CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities

CALL FOR PAPERS : Remapping the Arts, Heritage, and Cultural Production: Between Policies and Practices in East and Southeast Asian Cities, 16-17 August 2017, Asia Research Institute, NUS

Deadline : 30 April 2017

For Zukin (1982, 1987, 1995) culture has been central to the development of the new ‘symbolic’ or ‘creative’ economy, but she also cautions against its appropriation for urban redevelopment that can lead displacement of local communities. Castells (2010), on the other hand, suggests that cultural materials, including digital media, facilitate social change, especially in relation to social movements, because they enable social actors to redefine their subjectivities and transform the social structure. While local and regional governments are striving towards the ‘rejuvenation’ of urban spaces as a form of city branding, citizens and artists alike are seeking ways to maintain the viability of local arts and culture along with (in)tangible heritage. In many Asian cities, heritage preservation has played an important role in the democratisation of urban spaces and community building. Tensions between different interest groups have been unavoidable but mutual ground is needed for feasible policies and practices to construct inclusive and socially just urban spaces.

With the rise of local governance, and changing state-society relationships, we believe that the full potential of arts, heritage, and cultural production in the social transformation and civic participation has not yet been fully acknowledged. Given differences in urban governance, planning and civic participation in East and Southeast Asia, more nuanced research is needed to identify what kind of cultural policies and creative practices could be developed and how they might provide innovative approaches beyond the Western paradigms of ‘creative’ or ‘cultural’ cities, and gentrification. Similarly, Douglass (2015) has raised policy questions about how to strengthen civic engagement, belonging and community building in cities through the cultivation of civic participation. Innovative forms of civic participation resonate with the ‘worlding practices’ defined by Ong (2011:4) as ‘projects that attempt to establish or break established horizons of urban standards in and beyond a particular city’. The purpose of this multidisciplinary conference is thus to explore both government-led cultural policies and the organically emerging artistic and creative practices aimed at the empowerment of local communities and neighborhoods in contemporary East and Southeast Asian cities.

We invite the submission of papers from early career and established scholars, policy makers, activists, and creative practitioners to explore the role of arts, culture, and heritage in developing more progressive urban societies in East and Southeast Asia cities. We encourage applicants to consider empirical case studies and theories within comparative contexts and to extrapolate policy options for other regions apart from the East and Southeast Asia that explore innovative ways to build co-operation between varied social groups, institutions, and local governance. Questions that will guide the conference proceedings speak to integrated themes across disciplinary and geographical boundaries and include:

  • How do arts, heritage, and creative practices provide opportunities for ‘creative communities’ to resist the encroachment of the corporate economy (Douglass 2015)? What challenges do they face in asserting their right to urban space?
  • How and to what extent could ‘gentrification aesthetics’ (Chang 2014) open up new approaches for analysing both positive and negative impact of urban redevelopment?
  • What kind of innovations in governance are needed to support art communities, heritage preservation, and cultural and creative industries in ways that are socially inclusive, viable, and enhance civil participation? Can an approach based on the interconnectedness of cultural and social sustainability (Kong 2009) benefit the understanding of the collective processes emerging in cities today?
  • How does public art reflect the ways in which forms of vernacular heritage, culture, and socio-spatial identity are bound up with the representation and (re)shaping of place and landscape in cities? What controversies and political fault lines might emerge through these processes?
  • What kind of novel forms of ‘art activism’ or ‘cultural activism’ are emerging, and how do they benefit, interact, or hinder the aims of social transformations?
  • To what extent are arts, heritage, and cultural productions contributing to the development of ‘tourist cities’? How is this being resisted or embraced by local populations?
  • What new approaches are emerging that transcend purely physical space? Can intangible forms, such as digital networks, forums and sites, benefit the survival of local communities?

Plus d’informations sur : https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Event/Detail/f767b24e-9d53-4d4b-9f72-0ec54a53689b

BIES: Read our latest free-access collection

BIES: Read our latest free-access collection

Each year, the editors of the Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies (BIES) make six recently published articles free to access online. Their selections for 2017 are below.

Jokowi and the New Developmentalism by Eve Warburton
December 2016 (52.3)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1249262

Authoritarian Legacies in Post–New Order Indonesia: Evidence from a New Dataset by Sharon Poczter and Thomas B. Pepinsky April 2016 (52.1)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2015.1129051

 Village Governance, Community Life, and the 2014 Village Law in Indonesia by Hans Antlöv, Anna Wetterberg, and Leni Dharmawan
August 2016 (52.2)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00074918.2015.1129047

Consistency between Sakernas and the IFLS for Analyses of Indonesia’s Labour Market: A Cross-Validation Exercise by Sarah Xue Dong
December 2016 (52.3)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1228828

Could a Resource Export Boom Reduce Workers’ Earnings? The Labour-Market Channel in Indonesia by Ian Coxhead and Rashesh Shrestha
August 2016 (52.2)

A lire sur : http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00074918.2016.1184745

How Robust Is Indonesia’s Poverty Profile? Adjusting for Differences in Needs by Jan Priebe
August 2016 (52.2)

 

Communal Violence in Myanmar

CSEAS Lecture. Communal Violence in Myanmar: Roundtable Discussion, 27/03/2017, University of Michigan

Since 2012, Myanmar has experienced recurrent, sporadic, collective acts of lethal violence, realized through repeated public expressions that Muslims constitute an existential threat to Buddhists. Much of this has been directed at those who identify as Rohingya, but it has not been limited to this category. The panelists discuss the narratives, genealogies and typologies of this violence, drawing on scholarship from South and Southeast Asia.

Panelists:

Nick Cheesman, Fellow, Department of Political & Social Change Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, Australian National University, 2016-17 Member of Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study

Mike McGovern, Associate Professor, Anthropology & Director of Undergraduate Studies, University of Michigan

Matt Schissler, Doctoral Student in Anthropology, University of Michigan

Moderated by Allen Hicken, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan

Voir : https://www.ii.umich.edu/cseas/news-events/events.detail.html/39698-8241180.html

 

Brutalism and Traditional Khmer Design Come Together in Phnom Penh’s Hiroshima House

Brutalism and Traditional Khmer Design Come Together in Phnom Penh’s Hiroshima House by Ben Valentine, 17/03/2017, Hyperallergic

Osamu Ishiyama’s structure exemplifies the surprising adaptability of humans in the face of dehumanizing events.

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — During the 1994 Asian Games in Hiroshima, atomic bomb survivor Keiko Kunichika was inspired by a Cambodian athlete’s desire for his country to grow as Hiroshima had after the devastation of war. The Association for the Exchange Between Hiroshima Citizens and Cambodians was founded, and volunteers from Japan began building the Hiroshima House in Phnom Penh, brick by brick, from 1995 until its opening in 2007.

[…]

As a monument for peace, a site for children, and a building within one of Phnom Penh’s oldest and most important temple complexes, Wat Ounalom, the building itself is somewhat bizarre. From the outside, it’s an awkward, nearly cube-shaped five-story structure of progressively smaller cement and brick horizontal stripes. The weirdness culminates in a traditional Khmer roof plopped on top of the modern building. Surrounded by traditional Buddhist temple buildings, which are heavily ornate with highly circumscribed meanings, the Hiroshima House sticks out like a sore thumb.

Lire la suite sur : http://hyperallergic.com/364076/brutalism-and-traditional-khmer-design-come-together-in-phnom-penhs-hiroshima-house/

Malaysia and the world : cross-regional perspective on race, religion and ethnic identity

Malaysia and the world : cross-regional perspective on race, religion and ethnic identity, International Conference at Ohio University, 24-26/03/2017, Athens, Ohio

The conference aims to highlight Malaysia’s profile and role on the world stage by bringing together leading scholars from Malaysia, Europe, and North America. The intellectual academic exchange will provide a venue for competing comparative perspectives on Malaysia and other countries. It is the broader intention that this academic activism will benefit and enrich Malaysian studies.

The highlights of the International Conference will include keynote addresses by:

  • Malaysia’s Distinguished Professor Datuk Shamsul Amri Baharuddin of UKM and the National Council of Professors, who will speak on “The Making of Malaysia’s National Unity Blueprint: Redefining Unity in Malaysia”
  • UPM VC, Prof Datin Paduka Aini Ideris, who will speak on the role of research universities in nation building.

The conference will also feature talks by leading American scholars who have done extensive work on Malaysia such as:

  • Donald L. Horowitz, the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science Emeritus of Duke University
  • Professor Meredith Weiss of the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs, State University of NY at Albany.

Other distinguished and notable speakers from Malaysia will include:

  • The well-known former Imam of Perlis, the Honorable Dato Dr Juanda Jaya, who is a member of Sarawak Legislative Assembly and will speak on a subject that addresses the themes “Islam, the state and law”
  • UPM’s Visiting Professor at Wailalak University, Thailand, Professor Ahmad Tarmizi Talib, who will speak on “Muslim – Non-Muslim Relations in Malaysia »
  • UNIMAS Professor Stanley Bye Kadam Kiai, who will speak on “the Politics of Federalism: reflecting on the role Sarawak and Sabah played in the formation of Malaysia »
  • Tun Abdul Razak Chair Professor Jayum Jawan, who is from UPM, will speak on “Race & Ethnic Relations: What can Malaysia and the US learn from each other?”

The three day conference will have speakers addressing four major themes:

  1. Post-Colonial Legacies and Its Impact
  2. Majority-Minority Relations
  3. Electoral Politics
  4. Islam, the State and Law

Plus d’informations sur : https://www.ohio.edu/global/cis/activities-events.cfm

What’s (written) history for? On James C. Scott’s Zomia, especially Chapter 6½

Jean Michaud, « What’s (written) history for? On James C. Scott’s Zomia, especially Chapter 6½, » Anthropology Today, vol. 33, no. 1 (february 2017)

« Zomia. It sounds like a skin disease or some alarming bacteria. As it turns out, Zomia is a recently named space in Asia. As referred to in this article, Zomia encompasses the highlands of northeast India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and southwest China. Within these countries resides a combined population of over 100 million1 individuals officially registered as ‘national minorities’ by each respective government. For anthropologists who might have spent the last few years on a solitary digging trip to North Korea or foraging for tasty ontologies in Amazonia, let me start by teasing apart the term Zomia a little more, before I weigh in further on the Zomia debate. »

PDF à télécharger sur :  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-8322.12322/full

Spirits and Ships: Cultural Transfers in Early Monsoon Asia

Andrea Acri, Roger Blench, Alexandra Landmann,  Spirits and Ships: Cultural Transfers in Early Monsoon Asia, ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute, 2017

Abstract

This volume seeks to foreground a borderless history and geography of South, Southeast, and East Asian littoral zones that would be maritime-focused, and thereby explore the ancient connections and dynamics of interaction that favoured the encounters among the cultures found throughout the region stretching from the Indian Ocean littorals to the Western Pacific, from the early historical period to the present. Transcending the artificial boundaries of macro-regions and nation-states, and trying to bridge the arbitrary divide between (inherently cosmopolitan) high cultures (e.g. Sanskritic, Sinitic, or Islamicate) and local or indigenous cultures, this multidisciplinary volume explores the metaphor of Monsoon Asia as a vast geo-environmental area inhabited by speakers of numerous language phyla, which for millennia has formed an integrated system of littorals where crops, goods, ideas, cosmologies, and ritual practices circulated on the sea-routes governed by the seasonal monsoon winds. The collective body of work presented in the volume describes Monsoon Asia as an ideal theatre for circulatory dynamics of cultural transfer, interaction, acceptance, selection, and avoidance, and argues that, despite the rich ethnic, linguistic and sociocultural diversity, a shared pattern of values, norms, and cultural models is discernible throughout the region.

Voir la table des matières sur :

 

 

Buddhist Sectarianism in Burma’s Last Kingdom

Buddhist Sectarianism in Burma’s Last Kingdom by Alexandra Kolayanides (Stanford), 02/05/2017, UC Berkeley Centre for Southeast Asia Studies

The collapse of Burma’s final kingdom was devastating for the Buddhist organizations that depended on its royal sponsorship. The nineteenth-century encroachment of the British Raj crippled both the Konbaung Dynasty and its once-powerful monastic establishment, but it also created opportunities for opposition parties. One adversarial Buddhist sect, the Paramats, was particularly active between the Second Anglo-Burmese War in 1852 and the total colonization of the country in 1886. This reformist sect has been something of a mystery in the study of Burmese Buddhism because of minimal references to them in official Burmese materials. This paper examines a previously unstudied collection of documents dating from 1830–1880 found in an American missionary archive to argue that the Paramats were not a kind of Mahayanist group dedicated to propounding emptiness teachings, as scholars have argued, but rather, they were a Burmese Buddhist organization concerned with protesting laxity within mainstream monasteries and excess at royally-sponsored shrines. These archival documents suggest that scholars should attend to politics, as well as philosophy, to understand this particular sectarian development and similar religious reform movements at the end of the Konbaung Dynasty.

Alexandra Kaloyanides is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford University. She researches Burmese religions and American religious history. Her book manuscript, “Objects of Conversion, Relics of Resistance,” examines the religious contestations, conversions, and transformations during the nineteenth-century American Baptist mission to Burma.

Voir : https://www.facebook.com/events/1771316929755778/

Postdoctoral Fellow in Transnational Asian Studies – Rice University in Houston

The Chao Center for Asian Studies (CCAS) at Rice University in Houston, Texas is currently accepting applications for the Annette and Hugh Gragg postdoctoral research fellowship in Transnational Asian Studies with an emphasis on Asian American Studies to begin July 1, 2017. By “transnational,” we mean an approach that devotes particular attention to the movement of people, products, ideas, technologies, etc. across established borders and boundaries. The search is open to geographical areas within Asia (including Asian America) and to a broad historical time of research.

The annual stipend is $50,000, with an additional $5,000 for research and travel expenses and a one-time relocation allowance of $3,000. Renewal for the second year will be contingent upon the appointee’s performance in the first year.

Applicants must have a PhD degree in hand by the time of appointment in one of the following fields: Anthropology, Art History, Asian American Studies, Asian Studies, Cinema, Comparative Literature, Global Health Studies, History, Political Science, Religion, Science and Technology Studies, Sociology, or Women’s/Gender/Sexuality Studies.

 

Pour en savoir plus

 

IRD : Prochaine campagne de concours chercheurs : 30 postes proposés

L’IRD va très prochainement, d’ici à la fin mars, lancer sa campagne de recrutements chercheurs. Cette année, 15 postes seront ouverts au niveau chargé de recherche – 10 chargés de recherche 2ème classe (CR2) et 5 chargés de recherche 1re classe (CR1) – et 15 postes au niveau directeur de recherche 2e classe (DR2).

Continuer la lecture de IRD : Prochaine campagne de concours chercheurs : 30 postes proposés

Colloque CAMNAM « Temps-temporalité en Asie du Sud-est », INALCO, 29 novembre au 2 décembre 2017

Colloque international
Temps et temporalité en Asie du Sud-EstInstitut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales
29 novembre au 2 décembre 2017

En Asie du Sud-Est comme ailleurs, les modalités de la co-présence du passé, du présent et du futur donnent lieu à diverses formes d’organisations conceptuelles et pratiques. Un large éventail de dispositifs s’offre ainsi à l’observation, entre une représentation de l’immutabilité des choses – lorsque par-delà l’agitation continue des êtres tout se répète et rien ne change vraiment – et une affirmation de l’irréversibilité de l’altération graduelle et permanente de toutes choses – car si rien ne change rien ne dure non plus. Placés devant ce dilemme, les acteurs s’en accommodent, selon des stratégies elles-mêmes diverses allant de la résignation à la recherche plus ou moins confiante d’une maîtrise de la temporalité – entendue ici comme la perception, à chaque fois particulière, de la durée, cette universelle condition que l’homme ressent par nécessité, où qu’il vive.

Continuer la lecture de Colloque CAMNAM « Temps-temporalité en Asie du Sud-est », INALCO, 29 novembre au 2 décembre 2017

CFP: Archaeology of the Seaports of Manila Galleon and the History of Early Maritime Globalization

CFP: Archaeology of the Seaports of Manila Galleon and the History of Early Maritime Globalization, 21–23July 2017,Amoy, Fujian, China

During 16-19 century, the Spanish navigators established and operated the Manila Galleon maritime route which connected eastern Asia and New Spain in the American continent. The galleons sailed via the hub seaports and trade centers of Manila in the Philippines and Acapulco in Mexico, being a prosperous route for more than 200 years. This pioneering navigation of pan-Pacific regions promoted early global maritime trade and can be regarded as a new maritime Silk Road between the East and the West.

The Manila Galleon Navigation is an interesting academic theme which had been investigated and researched by multi-disciplines as archaeology, history, anthropology, marine navigation, oceanology, and etc. in last half century. The seaport sites and shipwrecks underwater are respectively 2 important types of cultural heritage contributing to archaeological reconstruction of galleon navigation history. An international academic workshop of “Early Navigation in the Asia-Pacific Region” was carried out at Harvard University in summer of 2013. Maritime archaeologists from United States, Mexico, England, Philippine and China met to discuss the early pan-Pacific maritime trade history focusing on the perspective of shipwreck archaeology of galleons (Wu, C. editor, Early Navigation in the Asia-Pacific Region: A Maritime Archaeological Perspective, Springer Press, 2016)

A further dialogue on the galleon and related history of maritime cultural interaction between the Eastern Asia and New Spain will be carried out at Amoy on July 21-23, 2017. The meeting calls for papers focusing on the newest developments in the archaeology of the Manila Galleon connecting seaports of Manila in Philippines, Acapulco and San Blas in Mexico, Hagatna in Guans, Haicheng (Amoy), Macao in China, Nagasaki in Japan. A dozen of presentations respectively on different seaports archaeological fieldworks will be welcome. We hope these archaeological discoveries on galleon seaports will open a new window for sighting and understanding the social cultural exchange on the new maritime Silk Road of pan-Pacific region in last 500 years.

Proposed topics:

1, New archaeological discoveries of Manila Galleon Archaeology and related seaports such as Manila in Philippines, Acapulco and San Blas in Mexico, Hagatna in Guans, Haicheng (Amoy), Macao in China, Nagasaki in Japan

2, Maritime cultural heritage of harbors, historical city architecture, maritime folklore and population of different Manila Galleon related seaports.

3, Transportation between Manila Galleon related harbors, and origin of the cargo such as the kilns of the ceramic industry.

4, Trade, merchants, business organizations and navigation, related to the Manila Galleon.

Plus d’informations sur : http://www.southeastasianarchaeology.com/2017/03/07/cfp-archaeology-of-the-seaports-of-manila-galleon-and-the-history-of-early-maritime-globalization/

Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 76, no. 1 (feb. 2017)

Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 76, no. 1 (feb. 2017)

Sommaire : https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-asian-studies/latest-issue

A signaler : 2 articles sur le Cambodge

  • The Dead in the Land: Encounters with Bodies, Bones, and Ghosts in Northwestern Cambodia by Lisa J. Arensen
  • The Lingering Effects of Thought Reform: The Khmer Rouge S-21 Prison Personnel by Angeliki Andrea Kanavou and Kosal Path

 

 

Talking Indonesia podcast : Volunteers and Indonesian elections

Talking Indonesia: Volunteers and Indonesian elections by Dirk Tomsa

The last five years have seen the emergence of volunteer organisations as new actors in the campaigns of some of Indonesia’s most important elections. Who are these volunteers, what motivates them and what role do they play in elections? Have volunteer organisations changed the role of political parties, or opened new access for the citizens mobilising as part of them? How will they influence the 2019 presidential elections?

In this week’s Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Dave McRae explore these issues with Dr Dirk Tomsa, senior lecturer in the Department of Politics and Philosophy at La Trobe University and a new co-host in 2017 of Talking Indonesia.

A écouter sur : http://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/talking-indonesia-volunteers-and-elections/

Appel à contributions : Transnational Asia : an online interdisciplinary journal

Transnational Asia : an online interdisciplinary journal est une nouvelle revue éditée par le Chao Center for Asian Studies de l’université de Rice.

Transnational Asia envisions Asia in transnational time and space. Interdisciplinary, transhistorical, and trans-spatial in approach, Transnational Asia publishes scholarship that challenges traditional understandings of Asia, moving beyond the confines of area studies and nation-state focus and capturing the emergent forms of Asia-related, Asia-inspired, and Asia-driven themes and sites of inquiry in the world today.

Transnational Asia stands on a multidisciplinary premise, encouraging scholars in broad humanistic and social scientific disciplines to submit their work. Being a web-only journal, our goal is to turn our journal into a space where highly engaging scholarly discussions on transnational Asian themes are posted in a timely manner free from the constraints of traditional journal publication. At the same time, we uphold scholarly rigor and, therefore, all main articles will be peer-reviewed. Additionally, each issue will have a specials section with two or more articles discussing an overlapping theme and review articles whereby authors present their views on the basis of two or more books recently published.

Plus d’informations sur : https://transnationalasia.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=37

Le premier numéro, paru à l’automne 2016, propose un article sur l’Indonésie :

  • Epistemological Considerations of Studying History Through Film with Reference to Indonesia by Sandeep Ray

Lire l’article sur : https://transnationalasia.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=116