun

Balancing the foreign and the familiar in the articulation of kingship: The royal court Brahmans of Thailand by Nathan McGovern

Book  Reviews

Voir sur : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-southeast-asian-studies/latest-issue?

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence

Cannes Notices Indonesian Film Resurgence by Maggie Lee, 21/05/2017, Variety

Something invigorating and full-bodied is brewing in Indonesia, and it’s not a cup of mocha java. It’s a cinematic resurgence, the biggest since the early 2000s, when Rudy Soedjarwo’s 2002 teen romance Apa ada dengan cinta? (What’s With Love?) rocked the Southeast Asia market while in the same year Riri Riza’s Eliana Eliana stunned the festival circuit with femme-centric social realism.

In September 2016, Warkop DKI Reborn: Jangkrik Boss Part 1, a reboot of a police slapstick comedy by 1980s comic trio Dono, Kasino and Indro (DKI), became the most-viewed Indonesian film in history, with 6.8 million tickets sold. For the first time, the top 10 domestic films enjoyed more than 1 million admissions, with horror Danur taking the top spot in 2017. According to Korean industry giant CJ CGV, exhibition of local films at its theatrical chain in Indonesia rose from 5% to 23% last year.

The arthouse scene is also flourishing, with second-generation directors Edwin, Joko Anwar, Lucky Kuswandi and Teddy Soeriaatmadja turning up at top festivals alongside relative newcomers including Eddie Cahyono (Siti) and Yosep Anggi Noen (Solo Solitude). In fact, there is talk of a new wave, or neo-neorealism, that explores gritty contemporary subjects about politics or gender with stylized, poetic film language.

A new height has been scored by the selection of Marlina, the Murderer in Four Acts in this year’s Directors’ Fortnight, the third Indonesian feature to bow in Cannes. It is also the third feature by Mouly Surya, whose sophomore feature, What They Don’t Talk About When They Talk About Love, premiered at Sundance 2013.

Australia-educated Surya, whose auteur influences are Stanley Kubrick, Michael Haneke and Abbas Kiarostami, cites Garin Nugroho’s Of Love and Eggs and Sjumandjaja’s biopic of women’s rights champion R.A. Kartini as her entry point to national cinema. It was Nugroho, the country’s most distinguished filmmaker, who proposed her to direct Marlina, based on a treatment developed from his visit to Sumba Island, an isolated, arid territory that resembles Texas.

Taking cues from Japanese samurai and Chinese martial arts that fused Western elements, she refashioned the Italo-American genre into a vehicle to examine male violence and patriarchal dominance in Southeast Asian backwaters such as Sumba, while highlighting the indigenous women’s unique air of mystery, sensuality and reliance. The women in Surya’s films bleed in key moments and there will be blood in Marlina, too.

“In my debut Fiksi [written by Joko Anwar], the heroine lost her virginity; in my second film, the blind protagonist had her first period,” Surya says. “Marlina doesn’t spill her own blood, but that of others, symbolizing the strength of women from Sumba. My female characters have grown up. Marlina is a full-grown woman, a widow who finds strength in grief.”

Voir : http://variety.com/2017/film/asia/indonesia-film-industry-recognized-at-cannes-1202437479/

 

Locating the historical Kartini

Locating the historical Kartini by Joost Coté, 22/05/2017, Indonesia at Melbourne

A new feature film has prompted a renewed interest in the life of national hero Kartini.

Dr Joost Coté will speak tomorrow at a panel discussion on “The film ‘Kartini’ and Kartini as a source of historical and contemporary inspiration in Indonesia”, sponsored by the University’s Indonesia Forum. Coté was a researcher and adviser for the film, which was released inIndonesia earlier this year.

Joost Coté is also the editor and translator of Kartini: The Complete Writings 1898-1904.

Like so many iconic figures of history, over the last century, Raden Adjeng Kartini (21 April 1897-17 September 1904) has been much mythologised, misused and misread – or should that be not read?

The creation of Kartini as a national feminist icon all began with a Jacques Abendanon, the former director of colonial education, who selected and published letters Kartini had written to prominent Dutch progressive figures to support his campaign for colonial education reform. The result was Door Duisternis tot Licht (1911). An American feminist, Agnes Louise Symmers, on hearing about this remarkable Javanese woman, produced a (rather loose) English translation. The result was an international “feminist text” in 1920, ever since known by the inappropriate title, Letters of a Javanese Princess.

Two years later, the erudite North Sumatran author Armijn Pane produced the first Indonesian translation, Habis Gelap, Terbitlah Terang, for the colonial government’s “good literature” program, Balai Pustaka, and 16 years on, a definitive version for Indonesian readers. In 1939, the first Javanese translation appeared – which has since effectively disappeared –in 1940, a Japanese translation, later a French translation, followed by others.

Lire la suite sur :

Ahok’s defeats and public debate in Indonesia

Ward Berenschot, Ahok’s defeats and public debate in Indonesia, 18/05/2017, New Mandala

Basuki Thahaja Purnama’s (‘Ahok’) electoral defeat in Jakarta’s gubernatorial election on 19 April was stunning in itself. And then Jakarta’s sitting governor was dealt a further blow on 9 May when he was convicted to a two year jail sentence for blasphemy. Both events are a setback for those campaigning for a tolerant and pluralist Indonesia. As the election campaign focused on Ahok’s Chinese-Christian background and the purported threat he posed to Islam, the election results and the subsequent court ruling suggest that the appeal and the power of hardliner Islamic organisations is growing.

So far the interpretations of these events have focused on the considerations of Indonesian voters. Some attributed Ahok’s electoral defeat to a growing concern about social inequality, pointing to his low vote-share among poor Jakartans. Others focused on the impact that religious identity has on voting behaviour. Compared to other groups, Muslims were much less likely to vote for Ahok. These views suggest that a complex interplay of class and religion brought about Ahok’s defeat.

These analyses all focus on the considerations that individual voters may have. But at least as significant is what Ahok’s defeat says about the character of public debate in Indonesia. The Jakarta elections and Ahok’s conviction throw up a number of puzzles that suggest that we need to take a closer look at how public opinion is shaped, and by whom. The nature of Ahok’s defeat raises concerns about the increasingly closed character of Indonesia’s public sphere, and points to the importance of informal, personal networks in spreading and legitimising ideas.

Lire la suite sur : http://www.newmandala.org/ahoks-defeats-say-public-debate-indonesia/

Philippines Studies : Historical and ethnographic viewpoints, vol. 65, n° 1 (2017)

Philippines Studies : Historical and ethnographic viewpoints, vol. 65, n° 1 (2017) : José P. Laurel’s Political Thought

Table of Contents

Articles

  • Cultures of Empire, Nation, and Universe in Pres. José P. Laurel’s Political Thought, 1927–1949 by Nicole CuUnjieng
  • A Philippine History of Denmark: From Pioneer Settlers to Permanently Temporary Workers by Nina Trige Andersen

Research Note

  • Contextualizing the Contextual: A Note on the Revolutionary Exegesis of Gregorio L. Aglipay by Peter-Ben Smit

Reminiscences

  • Scotty, Sage of Sagada by Stuart A. Schlegel

Book Reviews

Lire la suite sur : http://philippinestudies.net/ojs/index.php/ps/issue/current/showToc

 

Appel à contributions : Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archive: An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares

Appel à contributions : Bridging Worlds, Illumining the Archive: An International Conference in Honor of Professor Resil B. Mojares, 30–31 July 2018, Quezon City, Philippines

Organized jointly by Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Perspectives, School of Social Sciences, Loyola Schools, Ateneo de Manila University and Southeast Asian Studies, Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University

Deadline for abstracts and panels proposals submission : 01 October 2017

In a prolific career spanning five decades, Resil B. Mojares has produced a remarkable body of work that combines meticulous research, incisive analysis, and elegant, lyrical writing.

An exemplary home-grown and -educated activist, intellectual, institution-builder, and man of letters, Mojares has made important, often pioneering, contributions to diverse fields and subjects, ranging from Philippine literature (Origins and Rise of the Filipino Novel: A Generic Study of the Novel until 1940; [co-ed.] the two-volume Sugilanong Sugboanon), architecture (Casa Gorordo in Cebu: Urban Residence in a Philippine Province, 1860–1920), theater and social history (Theater in Society, Society in Theater: Social History of a Cebuano Village, 1840–1940), to intellectual history (Brains of the Nation: Pedro Paterno, T. H. Pardo de Tavera, Isabelo de los Reyes, and the Production of Modern Knowledge), biography (Vicente Sotto: Maverick Senator; The Man Who Would be President: Serging Osmeña and Philippine Politics; Aboitiz: Family and Firm in the Philippines), history and politics (The War Against the Americans: Resistance and Collaboration in Cebu, 1899–1906; [co-ed.] From Marcos to Aquino: Local Perspectives on the Political Transition in the Philippines).

Scholars and academics with papers and panels related, but not limited, to the following topics are invited to participate in this conference:

  1. Historiography and the Archive: Issues and Debates
  2. Precolonial, Colonial, Imperial, and Postcolonial Histories
  3. Biography
  4. Intellectuals, Intellectual Histories, and Philippine Studies
  5. Philippine Languages and Literatures
  6. Philippine Architecture, Theater, and the Arts
  7. Nation-Making, Nationness, and Nationalism
  8. Politics, Politicians, and State Building
  9. Social Histories
  10. “What is Obscure, Hidden, and Marginal” in Philippine History and Current Affairs
  11. Local and Regional Histories
  12. Cultural Studies
  13. The Philippines in Asia and the World

Selected papers that pass the refereeing process will be included in a special issue of Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints, the quarterly published by the Ateneo de Manila University since 1953.

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.facebook.com/PhilippineStudies/posts/10154264194466017

RESOURCES ON DIGITAL (VISUAL) ANTHROPOLOGY AND ETHNOGRAPHY

Ressources on digital (visual) anthropology and ethnography

This is a selection of resources on digital visual anthropology & digital ethnography, collected via the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) Visual Anthropology Network’s & Media Anthropology Network’s mailing lists.

Elle comprend des projets et plateformes en ligne, des e-séminaires et des bibliographies.

Voir la liste complète sur : https://01anthropology.wordpress.com/2017/01/27/resources-on-digital-visual-anthropology-ethnography/

Nang Magazine, n° 2 : Scars and Death

NANG Magazine, n° 2 : Scars and Death

Guest-editors  : Yoo Un-Seong & John Torres

NANG is an English-language 10-issue magazine which covers cinema and cinema cultures in the Asian world with passion and insight.

Issue 2 is dedicated to Scars and Death. We asked writers, filmmakers, scholars, bloggers, and artists from Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, the USA, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, India, and Kazakhstan to pitch in without feeling the need to conform to a particular form or tone of writing. Write about scars and death. Die for the piece and swear by it. For the scarred workers, the dedicated, the desperate enough, for those dying to be offered another chance. For the films we have lost, the scenes that are scarred by time, those missing frames, abrupt endings and low resolutions. For the ones who died on- and off-screen, for deaths we haven’t seen. For those who risk life savings for a fictional piece. For all others who toil away, INT/EXT, their bodies taking it, DAY/NIGHT.

Yoo Un-Seong is a film critic, co-publisher of OKULO (a quarterly magazine on cinema and the moving image), and Lecturer at the Korea National University of Arts (K’ARTS). He worked as a programmer of the Jeonju International Film Festival from 2004 to 2012.

John Torres is a filmmaker, writer, musician. Does filmmaking workshops and hosts talks for independently run film and artist space “Los Otros” (with Shireen Seno). Feature films include Todo Todo Teros (2006) and Lukas the Strange (2013). Singer for Taggu nDios, working on their debut EP.

Vous pouvez suivre NANG sur son blog ou vous abonner à sa Newsletter, excellente source sur les ressources et les événements concernant le cinéma d’Asie.

Vous pouvez également aller feuilleter la revue à Paris, à la Librairie du Cinéma du Panthéon.

Site : https://www.nangmagazine.com/